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momaha.com

2018-2019

VOLUME 9 · ISSUE 8 AUGUST

Caterpillar

Member Shows

THE

Very Hungry

&

R.L. Stine’s

THE MUSICAL

Other Eric Carle Favorites

The Phantom of the Auditorium

the

Return to

PRESEASON CHECKLIST Getting your athlete ready to play

Doll Maker'

GIFT

Winnie thePooh Dragons Love Tacos 

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RoALD DAHL's

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Premium Show

$

SUMMER SEND-OFF

105

THE MUSICAL Premium Show

THAT’S 28 TICKETS!

BITTERSWEET?

(Additional packages available for larger families.)

Membership Mem mbeership is the best way to enjoy everything ng The Rose has tto o offer. offer Rose members receive access to seven regular season shows for one low price. That’s seven times to stop and laugh together with your child. Seven times to experience the awe and wonder of theater. Seven times to make memories together as a family — memories that will last a lifetime.

Memberships on sale now.

JOIN TODAY! 2001 Farnam Street  (402) 345-4849  www.rosetheater.org 2100637-01

NO, BERRY SWEET!

COOL CARPOOL Need-to-know car-cleaning hacks

2018


Enjoy an afternoon of jumping and playing with your family at the Boys Town Pediatrics Healthy Family Field Day.

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 Safety education for all ages  Mental health resources

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THE BEST PLACE FOR KIDS. Grace, age 10 Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Her IV pole in one hand, a leash in the other. That’s how Grace navigated chemotherapy – with Sven, our facility dog, by her side. An energetic fourth grader, Grace is in remission now. When she comes back for her check-ups, guess who sits and stays for a while…

Visit ChildrensOmaha.org for more information on how we (and our reassuring retriever) can help your child. For a pediatrician, family physician or pediatric specialist, call 1.800.833.3100. 2093713-01

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CHECK OUT Momaha.com & the Momaha Newsletter for more information on ways to keep your child on track over the summer months. PARENT TESTIMONIAL: “From day one, all the staff have truly cared about our child’s learning. The staff have even included siblings in the learning too. My child enjoys going and learning!” - Marybeth Korver Huntington parent

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PHOTO: HEIDI HOFFMAN

CONTENTS

6

REAL MOMS + ADVICE

SEASONAL

ON THE COVER

8 Editor’s Column 10 On Our Radar 12 Momaha Bookshelf 25 Be Well 30 Back-to-School Routine 32 Get Organized

22 Fro-Yo Granola Bites 23 Watermelon Milkshake 24 DIY Dreamcatcher 26 DIY Pencil Holder 27 Pencil Wafers

16 Perfect Popsicles

SPONSORED FEATURES 14 YMCA of Greater Omaha 20 Fontenelle Forest 28 The Rose Theater


momaha where moms connect

VOLUME 9 . ISSUE 8 . AUGUST 2018 editor in chief CHRIS CHRISTEN chris.christen@owh.com 402-444-1094

creative director + designer HEIDI HOFFMAN hhoffman@owh.com 402-444-1351

assistant editor MARJIE DUCEY marjie.ducey@owh.com 402-444-1034

copy editor SHELLEY LARSEN shelley.larsen@owh.com 402-444-1143

momaha.com editor ASHLEE COFFEY ashlee.coffey@owh.com 402-444-1075

REGISTER NOW FOR SWIM LESSONS ONCE-A WEEK LESSONS MORNING, AFTERNOON, EVENING & SAT. MORNING TIMESLOTS AVAILABLE

production coordinator PAT R I C I A “ M U R P H Y ” B E N O I T

content contributors AMY TOKOS M I K E W AT K I N S

cover photo HEIDI HOFFMAN

account manager L AURE N KRUGE R lauren.kruger@owh.com 402-444-1261

account executive E M I LY M A R T I N emily.martin@owh.com 402-444-1411

account executive MICHAEL MEDRANO michael.medrano@owh.com 402-444-1209 Momaha Magazine is a monthly publication of the Omaha World-Herald, 1314 Douglas St., Suite 700, Omaha, NE 68102. Momaha is a registered trademark, and all content is copyright 2018 by the Omaha World-Herald. All rights reserved. The opinions and perspectives published herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as those of Momaha Magazine.

