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The Chronicle • March 5, 2014 •

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Woman faces trial for her dog ‘rescue’

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Hearing scheduled for March 27 By Jennifer Marshall The Chronicle

Dee Camp/The Chronicle

Washington State Patrol Trooper Darren Wright, right, chats with two men attending a job fair Thursday at the Omak Community Center, 601 Benton St. Wright said a number of people inquired about joining the patrol, which is hiring. Several dozen employers participated, from the patrol and the U.S. Army to Omak Wood Products and the Omak School District.

Enloe Dam discussion shows breaching support Utility plans to meet with tribal representatives By Jennifer Marshall The Chronicle OKANOGAN – Despite the support of a number of residents and conservation groups to remove Enloe Dam, Okanogan County Public Utility District officials say there’s no funding currently to do it. Utility commissioners met with several agencies Feb. 24 to discuss the possibility of dam removal, including Bonneville Power Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, state Department of Fish and Wildlife, Hydropower Reform Coalition, Bureau of Land Management and Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. Crumbacher resident and PUD-Action Committee member Dan Isaac, a vocal opponent of reopening the dam, said it was a “very good meeting.” “The general attitude of those speaking was in support of removing the dam,” he said, noting a NOAA representative thought removing the dam would be more cost efficient. Utility General Manager John Grubich said agency representatives offered to work with constituents to come up with funding options if the utility decides to remove the dam four miles northwest of Oroville on the Similkameen River. “They were kind of generic comments,” he said. However, officials from Hydropower Reform Coalition, which has been involved in past litigation involving the dam, offered to help pay for its removal, he said.

“ The general attitude of those speaking was in support of removing the dam. Utility critic Dan Isaac

” Commissioners still haven’t decided to reopen the dam’s powerhouse or to breach the dam, board President Steve Houston said. “It was the first meeting, it was the first time that they’ve come in and even the issue of doing anything different than electrifying had never even been brought up,” he said. “I think the general consensus was nobody has funding to do it outright, but nobody had looked at it.” It still hasn’t been decided who’s financially responsible if the dam is removed – the utility or another agency. The dam sits on property owned by the Bureau of Land Management. The agency has stated it has no authority over the dam or other structures outside of what the dam’s federal license dictates. Commissioner Ernest Bolz said the utility – and in turn, ratepayers – would be responsible for paying for the removal as well as the contaminated silt behind the dam. However, several residents have argued that may not be the case. “That question, I don’t know if it’ll ever get answered until it gets to court,” Houston said. “That’s a wild card I guess, as to whose responsibility it is. It’s just speculation at this point.” The utility plans to open

Fair officials requiring hog-health statement The Chronicle OKANOGAN — Those planning to exhibit pigs at this year’s Okanogan County Fair need to have a statement declaring the animals have not come from an area known to be affected by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and have not been exposed to the virus within the previous 30 days. Okanogan County Parks and Recreation Board Chairman Lonnie Dixon said the information should be shared with the community. The state Department of Agriculture has adopted an emergency rule requiring all swine entering the state to carry evidence the animals are free of the virus, a disease that can make adult pigs ill and be fatal to suckling piglets. The new rule will remain in force for at least 120 days. The department said there is no public health risk from the virus because it cannot be transferred to other animals or humans. It is also not transferred through pork products. It can be fatal to piglets three weeks old and younger

and has caused the deaths of millions of suckling piglets since it was diagnosed in the U.S. last spring. All animals, including pigs, entering the state are already required to have a health certificate signed by a licensed veterinarian stating the animal is disease free. The new requirement for swine entering Washington will require that the certificates include the following statement: “To the best of my knowledge, swine represented on this certificate have not originated from premises known to be affected by Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus (PEDv), and have not been exposed to PEDv within the last 30 days.” The certificate must be signed by the animal owner as well as a veterinarian. Acting State Veterinarian Paul Kohrs said anyone planning to show pigs in fairs or exhibits should keep their swine apart during weigh-ins and tagging activities before the events. The disease has not been seen in Washington, but has been confirmed in other states, Kohrs said.

