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S a n ta C l a r a U n i v e r s i t y president’s

r e p o r t 2008–2009

500 El Camino Real Santa Clara, California 95053-1500

Paper Choice – Environmental Benefits Statement Using post-consumer waste fiber Pounds of paper

Trees saved

Energy saved

Waste water reduced

Solid waste reduced

Greenhouse gases reduced

16,000

52

16 million BTUs

23.694 gal.

1,439 lbs.

4,920 lbs.

Calculations based on research by Environmental Defense and other members of the Paper Task Force.

30%

Cert no. SCS-COC-001251

SCU OMC-7800C 2/2010 35,000

Keeping our commitment: students come first


university

contents

A Letter from the President.. ......................................................... 3 Foreword Commitment to Students........................................................ 4 Teaching Scholars Experiential Learning for Teachers and Students Alike............. 6 One with Nature..................................................................... 6 Challenging Students to Become Independent Learners The Making of a Rhodes Scholar............................................. 8 Broomball and the Physics of Movement on Ice.....................10 Spray Cooling Redefined....................................................... 11 Nurturing Responsible Leaders and Citizens A Passion for Public Service.................................................. 12 Changing the World Through the Arts.. ................................... 12 Technology and Facilities.. ...........................................................14 Future Plans: Strengthening the Academic Enterprise..................16

Ab out Santa Cl a ra U n iv e rs ity

Student Engagement: Indicators of Success................................18

Santa Clara University, a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university located 40 miles south of San Francisco in California’s Silicon Valley, offers its more than 8,000 students rigorous undergraduate curricula in arts and sciences, business, theology, and engineering, plus master’s and law degrees, and engineering Ph.D.s. Distinguished nationally by one of the highest graduation rates among all U.S. master’s universities, California’s oldest operating higher-education institution demonstrates faith-inspired values of ethics and social justice. For more information, see www.scu.edu.

2008–09 Highlights.....................................................................20 2008–09 Financial Overview........................................................24 University Governance................................................................ 27

Contributing Writers: Margaret Avritt Mansi Bhatia Christine Cole Dona LeyVa Photography: Charles Barry Design: Greg Lee

governance

Board of Trustees

Board of Regents

University Administration

Robert J. Finocchio Jr., Chairman

John M. Sobrato, Chairman

Michael E. Engh, S.J. President

Jon R. Aboitiz Gregory R. Bonfiglio, S.J. Tasce Bongiovani Margaret (Peggy ) Bradshaw Michael J. Carey William S. Carter Louis M. Castruccio Gerald T. Cobb, S.J. David C. Drummond Michael E. Engh, S.J.* James P. Flaherty, S.J. Paul F. Gentzkow Rebecca Guerra Sal Gutierrez Ellen Marie Hancock Rupert H. Johnson Jr. Richard Justice Jennifer Konecny J. Terrence (Terry) Lanni Timothy R. Lannon, S.J. William P. Leahy, S.J. Heidi LeBaron Leupp John (Jack) C. Lewis Lorry I. Lokey Donald L. Lucas Gerdenio M. (Sonny) Manuel, S.J.* Regis McKenna Joseph M. McShane, S.J. Richard Moley Kapil Nanda John Ocampo Edward A. Panelli Robert W. Peters Stephen Schott Robert H. Smith John A. Sobrato Larry W. Sonsini Michael Splinter William E. Terry Charmaine Warmenhoven Agnieszka Winkler

Betsy Ackerman Penelope Alexander Kathleen Anderson Jean Bagileo William Barkett David Barone Christopher Barry Marie Barry Paul Beirne Deborah Biondolillo Frank Boitano* Patricia Boitano Dianne Bonino* Roger Brunello Mary Frances Callan James Cunha Karen Dalby Raymond Davilla John Del Santo Thomas Farley Gary Filizetti Julie Filizetti Stephen Finn Joseph Gonyea Philip Grasser Paris Greenwood Michael Hack Mark Hanson Laurita Hernandez Catherine Horan-Walker* Kathy Hull Suzanne Jackson Brent Jones Thomas Kelly Jay Leupp James Losch Paul Lunardi Luciann Maulhardt John McPhee Martin Melone Daniel Mount Patrick Nally Maria Nash Vaughn Randall Pond Marc Rebboah Scott Santarosa, S.J. Byron Scordelis Abby Sobrato Bess Stephens Kirk Syme Margaret Taylor Susan Valeriote Julie Veit Christopher Von Der Ahe

Lucia Albino Gilbert Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

* ex officio

On June 4, 2009, Michael Markkula’s six years’ service as chair of the Board of Trustees was celebrated. Robert Finocchio Jr. was elected as chair of the board on June 5.

John Ottoboni General Counsel James Purcell Vice President for University Relations Michael Sexton Vice President for Enrollment Management Robert Warren Vice President for Administration and Finance Paul Locatelli, S.J. Chancellor

Santa Clara University on the Web www.scu.edu Office of the President www.scu.edu/president

Art Direction: Linda Degastaldi

27


A letter from the President My journey to being Santa Clara’s 28th president has been a remarkable one. I stepped into some big shoes; very few college presidents serve for 20 successful years as Paul Locatelli S.J., did.

