Page 1

Courtesy of ahmadhammoud photography


28%

36%

25%

11%

Sexual Abuse Drugs Theft

30%

70%

Rural

Urban

No Schooling

Primary Education

Preparatory Education

Other

Street Vending

Begging

Theft

Drug Distribution


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1

2 3 4 5


MOHANDSEEN The project site offers an opportunity for an alternative urban development vision on multiple levels: the city, the district and the neighborhood. The site, firstly, lies within a grand urban corridor stretching north to south and separating planned districts from informal neighborhoods. Viewed as part of a larger cityscale pattern of deteriorating infrastructure networks. Secondly, through addressing traffic congestions and crossing problems, this intermediary zone would contribute to restructuring the formal-informal relation from one of exclusion and marginalization into one of integration and interdependence. Thirdly, the linear morphology of the site offers room for a series of Rehabitational facilities and services lacking in Ard al-Liwa and a generic solution for Street children phenomena.

Crack Formation

Vegetation

Abo el Ela Muhandeseen

Green Areas


Income Classes

Vegetation


Building Density

Territory


Street names

Mehwar 26 july

Aly ibn aby taleb

Nahya

Network hierarchy


Educational Facilities

Physical Borders


ʿ

ā āṭ ʿ

ʿĀṣ ṭāṭ

ā ʿʿ


Tanneries Considered as a commercial space for children which can learn a future profession.

Al-Fustat Park Big park beside the site can be a great recreation outdoor space for children.

Cairo Land The nearest space for our site which has a great children activity can be used.

Museum of Egyptian civilization A great landmark for the site in which helps in accessing it, and it can be a helpful surrounding place for education/cultural treatment.

The Site

Lake One of the main elements of the site which can be greatly used in the project for children.


Lake Site Sports Range Governmental Range

Religious Range

Hospitality Range

Educational Range


Cairo Land The existing amusement park at the same land of our site will make a good interaction with our project, as the children will be the main users of the park. Also it will make the park restart working again as it is stopped working.

Lake This existing lake can has a good impact with our project not only environmentally but also architecturally as it can be an outdoor recreational place.

Religions Complex An important landmark beside the location of the site, full of touristic visits which can also visit Al-Fustat park and this will be a great and new interaction treatment with our project.

Al-Masry club A club in the same location of the site is important as it will make a great interaction with our project as a good recreational space for children.


Site

Private Buffers Public Private Gardens Water Features


Shooting club Invasion

Rehabilitation Zone

University Zone

Orman Garden Agriculture farms University Hostel

Bulaq El Dakroor acts a source of street children due to its poverty , Informal Status and inhumanity.

Site Chosen Acting as a transitional part between the informal and formal areas In the line of segmentation.

Giza Zoo

Dokki is a high level community as it also has multiple universities , clubs ,Public , gardens and entertainment facilities.


Soudan st. is the main acces going to cairo university. Tahrir st. acts as the secondary main street from cairo university. National Research center in dokki which can benefit our project. Creating a bond between the police and the street children. Cairo university hostel consists of the students and professors.

Main Node connecting between Sudan street and tahrir street where transportation drop-off occurs.

Parking infront of the site used by the surroundings such as media masr and can be used by the project next to the admin. Railway tracks that cause noise and danger , also acts separation line between the two communities.


Multiple Educational Facilities existing ( Ramsees language school , Facility of educational facility Youth sports center in between Bulaq el dakroor and Eldokki right before the start of feesal Bridge . El moroor Street which exists of multiple workshops , printing centers and many commercial centers

Existing Node where many street children accumulate as it acts as a point that spreads towards the surroundings.