402-932-2030 LittleWavesFamilySwimSchool.com 7


MOMAHA.COM EDITOR // ASHLEE COFFEY Wife to Kevin Coffey, music critic for the Omaha World-Herald. Mom to Sam and Elliott. Follow her on Twitter: @AshleeCoffeyOWH

FROM BLISS TO CHAOS

A

h, August — the back-to-school month. Parents and kids are scrambling to enjoy every last second of summer vacation. There are probably last-minute vacations scheduled, lots of late nights catching fireflies or having s’mores by the fire, and lazy mornings lounging in pajamas and watching cartoons. It’s pure summer bliss. But come that first week of school, those late nights and lazy mornings will come to a halt, unless it’s the weekend. So consider

establishing a routine now. That way, your first week back isn’t complete chaos mixed with breakdowns and tears. It won’t be easy. The kids will probably protest, but you’ll thank yourself later. Find tips for getting that routine down before school starts, page 30. If you’re running out of new things to do as summer winds down, or find yourself housebound on a rainy day, we’ve got you covered with some school-themed crafts your kids will love. You will, too. It’s a win-win. Good luck!

GET SOCIAL FACEBOOK /momahacom

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TWITTER @momaha_owh PINTEREST /momahaowh INSTAGRAM /momaha_owh


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ON OUR RADAR // EDITOR’S PICKS New and Momaha-tested too!

THINGS TO TRY THIS MONTH

DRESS YOUR DESK PICK A HOUSE A Harry Potter backpack is just the ticket for your first day of school. Each pack is sturdily constructed of canvas with a zipper closure, a handle and adjustable straps, silver and nickel finishes on the hardware and lots of room. Ravenclaw, Gryffindor, Hufflepuff and Slytherin available. $79.50, pbteen.com

You can never have too many cat items and this sticky note holder is just the thing for a catcrazy student. Post-it Note paper is from certified, renewable and responsibly managed forests. Refills are available. $8, amazon.com

ERASE MISTAKES

ADD SOME FLAIR Own the most fashionable locker in school with this metallic gold chandelier. The cordless light fixture requires three AAA batteries, but it will provide plenty of LED light. A strong magnet keeps it in place.. Locker bling is the thing, so be sure to look for other fun accessories while you’re shopping for those backto-school necessities. $12, Target

WALK IN STYLE Tennis shoes are flowing into the Finish Line at Oak View Mall, just in time for the first day of school. Store manager Jayson Canton says there’s more than one popular shoe this fall. Check out the Air Max 270 from Nike, the Air Jordan Mid 1 Retro, the Tubular Shadows and the Swift Run by Adidas.

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Succulents are so popular! And now you have your own Prickly Pals Cactus Erasers. These three adorable buddies are ready to erase any of your pencil-made mistakes. You can even take them apart and put them back together. $4.95, papersource.com


Sarah has her favorites,

and now you can too with the new Omaha Dines app!

When a new review or story is posted, add the article to your favorites as an easy reminder to try the dish or restaurant in the future.

Read Sarah Baker Hansen’s latest review or be the first to know about new restaurant openings. Omaha Dines gives you easy access to Food Prowl, our best-of-Omaha series. Craving a burger, a waffle, a bloody Mary or a solid patio? The Omaha Dines app can help you sort through your options. Mark your favorites as a reference for when you have time to try the establishment yourself.

A one-of-a-kind website, newsletter and app for local dining news and reviews. 2105440-01

Download l d the h O Omaha h Dines app

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MOMAHA BOOKSHELF Hot off the presses and worthy of your home library COMPILED by Momaha Magazine

THE SECRET LIFE OF SQUIRRELS: BACK TO SCHOOL

Nancy Rose Rosie and Mr. Peanuts aren’t gathering nuts for winter. Rosie is a teacher, and Mr. Peanuts is helping her get ready for a new school year. The author makes miniature props (think school bus, podium, classroom furniture), and then photographs the squirrels as they explore them during their regular visit to her bird feeders. She gets the squirrels to “pose” by hiding peanuts in and around props. All ages.

