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Hello and welcome… … to the New ear edition of Love to Make. I don’t know about you but I always enjoy putting up the decorations and having plenty of sparkle around. So much so, that I hate having to take them all down, leaving the house feeling bare. So what better time to plan ahead and see what can be given a makeover in your home? To inspire and help you get creative, turn to pages 6 and 7 for some brilliant upcycling ideas. Officially, we are now in winter and so with a few months of dark evenings ahead, it’s the perfect time to start a long-term project; our beautiful Tilda patchwork quilt certainly fits the bill. However, if you’re after a quicker patchwork project, you could make the gorgeous matching cushions instead. Also this month we have extended our monthly ‘Know-how’ feature… Understanding Dressmaking Patterns, which explains how to measure yourself accurately, buy the correct size pattern and use it properly to ensure you get a great-fitting garment every time. Then, we have two FREE dressmaking patterns for you: a fabulous lifestyle wardrobe to send for on page 33 (you just pay the postage) and a sweet little girl’s pinafore dress to trace out on pages 51-53. As this issue is on sale before Christmas, we still have a couple of quick decorations to make – look out for the ‘Get Making for Christmas’ stamp. And don’t forget our fabulous Subscription deals; they make wonderful last-minute presents for family and friends (see pages 8 and 64). So until next month, enjoy your celebrations and a very Happy New Year to you all!

To help you with your makes we’ve added at-a-glance experience levels. Look out for this at the top of each ‘You Will Need’ section. EASY-PEASY A BIT MORE TRICKY HARDISH

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Look what’s inside . So many inspiring projects for you

19-20 Make it tonight!

19 Topiary trees

21-25 Patchwork throw

38-39 Crochet wrap

40-41 Knitted floor cushions

42-49 Understanding dress patterns

8, 64 Our latest subscription offers 26 Shop: Knitting and crochet patterns 36-37 Woman’s Weekly workshops 50 Shop: Knitting and crochet patterns 58 Shop: Knitting patterns 59 Craft book reviews 65-66 Complete stitch reference guide 67-73 All your charts and templates for the makes in this issue 74 Over to you… you share your makes with us

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6-7 Now’s the time – to upcycle

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17 Cross-stitch sampler

27 Christmas tree dec

28-31 Try wet felting

34-35 Cross-stitch tote

51-53 Girl’s pinafore dress

54-55 Draught excluder

56-57 Take one table

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Now’s the time… to upcycle Create some New Year cheer with these inspiring ideas for your home Add a touch of ’60s chic to your home with this fun upcycled trolley project Unscrew the legs from an old serving trolley and remove the metal edging from the trays. Wash and dry surfaces and then carefully apply sticky-backed plastic in a design of your choice. Starting at one corner, use a card, or something similar, to remove any air bubbles as you peel away the backing. Make sure the film adheres right to the edges, then trim off any excess. Re-attach the metallic edging using glue and leave to dry. Screw on the wooden legs and it’s ready to use. Time to put the kettle on…

EWA/Flora Press

Retro-Style Serving Trolley

Découpage an old chest of drawers and bring it bang up to date using retro newspapers Remove handles and strip any previous finish from the furniture. Apply a coat of découpage medium over all surfaces to be covered and leave to dry. Cut out your chosen headlines, adverts and images from the newspapers then start sticking them to the furniture, overlapping the pieces until all surfaces are covered. Once dried, give the furniture a coat of varnish to protect the surface and attached new crystal handles to finish. 6 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

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Newspaper Découpage


Take a pair of worn-out jeans, scraps of cotton fabric and an old sweatshirt and create these pan-holders Cut one back pocket from a pair of old jeans then, using the image as a guide, cut a square of cotton fabric, just larger than the pocket, using pinking shears, another square slightly larger from the jeans fabric and, finally, one from a sweatshirt. Layer all the pieces as shown then machine stitch together around edge of the pocket, leaving the top open, and again around the edge of the cotton fabric. Finally, to neaten the outer edge, blanket stitch in a contrast coloured yarn. Pop your hand in the pocket to use; they can also double-up as heat-resistant pan stands.

Text: Juliette Goggin and Stacy Sirk Photography: ©Loupe Images/Holly Jolliffe

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Denim Pan-Holders

Lace Doily Lampshade

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Mobile Recycling Hub Equip your kitchen or utility room with a portable, vintage-style crate Look out for an old wooden fruit crate – try car-boot sales or the internet. If your crate has seen better days, give it a coat of wood stain then screw castor wheels to each corner so it’s easy to manoeuvre. Pop a few plastic boxes inside the crate so you can throw paper, plastic and glass into separate tubs, then find a space in the kitchen for your new recycling hub.

Almost any shade and lampstand can be restyled using old lace doilies NOTE: There’s a fair amount of handstitching required for this project but it’s all pretty easy. Strip the existing fabric from your lampshade. Find a good selection of clean, lace doilies, large, medium and small. Pin the edge of a large doily to the top of the frame, folding over a small amount of fabric to secure. Pull doily down to bottom of the frame and fold over to pin in place. Repeat all the way around the frame then whipstitch them in place to secure. Next, pin the mediumsized doilies to the frame’s upright struts, overlapping the large doilies and filling in the gaps between; sew them in place. Finally, use small doilies to fill any gaps. LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 7


Take A

T

Inspirational

R

Using our simple lettering techniques, you can make something that’s personal and individual

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 9


These padded fabric letters look fabulous standing on a mantelpiece or hung on a wall

EASY PEASY

You will need O Coordinating cotton print fabrics of your choice O Lightweight wadding O Papier-mâché découpage letter blanks, 20cm tall by 25mm thick O 25mm-wide coordinating grosgrain ribbon long enough to fit around the edges of each letter O A piece of cardboard the same size as each letter O Double-sided ultra-sticky tape O Marker pen O Rubber-solution glue O Fabric scissors O Craft knife and cutting mat

To make

1

From fabric, cut out one rectangle 4cm larger all round than the letter, for covering the letter blank, and one rectangle 2cm larger all round than the letter for the backing. Place your letter blank onto the wadding and, using the marker pen, draw all around the outer edges and cut out. Finally, draw around the letter onto the cardboard; cut out using a craft knife and cutting mat to form a backing panel.

2

Apply a thin layer of glue to the front surface of letter blank and stick the wadding in place; leave to dry.

3

On the reverse side of the letter blank, run strips of double-sided tape around the edges, cutting short lengths to fit around any curves. Place the letter blank, wadding side down, centrally onto the fabric rectangle.