Car Service center Residential Blocks

Bulaq El Dakroor acts a source of street children roaming in the streets of el dokki to integrate with higher classes. El dokki is a high level district where multiple services exist such as educational and entertainment

Open area

Informal settlements

Research center

Mosque

Cairo University

Railway Noise and Danger

Church

Agriculture Department

Open parking Media masr commercial


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Functional requirements for the living of a child: It means to provide suitable places for child’s living, such as Sleeping, living, studying, playing, recreation, food and other requirements and spatially appropriate requirements of the needs of the child (rate per child) of each of the former and it can be addressed as follows:

Sleeping Spaces Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities’ Space

Services

Administration

Sleeping Spaces The identification of sleeping spaces plane is considered an influential factor in determining the overall shape of the institution, also the determining of the appropriate number of children participating in the one space is due to economic and supervisory reasons where fewer children participating in the space, the more bedrooms are required and a larger number for the supervision of specialist, specialized studies meet on a specific point that is that the appropriate number of participating children in a single space for sleeping ranges from 4 children and up to 12 children and for children over the age of 12 years there must be a unit for clothing storage for each child separately next to his bed while younger children the clothing storage unit must be located in a room nearby at the disposal of the supervisor in charge and the sleeping space per child should be ( 3.7 - 4.6 m2). In the girls’ institutions it is preferred that the space be divided by light partitions or curtains into an equal number of dormitories (cubicles) to achieve a capable amount of privacy for every girl and the cubicle should not be less than 5.5 m2. The sleeping space can be designed so that it can be divided into bed groups so that each group come into a private space with low thin partitions.

Dividing space into Cubicles.

Dividing space into Groups.

One of the prime importances is flexibility, as with other necessities for street children. Beds being of the conventional norms isn’t a necessity and could be specially designed, i.e. 90cm x 180cm, they can be designed to the average heights of the children accordingly. Savings in space can be achieved by reducing bed sizes significantly.


Example of space required for a dormitory with beds that are 65cm x 170cm.

Argentina

Example

Nigeria

Area (M2)

Kenya

No. of Places

M2/Place

Argentina

115

14 or 22

8.25 or 5.25

Nigeria

90

20

4.5

Kenya

102

40

2.55


Sleeping Spaces

Health Care Studying Space

Library

General Activities’ Space

Services

Administration

The Health Care Space Provisions of primary health care for street children should be catered to both their psychological and physical needs. Basic education and information on hygiene, nutrition and health wherever possible, should be given in association with medical treatment. In Patient Care Inpatient care requires overnight observation and specialised treatment. Out Patient Care Basic first aid • The basic first aid clinic is used for treatment of minor maladies, addressing of cuts, contagions, colds, viruses, and stomach aches, etc. Immunisation • A health centre for street children should provide preventive treatment as well as remedial health services. Dental care • Eye care • Basic health, nutrition and hygiene education • Basic education in nutrition and health could be taught in a health centre. Ideas and principals can be practically demonstrated to make learning much easier, particularly when directly related to the children. Counselling • In their day to day lives street children face massive pressures, fighting against social rejection and pressures and to survive. Substance (mainly solvent) abuse is a common (resulting) problem which causes many of their emotional problems. Their emotional problems need to be addressed so as to successfully rehabilitate these children. This can be achieved through individual and group counselling discussions, between children themselves, or between children and adults. Formal discussions are not well received by Street children. Therefore, it may be more appropriate to have counselling sessions in general activity rooms or even outdoors, in comfortable and familiar environments. The Medical Isolation Space • It’s a room for isolating the cases of infectious diseases, and a minimum of one room should be provided for each 50 beds in the institution, and it should be provided by its own entrance separated from the entrance of the sleeping zones, with a private W.C. provided, and a room for medical supervision, the room should not be less than 11 m2 and in case of increase of more than one bed in the room, the distance between both beds should be no less than 1.8 m and each bed’s dedicated area should be no less than 22.6 m2.


