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momaha.com

VOLUME 9 · ISSUE 6 JUNE

ALL ABOUT DAD GOLF, GADGETS & GRILLING

Storytime with dad & summer reading series

GET ORGANIZED Moving in stages

2018


Memorial Day Run                 

Kids’ Fun Run

1-Mile Walk/Run

5 5-Mile Walk/Run

                    in the lives of children who are deaf and hard of hearing.

May 28, 2018 Register online at MemorialDayRun.org or call 402-498-6729 for more information. Presented by:


2074876-01

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BAND

CHEER

Middle School Concert Band Retreat

May 31 - June 1

Ages 4 - 13

Middle School Marching Band Clinic

June 4 - 8

DANCE

BASKETBALL

June 4 - 8

Pre-K - Grade 6

June 13 - 15

Boys: Grades 4 - 8

June 18 - 21

FOOTBALL

Girls: Grades 2 - 8

June 11 - 14

Quarterback Camp: Grades 7 - 9

SOCCER

June 18 - 20

SHOW CHOIR

Boys: Grades 1 - 8

June 11 - 14

Grades 3 - 8

Girls: Grades 1 - 8

June 25 - 28

WRESTLING

VOLLEYBALL

Ages 5 - 12

Girls: Middle School

June 5 - 8

BASEBALL

Girls: Grades 3 - 5

June 11 - 14

Boys: Ages 8 - 14

Girls: Grades K - 2

June 11 - 14

SOFTBALL

Boys Sand Volleyball Clinic: Grades 3 - 8

June 15

Girls: Ages 8 - 14

May 29 - 30 June 13 - 15 June 11 - 13 June 5 - 7

BASKETBALL | BASEBALL | CHEER | DANCE | FOOTBALL | SHOW CHOIR | SOFTBALL | SOCCER | VOLLEYBALL | BAND | BASKETBALL | BASEBALL

FOOTBALL | SHOW CHOIR | SOFTBALL | SOCCER | VOLLEYBALL | BAND | BASKETBALL | BASEBALL | CHEER | DANCE | FOOTBALL | SHOW CHOIR

MAKING A DIFFERENCE SINCE 1993 2088479-01

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YOUR PLACE FOR SUMMER FUN

2nd Thursday Every Month • 10:30-11:30am

FREE TO ATTEND Nebraska Medicine Bellevue Amphitheatre

Little Line Dancers

Nebraska Medicine Bellevue Amphitheatre

String Beans

Amazing Bubble Show

JUNE 14

JULY 12

AUGUST 9

Nebraska Medicine Bellevue Amphitheatre

A fun and relaxed atmosphere for the whole family. After a long week, come unwind by listening to your favorite songs performed live by local cover bands. Free face painting or balloon art each week for the little ones. Bring a blanket or chair and we’ll see you there! PRESENTED BY

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

Opens Friday, May 25 through Labor Day 11am-6pm Weather permitting

Visit ShadowLakeShopping.com/events for more information Highway 370 & 72nd Street | Papillion | 402.537.0046 2085364-01

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THE BEST PLACE FOR KIDS. Mason, age 4 Launched in life at our Level IV Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, this junior jet-setter really enjoys taking off – proof that complex medical issues don’t have to keep you down, especially when your journey includes a highly-skilled team of neonatal critical care specialists, cardiologists, nurses and therapists.

Visit ChildrensOmaha.org for more information on how we can help your child. For a pediatrician, family physician or pediatric specialist, call 1.800.833.3100. 2093710-01

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BOGO Mother’s Day Sale

Give mom the gift of a clean house! 1 1/2 hours for $90 3 hours for $150 6 hours for $250

*Restrictions apply, please call 402-390-2300 for details 2086187-01

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HEIDI THORSON

CONTENTS

6

REAL MOMS + ADVICE

SEASONAL

ON THE COVER

8 Editor’s Column 10 On Our Radar 28 Be Well 32 Get Organized

12 Summer Reading 14 DIY Tooth Fairy Envelope 16 Summer Skewers 20 Burger Bar 22 Rootbeer Float Bar 24 DIY Clock Craft 26 ‘Fore’ the Love of Golf

13 Momaha Bookshelf

SPONSORED FEATURES 30 YMCA: Team Sports


momaha where moms connect VOLUME 9 . ISSUE 6 . JUNE 2018 editor in chief CHRIS CHRISTEN chris.christen@owh.com 402-444-1094

creative director + designer

      