4

Peel off the backing papers from the tape and fold back the fabric hems, sticking them in place using the sticky tape. Start at the centre of a straight edge and work towards the corners to keep the fabric smooth. Clip into corners

10 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

to help the fabric fold back and use more doublesided tape if necessary. To cover an outside curve, pleat the fabric slightly and pull it towards the centre of the letter. For inner curves, clip into the hem at right angles, spacing the cuts at 15mm intervals and snipping to within 3mm of the letter edge.

5

Now cover the cardboard backing panel with the remaining rectangle of fabric, folding and sticking down hems, as before, but make sure this letter is a mirror image of the main letter. Using the glue, stick backing to the letter, keeping all edges level. Leave to dry.

6

Apply strips of double-sided sticky tape to the outer edges of fabriccovered letter then stick the grosgrain ribbon around carefully to cover up any visible raw fabric edges. Overlap ends to finish and trim away excess ribbon.

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The soft touch


Write on EASY PEASY

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You will need O Computer-printed letters (see note below) O A4 paper O Pencil O Paper scissors O Clean, ceramic-glazed plates O Masking tape O Chinagraph pencil O Fine artist’s paint brush O Bake-on water-based ceramic paints in colours of your choice O Kitchen paper Note: You can download a wide range of no-cost, copyright-free fonts online; we used Calson Bold by George Williams but a Times font looks similar.

To make

1

Type out your chosen letter on your computer screen and enlarge it to fit the diameter of your plate. Print out the letter to check the size, using the photograph as a guide. When happy with the size, cut out around the letter’s outline to form a template.

2

Make sure that your plate is clean and dry then, using masking tape, secure the template to the plate. Draw around the outline using the chinagraph pencil. Remove the template.

3

With your chosen colour, paint small dots just inside the chinagraph

outline, continuing until you have gone all around the outline. Repeat process with remaining plates, using different letters as desired.

4

Fill in the entire letter with dots. Leave to dry for about 12 hours, then gently wipe away the chinagraph outline. The ceramic is now ready to bake. Bake following the manufacturer’s instructions, then leave to cool.

Tip... Before starting, test your technique and colours on an unwanted tile.

Can’t find the right pattern or fed up with plain? Then design your own china using ceramic paint

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 11


Create this fun artwork for a child’s bedroom using waxed crayons

By the books A BIT MORE TRICKY

Measurements Each letter measures approximately 23cm high by 17cm wide.

You will need: O Two 50g (85m) balls of Rico Design Creative Cotton Aran (100% cotton) in each of Light Yellow (063) and Pearlgrey (052); one ball in White (80)* O Size 4.00 crochet hook O Polyester toy stuffing

Kid’s play A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need O Computer-printed letters O A4 paper O Box of wax crayons with paper wrappers O 30cm square box frame O Piece of mountboard in white or colour of your choice O Hot-glue gun O Craft knife O Cutting mat O Steel ruler O Masking tape O Pencil

To make

1

Type out your chosen letter on your computer and enlarge it to a height of 18cm. Print out the letter and place it in the centre of your frame to check the size, then cut out the letter to form a template.

2

Cut a piece of mountboard to fit inside your picture frame, then place the template centrally on the right side of the mount board and trace around the edges with a pencil to give you a faint outline of the letter.

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3

Remove the template and then, using the photograph as a guide, start to cut the crayons to varying lengths to fit the shape of your letter. When you have all the crayons cut to size, start to glue them in place, one at a time, using the glue gun. Finally, insert the mount board into the frame; your picture is ready to hang.

12 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

Abbreviations Ch, chain; st, stitch; dc, double crochet; tog, together; yrh, yarn round hook; slst, slip stitch; dc2tog, [insert hook into next st, yrh, pull yarn through] twice, yrh and pull through all 3 loops on hook.

Note Yarn amounts are based on average requirements and are therefore approximate. Also note that throughout instructions, 1ch at beginning of each row does not count as a st. * Yarn subject to availability.

Letter A Front Bottom of first side: With 4.00 hook and Light Yellow, make 10ch. 1st row (right side): 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1dc in each of next 8ch, turn – 9dc. 2nd to 13th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, turn. 14th row: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, 7ch for middle horizontal bar – 16 sts. Fasten off. Bottom of second side: With 4.00 hook and Light Yellow, make 10ch. 1st row (right side): 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1dc in each of next 8ch, turn – 9dc. 2nd to 14th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, turn. 15th (joining) row: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, 1dc in each of 7ch of horizontal bar, 1dc in each of next 9dc of first side, turn – 25dc. 16th to 21st rows: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 25dc, turn. 22nd row: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, turn and work on these 9 sts only for top of first side. Top of first side: 23rd to 27th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each of 9dc, turn.

28th row: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, 7ch for top horizontal bar – 16 sts. Fasten off. Top of second side: With wrong side facing, return to end of 22nd row, miss next 7dc at centre, rejoin yarn to next dc, 1ch, work 1dc in same place as join, 1dc in each of next 8dc, turn – 9dc. 23rd to 28th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each of 9dc, turn. 29th (joining) row: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, 1dc in each of 7ch of horizontal bar, 1dc in each of next 9dc of first side, turn – 25dc. 30th and 31st rows: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 25dc to end, turn. 32nd row: 1ch, dc2tog, 1dc in each dc to last 2 sts, dc2tog, turn. 33rd to 35th rows: As 32nd row – 17dc. Fasten off. Inner edging: With right side facing and using 4.00 hook, attach Light Yellow to right corner of top of middle horizontal bar and work 24dc evenly around inside edge of opening, slst in first dc. Fasten off, leaving a long end. Outer edging: With right side facing and using 4.00 hook, attach Light Yellow to beginning of 35th row, 1ch, 1dc in each of 17dc along top edge, now work down outside edge of first side thus: 2dc in next row-end, 1dc in next row-end, 2dc in next row-end, then work 1dc in each of next 30 row-ends, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of 7ch at base of first side, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 12 row-ends up inside edge of first side, 1dc in each of 7ch of horizontal bar, 1dc in each of next 12 row-ends down inside edge of second side, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of 7ch at base of second side, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 30 row-ends up outside edge of second side, 2dc in next row-end, 1dc in next row-end, 2dc in last row-end, slst in first dc – 144dc. Fasten off, but do not break off the yarn.

Back Using Pearlgrey, work as front.