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PEANUT BUTTER’S FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL

Terry Border Get ready for your child’s first day of school with Peanut Butter. He’ll have a great day at his new school because he goes with his friends, Hamburger, Cupcake, Egg, Meatball, French Fries, Soup and of course, Jelly. Penguin Young Readers series, Level 2. Ages 4 to 8.

PEEPS AT SCHOOL

Andrea PosnerSanchez The Peeps chicks and bunnies spend the day at school together in this Step Into Reading Level 1 book. Big type and easy words. For children who know the alphabet and are eager to begin reading on their own. Ages 4 to 6.

TWO DOGS IN A TRENCH COAT GO TO SCHOOL

Julie Falatko Sassy and Waldo are good dogs who spend the day keeping their house safe. But every day their boy, Stewart, comes home from this place called school smelling like anxiety and loose-leaf paper. So they decide to save Stewart and that takes some creativity, because they don’t let dogs into school. They put on an old trench coat, and now everyone at Bea Arthur Elementary thinks they are a new student named Salty from Liver, Ohio. And they love school. Ages 8 to 12.

WE DON’T EAT OUR CLASSMATES!

Ryan T. Higgins It’s the first day of school for Penelope Rex, and she can’t wait to meet her classmates. But it’s hard to make human friends when they’re so darn delicious! That is, until Penelope gets a taste of her own medicine and finds she may not be at the top of the food chain after all. And who doesn’t want to read about a backpack that can carry 300 sandwiches! Recommended for any child who is nervous about starting school.


BACK TO

L O O H SC

MAKE THE GRADE!

Access these and other free resources using your Omaha Public Library card! Visit omahalibrary.org and click on Resource Center.

Live, personalized homework help (in Spanish or English) every day from 2 p.m. to midnight on subjects including math, science, English and more!

              other resources available to browse by topic area or keyword search.

Read-along stories, puzzles and games, and language learning for kids.

       

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Giving joy. One day at a time. Specialized services, support, care and therapy for exceptional Omaha children and their families.

www.crccomaha.org 13


SPONSORED FEATURE // YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

SCORE!

YMCA coaches: Youth sports teach fundamentals, but that’s not the biggest win TEXT Mike Watkins

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PHOTO COURTESY OF YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

S

ure, youth sports teach the fundamentals. But that’s not the biggest win for young athletes. “When I think of youth sports, I think of the bigger picture,” says Kyle Gay, youth sports director at the Charles E. Lakin YMCA and Mills County YMCA. Beyond the fundamentals, he says, kids learn important life skills — problem-solving, teamwork, responsibility, respect and honesty. “They’re developing their handeye coordination while boosting their self-esteem, coming out of their shells, reducing stress and improving their overall health,” Gay says. “Sports can even help kids perform better academically and behave better. All of these benefits are the true win of youth sports.” And when autumn rolls around, the enthusiasm builds. “Fall sports just have a special feel to them,” says George Tintera, youth sports director at the Maple Street YMCA. “I cannot put my finger on the reason, but with kids going back to school and the weather beginning to change, there is just an excitement and atmosphere that goes along with fall sports.” While there are several sports opportunities for kids and families in the community, the YMCA’s sports programs differ. Coaches, he explains, are required to play each child at least 50 percent of the game – meaning every child gets a chance to play and learn. “Our focus is not about winning or losing but rather about learning the sport, having the opportunity to be part of a team, making friends and, most importantly, having fun,” says