I feel both great responsibility and immense satisfaction in furthering many of the principles, programs, and plans President Locatelli espoused: an emphasis on globalization, a determination to develop a curriculum that produces independent learners and responsible citizens, and much more. All of these efforts are in the centuries-old Jesuit, Catholic tradition: • Educating the whole person, • Educating men and women for others, and • Educating leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion. At Santa Clara, we have reframed these principles for the contemporary world. For instance, in light of increased globalization, there is simply so much more that good global citizens must learn than in the recent past. Our new Core Curriculum emphasizes languages, cultures, and religions in a much more inclusive manner. We are enhancing Santa Clara’s Study Abroad Program by working with our international partners to develop courses and experiences that fit with the University’s mission and core learning goals. We have welcomed the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley to strengthen our Jesuit, Catholic values. Sustainability has increasingly come into our view as a global issue. We are committed to helping our students understand that environmental problems cannot be solved without consideration of social justice. In my inaugural address earlier this year, I proposed that Santa Clara become a major center for discussions of environmental justice and for examining the ethical dimensions of how we treat the physical world. Far too often, those who suffer the greatest harm from mistreatment of the environment are the poorest and most vulnerable. Our commitment to social justice requires a response to this global challenge. The assessment of how we teach and learn is increasingly important. For instance, the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) measures how well we have provided our students with opportunities to engage in educationally effective activities. Santa Clara scores higher on every benchmark than the national average. Our careful attention to student learning and outcomes is only part of our ongoing commitment to students. In the midst of last year’s financial crisis, we did everything we could to minimize the impact on our students— both new and current—without compromising academic quality. We held the tuition increase to 3 percent, the smallest increase in 25 years, and faculty and staff did not receive salary increases for the 2009–10 school year. For current students in need of emergency financial aid, we created Special Assistance Awards worth nearly 1 million dollars. Much of this amount was made up of generous gifts from donors including $300,000 from faculty and staff. I look forward to continuing this journey in collaboration with the many talented people who make up the Santa Clara community. Together, we will provide undergraduate and graduate students with still more opportunities, not only for financial aid, research, internships, and jobs, but also for engaging their hearts and minds in creating a more sustainable, just, and humane world. Best wishes,

Michael E. Engh, S.J. President

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4


foreword

P

utting students first and focusing on effective teaching practices that result in positive outcomes continues to be our core commitment. How did Santa Clara University keep this commitment last year? The following are a few examples:

• We enhanced study abroad opportunities by developing programs more closely linked to social justice and experiential learning. • We launched a new Undergraduate Research Initiative to expand research opportunities for undergraduates and foster a culture supportive of undergraduate research. • We improved our facilities by opening the Lucas Business Building and the Sullivan Aquatic Center. We honored the “teaching scholar” concept by providing courses and experiences led by faculty whose primary responsibility was teaching but who also were conducting research. We believe that students learn best when they engage with faculty whose passion for teaching is informed by their active scholarship. In this report, you will read of Elizabeth Dahlhoff, associate professor of biology, and the ways in which she embodies the teaching scholar model.

“We believe that students learn best when they engage with faculty whose passion for teaching is informed by their active scholarship.” We continued to mentor our students to become independent learners. A truly stellar example of such mentoring is Noelle Lopez, an honors student, track star, philosophy major, and Rhodes Scholar. Ms. Lopez’s story of how academia and sports are interconnected is featured in this report. The notion of challenging and helping students undergirds the University’s Residential Learning Communities program. Each RLC is supported by a faculty director, a resident director, a resident minister, and various faculty and Jesuits in residence. Together, these mentors create an environment in which students can flourish academically, socially, and spiritually. In this report, you will read how one RLC combined science and broomball through the mentorship of its then-faculty director, Phil Kesten, associate professor of physics. The development of a new Core Curriculum is a way to continue nurturing our students’ inclination and ability to become responsible citizens and leaders. The new Core Curriculum increases attention to learning goals and objectives. Each class syllabus is a commitment from the teacher to the student that he or she will attain specific learning objectives. In this report, you will read about Assistant Professor of Philosophy Shannon Vallor and how her students benefited from her Core pilot course Personal Identity and Community.

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teaching

scholars

“It’s so intense. It becomes, in the truest sense of the word, experiential learning.”

T

en days. Sixteen students. One island. And two professors. When Elizabeth Dahlhoff, associate professor of biology, and environmental studies Lecturer John Farnsworth co-taught the Spring Break Immersion Program in Baja California, Mexico last year, they expected it to be a life-changing

experience for the students. They didn’t know that it would be as transformational an experience for them. “You start becoming part of conversations that you wouldn’t have in a classroom,” says Dahlhoff. “You really come to know these students. And they really come to know you.” The 10-unit program is two courses: one in advanced nature writing and the other in desert and marine ecology. The classes meet in the winter quarter and students spend spring break writing about and investigating, by kayak, snorkel, and on foot, habitats in southern Baja. “Baja gets under your skin, just like sand … and in your hair, just like the salt,” says Dahlhoff. “There’s something about it that’s so stark, so beautiful, and so precious that you just don’t get over it.” The group spent two days camping and hiking in the Sierra de Laguna, followed by seven days of kayaking around a desert island. Dahlhoff explained plant and animal adaptation to the desert and marine environment, while Farnsworth challenged students to write about their observations. On one particular two-hour adventure to some tide pools, “they learned more about invertebrate zoology than they had in the previous 12 years of their lives,” says Dahlhoff. “We prepare them for Baja for 10 weeks—we show them pictures of organisms, we have them do writing exercises, we prepare field guides, but when they get there, it’s so intense. It becomes, in the truest sense of the word, experiential learning.” Dahlhoff’s research program also takes her undergraduate research students to the high Sierra Nevada in Eastern California for four to eight weeks each summer. “We’re

One with Nature “The pelicans, the doves, the hermit crabs that creep into your tent … the sergeant majors, cordons, ringtailed cats, and chuckwallas basking in the sun …”—these are some of the most vivid images that remain with A bigail Pira ’10. “In Baja, there is no stress,” she says. “There are no bills to pay or phone calls to make, no tests to study for or errands to run. It’s just living life in the moment.”

6

investigating how high elevation populations of willow beetles As a psychology major and biology and Spanish double minor, Pira took this class to fulfill some core units as well as practice her Spanish skills. “What I learned from it was far more,” she says. “For seven long and laborious days, we kayaked a jawdropping 44 miles; we hauled our tents and sleeping bags; we carried utensils, washing basins, fresh food, and cans ... we cooked, we talked, we laughed. We made connections for a lifetime.”

are evolving in response to rapid climate change,” she explains. “Not only do students get to develop their own research projects, but they camp, have breakfast with scientists from all over the world, and get exposure to some of the last true wilderness.” And they help Dahlhoff as a scholar. “They ask insightful questions, find papers that I haven’t seen, and expand my bandwidth,” she says. “They take my research program from being an individual enterprise to a team effort.”


The group paddles for seven days in the La Paz Bay in Baja California, Mexico, stopping only to snorkel with sea lions and camp at night. “Students are exposed to things they haven’t seen before in their lives,” says Dahlhoff. “It’s a transformative experience.”