Inner gusset With 4.00 hook and White, make 25ch. 1st row (right side): 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1dc in each ch to end, turn – 24dc. 2nd to 4th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each dc to end, turn. Fasten off.

Outer gusset With 4.00 hook and White, make 145ch. 1st row (right side): 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1dc in each ch to end, turn – 144dc. 2nd to 4th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each dc to


Keep things neat and tidy with these A to Z bookends

end, turn. Fasten off.

To make up Join row-end edges together on each gusset. Place wrong sides of front and inner gusset together. With right side of front facing, using 4.00 hook and attached yarn, work slip stitch through corresponding stitches of each layer. Fasten off. Join outer gusset to front in same way. Join back to gussets as front, carefully aligning back to front and stuffing the letter as you join outer gusset.

LETTER Z Front Using 4.00 hook and Light Yellow, make 26ch. 1st row (right side): 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1dc in each of next 24ch, turn – 25dc. 2nd to 7th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each dc to end, turn. 8th row: 1ch, 1dc in each of first 9dc, turn and work on these 9 sts only. 9th row: 1ch, 1dc in each dc to end, turn. 10th row: 1ch, dc2tog, 1dc in each of next 6dc, 2dc in last dc, turn. 11th row: 1ch, 2dc in first dc, 1dc in each of next 6dc, dc2tog, turn. 12th to 18th rows: Repeat 10th and 11th rows, 3 times, then work 10th row again. 19th row: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc,

turn. 20th to 27th rows: Repeat 10th and 11th rows, 4 times. 28th row: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, turn. With 4.00 hook and short length of Light Yellow, make 16ch, fasten off and leave this chain. 29th (joining) row: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 9dc, 1dc in each of 16ch, turn – 25dc. 30th to 35th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each of next 25dc, turn. Fasten off. ** Edging: With right side facing and using 4.00 hook, attach Light Yellow to beginning of 35th row, 1ch, 3dc in first dc, 1dc in each of next 23dc along top edge, 3dc in corner, then work 1dc in each of next 5 row-ends along side of top, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 15ch along bottom edge of top, 1dc in each of next 13 row-ends, 2dc in next row-end, 1dc in each of next 13 rowends, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 23ch of bottom, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 5 row-ends along side of bottom, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of 15dc of top edge of bottom, 1dc in each of 13 row-ends, 2dc in next row-end, 1dc in each of last 13 row-ends, slst in first dc – 160dc. Fasten off, but do not break off the yarn.

Back

of 35th row, 1ch, 3dc in first dc, 1dc in each of next 23dc, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 13 row-ends, 2dc in next row-end, 1dc in each of next 13 rowends, 1dc in each of 15dc of top edge of bottom, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 5 row-ends along side of bottom, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 23ch of bottom, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of 13 row-ends, 2dc in next row-end, 1dc in each of next 13 row-ends, 1dc in each of next 15ch along bottom edge of top, 3dc in corner, 1dc in each of next 5 row-ends along side of top, slst in first dc – 160dc. Fasten off, but do not break off the yarn.

Gusset With 4.00 hook and White, make 161ch. 1st row (right side): 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 1dc in each ch to end, turn – 160dc. 2nd to 4th rows: 1ch, 1dc in each dc to end, turn. Fasten off.

To make up Join row-end edges together on gusset. Place wrong sides of front and gusset together. With right side of front facing, using 4.00 hook and attached yarn, work slip stitch through corresponding stitches of each layer. Fasten off. Join back to gusset as front, carefully aligning back to front, stuffing the letter as you join.

Using Pearlgrey, work as front to **. Edging: With wrong side facing and using 4.00 hook, attach Pearlgrey to end LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 13


EASY PEASY

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You will need O Computer-printed letters (we used Passion One, by Fontstage) O A4 paper O SprayMount O Fast-dry spray enamel paint in silver or gold O Short, straight-sided glass tumblers O Scissors O Old newspapers to protect your surfaces O Tealights

Personalised candle pots To make

1

Type out your chosen letter on your computer screen and enlarge it to fit your tumbler – see the main image as a guide. Print out the letter and cut it out to form a template.

2

Using SprayMount, stick the letter to the side of the tumbler. Spread out the old newspapers to protect your surface and place the tumbler upside down on top. Making sure that the room is well ventilated and following the manufacturer’s instructions, spray

Hang on every word A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need

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O Large vintage letter press printer’s blocks spelling out your name (see note below) O Fine grade sandpaper O Eggshell paint to match decor O Paint brush O One 35mm flush wall mounting bracket per letter O Tie-back hooks with a deep rounded hook O Masking tape, optional Note: You may find it hard to buy letters that all face the correct way (printer’s blocks tend to be reversed) but having a mixture of reversed letters is fun. Look out for blocks on the internet or at craft and antique fairs.

14 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

How to make

1

Gently rub down the top, flat surface on each print block and give it a coat of eggshell paint, taking care not to get paint on the background; use masking tape to mask off any areas around the letters if you have an unsteady hand. Leave to dry and apply a second coat, if necessary.

2

Screw a tieback hook into the base of alternate letters in your name and then screw the top half of a flush bracket to the top back of the letter.

3

Measure and mark the position of the lower part of your flush brackets on your wall, spacing the letters evenly apart and alternating the heights to create a pleasing display. Screw brackets in place and attach letters; your hooks are now ready to use.


These personalised candle pots are great at Christmas or any time of the year

the tumbler all over with paint. Leave to dry then give it a second coat if necessary.

3

Once dry, carefully peel away the template to reveal the letter’s shape underneath. Place on a heat-resistant surface and pop a lit tealight inside. Warning: Never leave burning candles unattended.

Brighten up your office wall with this photo frame, which you can fill with happy memories

Family framed EASY PEASY

Refashion vintage letterpress printer’s blocks as useful, personalised hanging hooks

You will need O Giant, unpainted MDF letters in Ariel font, 9mm thick by 70cm tall (www. thewoodenletterscompany. com) O Photographs O Laser printer or photocopying facilities (an Inkjet printer is not suitable for this project) O White emulsion paint O Paint brushes O Découpage medium O Paper scissors O Picture wall-mounting brackets O Small screws

To make

1

Wipe down the MDF letter with a damp cloth to remove any dust

particles, then give it a coat of white emulsion paint all over and leave to dry.