HEIDI THORSON hthorson@owh.com 402-444-1351

copy editor SHELLEY LARSEN shelley.larsen@owh.com 402-444-1143

assistant editor MARJIE DUCEY marjie.ducey@owh.com 402-444-1034

momaha.com editor ASHLEE COFFEY ashlee.coffey@owh.com 402-444-1075

production coordinator PAT R I C I A “ M U R P H Y � B E N O I T

content contributors JULIE HUMPHREY KENDALL MUNCH STU POSPISIL AMY TOKOS M I K E W AT K I N S H E AT H E R W I N K E L ROWAN WI N K E L

cover photo STEVEN & AIDEN HENRI OF BELLEVUE PHOTO: HEIDI THORSON

account manager L AURE N KRUGE R lauren.kruger@owh.com 402-444-1261

account executive G AY L I D D E L L gay.liddell@owh.com 402-444-1489

account executive E M I LY M A R T I N emily.martin@owh.com 402-444-1411

account executive

             

MICHAEL MEDRANO michael.medrano@owh.com 402-444-1209 Momaha Magazine is a monthly publication of the Omaha World-Herald, 1314 Douglas St., Suite 700, Omaha, NE 68102. Momaha is a registered trademark, and all content is copyright 2018 by the Omaha World-Herald. All rights reserved. The opinions and perspectives published herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as those of Momaha Magazine.

        2059508-01





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MOMAHA.COM EDITOR // ASHLEE COFFEY Wife to Kevin Coffey, music critic for the Omaha World-Herald. Mom to Sam and Elliott. Follow her on Twitter: @AshleeCoffeyOWH

WELCOME, SUMMER!

I

t’s no secret that October is my absolute favorite month. But June rates a close second. Why? Because it’s the beginning of summer. I love the season because it’s fresh and exciting and filled with plans and high hopes. Bonus: It’s rarely insanely hot. We’ve filled this issue with ideas to keep summer’s momentum strong. Why not start by inviting friends over for burgers and root beer floats? While the grill is hot, try our super easy fruit kebabs. Just because it’s summer doesn’t mean kids should stop learning. Check out our article

about the importance of summer reading on page 12. Our suggestions are sure to keep your kid’s nose in a book all summer — or at least in between trips to the pool. Another great thing about June: Dads! Father’s Day is Sunday, June 17, and we’ve got some great ways to celebrate. Check out our dad-themed products, page 10, as well as instructions for making a chalkboard face clock for dad, page 24. Finally, see page 13 for storybooks dad and the kids will love. I hope all you dads out there have a great time celebrating. Happy summer!

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Join us at BT Storytime! Storytime events are from 9:30 am to 10:30 am. Families of children ages 1-4 are invited to attend!

BROW NELL TAL BOT

STORYT IME

We’ll share stories, sing songs, do fun activities, and have play time in the Kotula Family Nature Classroom.

Summer Storytime Dates Tuesday, June 12 Wednesday, July 18 Tuesday, August 14

BT Storytime is free and open to the community!

brownell.edu 400 N. Happy Hollow Blvd. • 402.556.3772 2093242-01

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ON OUR RADAR // EDITOR’S PICKS New and Momaha-tested too!

LULLABY BABY

THINGS TO TRY THIS MONTH

ADULT SIPPY CUPS

The DreamPad pillow is wonderful, our struggling sleepers said. They loved the size, the cool cotton fabric and most of all, the amazing sound technology. Music or nature sounds helped lull them to sleep, and no one else could hear a thing. They only wish the sound could be a bit louder. “When we move the pillow around, sometimes it’s hard to hear,’’ they said. $149 to $179, dreampadsleep.com

These 12-ounce stemless wine tumblers by Swig won’t fit your car’s cup holders. They aren’t supposed to. The insulated stainless steel adult sippy cups are great for poolside or at the beach, keeping your favorite beverage cold for up to nine hours. Moscow mules, anyone? Or fireside with a good book and a cup of hot chocolate loaded with Baileys, perhaps? $19.95, swiglife. com

COOL SHORTS As someone who enjoys a cool drink while hiking, fishing and playing disc golf, our reviewer liked the clever koozie pocket on these 100 percent nylon Coast angler shorts. He even conducted his own experiment and said the shorts kept a can of his favorite beverage slightly cooler than its counterpart left out at room temperature. These shorts ended a few inches above the knee, so he recommends choosing the longer available inseam. $59.50, coastapparel.com PACKING ESSENTIALS Our dad loved the sophisticated color of this bbluv ultra diaper bag, which works for either a boy or girl. He didn’t have to feel embarrassed by teddy bears or other baby motifs. The mom of the family of four loved how much it holds and the changing pad that’s included. The cooler gave her plenty of room for bottles of all sizes. The only thing missing was backpack straps to make it easier to carry. $79.99, bbluvgroup.com

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FOR THE SPICE RACK It’s grilling time, and Primo spices might be just the ticket for your next barbecue. Cooking steak? Then use the Bourbon Whiskey Twist. For beef, go with the Chicago Stockyard. Kleftiko Barrel Wine is perfect for lamb, poultry and veggies. Created by a culinary chef and food scientist, each blend has fresh herbs, spices and oils for enhanced natural flavor. Can be used as a dry rub or added to cooked meat and vegetables. Prices vary. primogrill.com