Tintera, who will oversee flag football, soccer and volleyball at the Maple Street YMCA from Aug. 25 to Oct. 13. The flag football leagues are for youths in kindergarten through eighth grade. Soccer leagues are for children ages 3 through eighth grade, and volleyball league play is for firstthrough eighth-graders. All leagues are recreational, although a competitive volleyball league is offered for fifth-graders and older. “Kids in early elementary (grades) are learning that if they don’t practice and put in the time, it’s hard to improve,” says Cole Buffington, sports director at Twin Rivers YMCA in Valley. “A majority of the time, these kids get to see how much they’ve improved and get a sense of accomplishment.” The Twin Rivers YMCA offers soccer for preschoolers through kindergartners as well as volleyball for grades first through eight. A competitive

volleyball league is available for fifththrough eighth-graders. “These games may not be the Super Bowl or a national championship game, but they’re key moments in a child’s life as they learn about winning and losing, how to handle adversity, and how to work with others,” Buffington says. In addition to recreational leagues, the YMCA offers a clinic-style fundamentals program in the fall. Sessions meet weekly and participants learn basic skills for a specific sport. For more information, call or stop by a YMCA near you or visit www.metroymca.org. The YMCA’s open registration period for fall youth sports has passed, but it’s still possible to register your child (a late fee applies). Team placement is based on availability and is not guaranteed.


SHOOT & SCORE! YMCA Fall Youth Basketball Sign up for YMCA Fall Youth Basketball August 27-September 15! Teams available for kids 3 years-12th grade. The season begins October 27. Sign up online or at your Y location.

YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA • www.metroymca.org

2104151-01

SUMMER CAMPS ENROLLING NOW MAKE THEIR SUMMERS ELECTRIFYING 402-691-8875 Omaha@SchoolofRock.com www.schoolofrock.com 2076603-01

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SUMMER IS SERVED COOL DOWN WITH 5 PERFECT POPSICLES STYLING + RECIPES + PHOTOGRAPHY Heidi Hoffman

BLUEBERRY SMOOTHIE POPS Blueberries, yogurt, honey

In a food processor, purée 1 cup blueberries. Place blueberry purée in a blender and add 1 cup yogurt and 3 tablespoons honey. Blend until creamy. Pour into popsicle molds and freeze.

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LIME CREAMSICLES

Lime juice, milk, sweetened condensed milk In a blender, add Âź cup fresh squeezed lime juice, 2 cups milk and 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk. Blend together until smooth. Pour into popsicle molds. Freeze and serve.

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RASPBERRY PEACH YOGURT POPS Peaches, raspberries, vanilla yogurt, honey

Dice 1 cup peaches. Purée ¼ cup raspberries. In a medium size bowl, stir together 2 cups vanilla yogurt and 2 tablespoons honey. Fold in diced peaches and raspberry purée. Pour into popsicle molds and freeze.

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GUMMY BEAR POPSICLES Gummy bears, Sprite

Fill popsicle molds half way with gummy bears. Add Sprite. Freeze and serve.

STRAWBERRY LEMONADE Strawberries, lemonade

Pour boxed lemonade into popsicle molds. Add sliced strawberries and freeze.

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SPONSORED FEATURE // FONTENELLE FOREST

Into the woods Too hot and humid? High-tail it to Fontenelle Forest for a cool indoor-outdoor adventure TEXT Mike Watkins PHOTOGRAPHY Courtesy of Fontenelle Forest

W

hen temperatures and humidity soar, head for Bellevue's perennial outdoor paradise, Fontenelle Forest. The 2,000-acre nature center has 26 miles of trails through cool forests, grasslands and marshes on the Nebraska side of the Missouri River. Indoors, you'll find a variety of interactive exhibits for all ages, fun animal encounters and special programming. Three highlights the whole family can enjoy:

CANOE THE GREAT MARSH It's easy and fun to canoe the Great Marsh. "This guided trip is great for everyone,” from first-timer to seasoned pro, says Molly Mullen, marketing and events manager. Choose sunrise, full moon or midday canoe trips. The cost is $5 for members and $15 for nonmembers. Each wetlands excursion is limited to 16 people, ages 7 and older, and pre-registration is necessary. RUN, JUMP AND CLIMB AT ACORN ACRES Almost every kid can fall in love with digging holes, making mud pies and building with sticks and logs. But who wants to mess up their own yard? Acorn Acres is an area where children can dig, jump off logs, explore a tree house, play wooden xylophones and a match games – all under the canopy of the forest. “No matter the weather, there are always kids discovering something new in this play area right outside the Nature Center,” Mullen says. DODGE THE HEAT, RAIN AND SNOW IN HABITAT HOLLOW

The weather is always perfect in Habitat Hollow. “Kids can use the indoor jungle gym, play nature games and view the animals on display – from turtles to snakes to fish,” Mullen says. “They can dress up in animal costumes and do a puppet show as well as other fun, playful activities regardless of what the weather is like outside.” Monday through Thursday mornings, adults and kids can make crafts and go on short hikes in the drop-in Mud Pies program in Habitat Hollow. Learn more about all of these activities and adventures at www.fontenelleforest.org.