2

Meanwhile, sort out the photographs you would like to display. If you have a Laser printer, print them out direct; if not, take your images to a photocopying place and get them colour copied. If you try to use Inkjet printed images, the ink may run when you apply the découpage medium.

3

Cut out your printed photos and arrange them on the painted MDF letter, trimming them to shape around diagonal edges and curves. When happy with your display, start to stick them in place using the découpage medium and leave to dry.

4

Finally, give the photographs a coat of découpage medium over the top to protect them. Attach wall-mounting brackets to the back of the letter using small screws and hang on your wall. LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 15


What a corker A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need O Computer-printed letters (we used Buchanan by Iconian Fonts for our letter ‘M’) O Two x 4.75mm thick cork floor tiles 30cm square per letter O Picture frame hangers O Impact glue O Metal rule O Craft knife O Cutting mat O Masking tape O Fine marker pen

To make

1

Using the impact glue, stick the two cork tiles together, with edges level to form one layer approximately 1cm thick. Leave to dry.

2

Meanwhile, type out your chosen letter on your computer screen and enlarge it to a height of 30cm. If you only have an A4 printer, you may need to take your file to a copy shop to get them to print it out at a larger size. When you have the correct size, cut out around the letter’s outline to form a template.

3

4

Using impact glue, stick one, or two picture frame hangers to the back of your letter depending on its shape. For example, the letters H, K, L, M, N, U, V, W, X and Y will need two rings to enable them to hang straight, all other letters will need one.

Create novelty pin boards for your notes and memos 16 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

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Place your letter template on top of the cork tiles and secure it in place using masking tape. Draw around the edges with the marker pen. Place the cork tiles on top of the cutting mat; remove the template and using the steel ruler and craft knife, carefully cut around the outline to create the letter shape in cork.


This pretty alphabet sampler in pastel shades is simple to cross-stitch and makes an heirloom keepsake

Home sweet home A BIT MORE TRICKY

Photography: Barry Marsden

You will need O Cross-stitch chart on page 67 O Anchor stranded cotton in the following shades: Lilac 108, Dusty Pink 1021 and Pale Jade 186 O Tapestry needle size 22 O 30 x 40cm ivory 16-count Aida fabric O Embroidery hoop

To embroider

1

You’ll find the cross-stich chart on page 67. Starting from the arrows on the chart, work a row of tacking stitches lengthways and widthways following the bold lines on the chart, across your Aida fabric (the point where the two lines intersect is the centre of the design).

2

Mount your fabric in your embroidery hoop, with the tackedcross centred. Start stitching from the centre, following the colour key and chart, using three strands of cotton in

your needle. Each square on the chart represents one cross-stitch, worked over one block of the fabric (see page 65 for details on how to work this stitch).

3

When the embroidery is finished, remove tacking threads. Place work face down on a padded surface and press on the wrong side, under a damp cloth, using light pressure to avoid flattening the stitches; frame as desired.

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 17


Pillow talk EASY PEASY

You will need O Computer-printed letters (we used Circus by Dan Roseman, free, Fontspace) O Inkjet printer O One pack of A4 Inkjet T-shirt transfer paper for light fabrics O Sheet of A4 paper for each letter of your word O Two plain pillowcases O Iron O Scissors

Choose one of the colours from your duvet cover to create a bespoke look on a budget 18 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

Method

1

Open enough A4 pages on your computer screen for your chosen word, then type and enlarge each letter to fill a page. Now reverse them to give mirror images. Print each letter onto a sheet of transfer paper, following the manufacturer’s instructions and cut out leaving a small border.

2

Lay out the two pillowcases, with their openings facing outwards. Arrange the letters (with the printed side down) on top, spacing them

equidistant apart. Using a dry iron set at a high temperature and following the manufacturer’s instructions, iron on each letter, a small area at a time, using both horizontal and vertical strokes.

3

Leave the letters to cool, then carefully peel off the transfer backing papers. If the corners don’t come away easily, run the iron back over and try again.

Tip... Why not add his and hers initials, or Mr and Mrs, to mark which side of the bed is yours!


Easy Makes

Make It Tonight! Here are four inspiring ideas for brightening up your home and clothing during these long, dark evenings

Wash Bags Rock Art Badges

Lavender Topiary Trees Funky Lampshade

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 19


Lavender Topiary Trees

Laundry Sorter Bags

Add interest and a pleasant fragrance to your living room with these lavender pomanders

Eliminate laundry problems by organising your dirty laundry in these colourful drawstring bags

1

1

Push the twig into the oasis ball. Apply PVA glue all over the ball and leave until it is tacky.

Type up your bag label (we used 72pt ITC American Typewriter font), then, following the manufacturer’s instructions and using the transfer paper, transfer the word onto the calico fabric. Leaving a 3cm border around the word, cut out a rectangular label using pinking shears.

2

Roll the oasis ball into a bowl filled with the dried lavender flowers until it is covered.

You will need X Twig from the garden X Round oasis ball X PVA glue X Loose, dried lavender X Long Tom terracotta pot X Sandpaper X Off-white emulsion paint plus paintbrush X Empty tealight holder X Small piece oasis to fit inside tealight holder X White gravel

3

Use a paintbrush to coat the clean, dry terracotta plant pot with emulsion. Leave to dry, then sand roughly.

4

Push the small piece of oasis into the empty tealight holder and place it in the base of the pot, then push in the remaining end of the twig. Cover with gravel and then fill the pot to the top with more gravel.

You will need X 66 x 100cm of printed cotton fabric for each bag X Small piece of calico for each label X Matching threads X White and light T-shirt image transfer paper for inkjet printers X String or fine cord for drawstring X Pinking shears and scissors

2

Fold the bag fabric in half with wrong sides facing and short ends level. Place calico label centrally on top, then pin and stitch it to the top layer of fabric only around the pinked edges.

3

Now fold bag fabric in half again, with right sides facing, and machine stitch across bottom and up the side, taking a 1.5cm seam allowance and finishing 8cm from top edge; reverse stitch at each end to secure.

4

Press the top, unstitched side edges 1.5cm to wrong side, then press top edge first 1cm and then another 3cm to wrong side to form a channel. Stitch the top channel in place close to first pressed edge. Turn right side out and thread the string through using a safety pin; knot ends together.

Funky Lampshade

Rock On Badges

Simple cup-cake cases transform a basic white paper lantern into a designer lampshade

Turn pebbles into works of art with a spot of paint and a steady hand – perfect for jazzing up a plain jacket

1

Open out and assemble the paper lantern, then separate around 120 cupcake cases (so they are easy to pick up).