• • • •

Clinic Separate noisy and quiet areas. Suitable flow of patients to avoid other circulation movements. The number of children that can be treated must be maximized by sharing facilities and spaces everywhere possible. • Privacy is required. • A relaxing atmosphere must be provided to make patients feel comfortable. • Health center -if part of a general center for receiving street children- must be linked visually with the general center, in order to make the children not feel isolated. Reception & Waiting Area The reception area is where patients will be received and directed to waiting area or consultation and treatment rooms. • Reception and waiting areas should be located near to each other. • Reception should be closely associated with storage of patient’s records. As a rule of thumb approximately 0.8m2 should be allowed per person in waiting room area. • Waiting area should not be part of general circulation. • Waiting area could be inside or outside i.e. I under the shade of trees or on a veranda. Record Storage • The record storage area is ideally associated with the reception area but not par-t of it. It should be extendible as patient documentation will increase over time. • As a rule of thumb, approximately 1.4m2 is required per 1000 patients. Record storage should be lockable. Office A health centre office space should be closely associated with the record storage. It should have its own self contained storage. some of which is lockable. There should be horizontal work surfaces for administrative work. Storage There should be plenty of lockable storage in a health centre, both individual (i.e. in each room),and general. Provisions should be made for storing medicines, linen, equipment, cleaning materials and disinfectants, and other miscellaneous items. Ward If in-patient care is provided there will be a need for a ward, a place where the children can stay over night. The ward should have a relaxing atmosphere If health centre is associated with a general rehabilitation centre for street children it may be desirable to have visual contact with the rest of the establishment so that children do not feel isolated. Consultation/Medical Treatment • Medical treatment room should allow for privacy. If more than one patient is to be treated at any one time, provisions should be made for screening off areas. • Medical treatment requires its own associated storage for medication. • Medical treatment room should be well it preferably with natural lighting. In hot climates there should be adequate cross ventilation so patients feel comfortable. Consultation / Examination Room • The consultation room can be used for medical examinations as well as counselling and demonstrations (for educational purposes). • Consultation room should have its own lockable storage, a horizontal work surface and a couch/bed for lying down on. • As a rule of thumb a floor area of approximately 13m2 should be allowed for consultation/ there should be adequate cross ventilation so examination rooms. • The consultation room is best located near to where dispensing of drugs and immunisation takes place so that both functions can easily be performed by one person.


Sleeping Spaces

Health Care Studying Space

Library

General Activities’ Space

Services

Administration

Studying Spaces Street children are independent, sharp, street-wise. However, due to poor health and/or inhaling of glue fumes they may have short attention spans. Therefore, an educational programme needs to be innovative, interesting, and must be related to their daily lives in order to sustain and capture their commitment and imagination. If education was the corner stone for the correction programs provided by the institution then in this case: Kids older than 12 years old, desks dedicated for studying must be provided for every child besides the sleeping area dedicated for said child, and a suitable lighting fixture, a chair, and drawers must be provided. For the younger children, it is preferred for them to have a separate studying area away from the bedrooms and to be 2.8 m2 / child, with the importance of no more than 12 children in one space, and for these spaces to be away from the activity rooms, and the noisy games. Standard classrooms, supplementary classrooms, extra-large classrooms, rooms for special courses, rooms for teaching languages and social studies, language labs, workshops and other ancillary rooms are all the components of the teaching area. Space requirements: 2.00 m2/pupil are required for classroom for traditional teaching; 3.oo m2/pupil are for teaching in sets, 4.50 m2/pupil are required for open plan teaching place including ancillary areas needed for each The approximate space required per child for subject. general classroom

• Standard room space shape: activities is 1-1.5m2/child (12x20, 12x16, 12x12, 12x10) this in the rectangular or square case; with a 7.20 m max. room depth, it is possible to have windows on one side only. • Floor areas are: 1.80-2.00 m2/pupil are required for traditional classrooms; 3.00-5.00 m2/pupil are required for open lab, The clear height should be 2.70-3.40 m.


Associated Activities

Traditional School Subjects

Self Expression and Communication

Basic literacy and numeracy General studies History Geography Current Affairs Language(s) Mathematics Science(s)

Reading Writing Relaxing Story telling Noting Typing Dictating Browsing Listening Watching videos/TV Listening to radio Measuring Observing Ordering Classifying Counting Manipulating Demonstrating

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Theatre / • Drama Music •

Acting Dramatic presentation Role playing Dressing up Making props Dancing Singing Percussion Playing instruments Listening Composing Relaxing Watching Observing Discussing

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Art • Craft •

Drawing Painting Colouring Sticking Cutting Mounting Washing Mixing Collage Clay modelling Mural painting Finger painting Demonstrating

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Personal Awareness Nutrition • Health (including • basic first aid) Hygiene • (including personal)

Observing Listening Reading Writing Counting Measuring Note taking Demonstrating Discussing (group) Exchange experiences Role playing

• • • • • • • • • • •

Designs that allow for flexibility in teaching group sizes and demonstration of subject matter will be the most successful.