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CHECK OUT Momaha.com & the Momaha Newsletter for more information on ACT prep and tutoring HUNTINGTON LEARNING :

Congratulations to Emma Fuller who went up 5 points on her ACT and received a 35! OMAHA 546 North 155th Plaza Pepperwood Village Omaha, NE 68135 402-884-4407

MILLARD 17935 Welch Plaza Bay #6 Omaha, NE 68135 402-934-7909 2074859-01 2042837-01

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STOP THE SUMMER SLIDE Crack open a book TEXT Julie Humphrey & Kendall Munch, Omaha Public LIbrary

D

on’t let your kids stop reading just because school is out. Reading during summer vacation is extremely important. Studies have found that students who take the summer off experience a decline in reading skills. Experts call it the summer slide. It’s cumulative. Kids who continually lose reading abilities over the summer will be two years behind their class by the end of their sixth-grade year. The summer slide can be reduced by encouraging children to read every day, preferably a book they find enjoyable. Supplying a book they like ensures they’ll be more engaged in what they read, which helps deepen their comprehension. Studies have also shown that kids who read for fun often outperform kids who do not, resulting in higher scores on standardized tests. The Omaha Public Library’s Summer Reading Program combats the slide and rewards students for reading 10 hours, or the equivalent of about 15 minutes a day. Here are some popular titles available at a library near you.

JULIE HUMPHREY

12

KENDALL MUNCH

PRE-KINDERGARTEN TO KINDERGARTEN • Elephant & Piggie series by Mo Willems • Pete the Cat series by Eric Litwin and James Dean KINDERGARTEN TO SECOND GRADE • How to Be an Earthling series by Nan Walker, Lori Haskins Houran, Lisa Harkrader and others • Who was...? and What was...? series by various authors • Mercy Watson series by Kate DiCamillo THIRD TO FIFTH GRADE • The Penderwicks series by Jeanne Birdsall • Secret Coders series by Gene Luen Yang • Survivors series by Erin Hunter FIFTH TO EIGHTH GRADE • Michael Vey series by Richard Paul Evans • The Lunar Chronicles series by Marissa Meyer • Amulet series by Kazu Kibuishi CUSTOMIZED LISTS The library also offers a custom reading list service. Simply submit a topic request and you’ll receive a list of 10 to 15 books to try. BOOK CLUB BAGS Kids and parents can check out book club bags with

15 to 25 copies of a title for children and teens. EVENTS Books aren't the only fun things you'll find this summer at the library. Free events engage families in educational activities. Summer events are held at all 12 locations. Check omahalibrary.org for full details, including age restrictions and pre-registration. A sampling of events: PRE-K Family Storytime and Teddy Bear Picnic, Friday, June 8, 10:30 a.m., Florence Library K TO FIFTH GRADE Art Rocks!, June 4, 1 p.m., South Omaha Library Paper Airplane Piloting, July 6, 2 p.m., Sorensen Library Get Crafty: Seed Bombs, July 12, 2 p.m., Charles B. Washington Library SIXTH TO EIGHTH GRADE Musical Instrument Show and Tell, June 6, 2 p.m., W. Clarke Swanson Library National Dance Day Dance Party, July 28, 2 p.m., Abrahams Library


On the Momaha Bookshelf: Books starring dads Kids love it when their parents read to them. In honor of Father’s Day, Kendall Munch of the Omaha Public Library offers favorite selections with dads in lead roles.

DAD AND DAUGHTER BOOKS

DAD AND SON BOOKS

GENERAL DAD BOOKS

Spy Dad by Jukka Laajarinne

Made for Me by Zack Bush

You and Me, Me and You by Miguel Tanco

The Better Tree Fort by Jessica Scott Kerrin

My Dad and Me by Alyssa Satin Capucilli

Dad by My Side by Soosh

Lola Loves Stories by Anna McQuinn

Papasaurus by Stephan Lomp

My Dad Is Amazing by Sabrina Moyle

My Daddy by Eone

Alma and How She Got Her Name by Juana Martinez-Neal

I Want My Dad! by Tony Ross

Furqan’s First Flat Top by Robert Liu-Trujillo

Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

My Daddy Rules the World by Hope Anita Smith

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DIY TOOTH FAIRY ENVELOPE Lost tooth? Deliver it to the tooth fairy in this darling package.

TEXT, STYLING + PHOTOGRAPHY Heidi Thorson

WHAT YOU NEED 3 sheets felt fabric (2-3 colors) Momaha.com envelope template Scissors Embroidery thread Needle Hot glue 2 small buttons Fine black fabric marker

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INSTRUCTIONS 1. CUT FELT Download the envelope template from momaha.com. Print on card stock and use to outline shape on felt. Cut along the edges.