1

2

2

You will need

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X Ivory paper lantern X Approximately 120 white cupcake cases X PVA glue

20 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

Starting at the top, glue the base of each cupcake case onto the shade using the PVA glue, ensuring that each case touches the next. Work in rows, from left to right or up and down the shade, taking care not to put any pressure on the ones already glued in place.

3

Leave the lampshade to dry then hang it.

Clean your pebble in soapy water, rinse and dry thoroughly. Paint your pebble a solid colour using the flat artist’s brush then leave to dry.

You will need X Small, smooth, plain pebbles X Acrylic paints in colours of your choice X Flat artist’s paintbrush X Fine point artist’s paintbrush X Sharp pencil X Clear waterbased varnish X Mixing plate (optional) X Brooch backs X Clear allpurpose glue

Draw your design onto the front of the painted pebble, using the pencil. Practice your design on paper first, if you are unsure.

3

Squeeze a little paint onto your plate then dip in the fine-pointed artist’s brush – but don’t overload the brush. Gradually paint over your design lines.

4

Allow paint to dry fully and then varnish to protect your design. Glue a brooch back to the reverse of the pebble and leave to dry.

Rock Art! by Denise Scicluna (Search Press, £9.99). www.seachpress.com


Block Busters

Sewing

Any little girl will fall in love with this heirloom quilt and cushion, created using designer Tone Finnanger’s Tilda range of cotton fabrics

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 21


Getting started Note: Seam allowances are included in the size specifications for these patchwork projects to make things easier. Seam allowances are calculated at ¼in (6mm). O The quilt is made up of two blocks: a Flying Geese block and a Squares block. Each block is made from two colourways, so you get four different repeated blocks (see Figure B). There is also a narrow, off-white border around the patchwork panel measuring 1¼in (3cm) deep and, finally, a border of squares 2in (5cm) deep.

Figure A

The finished quilt measures 46½ x 70½in (approximately 118 x180cm). A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need O Off-white cotton fabric, plus 13 coordinating Tilda fabric prints for the patchwork front O Coordinating cotton backing fabric O Contrasting cotton binding fabric O Matching thread O Cotton wadding O Rotary cutter O Quilter’s rule O Self-healing cutting mat O Chalk pencil or fade-away marker pen O Sewing machine O Pins O Hand-sewing needle Note: The most common measuring unit for patchwork and quilting is the inch, which is equivalent to 2.54cm. This is usually rounded off to 2.5cm to make measurements simpler. There are many advantages to using inches: measurements on quilter’s rulers and instructions often give measurements in inches; and round numbers are often quite complicated to convert into centimetres. The inches in the following instructions are written first with the cm measurement in brackets afterwards, so you can work with the measuring unit that you prefer, for example: 3½in (8.75cm).

22 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

O Figure A shows the measurement for all the parts to be cut for the quilt, apart from the narrow border between the patchwork and edge of the square border. Figure B also shows how many of each part you need to cut.

Square block patches

A

B 2 x 3½in (5 x 8.75cm)

2 x 2in (5 x 5cm)

B

Flying Geese patches

A

D 4¼ x 4¼in (10.25 x 10.25cm)

B

C 3½ x 3½in (8.75 x 8.75cm)

A

Figure B

E

A

B

2/ x 2/in (6 x 6cm)

Square block patches

24 blocks

1

C x 39

C x 18

C x 20

18 blocks A x 48

A x 78

A x 30

2 B x 78

20 blocks

3

B x 48 B x 30

A x 152

Flying Geese patches E x 152

D x 38

15 blocks

4 A x 76

A x 76


Assembling the Square blocks

1

With right sides together, stitch a rectangular patch (B) between two small squares (A) and press seams open. Repeat with another two small squares and a second rectangular patch to create two narrow strips.

2

In the same way, stitch a large square patch (C) between two rectangular patches (B), and press seams open. Then, stitch the two narrow strips formed in step 1 to the top and bottom to form a square block. Make 24 in colourway 1 and 15 in colourway 4 (see Figure B).

Assembling the Flying Geese blocks Note: These instructions will make four Flying Geese at once. The small squares are half the size of the large one.

C Cutt apart along the line and press the triangles outwards.

7 5

Place one small square (E), right sides facing, on each of the sewn units, aligning them with the corners. Draw a line and sew in a seam allowance on each side, as before.

When you have sewn all the Flying Geese pieces for the quilt, they are sewn together with a large square (C) and small corner squares (A) into finished blocks. We have varied our pattern so that each block has different blue-patterned parts. Make 18 in colourway 2 and 20 in colourway 3 (see Figure B).

Assembling the patchwork top

3

Place two small squares (E), right sides together with a large square (D), aligning them in the corners. Draw a line from corner to corner, then stitch in a ¼in (6mm) seam allowance along each side of the drawn line.

8 6

Cut apart along the lines and press the parts outwards. You will now have four identical Flying Geese parts.

Following the assembly diagram top right, lay out the blocks in 11 rows, each with seven blocks. Sew the blocks together in rows, pressing the seams of alternate rows in opposite directions. Now sew the rows together and press the seams downwards.

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 23


Quilt assembly diagram

1 2

1 2 1 2 1

3 4

3 4 3 4 3

1 2

1 2 1 2 1

3 4

3 4 3 4 3

1 2

1 2 1 2 1 3 4 3 4 3

1 2

1 2 1 2 1

3 4

3 4 3 4 3

1 2

1 2 1 2 1

3 4

3 4 3 4 3

1 2

1 2 1 2 1

9

For the narrow border, cut two fabric strips: 1¼ x 42½in (3 x 108cm) from off-white. Cut another four strips: 1¼in (3cm) x width of fabric and sew them together end to end to form two long strips. Press seams open. From the long strips cut two strips 1¼ x 68in (3 x 173cm).

10

Sew the shorter, off-white strips to the top and bottom of the quilt and press the seams outwards. Then, sew the longer strips to the sides of the quilt and press the seams outwards.

13

There are also many ways to work the quilting stitches, from simple, straightforward sewing along the patchwork seams (stitch-in-theditch) to intricate, freeflowing designs that require knowledge and experience. You can also find companies that will quilt your finished patchwork for you, using a special, long-armed quilting machine. Find out more about quilting methods in quilting shops and on the internet.