News • A5

communication with the tribe and get input, then discuss the next steps at a 2:30 p.m. meeting next Monday 10 at 1331 N. Second Ave. In the meantime, Houston said the utility is continuing to comply with the federal 50-year license it received last year to operate the dam’s powerhouse.

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TWISP – A local woman whose friends claim was trying to save a dog one cold December night is facing trial later this month for allegedly stealing the animal. Pre-trial proceedings begin at 8:45 a.m. March 27 in Okanogan County District Court against Judy Camp. Under the name Judy Brezina, she was charged Dec. 9 for theft of a pet animal, according to court documents filed by Deputy Dave Yarnell. Camp and her attorney, Ken Miller – a public defender with MacDougall Prince of Okanogan – declined to comment on the case. “I think she actually saved the dog,” resident Sarah Pfeifer said. “A lot of people called on this dog.” The dog, a Blue Heeler named Duke, was owned by the Magruder family of Carlton, but was being kept in a junkyard and living under a canopy set up on a vehicle, Pfeifer said. In his report, Yarnell said he had been to the site on previous occasions to check on the dog and noted there was nothing criminal about the way Duke was being cared for. A number of Methow Valley residents disagreed, taking to the Internet to complain about the treatment of the dog. Camp herself posted on the Methow Valley Bulletin Board website, noting she has also been charged with obstruction of justice and lying to a government official. “I have now crossed over into the area of, hey, if this is going to be a life experience, then let’s make it a really memorable one,” she wrote Feb. 22 under the screen name “biglakejudy.” “When I rescued the dog, the main thrust was A) get him safe and warm so that he would not freeze and B) find the owners so

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I could negotiate for him because it seemed that no one was,” she wrote Feb. 15. Juanita Magruder reported the dog stolen Dec. 8, a Sunday. Pfeifer said Camp had taken the dog from the junkyard that weekend with the intention of taking it to the veterinarian Monday morning. Yarnell said that day he contacted veterinarians, asking them to let him know if anyone brought in a dog matching Duke’s description. A response came from Valley Veterinary Clinic in Twisp, where Daniel DeWeert, DVM, was scheduled to examine a dog. When Yarnell arrived at the clinic, he said Camp told him the dog was hers and his name was Tank. “Camp became very upset and told me that she would not give me the dog,” Yarnell wrote. “Camp admitted to taking the dog...” Camp told Yarnell it had been 5 degrees below zero the night she took Duke, but she did not contact the Sheriff’s Office. “I told Camp that it wasn’t the best situation and I had already spoken to the Magruders about that, but it was not criminal and therefore she had no right to steal their dog,” he wrote. When he tried to take the dog, he said Camp elbowed him in the rib cage. He placed her under arrest, put the dog in the kennel inside the clinic and then released her. Later, Yarnell was notified by Magruder that she sold the dog to Camp for $500. Renamed Tank, the dog remained at DeWeert’s office, getting vaccinations. Magruder told Yarnell the dog hadn’t been given shots since it was a puppy. He said Camp brought Tank in Dec. 19 to be neutered, when DeWeert noticed “he had multiple scars on his scrotum.” “My thought at this time was someone had either tried to neuter him or at sometime in his life he had frozen his scrotal area,” DeWeert wrote. After she was cited for theft,

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Camp contacted Spokane-based attorney Cheryl Mitchell, a former chairwoman of the state bar association’s animal law section and a member of Animal Advocates of the Inland Northwest. Mitchell advised Camp to get an attorney, but since then has taken interest in the case. She said there are no state laws defining what adequate shelter for an animal is, so each county makes up its own definition. “They just are winging it,” she said of the sheriff’s office. “Save an animal, go to jail. It doesn’t make any sense, does it?” she said.

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Doug Sklar, Member SIPC 646 Okoma Dr. • Omak, WA 826-5566 • 1-800-284-5567 Edwardjones. com


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