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Feature

Portland, Oregon, Travel Oregon

increase in reported employment in the Motion Picture and Video Production sector from 2005 to 2015.” While bringing films to Oregon is the task of Oregon Film, “showcasing our strong, connected crew members and advocating for film incenPeter Iredale Shipwreck, Warrendale, Travel Oregon tives is Oregon Media Production Association’s mission,” said OMPA Executive Director Janice Shokrian. A valued partner of Oregon Film and OMPA is Travel Oregon. “Our Oregon landscape is oftentimes a supporting character in any production or at times a leading role,” said Shokrian, citing popular films and television like Wild, Grimm and Portlandia. “Once the production is released then the residual benefits of tourism continues for decades, much like Brownsville’s Stand by Me or Astoria’s Goonies.

“…showcasing our strong, connected crew members and advocating for film incentives is Oregon Media Production Association’s mission.”

— Janice Shokrian Executive Director OMPA

“Oregon’s climate and terrain are a story in themselves,” said Linea Gagliano, global communications director of Travel Oregon. “Filmmakers can find any landscape or weather pattern they need to help them tell their story in a real and authentic way.” And that authenticity translates to more visitors. “When Oregon is given its ‘close-up’ in film, moviegoers clamor for more. This land is something that feels different than any other place. It feels dramatic and cinematic. Its beauty is so unique and piercing, it seems unreal and yet completely genuine…audiences want to be a part of the scenery: to see it, to touch it, to photograph it, and tell their friends that it is, indeed, real.”

14  SourceOregon 2017 | A Publication of the OMPA

An early adopter of basing his productions in Oregon, award-winning director Gus Van Sant made his first film, a high-school senior project called “The Happy Organ,” in Portland in 1971 alongside Eric Edwards, now director of photography for many of Van Sant’s films. Since then he has made a number of films, often with Edwards, that were originally set in and written about life in Oregon, including Mala Noche, Drugstore Cowboy, and My Own Private Idaho. “The biggest attraction,” said Van Sant, “is that I’ve lived and was accustomed to making things here…I didn’t need to relocate to make a film, and I could make the work a pleasure in that I could work all the time, because wherever I went I was potentially scouting people or places, or even stories. I originally thought it was imperative I hold on to the ‘real’ location of the story. I’ve since loosened up and have thought almost the opposite is possible, and in a way preferable. You could make Portlandia in Austin.” But Van Sant added, “I just love it here, and I want to always shoot when I can in Portland; that’s the advantage.” Film producer and OMPA board member Neil Kopp understands the Oregon “advantage” and works with it, albeit, only when it works for the film. Kopp is the producer of independent hits such as Kelly Reichardt’s Old Joy, Wendy and Lucy, Meek’s Cutoff, and Certain Women, as well as Van Sant’s Paranoid Park and Macon Blair’s Green Room and the much-buzzed about I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore, many of which were filmed in Oregon. “I live here, so I try to work here as much as possible,” said Kopp (he and his spouse, Amanda Needham, an Emmy award-winning costume designer on Portlandia, are raising their family here). “I’ve also been fortunate in

Profile for Oregon Media Production Association

SourceOregon 2017  

Enjoy OMPA's annual publication exclusively highlighting the award winning work of Oregon Media Production Association members. 2017 theme...

SourceOregon 2017  

Enjoy OMPA's annual publication exclusively highlighting the award winning work of Oregon Media Production Association members. 2017 theme...

Profile for ompa
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