3 4

Adding borders

finally the patchwork top, right side up, and smooth out until there are no wrinkles. There are many techniques for holding the fabric layers together while you are quilting – safety pins, a quiltbasting gun or large tacking stitches – however, one of the simplest methods is using a basting spray.

Binding

14

Cut 2¼in (6cm) wide strips of contrasting fabric for the binding; the seam allowance is included. Join the strips together until you have a strip long enough to bind all around the edges of your quilt. Iron the binding strip in half, wrong sides together, so it measures 1¼in (3cm) wide.

11

Assemble the outer borders from blue and white small squares (A). Stitch in place around the outer edges, adjacent to the narrow off-white borders. The outer square border should finish with one blue square placed at each corner; see the assembly diagram.

Layering and quilting

12

Cut a piece of wadding and backing fabric to the same size as the completed patchwork top. Carefully lay out the backing fabric on a flat surface, wrong side up. Place the wadding on top and

24 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

15

Working from the right side, place the folded strip half way down one side edge of your quilt, with raw edges level. Starting ½in (12mm) from the short end of the binding, sew it in place, stopping approximately the distance of one seam allowance from the corner.

16

Fold the binding neatly at the corner to turn it 90 degrees before continuing to sew along the next side. Continue in the same manner until you meet the starting end of the binding. Fold over the binding at the finishing end and tuck it under the starting end. Trim away excess binding and stitch the ends in place.

17

Finally, turn the folded edge of the binding over the wrong side, enclosing the raw edges of the quilt, and whipstitch the folded edge to the back of the quilt.


Matching Cushions Using the patchwork quilt instructions as a guide, you can adapt them to make these matching cushions Finished size: 22in (56cm) square. A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need O Off-white cotton fabric, plus coordinating Tilda fabric prints for the patchwork front O Coordinating cotton backing fabric O Coordinating cotton binding fabric O Matching thread O Cotton wadding O Rotary cutter O Quilter’s rule O Self-healing cutting mat O Chalk pencil or fade-away marker pen O Sewing machine O Pins O Hand-sewing needle O 22in (56cm) square cushion pad

1

Make up two of blocks 1 and 4, and five of block 3 (see Figure B, on page 22) and assemble them as shown in the quilt-assembly diagram below. Cut four strips for the inner border from off-white fabric, 1¼in (3cm) wide, and sew them to the side edges of your patchwork centre. Finally, assemble the outer borders from blue and white small squares (A). Stitch in place around the outer edges, next to the narrow off-white borders. The outer border should finish with one blue square placed in each corner (see the assembly diagram below).

3

1

3

4

3

4

3

1

3

Cushion assembly diagram

2 3

Layer the patchwork top with wadding and backing, and tack the layers together. Quilt as desired. Cut two pieces of coordinating fabric for the cushion back, 16½in (42cm) x 22½in (57cm). These pieces will overlap down the centre back of the cushion to form an opening for inserting your cushion pad.

4 5

Press, tack and machine a ¾in (2cm) double-turned hem to the wrong side down one long edge of each cushion back. Lay the front patchwork piece wrong side up, with wrong sides facing, and place one back cover on top, keeping raw edges level and hemmed edge towards the centre. Place the second back on top, covering the remaining part of the front, again keeping raw edges level and hemmed edges overlapping at the centre. Pin, tack and machine stitch around all edges of the cover, taking a ¼in (6mm) seam allowance.

6

Remove tacking and then make and attach contrasting binding to the raw edges of the cushion cover, as shown in steps 15, 16, 17 and 18 of the quilt. Insert the cushion pad through the back opening.

Coming next month… Small Tilda dolls

Tilda’s Toy Box by Tone Finnanger (F&W Media, £16.99). www. searchpress.com

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 25


Printed Patterns By Post

Lovely Christmas Decs & Gifts To Knit

Jumper, Waistcoat and Leggings Knitting Pattern, £4.99 WOWE14KD0003

Fairy Christmas Tree Hanging Christmas Decorations Crochet Pattern, Decoration Knitting Pattern, £2.99 WOWE14KE0001 £1.99 WOWE14KS0040

Festival Stocking Crochet Pattern, £1.99 WOWE14KE0003

Abstract Christmas Tree Knitting Pattern, £1.99 WOWE14KS0039 Father Christmas Advent Calendar Crochet Pattern, £2.99 WOWE14KE0000

Christmas Puddings Knitting Set of Nordic Christmas Decorations Pattern, £2.99 Knitting Patterns, £2.99 WOWE14FH006H WOWE14FH009S Each pattern will be printed on A4 card and delivered to your door

To order, call 0800 024 1212* or complete the coupon TO: LTM01 Christmas Knits Offer, WW Shop Customer Care, Blue Fin Building, Room 06-C06, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU

This offer ends 11 January 2016

Grand total

Total

Order By Phone Call 0800 024 1212* MasterCard, Visa or Maestro cardholders can order direct on this number quoting LTM01. Lines open Monday to Friday, 10am-4pm, but closed bank holidays. Fill In The Coupon Payment must be made by cheque, sent with the coupon to the address provided. For more patterns, visit womansweekly.com/patterncollections

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS Subject to availability to readers in the UK, offers cannot be used in conjunction with other promotions, prices are correct at time of printing. All correspondence concerning this offer should be sent to: LTM01 Christmas Knits Offer, WW Shop Customer Care, Blue Fin Building, Room 06-C06, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU. Items will be despatched within 2-5 days once payment has cleared. You’ll be notified if a longer delay is expected. This offer ends 11 January 2015. *Call charges from mobiles and non-BT landlines may vary. DATA PROTECTION Woman’s Weekly, published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, will collect your personal information to process your order and alert you of news, new products, services and offers available from Woman’s Weekly and from Time Inc. (UK) Ltd by email, phone and post. You can unsubscribe from emails by clicking unsubscribe from within the email.