Rein acting personal experiences or fantasies can help children to understand themselves and others through drama and music. The children can be whoever they want and in this way they can gain confidence and enhance their capability to express themselves. Children can work as a group to design stage sets and make props (adjoining workshops could help in making larger props).


Studies have shown that street children respond poorly to organized teaching sessions. A more appropriate methodology is the informal educational methodology, and should be accompanied by planning of rooms and careful design in which these activities occur. Design should also provide for small and large interactive group work as well as individual work. Physical Education Environment

Organizing Classes

Plans

Traditional Education Thoughts

Modern Education Thoughts

Class is the main component of a children Kindergarten.

Activity corner is the main unit of a Kindergarten, these corners are the components of the activity hall.

Monolith lines for children seats, facing the teacher (main focal point).

Small flexible groups seating's, helping children to make free activities, with no focal point.


Workshops

Purchase And Supply

Materials  Tools and equipment  Associated Activities Ordering Delivering Carrying Measuring Weighing Paying

Storing

Raw materials Bulk materials / stock lengths of supplies. Projects in progress Completed projects Safe storage or display. Tools Basic hand tools  to be kept near workstation. Accessories and machining tools  to be kept near machines. Collective and specialized tools  to be kept in central store.

Vocational Training

Subjects-some examples Building  Electrics  General House wining Car Ari-conditioning Mechanics  Car Metal work  Iron molding Locksmith Welding Sheet metal Woodwork  Carpentry Joinery Wood carving

Day to day clearing and cleaning up + General maintenance

Workshop  Equipment and machinery  Associated Activities Clearing away Sorting through objects (i.e. those to be thrown away and those to be  recycled) Sweeping Wiping Rubbish disposal Painting / decorating Checking equipment and safety devices Cleaning, oiling Machinery

Associated Activities Arriving / Leaving (students) Changing Demonstrating Explaining Listening Fetching tools/ equipment Sawing Filing Grinding Drilling Cutting Lathing Gluing Hammering Nailing Painting Polishing Finishing


Workshops A good way of assisting the children in the process of rehabilitation is teaching them a skill or a trade. This doesn’t only produce immediate, visible results, but also the objects made can generate revenue for the children and/or prepare them for work, consequently improving their confidence and self-esteem. The trainees are provided with practical on-the-job tuition by a work force of technicians, and theoretical sessions back up this practical instruction so the boys understand the basic fundamental principles of their fields of training.

• The horizontal and outer-directed design concepts are utilized in these layouts. Different site constraints or opportunities caused in making these two layouts shown have alternative entrance locations. The four major elements of the workshop are separated in these layouts. • The vertical and outer-directed design concepts are utilized in the layout. This layout may have to be used in order to meet the natural terrain of the land best. An exciting building visually is formed but must be made sure it work properly. • The horizontal and inner-directed design concepts are utilized by the layout. A central courtyard is the focus of work areas, which can also be used as an outdoor work area where weather dictates the need for shelter and protection.


Bench Area The work bench is one of the most vital pieces of furniture in any workshop. The kind of work being carried out relates directly to the separate design of workbenches. The bench area should be easily accessible from machine and storage areas and located in center of workshop. Storage Area(s) A very important consideration in workshop design is storage. At least 20% of the total floor area should be billed for storage, as a general rule. At least 3 different storage areas should be planned for • Large material store • Projects in progress & finished projects • Tool store These stores should be in close proximity to bench area. Machinery • Heavy machinery should be located as near as possible to services doors. • Machinery frequently used should receive as much natural illumination as possible and be close to bench area. • Cutting stock Machines should be located near material storeroom. • Located along walls should be the Smaller, movable machines. • Exhaust fumes can be extracted more easily if the furnaces, forges etc. were located along outside walls so that exhaust fumes can be extracted more easily.