2. STITCH ON NAME TAG From sheet of light colored felt, cut a 1-inch by 2-inch rectangle to use as name tag. Stitch onto center of envelope. Hot glue small felt heart to top right. 3. HOT GLUE ENVELOPE Form the envelope pocket by hot glueing the edges of the flaps together. Start with the side flaps, then the bottom flap.

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4. ADD BUTTONS Hot glue one small button to outside of top flap and one to the back center of envelope. Tie string to top button and wrap around center button to hold together. 5. PUT YOUR NAME ON IT With the black fabric marker, add your child’s name to the tag on the front. Place the lost tooth inside the envelope and tuck it under bed pillow.

The Omaha World-Herald’s home and lifestyle magazine. To start your Sunday subscription, call 402-348-3363 or email circulationcustomerservice@owh.com inspiredlivingomaha.com

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SUMMER SKEWERS

These yummy desserts on a stick will be the talk of your next barbecue. TEXT + STYLING Chris Christen & Marjie Ducey PHOTOGRAPHY Heidi Thorson

Tastes just like pie but with no forks needed.

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CITRUS-GLAZED FRUIT KEBABS WITH HONEYYOGURT DIP

INSTRUCTIONS

SKEWERED CANTALOUPE INSTRUCTIONS 1 cantaloupe peeled, seeded and cubed ¼ cup butter ½ cup honey ¹∕3 cup fresh mint leaves,

¾ cup light brown sugar, packed

chopped

¼ cup fresh lime juice

6 skewers

¼ teaspoon cinnamon

1. Preheat grill for medium heat. 2. Thread the cantaloupe chunks onto skewers. 3. In a small saucepan, heat butter with honey until melted. Stir in mint. Brush cantaloupe with honey mixture. 4. Lightly

oil grate. Grill skewers 4 to 6 minutes, turning to brown all sides. Serve with remaining sauce. Add a heaping scoop of vanilla ice cream. Source: Allrecipes.com

1 cup fresh peach wedges 1 cup cubed fresh pineapple 1 cup cubed mango ½ cup fresh nectarine wedges 8 skewers 1 cup plain yogurt 3 tablespoons honey ½ teaspoon cinnamon 2 tablespoons chopped pistachios, for garnish

1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, whisk together brown sugar, lime juice and cinnamon until the sugar is completely dissolved. Remove from heat and set aside. 2. Thread the fruit alternately onto pre-soaked wooden skewers. Place the kebabs on a large platter and brush with half of the brown sugar glaze. 3. Preheat the grill to medium-low heat. Lightly oil the grill and cook the kebabs for 5 to 10 minutes, turning once and basting frequently with the reserved glaze. 4. Meanwhile, make the dip by stirring together the yogurt, honey and cinnamon in a medium bowl until combined. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. 5. Garnish the dipping sauce with the chopped pistachios just before serving. Source: Tara Ballantyne/Styleathome.com

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GRILLED STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE KEBABS INSTRUCTIONS 1 pint fresh strawberries ½ angel food cake, cubed 3 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk Whipped cream 8 skewers

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1. Soak skewers in water for 15 minutes; remove and pat dry. Spray grill rack with nonstick spray. Preheat to medium heat. 2. Cut angel food cake into 1½-inch cubes. Brush each cube lightly with sweetened condensed milk. (This keeps the cake from drying out and gives a

nice sweet crust on the outside.) Thread skewers with alternating strawberries and cake cubes. 3. Place on hot grill rack and turn every 30 seconds or so until all sides get grill marks. 4. Serve immediately with dipping cream. Source: tasteofhome.com


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Customized burgers – dressed just the way you love them – are all the rage. But that doesn’t have to mean tons of work for the head chef at your next backyard barbecue. Setting up a burger bar with a variety of patties, toppings and buns is a fun way to enjoy a cookout – for host and hungry guests alike.

BURGER BAR TEXT + STYLING Chris Christen & Marjie Ducey PHOTOGRAPHY Heidi Thorson

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FIRST THINGS FIRST 1. Arrange your burger bar in stations to promote easy traffic flow and prevent pileups. 2. Add a simple label beside any homemade toppings or unfamiliar items and where there’s a choice, such as between types of patties. 3. Keep platters easy to reach, and offer an ample supply of serving utensils, with a dedicated one for each offering. 4. Don’t let the burger bar stand for more than two hours — only one hour when temperatures soar. Set up in the shade to maintain freshness. Serve cool items on smaller platters, replenishing them as needed. Keep hot food hot so it stays out of the danger zone and holds bacteria at bay. 5. When the party starts, have guests order their patty and cheese combos from the grill master. Direct them to pick up a bun and grab their patty just as it comes off the grill, and then head back to the serving station to build their burgers. 6. Plan for leftovers. Crumble cooked burgers and add to casseroles, soups, pizzas, taco fillings and pasta sauces. Add excess savory toppings to stirfries, pizzas and pasta dishes, and convert cold toppings, including cheese, into salads or sandwich fillings. Grind leftover buns into fluffy breadcrumbs.