7


The first female Rhodes Scholar in SCU history, Noelle Lopez ’09, was one of 32 students this year from across the United States awarded the prestigious scholarship for postgraduate study at Oxford.

8


challenging

students to become independent learners

I

n 2008, Noelle Lopez ’09, became one of

“Overall, running definitely teaches certain

32 students from across the U.S. awarded

virtues,” says Lopez. “Patience is a good one,

the prestigious Rhodes scholarship. Only the

and there’s a certain optimism that has to go

second Rhodes Scholar, and the first woman, in

along with running. I think the discipline is really

Santa Clara history, Lopez is frequently described

huge, too.”

by her coaches and professors as someone who breaks the mold, a student who is the embodiment of the athlete as scholar. Originally from Tucson, Ariz., the former crosscountry and track team captain is now studying virtue ethics at Oxford University and says she ultimately sees herself pursuing a career in education.

She credits Santa Clara with supporting and encouraging her wide range of interests, and this was one of the main reasons she chose to attend the University. Speaking of Lopez, Professor of Philosophy William Prior states, “She was encouraged to question everything she learned, which is central

“Noelle was encouraged to question everything she learned.” While academic excellence may be a

to philosophy as a discipline, and I’d say the

fundamental criterion for earning a Rhodes, it’s

most important thing she derived from Santa

not sufficient on its own. It’s the other factors—as

Clara is this critical perspective.”

Lopez has consistently demonstrated—of character, leadership, service, commitment, and discipline that tip the scales. Consistently on the dean’s list, Lopez, a

At Santa Clara, Lopez had the opportunity to become involved with student organizations and clubs that hold social justice central to their mission. She was a 2008–09 Hackworth Fellow

philosophy major, was lauded for earning

at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, where,

numerous academic awards, fellowships, and

annually, three seniors receive funding, allowing

grants throughout her time at Santa Clara, but

them to design ethics programs for their fellow

her success wasn’t limited to the confines of the

students. For her Hackworth Project, Lopez along

classroom.

with her peers explored the question: “What do

“In so many ways Noelle is the consummate Jesuit-educated student-athlete,” says Dan Coonan, Santa Clara athletic director. “She was a brilliant student, a gifted athlete, and leader on her team. She has a huge heart, which is evidenced by her commitment to community service and social justice. She is an inspiration to us all.” As a key leader and participant in Santa Clara’s women’s track and cross-country teams, Lopez believes that the intense training on the field instilled a high level of discipline that carried over

we mean when we use the term social justice?” To experience social justice issues firsthand, Lopez participated in community-based learning and immersion trips to Mexico and the Salinas Valley. “We have great expectations of Noelle,” says Christopher Kulp, associate professor of philosophy and a key supporter of Lopez’s efforts to apply for the Rhodes scholarship. “True, she doesn’t yet have a doctorate and she isn’t yet a professional, but it sure looks like she’s on her way. She has enormous potential.”

to all other aspects of her college career.

9


challenging

students to become independent learners

“Students don’t have to feel that academics and fun are two separate things.”

I

t’s 10:30 on a Thursday night. Sixty students

majoring in arts and sciences. “It’s a fun way to

from the da Vinci Residential Community

approach concepts like friction and inertia.”

in Casa Italiana listen intently to Associate

Professor Phil Kesten as he explains the physics

of movement on ice. It’s not a formal physics class, but Kesten is getting rapt attention because the students are subsequently headed to a game of broomball. And they want to apply what they learn from him on the ice rink.

10

Back in 2003 some students came across the idea of broomball—a sport that combines ice hockey and indoor soccer—and invited Kesten, then-faculty director of the residential learning community, to give a lecture that tied in with the game. “I decided to talk about sliding, friction, momentum, and it occurred to me that since I’ve

“I almost feel like one of those kids who hates

studied ice—albeit ice on some of the moons of

fractions but accidentally learns them by baking

Uranus—that I would throw that in as well,” says

cookies,” says Genevieve Kromm ’13, who is

Kesten.


Students have found the perfect recipe to build community with a game of broomball. It’s simple. Put on your sneakers. Get a bunch of brooms and a round ball. Have fun.

The lecture was a big hit and gave Kesten the

The success of spray technology hinges on the success of Escobar’s research, and he has already helped set a new record for dissipating heat from a chip. His name is on two pending patents, alongside those of other HP scientists, and he received the 2008 Student of the Year award from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Spray cooling redefined Sergio E scobar Vargas , a Santa Clara doctoral student in mechanical engineering, has been helping Hewlett-Packard lead the charge in information technology’s never-ending battle against heat. While HP researchers find ways to spray the hottest parts of a chip’s processor with microscopic bursts of coolant, Escobar is focusing on keeping processors at the minimum temperature required to dissipate the maximum amount of heat.

At Santa Clara, he has relished the ability to research, as well as the social and professional opportunities. “This school has always pushed me to think and learn independently—a quality that will serve me well in life,” he says.

The informal class setting and the subsequent

opportunity to “create an environment in which the

game also afforded students the opportunity to

students don’t have to feel that academics and fun

strengthen their community. “It was the perfect

are two separate things.”

excuse to get to know some of the other residents

It was an idea that worked in reality as freshman Kromm “kept in mind the inverse relationship between speed and friction” when running on ice

and interact with a faculty member I may or may not take a class with,” says Kromm. Kesten says it’s all about integrating all the

in her sneakers with a broom-like stick. “I must

different pieces. “We’re giving them a holistic

have looked pretty funny,” she says. “But it was

educational experience by bringing together

fun. Plus, I only fell once!”

the academic, the residential, and the social components,” he says. “They learn, they mature, and they acquire leadership skills from working and playing with their peers and professors.”

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nurturing

responsible leaders and citizens

“This was my calling to be a voice for those who are marginalized.”