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Coming Soon :

BALD EAGLE

THE RAPTOR WOODLAND REFUGE AT FONTENELLE FOREST JUST ADDED THE CHIP DAVIS EAGLE MEW. A BALD EAGLE WILL SOON CALL THE REFUGE ‘HOME.’ FOLLOW UPDATES ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE, AND COME SEE HER IN PERSON WHEN SHE MOVES IN! OPEN DAILY FROM 8-5

WWW.FONTENELLEFOREST.ORG 2101970-02

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EASY FRO-YO GRANOLA BITES PHOTOGRAPHY + STYLING Heidi Hoffman

INSTRUCTIONS • 1 bag honey granola crumbles • Mixed Berry yogurt • Fresh berries—blueberries, raspberries, blackberries • Mini muffin tin • Mini muffin tin liners

1. Place a liner in each cup of your minimuffin tin. 2. Drop 1-2 tablespoons crushed granola bits into the lined muffin-tin cups -- just enough to cover the bottom. 3. Add yogurt to each cup, spreading lightly so the granola in the cup is covered completely. Fill until cups are three-quarters full. TIP: Use a plastic piping bag for mess-free filling. 4. Top each cup with one, two or three fresh berries. 5. Freeze until yogurt is firm, about 1 to 3 hours. Store in a zip-top freezer bag for easy grab-and-go access. SOURCE: bettycrocker.com

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WATERMELON COCONUT MILKSHAKE SIMPLE, SWEET AND FAR MORE HEALTHY THAN YOUR AVERAGE FROSTY PHOTOGRAPHY + STYLING Heidi Hoffman

INSTRUCTIONS 1 cup frozen seedless watermelon chunks 1 cup boxed coconut milk 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract Mini dark chocolate chips (optional) Coconut flakes (optional)

1. Cut one seedless watermelon into chunks. Place cubes on parchment paper and freeze. 2. Add frozen watermelon chunks, milk, maple syrup and vanilla extract to a blender. Blend until you have a smooth but thick consistency. 3. Serve immediately. Optional: top with coconut flakes or mini dark chocolate chips. SOURCE: cooknourishbliss.com

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DIY WALL DECORATION YARN SUBS FOR FEATHERS IN THIS MODERN DREAMCATCHER STYLING + PHOTOGRAPHY Heidi Hoffman

INSTRUCTIONS • 12-inch macramé ring • White yarn • Wooden beads • Toothpick

1. Start with your first piece of yarn by tying and knotting it on the top of your ring. TIP: Use tape to hold top in place and use long pieces of yarn (2-3 feet) so that you can trim as needed. 2. Tightly tie and knot the other end of the yarn to the bottom of your ring. If you’re having trouble making it tight, tie it a little higher than where you want to place it and slide the yarn down once knotted. 3. Repeat step 2 as many times as you wish to create your own pattern. 4. Once you’re done tying all your yarn, trim the ends near the top knots. 5. Hang your ring on a wall, eye the yarn lengths and carefully trim them to hang equally on each side. 6. Attach your beads. TIP: If your yarn isn’t going through your bead holes easily, use a toothpick to push it through. Gently tie each bead on before knotting, then step back and eye how they're handing. Adjust as necessary.. 7. To finish, tie a small loop of yarn to the top of the hoop for hanging. SOURCE: almostmakesperfect.com

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PRESEASON CONDITIONING: 6 STEPS TO HELP YOUR YOUNG ATHLETE BE READY FOR SCHOOL SPORTS STORY Marjie Ducey

S

chool starts in a few weeks and that means most sports activities, too. There are all kinds of benefits to playing a sport or doing another extracurricular activity at school. It’s a great way to meet other students and be a part of something bigger than one's self. If your child is attending a new school or wants to play a sport for the first time, contact the athletic department before school starts. There are forms to fill out and other steps to tackle before fall sports begin. But making a team can be as much about attitude as it is about physical preparedness, says Stephen Eubanks, supervisor of athletics for the Omaha Public Schools. “Preparation, experience, determination, skill and hard work help all students achieve their goals.’ He offers these tips if you have a child who hopes to make a team this fall.