BUILD YOUR BURGER STEP 1 PICK A PATTY (OR TWO) There are so many options, whether you go homemade or store-bought. Beef is a sure bet. Think outside the box, too: Fish, turkey or chicken. And be sure to include a vegetarian option. If you’re whipping up your own patties, consider making them slider size so guests can sample two or three. Plan for two patties per adult and one patty or slider per child.

STEP 2 CHOOSE SOME CHEESE Cheese can take a burger to the next level. Serve varieties that melt easily: mozzarella, Swiss, blue cheese, soft goat cheese, brie, etc. Premium varieties will make burgers extra-special for true cheese lovers. Maximize melty goodness by popping the cheese on the patties during their last couple of minutes on the barbecue rather than having guests help themselves afterward.

STEP 3 WRAP IT UP Offer two or three types of buns. Lightly toast buns by placing them cut-side down on the grill for about 10 seconds to add a gentle caramelized note. Adding a smear of butter before toasting will help the bread crisp up and will contribute another layer of tasty goodness. Boston lettuce leaves and grilled portobello mushrooms make great alternative wrappers for guests who want to skip the bread.

STEP 4 ADD A SAVORY TOPPING Serve a selection of savory toppings, such as crisp bacon slices, sweet caramelized onions and tender grilled mushrooms, peppers and zucchini. Cut vegetables into thin slices or strips so they’re easy to pile on your patty. Not into savory? Try a grilled pineapple ring.

STEP 5 DRESS IT UP Punch up your condiment lineup with homemade toppings. Flavored mayos and tartarstyle burger sauces can be whipped up in a few minutes or even a day ahead. Homemade salsas and chutneys are crowd-pleasers, too. A typical family-size condiment container is more than enough for two dozen guests, but plan for an additional bottle of the classics for a larger group. SOURCE: sobeys.com

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CHEERS! Toast dad with a personalized root beer float bar TEXT + PHOTOGRAPHY Heather Winkel

Here's a Father's Day treat the whole family can enjoy: A root beer float bar – complete with custom bottle cap stir sticks in honor of Dad.

SERVING STATION ESSENTIALS

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Assorted root beer

Whole cherries for garnish

Vanilla ice cream

Ice bucket

Mason jars /serving glasses

Straws

Ice cream scoop

Serving spoons

Napkins

Bottle cap opener

Container for stir sticks


INSTRUCTIONS Bottle caps (1 per stir stick) Drill Wooden skewers Acrylic craft paint Small paint brush Hot glue

1. Collect enough bottle caps for each root beer float to be served. 2. Drill a single hole into the side of each cap to allow insertion of a round wooden kebab skewer. 3. Spread bottle caps on paper, top-sides up. 4. Using acrylic craft paint and a small paint brush, create a custom design for dad. 5. Allow paint to dry. 6. Assemble stir stick by sliding wooden skewer through drilled hole. Anchor with hot glue, if necessary. 7. Repeat this process until all caps are assembled. 8. Adorn your floats!

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FATHER TIME DIY clock has dad written all over it TEXT + PHOTOGRAPHY Heather Winkel CLOCK ART Rowan Winkel

Make sure dad is always on time with a DIY chalkboard clock that the kids can decorate in minutes.

INSTRUCTIONS Sponge brush Chalkboard paint 3/4-inch-thick clock movement kit Acrylic craft paint Small paint brush Chalk Spray-on fixative

1. Using a sponge brush, apply three coats of chalkboard paint to a round ž-inch-thick clock base available at a craft or hobby store. Let dry. 2. Remove hands from a ž-inch clock movement kit and decorate frontfacing sides using acrylic craft paint and a small paint brush. Let dry. 3. Assemble the clock movement according to kit instructions. 4. Have the kids decorate the face of the clock using chalk. Preserve the chalk sketch with a clear spray-on fixative. 5. Display clock where dad can see it when he wakes up on Father's Day.

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'FORE' THE LOVE OF GOLF

Here's your scorecard on the the best regional courses STORY Stu Pospisil PHOTOGRAPHY Courtesy of The Golf Club at Devil's Tower

W

hile the Midlands offer some of the best, affordable and varied golf courses in the nation, everyone can use a weekend getaway with the family (or a buddies’ trip, guys or gals). Chicago is only seven hours away from Omaha. Denver is only four hours from North Platte. On every compass point, there are golf destinations to explore. Starting with best-of lists from national golf publications, we’ve done homework on some popular driving-distance vacation spots and public-access courses in their area. Some courses are costlier than others, but many offer off-peak rates. Some have deals and facilities for youth golfers, too.