F

or Kristin Love Boscia three things have been essential

Outside the classroom, she studied women’s work

in successfully translating her education into a public

opportunities in a rural community in El Salvador, thanks to

interest law vocation: leadership, problem solving, and

a Hackworth Fellowship awarded by the Markkula Center for

bringing diverse groups of people together to work for the

Applied Ethics. With the support of David DeCosse, director of

common good.

campus ethics programs, Boscia developed her own research

Boscia ’03 economics and marketing, J.D. ’08, currently serves as staff attorney for Bay Area Legal Aid. She credits Santa Clara for providing opportunities to explore her interests and passions both inside and outside the classroom. “In

questions and wrote about her findings in El Salvador. “It was a wonderful way to combine my interest in social justice issues with my academic interest in economics,” she says. Boscia was also part of the Applied Cooperative Education

the classroom, I had the support of professors to explore

Program, a unique four-year program in the Leavey School of

issues that grabbed my attention, which was a critical part of

Business designed to provide students opportunities to enhance

developing myself as an independent learner.”

their leadership abilities and professional skills while connecting them with business executives, faculty, staff, and alumni. “The business school helped me realize that we need good people in all industries,” says Boscia. “And business skills are essential to making nonprofits work.” Boscia also participated in the Santa Clara Community Action Program (SCCAP), the Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC), and other social justice activities. While with JVC, Boscia worked with a girl from Mexico recruited to come to the U.S. to work in a restaurant, but forced into prostitution upon her arrival here. Merely 15 years

Changing the world through the arts K atie Fitzgerald ’09 is proud to have built the first permanent stage in Villa Catalina, Nicaragua, a small village that endured the wrath of Hurricane Mitch, which dumped nearly a year’s worth of rain in one week in 1998. As part of Teatro Catalina, a studentinitiated program mentored by the College of Arts and Sciences’ Justice and the Arts Initiative, Fitzgerald and fellow students were promoting social justice through the use of arts education. The stage will serve as home for an after-school summer theatre program for youth.

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It was a junior-year class—Social Justice in the Arts—that inspired Fitzgerald to combine her love for the arts and passion for service. For many summers Fitzgerald had volunteered in Nicaragua, but she had never thought about using her theatre degree there. As she listened to the guest speakers in that class, her “thoughts began running wild and I started to see how the arts could truly be used to change the world,” she says. Fitzgerald returned to Nicaragua after graduation to work for a nonprofit organization, Amigos for Christ. She teaches an after-school program that often incorporates the arts in the poor rural communities near Chinandega.

old, she took the job to support her family back home. “At the time, my youngest brother was only 16 years old, so I could immediately relate,” says Boscia. “It was just heartbreaking. I realized that this was my calling to be a voice for those who are marginalized.” Her volunteer experiences inspired Boscia to apply to law school. Of all the scholarships Boscia received to attend Santa Clara’s School of Law, the Law Faculty Scholarship, based on her prior volunteer work, is what enabled her to continue her efforts on behalf of low-income people. “I was delighted to return to SCU for a degree in law,” she says. “We have dedicated faculty and an amazing social justice program here.” Boscia currently practices family law and immigration law on behalf of low-income domestic violence survivors, many of whom are immigrants.


Kristin Love Boscia ’03, J.D. ’08, currently serves as staff attorney for Bay Area Legal Aid where she practices family law and immigration law.

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technology and facilities

O

14

pened in 2008, the four-story 194,000-

From its architecture to its furnishings, the new

square-foot intellectual center of

Learning Commons, Technology Center, and

campus—better known as the Joanne

Library blends the traditional with the futuristic,

E. Harrington Learning Commons, Sobrato Family

allowing for conventional, solitary scholarly

Technology Center, and Orradre Library—has been

experiences while encouraging more current,

embraced by the campus and local community

collaborative learning. Twenty-five study rooms,

alike. “One of our motivations was to create

three terraces, three video viewing and taping

a destination spot on campus,” says Ronald

rooms, and 1,100 reader seats including carrels

Danielson, vice provost for information services

and movable lounge furniture—each with a

and Santa Clara University’s chief information

wired network connection—provide extensive

officer. “The central design goal of this building

collaborative learning opportunities. An automated

was to create a space where people could interact

retrieval system houses less frequently used print

with each other and further the idea of integrated

resources, simultaneously optimizing the use of

education.”

building space and offering users quick access


“This is a long-term investment by the University that will pay

The Learning Commons, Technology Center, and Library is a four-level building occupying the site of SCU’s former Orradre Library. With nearly twice the square footage, high-tech collaborative rooms, and almost 1 million volumes, it is the new smart heart of campus.

long-term dividends.”

to more than 550,000 volumes of print material,

“You have to look at it more qualitatively than

in addition to the 250,000 volumes on open

quantitatively,” stresses Danielson. “Faculty

shelves. “This is a long-term investment by the

hold office hours here because they can use the

University that will pay long-term dividends,” says

technology in the collaborative rooms to share

Danielson. “This building will be able to adapt to

information with students, and sit and talk about

new technologies, new learning styles, and new

ideas instead of having them all huddle around one

pedagogical and scholarship needs.”

computer screen.”

It’s no surprise that the building passed a gate

He adds: “When you start seeing the same

count of 1 million visitors in merely 13 months.

people in the same spots day after day, you know

An impressive number, but certainly not the only

that this project is a success. Such things are

success indicator of this initiative.

difficult to put numbers behind, but they really are the soul of the building.”

15


The new Core Curriculum, with its emphasis on social justice and student engagement, will help SCU students become leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion.

16


future

plans

“I feel so much smarter than I thought I could be.”

T

he new Core Curriculum is born out of

Kong, while visiting with her family, she realized

SCU’s commitment to educate leaders

that she had a deeper understanding of the ways

and citizens of competence, conscience,

in which people act based on the concepts they

and compassion. The new Core, on which so

have of themselves and their communities. “The

much faculty/staff time and effort was spent,

perspective I learned in Professor Vallor’s course

was not launched until the fall of 2009. But, 30

helped me to understand people better—who they

pilot courses were taught last spring, including

are and why they do the things they do.”

Personal Identity and Community, and Concepts of Justice and Just Society by Assistant Professor of Philosophy Shannon Vallor. Ann Cheung ’12 says of Vallor’s courses, “They

Several aspects of the new Core involve significant changes from the previous Core Curriculum, such as the development of courses in a number of new Core areas and increased

were my absolute favorites of my freshman year.”

attention to learning goals and objectives in syllabi.