GET MOVING. It will be rough going for any student who shows up for the first day of practice out of shape. “Students who are in good physical condition may have an advantage over those students

who are not in shape,’’ Eubanks says. Still, he says, it’s never too late to get involved.

DO THE WORKOUTS . Most if not all high schools provide general conditioning/weight training/open gym opportunities for potential student-athletes during the summer months. Club and YMCA programs are a good way for younger athletes to play during the summer. COMPLETE THE FORMS. Each school's athletic department requires consent forms for practices and tryouts. Athletes must provide proof they’ve undergone a preseason physical screening exam. OPS parents must also sign a release form for their child to participate and a head injury-concussion acknowledgment form. “The athletic forms ensure that all student-athletes have passed a physical examination, have health insurance and understand the potential risks associated with participation in athletics,’’ Eubanks says.

GET A PHYSICAL. Many area physicians work with OPS high schools to provide athletic

physical exams for studentathletes, Eubanks says. Contact the athletic department for more information. “We also encourage many of our families to schedule appointments for sport physicals at our SchoolBased Health Centers located at Belvedere Elementary, Indian Hill Elementary, Kellom Elementary, Liberty Elementary, Spring Lake Elementary, King Science Magnet Middle, Bryan High and Northwest High.

START WITH THE RIGHT GEAR. Comfortable socks and footwear are essential; blisters and sore feet can halt an athlete's progress. It is also important to eat healthy, stay hydrated (bring a water bottle) and get lots of rest between practices. A duffel bag with dry clothes (shirt/ shorts/socks) and a few healthy snacks can come in handy.

REMEMBER: The coach makes the call. Playing time and selection of teams are the responsibilities of the coaches. OPS Athletics provides general guidelines and best practices for team selection and individual playing time. However, it is ultimately a coach's decision.

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DIY PENCIL HOLDER STYLING + PHOTOGRAPHY Heidi Hoffman

INSTRUCTIONS • Air-dry clay • Pencils • Box cutter or large blade • Optional: Paint or Sharpie markers

1. Start by rolling a large piece of clay into a ball. 2. Flatten the ball into a dome. You are going to cut away at this later, so make it a little bigger than you think you might need. 3. Start pushing pencils into the ball. TIP: Leave the pencils in as you place them to make sure the holes do not cross. 4. Wiggle and twist pencils to make make each hole a bit larger, then remove the pencils. 5. With a sharp knife, cut away chunks of clay at random angles to create a geometric shape (you should have no rounded edges). Clear pencil holes of any excess clay and let dry. 6. Once clay is dry, paint as desired (optional). Add your pencils and enjoy! SOURCE: linesacross.com

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PENCIL COOKIES PHOTOGRAPHY + STYLING Heidi Hoffman

INSTRUCTIONS • Wax paper • White chocolate candy melts • Pink food coloring • Vanilla sugar wafer cookies • Mini chocolate chips

1. Cover table with wax paper. Use a knife to cut away the corners of one end of each wafer to resemble a pencil point. 2. In a small bowl, melt half of the white chocolate candy melts. Add a drop of pink food coloring and mix together. 3. Put pink-colored white chocolate into a small piping bag and pipe a ½-inch rectangle on top of each wafer, starting at the flat end (opposite the point

cut in step 1). This creates the "eraser." 4. In a small bowl, melt the remainder of the white chocolate candy melts. Place into small piping bag and pipe a ½-inch triangle on top of each wafer, starting at the pointed end. 5. Add one mini chocolate chip to the tip of the triangle to complete your "pencil." 6. Let the chocolate harden (about 1-2 hours) and enjoy! SOURCE: shakentogetherlife.com

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SPONSORED FEATURE // THE ROSE THEATER

family date nights For only $4 per person!