Teaching Area The teacher may need an area where he/she can address the entire group. Conditional on the size of the workshop and the nature of the program explanations, demonstration etc. may occur in the workshop or in an adjoining class room. However, much of the teaching will be casual. The teacher will require being available for help and small group or individual demonstrations. Therefore the teacher should have his/her own space from which he/she can easily supervise activities and where children can come to for help. Blackboards would be useful to have around the workshop so that ideas can be easily explained using drawings and/or writing.


Examples Electrical equipment are prepared in this department which is responsible for repairing such items, such as air-conditioners, household equipment, typewriters and other office machines. It also plays a major part in building construction and has done much to make the workshop known as a place where original solutions are found for special problems.

1. Electricity

4. Wood Work / Metal Work

6. Auto Mechanics

2. General Workshop

3. Auto Mechanics

5. Construction Workshop

7. General Workshop


Example

Area of Workshop (M2)

Workshop Capacity (No. of students)

Area (M2) / Student

1

202.5

-

-

2

213.9

-

-

3

138.2

20

12.6

4.A

130

-

-

4.B

104

20

5.2

4.C

104

20

5.2

5

103.4

18

5.76

6

252

18

7.68

7

213.9

16

13.36

3. Multipurpose Textiles, food preparation, house keeping

2. Textiles

1. Multipurpose Textiles, food preparation, handy craft

Example

Area of Workshop (M2)

Workshop Capacity (No. of students)

Area (M2) / Student

1.A

83.2

32

2.6

1.B

83.2

32

2.6

2

104.4

-

-

3

60

24

2.5


Sleeping Spaces

Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities’ Space

Services

Administration

Library Space Library consists of a conventional school library for students and teachers with books and magazines, reading, lending facilities and work places. The multi-media center is an extension of the library where the recording and playback facilities -for radio, film, TV- are located. Standard spaces overall requirements: • 0.35-0.55 m2/pupil for the library/media center. Broken down into: • Book issues and returns require 5m2 per workplace, and 20-40 m2 of catalogue space. • Information: librarian, media technician, media advisor, etc. 10-20 m2 per person.

Main spaces are: 1. Multi-purpose room 2. Audio books 3. Office 4. Central catalogue 5. Newspapers, magazines 6. Group area 7. Individual places 8. Typing booths 9. Information, lending desk 10. Lecture room 11. Audio/visual studio 12. Racks 13. Free access 14. Photocopier 15. Cloakroom, lockers


Sleeping Spaces

Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities’ Space

Services

Administration

Why Is Recreation Important?

Physical Development

Social Development

Emotional Development

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Physical skills Stamina Co-ordination Elegance of body movement

By playing in groups children can learn to:  Respect and trust each other  Follow rules  Share  Cope with conflict situations

Through recreation (group and individual) children develop:  The ability to make decisions  The ability to control aggression  The ability to cope with personal challenges (self reward), thus improving their self esteem and confidence  Improved attention spans and perseverance

Recreation is vitally important when dealing with street children. It breaks down psychological barriers (i.e. mistrust, hostility etc.) to achieve initial contact with street children. It can also boost their social, physical, and emotional development.


General Activities’ Spaces These spaces are divided into spaces for quite activities like reading, arts & crafts, and spaces for noisy activities like collective games, ping pong, TV watching, and it is preferred to have different spaces for different uses rather than one big space, in addition to halls used for music learning, gymnastics, athletic sports, and it’s not that important to have all these activities in all institutions, But the activities available must be depending on the type of the residing children and the institution possibilities, these spaces must be adequately lit, ventilated, and provided with comfortable sitting areas because these spaces are used the whole day, and is considered to be living quarters for the children, and the spaces designated for reading and arts & crafts must contain places specifically used for storage of tools and books, and the areas for said spaces could be calculated at the rate of 0.92 : 1.85 m2/bed.