Product code Product Price Qty WOWE14KD0003 Jumper, Waistcoat and Leggings Knitting Pattern £4.99 WOWE14KS0040 Hanging Christmas Decorations Crochet Pattern £1.99 WOWE14KE0001 Fairy Christmas Tree Decoration Knitting Pattern £2.99 WOWE14KE0003 Festival Stocking Crochet Pattern £1.99 WOWE14KS0039 Abstract Christmas Tree Knitting Pattern £1.99 WOWE14FH006H Christmas Puddings Knitting Pattern £2.99 WOWE14FH009S Set of Nordic Christmas Decorations Knitting Patterns £2.99 WOWE14KE0000 Father Christmas Advent Calendar Crochet Pattern £2.99 Postage and packaging

HOW TO ORDER

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Easy Make

Measurements 13cm/5in high and 14cm/5in wide

Materials O Small amount of Sublime Extra Fine Merino wool DK in each of Red (Red Hot 167) and Cream (Alabaster 003) O Small piece of polyester wadding O Pair of 3¾mm (No.9) knitting needles

Tension 23 stitches and 32 rows, to 10 x 10cm, over stocking stitch, using 3¾mm needles

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Abbreviations K, knit; p, purl; st, stitch; tog, together; inc, increase (by working twice into same st); dec, decrease; ss, stocking st (k on right side and p on wrong side)

Note Instructions in square brackets are worked as stated after 2nd bracket.

From The Heart The cards are written and presents wrapped, so keep those fingers busy with this Nordic tree decoration To make With 3¾mm needles and Red, cast on 5 sts. ** P 1 row. 1st inc row: Inc in first st, k to last 2 sts, inc in next st, k1. P 1 row. Repeat last 2 rows, twice more. 2nd inc row: Inc in first st, k1, inc in next st, k to last 4 sts, [inc in next st, k1] twice. ** Work from ** to **, once more – 25 sts. P 1 row. Work 1st inc row. Repeat last 2 rows, twice more – 31 sts. Ss 3 rows. Work 1st inc row – 33 sts. Ss 5 rows. Dec row: K1, k2tog, k to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1. P 1 row. Dividing row: K15, cast off next st, k to end. Work on last set of 15 sts for first side. First side: P 1 row. Work dec row. Repeat last 2 rows, twice more – 9 sts. Cast off.

Second side: With wrong side facing, rejoin yarn to remaining sts. P 1 row. Work dec row. Repeat last 2 rows, twice more – 9 sts. Cast off. Make one more piece. Hanging loop: With 3¾mm needles and Red, cast on 32 sts. Cast off.

To complete Using knitted heart as template, cut wadding to fit shape, making it about 1cm smaller on all sides. With Cream, Swiss darn snowflake motif (see chart and instructions, on page 66) on front at centre of heart. Pin knitted pieces together, enclosing wadding. With Cream, work blanket stitch around outer edges of heart. Join ends of hanging loop and attach to heart. LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 27


Wet Felting The art of wet felting is easy to learn and enables you to produce gorgeous wall hangings, soft furnishings or wearable items

All about felting materials The following materials are essential to the process of wet felting.

The wonderful thing about the materials required for wet felting is that they are readily available. Wool can be bought online or from specialist suppliers. Other materials can be recycled from old curtains or garments and, similarly, all embellishments, from beads to silk fibres, are simple to source.

lting? What is wet fe craft –

Felting is an ancient nd examples have been fou bs tom an eri Sib in preserved Even now, dating back to 600BC. continue some Mongolian tribes al to live in yurts, tradition s as ain rem t fel d an ts, felted hu r. eve versatile and useful as ting fel t we of s ces The pro ter and involves adding warm wa rolling soap to wool fibres and er. Each and rubbing them togeth les; when wool fibre has tiny sca ed the water and soap are add friction scales swell up and the ourages caused by agitating enc form the them to lock together to t. robust fabric we call fel n, thi or ck thi be can Felt layers ny ma w ho on ing depend ess ckn of fibres you use. The thi d nee you is based on how strong the finished felt to be.

Felt & Fibre Art by Val Hughes (Search Press, £17.99). See page 59.

28 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

Soap

Netting

Soap is used primarily to speed up the process of felting. The type you use in wet felting does not really matter: it can be a traditional bar of soap, washing-up liquid added to a spray bottle or even soap flakes sprinkled onto your work before applying the water. However, a bar of olive-oil soap is biodegradable and kinder to both the fibres and your hands.

Netting is used to cover the laid-out felt before it is felted. It helps to keep the wool in place as you roll the work. You can buy netting from specialist fabric shops, however, charity stores often sell net curtains, which can be cut to size and work just as well.

Spray bottle Used for dispersing water evenly over the fibres, spray bottles can be purchased from specialist felting suppliers or garden centres – or simply rinse out an old kitchen-cleaner spray bottle thoroughly and use that.

Plastic carrier bags These are useful when pressing and rubbing wet fibres together during the felting process.

Wool fibres Wool fibres are at the heart of felt making. These are generally bought as ‘tops’, semi-processed wool that has

Towel and plastic sheeting These are used to protect your work surface. The towels soak up most of the water from the felting process while the plastic sheeting prevents any excess water leaking through.

Rolling mat Specialist felting mats offer an effective way to speed up the felting process. They give a firm base when working and make rolling easier than the alternatives (such as using bubble wrap). However, bamboo mats – often sold as place mats or sushi mats – are inexpensive and just as good.

been cleaned and combed into coils called hanks or skeins. Merino wool felts extremely well, creating a flat, even surface that can be embellished or machine embroidered. The Merino is a breed of sheep from central Spain that is prized for its wool, which is some of the finest and softest wool produced by any breed of sheep. It is breathable and odour resistant, and various grades of Merino wool are available. Merino


Try A New Craft Creating a piece of felt with a distinct design, such as this, requires careful felting. However, the rewards of achieving a strong image with separated colours is well worth the effort

wool tops can be mixed readily and to good effect, giving a lovely, painterly look to your work. They are ideal for the beginner to use because they shrink quickly, which speeds up the felting process. There are, of course, many other wools that can be used for felting and adding interesting texture but we will only be using Merino wool in this feature.

Silk fibres Silk will not felt on its own, it needs to be mixed with wool fibres. It gives a lift and sheen to felt that can appear a little flat when made from wool alone.

Mulberry silk Like wool, this is bought as tops. It is soft, lustrous and naturally bright and white, although it is often dyed to an assortment of colours.

Tussah silk Another natural silk, produced by tussah moths, is also bought as tops. The tops are often creamy in colour and sometimes a darker colour resembling tea. This type adds a natural golden colour to the work.

Silk noils Found in the inner parts of the silkworm cocoon. These shorter fibres can be particularly useful for adding texture.

Embellishments Threads Using different threads can add interest, texture and colour with both machine and hand embroidery. Cotton and silk threads are useful for construction and mark making, while metallic and pearlised threads are fun for adding lustre and sheen.