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TOPEKA/MANHATTAN, KANSAS Take a spin down U.S. 75 to Firekeeper north of Topeka, attached to a casino resort, and then over on Interstate 70 to brawny Colbert Hills in north Manhattan.

KANSAS CITY, KANSAS/ MISSOURI Tradition-rich, city-owned Swope Memorial is close to the Truman Sports Complex and the Plaza. Ironhorse in Leawood was fifth on Golf Magazine’s most recent list of top Kansas publicaccess courses. Prairie Highlands in Olathe is fifth on Golfweek’s list. Shoal Creek is easily accessible from Kansas City International Airport.

SIOUX FALLS, SOUTH DAKOTA/NORTHWEST IOWA Sioux Falls has three municipal courses now being managed by Lincoln’s Landscapes Unlimited, including 27-hole Elmwood and the championship layout of Prairie Green. Across the Big Sioux River from Sioux Falls, in northwest Iowa, are The Falls at Grand Falls casino resort and, closer to Sioux City, The Ridge in Sioux Center and Landsmeer at Orange City.

BRANSON, MISSOURI Big Cedar Lodge, host to the Champions Tour’s Legends of Golf, has Buffalo Ridge Springs, Mountain Top and the one-of-a-kind Top of the Rock ninehole par-3. Buffalo Ridge vies with nearby Branson Hills for top honors among Missouri courses. Side trip: To the Lake of the Ozarks for Old Kinderhook and the Lodge of Four Seasons.

AMES/DES MOINES, IOWA One must-play is off the table. Iowa’s consensus top-ranked course, The Harvester, is closed this year while being converted to a private club. Other top choices include the Tournament Club of Iowa at Polk City, west of Ankeny; Iowa State’s venerable Veenker Golf Course in Ames; and the mix of holes at 27-hole Willow Creek in West Des Moines. Side trip: Bos Landen at Pella, southeast of Des Moines.

IOWA CITY/QUAD CITIES Around Iowa City are Blue Top Ridge at Riverside, part of a casino resort south on U.S. 218, and Finkbine, home course for the Hawkeyes. Cross the Mississippi to play where the pros play, TPC Deere Run in Silvis, Illinois. Side trip: The General at Eagle Ridge Resort at Galena, Illinois, in the hills southeast of Dubuque, Iowa.

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA Pair the usual Black Hills attractions with one or more of these highly rated courses – Red Rock, Hart Ranch and Meadowbrook. On the way to Mount Rushmore are Red Rock, which blends prairie grass and ponderosa pines, and Hart Ranch, which has Spring Creek meandering through its foothill footprint. Meadowbrook has six holes with Rapid Creek in play and is the locals' longtime favorite. Side trip: The Golf Club at Devils Tower, across the state line in Hulett, Wyoming. A scenic private course, it offers daily and stayand-play packages to the public.

DENVER AREA Murphy Creek and CommonGround in Aurora offer unique experiences.

Prairie-style Murphy Creek hosted the 2008 U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship. CommonGround, a Tom Doak design in the middle of Aurora, is the home of the Colorado Golf Association and has a junior course. Riverdale in Brighton has 36 holes, including the Dunes Course that once hosted the Web.com Tour. Arrowhead, closer to the foothills in Littleton, plays among gigantic, tilted red rocks.

CHICAGOLAND So many public courses are in the area, but any list must include Cog Hill’s four courses in Lemont (south suburbs). Its No. 2 course, Ravines, will remind you of Quarry Oaks or Iron Horse for the terrain, and it won’t break the wallet. Play the No. 4, Dubsdread, to experience the challenges pros and national-level amateurs have encountered through the years. Forest Preserve Golf is 11 courses throughout Cook County. Joe Louis Golf Course in Riverdale (south suburbs) is the most affordable of the set. Oak Brook (central suburbs) is near the East-West Tollway with plenty of shopping and dining. Coming into the city on the tollway, the Highlands of Elgin includes nine holes in a quarry setting.

TWIN CITIES Seemingly with as many courses as lakes, the Minneapolis/St. Paul area is blessed with courses the likes of Rush Creek in Maple Grove, with a steep prime-time price, and the city-owned Chaska Town Course that has co-hosted the medal-play portion of the 2006 U.S. Amateur. The Links at Northfork is in the northern suburb of Ramsey and Prestwick is southeast of St. Paul.