Cheung, a combined biology and business major,

And for faculty and students alike, smaller class

says, “My friend and I decided to take the personal

sizes and covering topics sequentially for 20

identity class together, and we were obsessed—

weeks instead of 10 have been markedly beneficial.

spending hours in the library in deep discussion about the philosophy of personal identity—can you imagine that?” Vallor’s course on personal identity taught

Vallor thinks this new way of teaching enriches her students’ learning experience. She says, “I was just amazed by the change at the end of the second quarter, and the way the students

students to look at various philosophical

themselves looked back and said, ‘Wow, you know,

conceptions of the self over history and across

at first I was really struggling with this, and I really

different cultures, and then relate it to their own

didn’t think I was going to be able to pull all these

sense of self and community. Vallor gives the

ideas together and really achieve the integration

example that in Western cultures the dominant

of all these things we were dealing with.’ I even

view of the self is individualistic—the self is an

had one student say, ‘I feel so much smarter than I

autonomous being who is born with certain

thought I could be.’”

freedoms and liberties. But, she adds, “you look at ancient China, and that view would sound completely crazy, because the notion of a person from the beginning is constituted by their obligations within the family and larger community.” On a personal level, Cheung’s new philosophical

Assessment of the pilot sequences has been important in determining whether the changes have, indeed, been beneficial. An August 2009 assessment and report of findings, generated by SCU’s Office of Assessment, revealed significantly positive outcomes.

insights have opened her eyes to the world in an entirely different way. On a recent visit to Hong

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Results of the National Survey of Student Engagement:

H

ow does the university experience affect students? This is a simple question with a complex answer. It would be impossible for Santa Clara to keep its commitment to students unless it paid careful attention to

the following questions:

•W  hat time and energy do students devote to educationally purposeful activities? •H  ow does the University use effective educational practices to channel student energy toward activities that matter? To help answer these questions and compare our own progress with that of other institutions, Santa Clara freshmen and seniors have participated in the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) for the past 10 years. NSSE, based in Indiana University, annually surveys about 370,000 students nationwide to assess the extent to which undergraduates are involved in educational practices empirically linked to high levels of learning and development. To simplify the discussion of good learning and teaching behaviors, NSSE developed the following benchmarks of effective educational practice: • Level of academic challenge

• Active and collaborative learning

• Student-faculty interactions

• Enriching educational experiences

• Supportive campus environment In every benchmark, expressed in a 100-point scale, SCU freshmen and seniors score significantly higher than the national average in the 2009 NSSE results.

L evel

of

A c ademic C hallenge

Challenging intellectual and creative work is central to student learning. SCU promotes a high level of student achievement by emphasizing the importance of

60.7 53.7

61.6 57.0

academic effort and setting high expectations for performance. Some specific success indicators: • 45 percent of SCU seniors were assigned 11 or more short written papers per

First-year students

Seniors

course vs. 32 percent of seniors nationwide. • 81 percent of SCU seniors learned to analyze quantitative problems either “quite

SCU National average

a bit” or “very much” vs. 75 percent of seniors nationwide.

SCU scores are significantly higher than national averages

A ctive

and

C ollaborative L earning

Students learn more when they are intensely involved in their education and are asked to think about what they are learning from different perspectives.

47.2 43.2

59.0 51.0

Collaborating with others in solving problems or mastering difficult material prepares students for the messy, unscripted problems encountered during and after college.

First-year students

Seniors SCU National average

SCU scores are significantly higher than national averages

18

Some specific success indicators: • 86 percent of SCU seniors often or very often worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments vs. 61 percent of seniors nationwide. • 31 percent of SCU seniors often or very often tutored or taught other students vs. 21 percent of seniors nationwide.


Indicators of Success S tudent I nteraction

with

F aculty

Students learn firsthand how experts think about and solve practical problems by interacting with faculty members inside and outside the classroom. As a result,

36.0 34.6

47.4 42.0

their teachers become role models, mentors, and guides for continuous, lifelong learning.

First-year students

Seniors

Some specific success indicators: •3  4 percent of SCU seniors often or very often worked with faculty members on

SCU National average SCU scores are significantly higher than national averages

activities other than coursework vs. 22 percent of seniors nationwide. •2  8 percent of SCU seniors have worked on a research project with a faculty member outside of class vs. 19 percent of seniors nationwide.

E nriching E duc ational E xperience Complementary learning opportunities enhance academic programs. Technology facilitates collaboration between peers and instructors. Internships, community service, and senior capstone courses provide opportunities to integrate and apply

33.8 28.0

57.6 40.8

First-year students

Seniors SCU

knowledge. Some specific indicators of success: • 76 percent of SCU seniors have participated in community service or volunteer work vs. 59 percent of seniors nationwide.

National average

• 42 percent of SCU seniors studied abroad vs. 15 percent of seniors nationwide.

SCU scores are significantly higher than national averages

S upportive C ampus E nvironment Students perform better and are more satisfied at institutions that are committed to their success and that cultivate positive working and social relations among

65.6 61.6

64.2 58.2

different campus groups. Some specific success indicators: • 72 percent of SCU seniors often or very often exercised or participated in physical

First-year students

Seniors SCU National average

SCU scores are significantly higher than national averages

fitness activities vs. 55 percent of seniors nationwide. • 74 percent of SCU seniors often or very often attended campus events and activities vs. 56 percent of seniors nationwide. SCU’s strong showing in the 2009 benchmarks underscores its commitment to assess and improve the undergraduate experience.

19


Highlights Student Awards

Beth Tellman ’09, who double majored in sustainable globalization and environmental studies, received the Fulbright U.S. Student Award. She’s researching food security for coffee farmers in El Salvador. Tellman

alumni in Obama’s cabinet

President Barack Obama appointed former SCU professor and trustee Leon Panetta ’60, J.D. ’63 to head the CIA, and former Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano ’79 as Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

Rankings and recognitions

University-wide Benjamin Snyder ’09, who majored in political science, German, and history, received a Fulbright Teacher Assistantship Award that took him to Saxony, Germany, where he’s teaching English to secondary school students.

Panetta Snyder

Napolitano

Michael Hayes ’10, a biochemistry major, received a Goldwater Scholarship that will go toward tuition and fees during the 2009–10 academic year. He intends to get an advanced degree in biochemistry and molecular biology.