Quite Activities’ Spaces:  Reading.  Arts & Crafts.

 Spaces must include storage for tools and books.  Activities’ spaces could be calculated at the rate of 0.92;1.85 M2 / bed.

Noisy Activities’ Spaces:  Team Sports.  Ping Pong,  TV watching.

 Different spaces for different uses rather than one big space.  Halls used for music, learning, gymnastics, athletic sports, all should be located on the ground floor.  A hall for official occasions.

These spaces are designed to be located on the ground floor or in the basement, and a minimum of one hall should be designated for official occasions, with a storage unit for movables attached to it. Indoor Recreation Recreational activities offered by a center for street children need not be especially elaborate. They are more about providing a space where children can come and play, relax, meet other children in an environment in which they feel comfortable and safe. A room that is used for general classroom teaching during the day may become a common room in the evenings.

Pool, billiards, snooker, etc.

Board games, card games, etc.

Ping Pong can be enjoyed inside and outside


Main Features Of An Activity Space

Outline of Space

 Different levels.  Furniture in limits.  Architectural elements (columns, walls, etc.)

Toys Storage

 Suitable storages.  Suitable places to use it.

Seating, Work Areas

 In groups.  Tables.  Chairs.

Unique

Location

 Remarkable signs.  Different colors & textures.  Different furniture.

Relation with:  Main circulation.  Staff location.  Other corners.

Tools and elements to work with and draw, whether furniture or on ground elements, also elements to pin up the children’s drawings on. Quite and comfort spaces, tables, shelves and vocal devices to hear vocal stories. Mirrors, different roles clothes, dinning tables, gathering spaces. Seating’s, tables, working surfaces, storage for toys, easy accessed by children. Different shapes for activity spaces Rectangle • Famous shape for activity corners. • Organized by furniture units. Rectangle • Narrow widths. • Wide, tall corridors helping children in running and in moving freely inside activity corner. Square • More time in movement between spaces, due to organizing corners and furniture around the center. L-Shape • Good, due to presence of many spaces for activities in the corners.


Outdoor Recreation The designed play space can only be used for a few specific activities as it shouldn’t be ‘over designed’. The adaptable, with some imagination, and simple interventions, to a vast variety of activities and games, will be the unsurpassed design. Ground shaping

The best for active games particularly ball games are flat areas.

Wherever possible, existing vegetation should be integrated into the designed recreational spaces.

Natural changes in ground terrain can be used for playing or seating, in addition to acting as wind screens and creating visual barriers. Loose materials and construction Assembling objects out of scrap materials requires inventiveness, co-ordination, cooperation and patience. The potentials for creative play, both individual and group, are boundless. Sand Sand as well has endless prospects for creative play, both group and individual.

In a play area water is always popular.


Swings and climbing structures

Innovative use of tires for recreational purposes.

Examples of sports field dimensions


Sleeping Spaces

Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities’ Space

Services

Administration

Services The Toilets Locating depends on the institution’s way of life, because institutions which are designed on the basis of the juxtaposition of sleeping, living and studding quarters together in one domain so that the children spend most of the day in this area it is imperative to provide enough toilets in this range, but as for the institutions that provide many spaces for general usage in the ground floor must provide enough toilets neighboring to it, and also there must also be toilets provided sufficiently near any place dedicated to kids gathering, and shall provide toilets especially for workers and separate from those for children, also taken into account the provision of toilets in open areas in the institution and those services must be provided for children at the following rates: Gathering toilets and showers. W.C. 2/10 children Sink 1/3 children

Shower 1/10 children Urinal 1/20 children

The kitchen In case of low capacity institutions or collective houses the kitchen happens to be of a residential character, with enough space for the children to be able to help out with the chores, and in case of large institutions, the kitchen must be adjacent to the dining hall or at least on the same level, and it must be designed for it to fit more than one sink, a big table, and more than one stove, or a big one, and storage for tools and foods to be attached to it, with the windows’ sill at 1.25 m and more preferable at 1.5 m. Whether food preparation is being carried out by staff members or by street children themselves, the design ought to be practical and simple, to allow swift and efficient preparation of food in an easy to clean, comfortable, well ventilated environment. Those that allow for flexibility in use will be the most successful of designs. In addition, the children should dine together in a family like environment.