I

t can be tough finding an affordable way to spend quality time with your family. Until now. For less than $4 per person per show, a membership to the Rose Theater, Omaha's only performing arts venue for young people, gives families the opportunity to see seven live shows in the 2018-19 season. The Rose shines a spotlight on stories of courage and personal adventure with seven hour-long main stage shows and two premium main stage shows that run about two hours with an intermission. The Rose’s First Stage program for very young children returns with two interactive shows performed on the theater’s smaller Hitchcock Stage. Building on more than 70 years of inspiring a love of theater in young people, The Rose’s new season brings audiences along on journeys with characters who push beyond their own limits, challenge the world around them, face their fears and succeed despite adversity. In addition, recent upgrades to the theater’s lighting and sound system will make the theater-going experience even more enjoyable.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ROSE THEATER

Here are the seven shows included in a Rose membership: 1. "Judy Moody & Stink: The Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Treasure Hunt" 2. "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" 3. "Goosebumps: The Musical – The Phantom of the Auditorium" 4. "Return to Niobrara" 5. "The Doll Maker’s Gift" 6. "Winnie the Pooh" 7. "Dragons Love Tacos" In addition, with a season membership families can add on tickets to see The Rose’s two premium shows and First Stage shows for very young children. The premium shows − "Elf the Musical" and Roald Dahl’s "Matilda" − immerse larger-than-life characters into whole new environments for a theater experience that is both hysterical and moving. Two classic children’s tales − "The Little Engine That Could" and "Thumbelina" − introduce children to the world of theater. “Studies show time after time that young people who attend live theater performances show greater empathy; they are better at understanding what other people think and feel,” says Rose Artistic Director Matthew Gutschick.

“What a wonderful gift to give to your children, particularly in this day and age.'' Together, the nine mainstage shows in the 2018-19 season introduce topics such as understanding others, persistence, community, exploration, environmentalism, heritage and multiculturalism. “These are all stories about characters that are trying to gain access to or mastery of the rules of a specific community, oftentimes one that is not naturally their own,” Gutschick says. “That’s really an emergent theme that links these shows together and shares an important message with our community.” The Rose’s seven regular-season main stage shows are included in a family membership that provides 4 tickets to each show for only $105. That's less than $4 per person (nonmembers pay $20 per ticket per show). Tickets for the First Stage series shows held on The Rose’s Hitchcock Stage are $12. Tickets to The Rose’s two premium shows, "Elf the Musical" and Roald Dahl’s "Matilda," are $27 main floor, $22 balcony. Rose members receive a $7 discount off the price of premium event tickets and $2 off the price of the First Stage series. Learn more at www.rosetheater.org.


ACTING  DANCE  VOICE  MUSICAL THEATER Omaha’s longest-running theater arts education program

Ages 3-18 Classes taught by professional artists Year-long & short-term classes Many performance opportunities 3 Convenient locations throughout Omaha

Be a

kid!

REGISTER TODAY! (402) 345-4849 www.rosetheater.org

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E M I T E R O M ’ S SPEND

W ITH YO U R KIDS

Quality time has never been more fun. Grab your sleeping bags and get ready to spend the night at Wildlife Safari Park for a wild adventure and so much s’more!

VISIT WILDLIFESAFARIPARK.COM TO BOOK YOUR STAY TODAY.