• U.S. News & World Report – Ranked No. 2 in the West for the 20th consecutive year. – One of 80 colleges and universities known for a strong commitment to teaching undergraduates. – Second highest undergraduate graduation rate nationally—85 percent—among master’s universities. – Highest average freshman retention rate—93 percent—of master’s universities in the West. • Listed in the top 50 nationally for best values among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance Magazine. • Named one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduate education in The Best 371 Colleges, Princeton Review’s annual survey, and once again scored 96 out of 100 for sustainability efforts. • Ranked No. 20 out of nearly 600 colleges or universities nationwide for undergraduate alumni earning among the highest salaries by PayScale, a Seattle-based compensation-data company.

Hayes

Jesuit School of Theology Integration In May 2009, boards of Santa Clara University and the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley (JST), along with the U.S. Jesuit provincials, approved an integration of the two Bay Area institutions that will enable each to draw upon the academic and theological strengths of the other. Starting July 1, JST became the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University. “This partnership solidifies and fortifies SCU and JST in their shared goal of engaging in global theological study, contextual education, and justice-oriented ministry,” said Michael Engh, S.J., president of Santa Clara University. “It will also help ensure a continued, strong Jesuit presence at SCU,” he added.

20

The Jesuit School of Theology is one of only two Jesuit theological centers in the United States operated by the Society of Jesus and currently includes students from nearly 40 countries. Post-integration, many facets of JST and SCU remain unchanged. For instance, JST remains a member of the nineschool ecumenical Graduate Theological Union; JST students continue to have the right to cross-register at UC Berkeley; and both schools retain their academic freedoms. The Vatican Congregation of Catholic Education in Rome will continue to set standards for the granting of JST ecclesiastical degrees.


Fr. Nicolás Visit As the California Province of the Society of Jesus entered its centennial year, the newly elected Jesuit Superior General Adolfo Nicolás, S.J., made a historic trip to Santa Clara to communicate a message of inspiration and encouragement. Fr. Nicolás’ visit to SCU was part of a nine-day tour that spanned 11 cities and almost 30 different locations.

• Named to the 2008 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for community service programs and student involvement. • Ranked No. 5 in the “large employers” category in the “Best Places to Work in the Bay Area 2008” survey, conducted by the San Francisco Business Times, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal.

“He enjoys being with people, and at the same time is remarkably understated and humble,” said Gerdenio Manual, S.J., rector of SCU’s Jesuit Community, who first met Fr. Nicolás more than a decade ago. “And he speaks to the issues of our times with clarity of purpose as he focuses on God and the world’s greatest needs.” While at SCU, Fr. Nicolás, who oversees the entire Jesuit order, addressed a small group consisting of the Board of Trustees, key

University leaders and administrators, and student leaders, where he reiterated the Society of Jesus’ commitment to higher education and thanked Santa Clara for integrating Jesuit School of Theology into the University. “It was very encouraging to hear him speak of the importance of the Jesuit mission to higher education as a critical part of their service to the world,” said Robert Finocchio Jr., chairman of SCU’s Board of Trustees and dean’s executive professor of management in the Leavey School of Business.

Leavey School of Business • The part-time MBA program ranked No. 10 among such programs in the country by U.S. News & World Report’s annual “America’s Best Graduate Schools” issue. The executive MBA program ranked No. 15 nationally. • The undergraduate business program is No. 32 in the nation, according to “The Best Undergraduate B-schools,” by BusinessWeek magazine.

School of Engineering

Faculty award

Simone J. Billings, senior English lecturer, was named a Fulbright Scholar. She is designing curriculum for in-class and online writing classes with Open Campus of the University of the West Indies, and running faculty workshops for community colleges in the Caribbean.

• Ranked No. 19 nationally by the U.S. News & World Report among engineering schools where the highest degree awarded is a bachelor’s or master’s.

School of Law • U.S. News & World Report – One of the top 100 law schools in the country. – The Intellectual Property Law program ranked no. 8 nationally. – One of the most diverse student populations of any U.S. law school.

Locatelli named Chancellor and given Packard Award In December 2008, President Michael E. Engh, S.J., appointed Paul Locatelli, S.J., as chancellor. In this position, Locatelli is advancing Santa Clara’s global initiatives. In February 2009, he received the 2009 David Packard Award from Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network, for bringing “an entrepreneurial, cross-boundary, problemsolving approach” to the region’s challenges.

Billings

Locatelli

21


highlights

$7 million gift for student activity center

Two New Facilities

Opened in fall 2008, the 86,000-square-foot energy-efficient Lucas Hall, named for donor and Silicon Valley venture capitalist Donald L. Lucas, houses the Leavey School of Business and has videoconferencing classrooms, a project room, and a café.

Mary Mathews-Stevens ’84 and husband, Mark, a partner in Sequoia Capital, donated $7 million to build the Paul L. Locatelli Student Activity Center in honor of the former president. Mathews-Stevens

New Writing Center

In spring 2009, the Provost’s Office inaugurated a writing center, headed by Dolores LaGuardia, senior English lecturer. With a goal to “celebrate and support SCU writers and writing,” the center is available to faculty, staff, and students, and in an effort to make it sustainable, is paper-free. The Sullivan Aquatic Center, also opened in fall 2008, was made possible by a gift from Jack Sullivan ’59 and his wife Joan. It features an Olympic-size pool for water polo, recreational swimming, and intramural sports.

grants

CSTS receives $1.08 million grant to continue GSBI A three-year $1.08 million grant from the Skoll Foundation was awarded to the Global Social Benefit Incubator, a signature program of the University’s Center for Science, Technology, and Society, that brings together Silicon Valley mentors and social entrepreneurs from around the world to create sustainable plans that address urgent human needs. The grant will allow the program to focus on a selected vertical sector each year, expand geographic coverage, and better disseminate the lessons learned from the program.