Food  Equipment  Fuel  Associated Activities Ordering.  Delivering.  Carrying.  Measuring.  Weighing. 

Purchase And Supply

Storing

Perishable food : Meat, vegetables, fruit and dairy products etc. Non perishable food : Flour, pulses, salt, oil etc. Utensils : Cooking, serving and eating equipment. Fuel : Firewood, charcoal, gasoline, petrol etc.

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Food Preparation

Associated Activities Preparing ingredients Cleaning and peeling fruit and vegetables  Cleaning and chopping meat  Mixing Ingredients Weighing.  Measuring.  Mixing.  Cooking prepared ingredients Baking.  Boiling.  Frying.  Grilling.  Stirring.  Mixing.  Managing stoves. 

Serving

Associated Activities Transferring food to smaller pots.  Keeping food warm.  Carrying food to tables.  Transferring food onto plates. 

Eating

Clearing + Washing Up

Associated Activities Transferring used plan to washing up area.  Washing.  Stacking.  Drying.  Putting away.  Rubbish disposal. 

Cleaning

Kitchen equipment and fittings.  Kitchen and dinning area. 

Waste Disposal

Associated activities Disposing of kitchen waste.  Composing perishable kitchen waste. 


Storage Area Storerooms ought to be close to both delivery and food preparation areas. They should be organized according to their contents, i.e. shelf widths and depths should relate to size of the objects they will be holding, thus efficiently using space. Preparation Area Food preparation will be taking place inside the kitchen, even though some activities, i.e. chilies, drying onions, etc. or cleaning grains and pulses, can be completed outside. It should be close to cooking area. Cooking Area Stove area is best located in the center of the kitchen. It ought to be close to preparation work tops. Path ways between stove and work tops should be wide enough to allow easy movement while cooks are working. Serving Area Serving area requires a counter (large enough for serving dishes, plates, etc.) which is adjacent to cupboards containing serving and eating utensils. It is preferred to have a separate room to serve food, in centers serving more than 400 meals. In smaller ones a serving area in the kitchen is perfectly acceptable. Shutters are recommended to close off the serving area if the adjoining dining area is used during the day for other activities. Outdoor Area The outdoor area should be protected from direct sun light- particularly in hot climates- and rain, as it’s traditionally where much of general food preparation takes place. Dining Area Dining hall size will depends on how many children are eating. In case there are a lot of children it is advisable to serve food in shifts so facilities can be shared.

Storage Space In storage spaces, for things • to be found easily, spaces ought to be well organized, and daylight should be provided particularly if there isn’t electricity available. Cleanliness is of extreme • importance, so food should never be stored on floors directly.


Passage ways between work-top / cooking areas should be wide enough for people to pass by easily. Dining Area The dining space is setup as for all the children could use it at the same time, and it’s area is calculated as 1.4 m2 / child and this is in the case of using dining tables that fit 8 to 10 children, but in case of using smaller dining tables then a bigger area must be provided for every child.

The examples cited are to be served as a guideline; so that the reader can have a general idea of how much is required of space to serve a set number of meals. Room sizes will differ depending on how many meals are to be prepared at any one time i.e. 150 meals prepared in several shifts over 24 hours will require less space than 150 meals prepared in one shift.

Serves 250

Serves 100


Sleeping Spaces

Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities’ Space

Services

Administration The administrative requirements to run a street children centre will differ due to the scale and the organisation of the project. For larger scale projects, they may require spaces for gathering, holding meetings, organising fund-raising activities, and giving information out. For smaller scale ones, they may only require to have an office space where secretarial work can take place. Office(s) Basic administration and management of centre.

Meeting room(s) Meeting place is for staff, members of the community, parents, government representatives, police, etc.

