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At La Petite Maison de Nicole Parisian cuisine at its best

Every evening by the Champs Elysées, La Petite Maison de Nicole lays a Parisian table in the Hôtel Fouquet's Barrière. A few months, word of mouth and a choice of sun-filled dishes have made this restaurant much more than a simple address. A success. Every evening by the Champs Elysées, La Petite Maison de Nicole lays a Parisian table in the Hôtel Fouquet's Barrière. A few months, word of mouth and a choice of sun-filled dishes have made this restaurant much more than a simple address. A success. A first veil is offered by a simple décor. Then along come others, billowing. White, bright and beige. This is where South meets North. By the polished grey streets of the Champs-Elysées, tucked away alongside Fuquet's on avenue George V, it floats in the air like a light wind passing through a hushed atmosphere, covered with light canvases, speckled with muffled murmurs of laughter and conservation that the surprise arrival of food and the cheerful disposition of the young men and women humbly devoted to serving send circulating from table to table. Where are we? "Right where you want to be. At my place!" The tone is set. Nicole Rubi knows her house,

determined, "Dominique" persuaded "Nicole" to bring a little azure to the glistening river Seine which glides along the bottom of avenue George V, just a few strokes from the Champs-Elysées. It was a tall order: it is a delight. Nicole Rubi was persuaded to put the capital city on her menu, come and take a look, and demonstrate her talent and her character here as well. That discovery belongs to one, and that curiosity is a result of the other is irrelevant: la Petite Maison is here. Really here. "Ooh la, la...", Joséphine Baker would have said that this eclectic atmosphere of fine food and shared contentment - the simplicity of al dente truffle pasta, the succulence of stuffed vegetables, the crunch of calamari... - contributes to what cannot be explained by the sole legend of Fouquet's: as ever, this is about reality. Has the Mediterranean Petite Maison de Nicole earned a place for itself in Paris? Yes. As surely as the cobblestones belong on the Champs-Elysées. Though Nicole remains faithful to her old stomping ground: Nice. That's where it all began in a bundle of flavours more than twenty-five years ago. In an old tea room opposite the opera. Nicole Rubi came to put a little femininity back into the local cuisine whose strong simplicity is reminiscent of an art as subtle as Mediterranean sea mist, drawn as well from the terraces of the hinterland with recognisable inspiration from neighbouring Italy. Nicole might not wear her chef's whites, but she oversees everything: from the order and freshness of her dishes, "straight out of the kitchen", to where each of her diners sits. Every last detail is taken care of. Mischievous and at times grouchy, she runs "her" petite maison. Every evening, her menu offers an unforgettable experience. Simply great. Voilà. Need I say more?

Laurent Lafitte “All roles written are gems”

page 66 La Petite Maison, because she built it and because she lives there. That Hôtel Fouquet's Barrière in Paris now features these colours and these flavours of the Côte d'Azur is because two passions have crossed paths: the passion for discovery, which is never without the passion for curiosity. Dominique Desseigne, president of the Barrière Groupe, wanted to share with Paris the delightful sensation he had already revealed at the Majestic Barrière de Cannes by gifting la Petite Maison with a little sister which, since 2010, has earned great renown. Unrelenting and 96 | Printemps 2013 - SignéBarrière

Although he admits to having once been lazy, Laurent Lafitte believes in “work well done” as he does in the beneficial effect of work. He honed his precise skills at the Comédie francaise as well as in French comedies brought to the cinema by real popular success. We go to meet this modest man. In “(Nearly) 16”, a UGC film directed by Tristan Seguela, Laurent Lafitte from the Comédie française plays a brilliant young lawyer who suddenly starts suffering from delayed puberty. Out at the beginning of July, this surprising story which goes much deeper than the character’s hormonal changes is a far cry from the real life of this man who is mad about theatre and who is finally finding his place – and his plays – in amongst the

Signé Barrière N°5  

Le Magazine du Groupe Lucien Barrière Hôtels & Casinos

Signé Barrière N°5  

Le Magazine du Groupe Lucien Barrière Hôtels & Casinos

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