Grants by the Numbers: • Awards Received: 52 • Awards Received that Include Student Funding: 34 • Faculty & Staff Who Received Awards: 35 • Total Funds Awarded in FY 2008/09: $7,829,422

Results of the Survey of Recent Grads, Class of ’08 Santa Clara University surveyed the Class of 2008 in February 2009, approximately eight months after their graduation. The purpose of the study was to learn the respondents’ employment and/or graduate school status. Here are some highlights: • 81 percent of the respondents were employed full time, attending graduate school, or participating in a service program such as the Jesuit Volunteer Corps. • The median starting salary for the graduate working full time was $45,000. • 68 percent of graduates employed full time worked in the service sector.

22


Presidential Inauguration On April 24, 2009, Michael E. E ngh , S.J., was inaugurated as the 28th president of Santa Clara University. The ceremony, held in the Leavey Event Center, celebrated the University’s first new leader in 20 years. Fr. John P. McGarry, provincial of the Society of Jesus in California, and A.C. (Mike) Markkula Jr., then-chairman of Santa Clara University’s Board of Trustees, performed the official investiture. In the inaugural address, Engh issued a proposal for Santa Clara to become a leading center for “just sustainability.” Weaving in themes of sparing the environment, listening to and protecting the poor, and educating students to do both, Engh reminded the nearly 1,500 guests, including students, staff, faculty, visiting university officials, civic officials, and Silicon Valley executives, that it is often the poor who suffer the most in the battle over scarce resources.

Trustees Robert J. Finocchio Jr. and A.C. (Mike) Markkula Jr. participate in President Engh’s inauguration.

E n rol l e d Fr e s h m a n P rof il e Class of:

2012

2011

2010

Mean academic GPA (unweighted)

3.53

3.5

3.52

Mean SAT critical reading score

600

597

597

Mean SAT math score

627

618

615

Mean ACT composite score

27

27

26.25

From public high schools

43%

42%

43.5%

From Jesuit high schools

12%

11%

11.8%

Religious background: Catholic

52%*

51%

51%

From California

58%

57%

54.7%

Number of states

37

39

38

Number of foreign countries

16

16

21

*Information collected from fall of previous academic year.

S tu de n t S tati s tic s

• 17 percent of graduates employed full time worked in the nonprofit sector. • 15 percent of graduates employed full time worked in the manufacturing sector. • Of those who had found full-time work, 94 percent indicated that their SCU education provided good to excellent preparation for their careers. • 95 percent of those who applied for graduate study were admitted to at least one graduate program. Of those who were admitted to full-time graduate study, 93 percent indicated that their SCU education provided them with good to excellent preparation for graduate study. • 89 percent of the graduates indicated that their SCU education had provided them with good to excellent preparation for life after college.

2008

2007

2006

Undergrad Grad

Undergrad Grad

Undergrad Grad

Men

2,469

2,027

2,415

1,956

2,239

1,885

Women

2,798

1,464

2,846

1,468

2,799

1,154

White

2,470

1,320

2,727

1,357

2,847

1,320

Asian

892

1,266

915

1,179

919

1,154

Hispanic

739

262

682

245

655

224

African-American

192

84

179

70

133

81

Native American

18

11

24

12

30

10

956

548

734

561

454

550

Gender

Ethnicity

Other

23


Financial

Overview

S

ince taking office, one of President Michael Engh’s key priorities has been monitoring the University’s economic health. The balanced budget that trustees

approved in February 2009 maintains a commitment to academic quality, avoids layoffs, addresses changing financialaid needs, and builds financial reserves. Deans and other administrators were asked to economize operating budgets wherever possible, with an expected savings of $2 million. “Targets were categories such as travel and entertainment—not academic programs,” Engh said. In addition, most construction has been deferred. Faculty, staff, and administrators have forgone pay increases (save faculty who are promoted and employees with certain kinds of contracts or collective bargaining agreements). The University has tried to minimize the financial impact on students. About 75 percent of the budget is funded by tuition, which increased this year by 3 percent for undergraduate and most graduate students, and 3.5 percent for law students.

This is the smallest percentage increase in 25 years. One special area of concern is for currently enrolled students in need of emergency financial aid. For them the University created Special Assistance Awards (originally called Emergency Financial Aid) in fall 2008. By the end of the 2009 academic year, 97 students were awarded $767,741 in supplemental aid. The University funded these grants through gifts from alumni, friends, and parents. In November 2008, an anonymous donor agreed to match other gifts for emergency financial aid with a challenge grant of $100,000. Then the Jesuit community designated a portion of its annual gift to the University to create another challenge

24


Endowment: Last 10 years

of $200,000. And early in 2009, the same anonymous trustee

$700M

gave another $100,000 to help meet still-growing needs. By June 30, each of these challenges had been met.

$600M

The global financial crisis led to a decline in the University’s endowment by 21 percent to approximately $529 million

$500M

in 2009. With the most recent economic recovery, the University is well positioned with its diversified investment $400M

Value

portfolio to take advantage of this turnaround. Since its founding in 1851, Santa Clara has made

$300M

every effort to educate students in uncertain financial circumstances. When donors endow scholarships, this

$200M

practice becomes reality. “Endowments impact more lives on a continuing basis than a one-time contribution,” reminded Jim Purcell, vice president for University Relations. “It is a legacy that fuels student success in the present and the

2008*

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

$100M

future.”

$0M * 7/31/09 value estimate

Fiscal Year

The University faces another challenge in the declining number of alumni who give annually to the University. Alumni giving participation has fallen from a high of 27 percent in 2001 to a record low of 15.5 percent in 2009.

SCU undergraduate alumni giving participation: the trend

Alumni giving participation is not a mere statistic. Its impact is felt by students and their families on an ongoing

30%

27.03%

basis. It is because of alumni support that many of our

26.04%

students are able to keep their hopes, dreams, and

24.16%

25%

22.55%

aspirations for a successful future alive. 21.85% 20.40%

Alumni participation is one of the most important metrics

20.19%

used to determine national rankings. It also helps leverage

20%

financial support from corporations and foundations.

17.38% 15.57%

Collectively, thousands of individual contributions, big and small, provide much-needed scholarships, services,

15% 2000–01

2001–02

2002–03

2003–04

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

2008–09

programs, and facilities. In a very real sense, a commitment to annual giving is a way of ensuring the success of our students and our University.