Administration


Small Meeting Room • Appropriate for both formal and informal interaction; an enclosed meeting space for two to four persons Large Meeting Room • Appropriate for formal interaction; an enclosed meeting space for five to twelve people Small Meeting Space • Appropriate for short, informal interaction; an open or semi-open meeting space for two to four persons Large Meeting Space • Appropriate for short, informal interaction; an open or semi-open meeting space for five to twelve people Brainstorm Room • Appropriate for brainstorming sessions & workshops; an enclosed space for 5 to 12 people Meeting Point • Appropriate for ad hoc, informal meetings; An open meeting point for two to four persons.

Resource centre Information can be gathered; Fund raising and public awareness take place in this Focal centre. A resource centre could be both used as a meeting room and a place to receive visitors.


Components of the project (In detail):

Component Type

Total Zone Area

Entrance

80 M2

Administration

500 M2

Educational Spaces

1955 M2

Sub Component

Area (Number of Rooms x Area of Each)

Offices

5x20 M2

Meeting Room

80 M2

MultiPurpose Zone

200 M2

Finance Sector

120 M2

Primary School Classes

(12 Classes x 20 Children) 60 M2 Per Class

Preparatory School Classes

(6 Classes x 20 Children) 60 M2 Per Class

Secondary School Classes

Multi-Purpose Zone (Theatre)

500 M2

Detailed Type

Detailed Area

Offices

300x20 M2

Meeting Room

60 M2

Meeting Room

80 M2

Quiet Space

80 M2

Archive Room

25 M2

Offices

2x15 M2

(6 Classes x 20 Children) 80 M2 Per Class

Staff Room

180 M2

Head Office

215 M2


Component Type

Total Zone Area

Sub Component

Area (Number of Rooms x Area of Each)

Community Center

845 M2

Community Hall

2x200 M2

Sharing Department

85 M2

Medical Zone

140 M2

Meeting Room

80 M2

Gallery

200 M2

Research & Survey Center

80 M2

First Aid Clinic

40 M2

Dentist

Entertaining Zone

4700 M2

Detailed Area

Office

3x15 M2

Waiting Area

25 M2

Archive & Lab

15 M2

Storage Room

80 M2

Library

200 M2

Training Room

300 M2

Art Studio

2x40 M2

Garden

15 % of Project Size

Activity Area

10% of Project Size

Multi Use Area

100-200 M2

2x20 M2

Small Surgery Room

60 M2

Indoor Area

500 M2

Outdoor Area

Detailed Type


Component Type

Total Zone Area

Sub Component

Area (Number of Rooms x Area of Each)

Workshop

4x80 M2 = 320 M2

Sleeping Spaces

3300 M2

Bedrooms with Bathrooms

(150 Users + 15 Staff) x20 M2

Facilities

260 M2

Computer Labs

4x30 M2

Show Data Class (Multi Media Class)

2x20 M2

Control Room

20 M2

Detailed Type

Private Outdoor Garden

Detailed Area

5 M2

Atrium = Communal Area Services Zone

415 M2

Kitchen Dining Area

50 M2 30 M2

Toilets

25 M2

Storage Room

20 M2

Technical Room

25 M2

Safety (Fire Escape Stairs)

60 M2

Stairs + Elevators

80 M2

Laundry Room

80 M2

Pantry

7x15 M2

Parking

30 Staff 40 Visitors

Total Area of The Project

13015/4200 = 3.10 Feddans


The three layers of the envelop

The exterior side of the facade


• • • • • • •

Room operator units

System components chart

System components organization


Case (B)

Al-Tahrir street

Case (A)

Al-Sudan street

Zone 3 Zone 2 Zone 1 Entran ce

Case (B)

Case (A)


Al-Tahrir street

Al-Sudan street

Main Educati Hall Worksho onal Recreat ps Sleepin ional g


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Translucent Faรงade Positions

Figure (A) : Cladding, Figure(B) : Translucent Facades


Section showing principles of Solar Chimney


Rehabilitation center for street children research omar elmelegy  

Rehabilitation Center For Street Children Graduation Project Research

Rehabilitation center for street children research omar elmelegy  

Rehabilitation Center For Street Children Graduation Project Research

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