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SCHOOL PREP Don't wait until the last minute to get back into your school routine

P

arents often hear about the importance of establishing a bedtime routine a week or so before school begins. Kim Dickhut, a sixth-grade teacher at Swanson Elementary, says it’s not just bedtimes that need to be addressed as opening day nears. Dickhut, a winner of Westside Community Schools’ Schrager Distinguished Teaching Award, thinks that making your bed and eating breakfast are just as crucial. “It’s having a routine,’’ she says. “It’s so very important, especially as you get ready to go back to school.’’ Many of Dickhut’s students struggle in those first days of classes, unused to going to bed early and rising early. Dickhut recommends that if you’ve been letting your children sleep in, at least three weeks before school starts begin to ease them in to the same routine they’ll face during the school year. By a week before the opening bell, they should be going to bed and getting up just like school has already begun. “You don’t end up having the battle to get them up then,’’ she says. “You’ve set the routine.’’ Some ideas about that routine: • Sure, an earlier bedtime is very important. But don’t forget some reading time before the lights go out. Students often tell Dickhut that they plan to avoid books over the summer. That leads to learning loss and can even affect

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STORY Marjie Ducey

the level of income they earn as an adult, studies have shown. So if they haven’t been reading the past few months, get your children started immediately, even if it’s comics or magazines. She recommends at least 30 to 60 minutes of reading daily. “It’s critical to setting up the students for success,’’ Dickhut says. • Dickhut is a big fan of the book by Admiral William H. McRaven, “Make Your Bed: Little Things that Can Change Your Life and Maybe the World.’’ Very few of her students do, Dickhut says. But straightening your covers each morning creates a sense of discipline, she says, and sets the tone for the day. “It does create a sense of satisfaction, even in young children, that they have participated in something that is important in your home and they have accomplished on their own.’’ • Because of her children’s crazy schedules, breakfast was the only meal they could eat together. It’s good to have that time together because it creates a sense of community, Dickhut says. It’s also a time for children to learn how to communicate without technology getting in the way. Breakfast also provides the fuel they need to do well in school. “That makes a huge difference in their readiness for learning.’’ • Take some time off as a family before things shift into high

gear. Vacations, no matter how far or how short, are a valuable learning tool. Not only does your student learn about different parts of the country, but they get to watch you deal with some of the challenges that arise from traveling. That problem solving teaches a lesson or two. “It’s a good thing,’’ Dickhut says. • Parents also have to get ready. Supply lists and required school and athletic forms are available before school starts. Avoid the last-minute panic and get them done early. Save money by watching sales and wrap up supply shopping ahead of the rush. “I have noticed that when I go to Target right before school starts, it’s pretty picked over by then,’’ Dickhut says. “Lists are more specific than they have been in the past. Making sure you can get those very specific things is helpful.’’

KIM DICKHUT


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arpool season has arrived. Sharing rides is good for the environment, saves you time and builds camaraderie. An added bonus? You get to eavesdrop on the kids and what's going on in their lives. Most carpool parents will tell you there’s lots of waiting involved, so use that time to your advantage. Start a conversation, have the kids work on their spelling lists or, if you're alone in the car, catch up on your reading. The two most important things when driving carpool is to be on time and have a clean car. It's the worst feeling when someone else’s kid climbs into your car and says “grrroossss.” That is typically the trigger you need to clean your vehicle. This year, do the cleaning before you start carpooling and, by all means, get the kids involved.

CLEAN

Console: Rid the console of trash and items you no longer need; organize your car registration, insurance card, owner's manual and other important documents. Seat pockets: These are a dumping ground. Insist that your kids use them only for storing non-food items such as books, small electronics, hats and mittens. Trunk: Free space in the trunk for sports gear and backpacks, and organize a quickaccess area for emergency items. Cup holders: Yes, I went there. This is where the cries of grossness usually originate. Someone leaves a drink or some food and it turns disgusting. If your cup holders don’t remove for cleaning, use a silicon cupcake liner to make future cleaning easier.

MAINTAIN • Keep a trash can/bag in an area of the car that's handy for the kids. • Empty the trash can/bag every time you fill up for gas. • Instruct kids to clean out their stuff after each trip. A few baby toys can get a pass, but older kids shouldn't leave anything in the car. • If you work out of your car, keep it organized in a container that is easy to move if someone needs a seat.

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Profile for Omaha World-Herald

Momaha Magazine - August 2018  

Monthly magazine for parents published by the Omaha World-Herald in conjunction with its blog Momaha.com

Momaha Magazine - August 2018  

Monthly magazine for parents published by the Omaha World-Herald in conjunction with its blog Momaha.com