25


financial

overview

Operating Revenues ($ millions) Other sources $16.0 Private gifts, grants, and contracts $12.8 Sales and services of auxiliary enterprises $23.1 Endowment income used in operations $26.3 Tuition and fees $250.4 Total operating revenues $328.6

Expenses ($ millions) Retained reserves/capital investments $12.4 Restricted/reinvested funds $6.1

Faculty $57.0

Capital renewal and replacement $24.3 Debt repayment $10.0

Staff $57.0

Financial aid $54.8 Library acquisitions $4.2 Operating expenses $63.6

Total expenses $328.6

Student wages $5.6 Benefits $33.6

Santa Clara University’s primary source of revenue is tuition and fees from current students. Gifts to the endowment or capital projects are not used for operations and not included in these charts. Santa Clara University maintains a high level of fiscal responsibility and control that is overseen by the administration and managed by the University Finance Office, which is responsible for the accounting, budgeting, collection, and management of operational funds. The annual budget planning process is led by the University Budget Council with the support of the president and senior management. The budget planning process culminates in the development of a Five-Year Financial Operating Plan. The Finance Committee of the Board of Trustees has provided important advice as the University has navigated through the recent turbulent periods of economic uncertainty.

26


university

contents

A Letter from the President.. ......................................................... 3 Foreword Commitment to Students........................................................ 4 Teaching Scholars Experiential Learning for Teachers and Students Alike............. 6 One with Nature..................................................................... 6 Challenging Students to Become Independent Learners The Making of a Rhodes Scholar............................................. 8 Broomball and the Physics of Movement on Ice.....................10 Spray Cooling Redefined....................................................... 11 Nurturing Responsible Leaders and Citizens A Passion for Public Service.................................................. 12 Changing the World Through the Arts.. ................................... 12 Technology and Facilities.. ...........................................................14 Future Plans: Strengthening the Academic Enterprise..................16

Ab out Santa Cl a ra U n iv e rs ity

Student Engagement: Indicators of Success................................18

Santa Clara University, a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university located 40 miles south of San Francisco in California’s Silicon Valley, offers its more than 8,000 students rigorous undergraduate curricula in arts and sciences, business, theology, and engineering, plus master’s and law degrees, and engineering Ph.D.s. Distinguished nationally by one of the highest graduation rates among all U.S. master’s universities, California’s oldest operating higher-education institution demonstrates faith-inspired values of ethics and social justice. For more information, see www.scu.edu.

2008–09 Highlights.....................................................................20 2008–09 Financial Overview........................................................24 University Governance................................................................ 27

Contributing Writers: Margaret Avritt Mansi Bhatia Christine Cole Dona LeyVa Photography: Charles Barry Design: Greg Lee

governance

Board of Trustees

Board of Regents

University Administration

Robert J. Finocchio Jr., Chairman

John M. Sobrato, Chairman

Michael E. Engh, S.J. President

Jon R. Aboitiz Gregory R. Bonfiglio, S.J. Tasce Bongiovani Margaret (Peggy ) Bradshaw Michael J. Carey William S. Carter Louis M. Castruccio Gerald T. Cobb, S.J. David C. Drummond Michael E. Engh, S.J.* James P. Flaherty, S.J. Paul F. Gentzkow Rebecca Guerra Sal Gutierrez Ellen Marie Hancock Rupert H. Johnson Jr. Richard Justice Jennifer Konecny J. Terrence (Terry) Lanni Timothy R. Lannon, S.J. William P. Leahy, S.J. Heidi LeBaron Leupp John (Jack) C. Lewis Lorry I. Lokey Donald L. Lucas Gerdenio M. (Sonny) Manuel, S.J.* Regis McKenna Joseph M. McShane, S.J. Richard Moley Kapil Nanda John Ocampo Edward A. Panelli Robert W. Peters Stephen Schott Robert H. Smith John A. Sobrato Larry W. Sonsini Michael Splinter William E. Terry Charmaine Warmenhoven Agnieszka Winkler

Betsy Ackerman Penelope Alexander Kathleen Anderson Jean Bagileo William Barkett David Barone Christopher Barry Marie Barry Paul Beirne Deborah Biondolillo Frank Boitano* Patricia Boitano Dianne Bonino* Roger Brunello Mary Frances Callan James Cunha Karen Dalby Raymond Davilla John Del Santo Thomas Farley Gary Filizetti Julie Filizetti Stephen Finn Joseph Gonyea Philip Grasser Paris Greenwood Michael Hack Mark Hanson Laurita Hernandez Catherine Horan-Walker* Kathy Hull Suzanne Jackson Brent Jones Thomas Kelly Jay Leupp James Losch Paul Lunardi Luciann Maulhardt John McPhee Martin Melone Daniel Mount Patrick Nally Maria Nash Vaughn Randall Pond Marc Rebboah Scott Santarosa, S.J. Byron Scordelis Abby Sobrato Bess Stephens Kirk Syme Margaret Taylor Susan Valeriote Julie Veit Christopher Von Der Ahe

Lucia Albino Gilbert Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

* ex officio

On June 4, 2009, Michael Markkula’s six years’ service as chair of the Board of Trustees was celebrated. Robert Finocchio Jr. was elected as chair of the board on June 5.

John Ottoboni General Counsel James Purcell Vice President for University Relations Michael Sexton Vice President for Enrollment Management Robert Warren Vice President for Administration and Finance Paul Locatelli, S.J. Chancellor

Santa Clara University on the Web www.scu.edu Office of the President www.scu.edu/president

Art Direction: Linda Degastaldi

27


S a n ta C l a r a U n i v e r s i t y president’s

r e p o r t 2008–2009

500 El Camino Real Santa Clara, California 95053-1500

Paper Choice – Environmental Benefits Statement Using post-consumer waste fiber Pounds of paper

Trees saved

Energy saved

Waste water reduced

Solid waste reduced

Greenhouse gases reduced

16,000

52

16 million BTUs

23.694 gal.

1,439 lbs.

4,920 lbs.

Calculations based on research by Environmental Defense and other members of the Paper Task Force.

30%

Cert no. SCS-COC-001251

SCU OMC-7800C 2/2010 35,000

Keeping our commitment: students come first


Santa Clara University President's Report 2008-2009