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SWIM SUMMER IN TO

REGISTER NOW FOR SUMMER CAMP AND ONCE-A-WEEK LESSONS TWO WEEK CAMP SESSIONS STARTING JUNE 4TH ONCE-A-WEEK LESSONS AGES 6 MOS. & OLDER. MORNING, AFTERNOON, EVENING & SAT. MORNING

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#METOO MOVEMENT HELPS PARENTS START CONVERSATIONS WITH THEIR KIDS STORY Marjie Ducey

T

he spotlight on the #MeToo movement and others on TV and in social media has opened a window of opportunity for parents to broach the subject of sexual violence and harassment with their children. It’s a conversation that will help not just their kids, but their grandchildren, too, experts say. “It really enhances the opportunity,’’ says Dr. Jennifer Harsh, a medical family therapist and assistant professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. “Kids are learning about it at an early age, and parents now have a language they can use.’’ It’s a challenging topic because of the stigma surrounding sexual violence and boundaries. It’s hard to figure out what your child knows and how to address it at an age-appropriate level. But if you as a parent are feeling confused about what is appropriate, Harsh says, just imagine how your child feels. A good way to bring up the topic is to say, "I know this #MeToo movement has been in the news a lot lately. I wonder, what do you know about it? Can you teach me what you know?’’ It’s an opportunity to gently correct any misinformation and jointly explore areas in which you need more information. Plus, your child will get the information from you instead of a friend or on social media. Don’t wait for junior high or high school to begin the conversation. Jonathon Sikorski, an assistant professor and director for wellness education at UNMC, has two young daughters, and he’s already talking to the 4-year-old about boundaries. “If we’re wrestling around and I’m tickling her, even though she’s laughing, if she says stop, I’ll stop,’’ he says. “I’ll ask her, 'If someone doesn’t stop when you’re wrestling and playing, what will you do?' I will have her practice telling me.’’ “It’s really important kids know you are comfortable talking about these things. If you have these conversations, it’s part of the normal repertoire. It’s not a shameful thing.’’


A Summer of Discovery Discovery Days at Omaha Christian Academy

DR. JONATHON SIKORSKI

HARSH AND SIKORSKI OFFER THESE TIPS: • Tell your children at an early age that they are in charge of their own bodies. Nobody else is allowed to do anything with that body that they don’t want them to do. That covers the family member who likes to pinch cheeks or grab and hug, too. If your child doesn’t like it, let that person know, or better yet, have your child tell the person. It will give them a feeling of power over their own body. • Teach your children that they should respect the boundaries of other people as well. If your child seems confused, acknowledge that you have questions, too, and you’ll figure it out together. They’ll think that’s pretty normalizing, Harsh says, and they won’t feel so bad for not knowing. • If you broach the subject of harassment or violence at home, your child won’t be so afraid to discuss it with you or seek help if something happens to them. If they do tell you that someone is saying inappropriate things about them or touching them, do not blame them, Harsh says. “Believe the kid. That goes with sexual abuse as well. Believe the kid right off the bat. That is one of the most protective factors for future well-being.’’ Sikorski says it’s important that your children know they can come to you, that you will help them and they won’t be in trouble. • Modeling proper behavior at home is crucial, Harsh and Sikorski say. If a father or mother treats their partner with respect and values that partner, the more likely the children will do the same with their peers. When they grow up, they’ll be more likely to look for the same thing in a relationship and will also be more likely to talk with their children openly, too.

May 29 - Aug. 3, 2018 Ages 3 - 12

An exciting summer filled with Christ-centered instruction, field trips, outdoor fun, creative projects, swimming, new friends and more. 2093229-01

DR. JENNIFER HARSH

CALL TO ENROLL YOUR CHILD TODAY! 402-399-9565 / omahachristianacademy.org

Aviation, Engineering, Robotics, Science, & Technology REGISTRATION OPEN! W W W. S A C M U S E U M . O R G / C A M P S

Harsh says she knows the issue can be difficult to discuss, but it’s something that shouldn’t be ignored. “It’s important to talk openly about these topics. We can’t pretend they aren’t there.’’ 2092992-01

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SPONSORED FEATURE // YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

YMCA Team sports build character, skills with long-term benefits PHOTO COURTESY OF YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

TEXT Mike Watkins

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outh sports have more payoffs than meet the eye, says Tom Stubby, a sports director for YMCA of Greater Omaha. And oftentimes, the impact is lifelong. “Kids participating in sports get the physical activity they need for a healthy lifestyle that can continue as they grow older,” says Stubby, who oversees sports programs at the Armbrust YMCA. “They also learn about teamwork and sharing, which are life skills as well. Another benefit is the friendships that are formed from playing on a team.” While summer sports are in full swing, Stubby and his YMCA counterparts are gearing up for fall sports signups at all YMCA locations. At Armbrust YMCA on South 168th Street, the hot sports are soccer (ages 3 through eighth grade), volleyball (first through eighth grades) and flag football (kindergarten through eighth grades). The same sports are offered in the spring, and according to Stubby, the players who continue from season to season stay consistent and strong.

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“During the summer, we offer baseball/ softball and over the winter we have basketball. Several players are with us year-round, which gives them a great athletic base and provides their bodies with different activities to grow and become stronger,” he says. Kyle Gay, sports director at the Charles E. Lakin YMCA and Mills County YMCA, believes a child’s (and a family’s) positive experience with sports begins with the coach. Because YMCA coaches are volunteers – and often parents themselves – the organization spends a lot of time and energy on coach development, he says. Resources and meetings help new coaches feel comfortable and set them up to be successful. That, in turn, helps make the child’s experience successful. “The goal is to have our coaches keep winning in perspective and focus more on developing the fundamentals that make athletes more successful in the long run,” he says. Gay and Stubby say that kids ultimately benefit from sports in everyday life.

“Kids learn much more than just sports. They learn lifelong skills as well as teamwork, problem solving, social skills and self-esteem all while becoming healthier,” Gay says. “It’s truly a win-win for everyone involved.” Kids also benefit from the many relationships they build, especially among teammates. And everyone gets the opportunity to play. No one is left out because of ability or skill level. “The kids enjoy playing with their friends and classmates,” he says. “Parents enjoy that their kids get to play. At the YMCA, we make sure each child participates in half of every game. This way, the kids don’t have to worry about sitting on the bench each game.” To register for fall sports, stop by your local YMCA or visit the YMCA’s website, www.metroymca.org. Registration runs June 25 though July 14. Season play begins Aug. 25.


THE FALL SEASON BEGINS AUGUST 25 (OCTOBER 27 FOR BASKETBALL)

WHERE ALL PLAYERS ARE MOST VALUABLE! • • • YMCA FALL YOUTH SPORTS • • • VOLLEYBALL • SOCCER • FLAG FOOTBALL • BASKETBALL Register online or at any YMCA location June 25-July 14 (Basketball registration opens August 27)

YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA • www.metroymca.org 2093227-01

2093239-01

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GET ORGANIZED // AMY TOKOS Amy Tokos is a Certified Professional Organizer and the owner of Freshly Organized. You can find more organizing tips at freshlyorganized.com.

SMART MOVE

Moving to a new house is a big transition for any family. Here's how to approach the task in five organized stages. STAGE #1: THINKING ABOUT IT Start paying close attention to your closets, cupboards, drawers and other storage areas. Items in these spaces typically can be thinned out, one space at a time, over several weeks. As you clean out each area, assess what the items will look like in five or 10 years, whether they'll still be in storage, and if they hold any sentimental value. Your answers will help you determine what to keep and what to pack, toss, recycle or give away.

STAGE #2: SELLING THE HOUSE Cluttered houses don’t sell as well as streamlined homes. Shift your focus to the items that aren’t behind doors. Start clearing your counters and shelves; the tidier your spaces are, the more functional your home will appear to a prospective buyer. Get an outside opinion on what would help make your home show well.

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STAGE #3: PACKING

STAGE #4: MOVING DAY

You’ve sold the house; and it’s time to pack. Start a few weeks before the move by packing items you don’t use all the time. Storage spaces and linen closets are good starting points. If you pack a weekend or two and then a few boxes every day, it will go fairly smooth. Pack heavy items in small boxes and light items in large boxes. Label the boxes with the contents and their location in the new house. You can also create a system of priority. The ABC method works well. "A" boxes are packed last and opened first; "C" boxes get packed first and unpacked last. As moving day approaches, set aside time to pack your final "A" items. Mark your "A" items so they are easy to find. I like to put a big X on them with blue painter's tape. You and the movers won’t be able to miss that. On the last day, pack an overnight bag with clothes, medicine, toilet paper and toiletries. The day before the move, order groceries online for pickup that evening or the following morning. Delegate the task to a friend.

You’ll save a lot of time and money by being prepared when the movers arrive. Have all the boxes ready and all the furniture disassembled. Review your system with the movers. This will help ensure that things land in the right space. Plan to feed family and friends who help. The night before a move, you won’t have much in the house, so keep it simple and use paper products. Be sure to make accommodations for young children and pets on moving day to keep them out of the way.

STAGE #5: UNPACKING After your new space is cleaned, you can start unpacking. Deciding where to put items is the biggest challenge of moving into a new home. Two rules: Keep like items together and place items near point of use. Start with the items in the "A" boxes. Next, stage all your home décor items in one area; this will help you see your options for decorating various spaces.


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Profile for Omaha World-Herald

Momaha Magazine - June 2018  

Monthly magazine for parents published by the Omaha World-Herald in conjunction with its blog Momaha.com

Momaha Magazine - June 2018  

Monthly magazine for parents published by the Omaha World-Herald in conjunction with its blog Momaha.com