Iridescent fibres Iridescent fibres are fine, reflective fibres that add sparkle to your work. They are useful for holding other mixed media materials – such as knitting wools, leaves and threads – in place. Subtlety is the key with these fibres: a little goes a long way. The material

comes in a variety of colours and some is heat-bondable.

Beads

Available in a vast selection of shapes, sizes and materials – paper, glass, felt and bone, to name just a few – stitching on a few beads adds light, texture or colour to whatever you are wet felting.

Turn the page to make the rose panel

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 29


Let’s get started This rose panel is created using the wet-felting method, utilising Merino wool tops and mulberry silks. It is then embellished using both free-machine and hand embroidery. The colour palette here is mainly black and red, with highlights of green and yellow to lift the work, but you can choose any colours to suit your taste (see Notes, below). A BIT MORE TRICKY

smaller amounts of cool green to the centre of each rose in the same way and, finally, tease out tiny amounts of black, twist them between your fingers to make wisps of wool, then add one or two to each rose to give texture and interest.

direction from top to bottom, in a rectangle measuring 36 x 33.5cm.

You will need O Basic felt-making equipment: 50 x 50cm bamboo mat, soap, spray bottle, towel, plastic sheeting, netting and plastic carrier bag O Merino wool tops: black, red, yellow-green and cool green O Mulberry silks: variegated pink, variegated lilac and variegated purple O Sewing machine O Machine embroidery thread: red and green O Stranded embroidery thread in yellow and green O Embroidery needle O Embroidery scissors

Notes: With strong subject matter such as this, it's important to stick to a limited colour palette – don’t be tempted to use any colours outside your initial planned range. Turn your work continuously during the felt-making process. This prevents shrinkage in one direction only, which will distort your design or even lose it completely. Keep fibres wispy to encourage them to lock onto your base layer of wool. Remember to cover mulberry silks lightly with wispy Merino slivers to help bond them to the base fibres. If a particular area is not attaching as well as others, concentrate on this area until it is firmly fixed before continuing. Cover it with the net, add more soap and water and rub in a circular motion.

5

Draw larger amounts of yellow-green fibres from the wool-top hanks, twist the ends together and open out the centres to make leaf shapes. Place a few around the roses to fill a little of the background.

2

Lay down a second layer of black Merino wool on top. This time, with the wool at right angles to the previous layer so that the fibres all run from left to right. Lay a third layer on top, again at right angles to the one beneath – so the fibres run from top to bottom on this last layer.

6 3

Pull off a fair amount of red from the wool-top hank and shape the fibres into rough circles to represent roses. The size of each rose is not critical but you will need to decide how many you wish to add and adjust the size you make them accordingly. Here, each one measures approximately 10cm in diameter. Arrange the roses on top of the black rectangle.

1

30 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

Felting the piece

7

Laying out the wool

Protect your surface by putting a towel on top of a plastic sheet, then place your rolling mat on top. Tease out some black wool fibres from the end of one wool-top hank. Lay them out in a fine, even layer, with the fibres all facing the same

Tease out tiny amounts of cool green fibres from the wool-top hanks and make wisps to add veins and other detailing to the leaves. Finally, using pinkpurple variegated mulberry silks, create a fine, broken border around the edges of the picture. Add some tiny touches of the same mulberry silk among the leaves and roses, and cover these touches lightly using small wisps of merino wool.

4

Draw off small amounts of yellowgreen fibres from the wool-top hank, shape them into small circles and place one in the centre of each rose. Add

Lay a large piece of netting over the whole piece and use the spray bottle to spray hot water over the whole area. The addition of the roses and other details means that the wool is very thick, so it is important that it is thoroughly wetted to avoid dry areas remaining inside, which will prevent it felting properly.


8

into place and lay the netting back over the top, then add more soap. Next, rub the area vigorously with a scrunched-up plastic bag. This forces the soapy water down into the area and felts the fibres. Lift the netting away to check the piece has felted properly, if not, then repeat the steps above, until it is secured.

details on how to free-machine embroider). Work from the inside of the flower outwards in a loose spiral. Keep the red thread within the red felted area and secure the thread by overstitching. Trim thread ends then embroider the other roses in the same way.

Use your hands to smooth the piece down and ensure the water is spread throughout. If any areas feel slightly fluffy, that area is still dry, so add more water with the spray bottle.

13 9

Once you are happy the wool is thoroughly wetted, draw the soap over the whole piece, working especially carefully to ensure all the layers and details stay in place.

Continue wet felting the piece, remembering to turn the piece each time, until the piece measures approximately 28 x 25.5cm in size. Rinse the piece in clean water and wring it out to remove excess water and soap. Pull the piece back into shape and leave it to dry naturally.

15

Thread your sewing machine with green embroidery thread and free-machine embroider veins onto the leaves.

Embellishing

16

Using all six strands of the embroidery cotton, stitch a group of French knots in the centre of each rose (see page 65 for details of how to work this stitch).

10

Carefully roll up the mat tightly, with the netting and wool in place. Place the palms of your hands on top of the rolled-up mat and rub back and forth vigorously around a hundred times to start felting the piece. Unroll the mat and check that all the pieces have remained in position.

14

Thread your sewing machine with red embroidery thread and begin to free-machine embroider loose, wavy spirals on one of the roses, to suggest the shape of petals (see page 65 for

The finished piece You can use your finished piece as a wall hanging, appliqué it to the front of a cushion or create a second panel to make a small bag.

11

Carefully remove the netting, lift the piece away from the mat, turn it through 90 degrees and place it back on the mat.

12

Repeat steps 10 and 11 to felt the piece in the opposite direction. If any areas are revealed to have lifted away, then press them back down

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 31


Join Us Online

Learn How To Patchwork With The Woman’s Weekly Video Guide Expert Pam Lumsdale shows you how to quilt using striking stripwork We’ve put together a great starter project that you can adapt as you wish. Just log onto www.womansweekly.com/patspatchwork for a step-by-step guide, including two video tutorials. Our strip patchwork tablemat is made from alternate blocks of green and blue, with a pink and red backing fabric. We’re sure you’ll agree that it’s a stunning make – and a great way to use up your stash of fabric remnants. Just plan your design out on paper first so that you get a harmonious and even design, then you are ready to begin. For a bigger project, such as a bed cover, simply make more stripwork squares and stitch them together with more fabric edgings.

PLUS! If you like to relax with KNITTING, CROCHET, PAPERCRAFT, CROSS-STITCH or JEWELLERY MAKING, our online collection of ideas covers all kinds of crafts. Do tell us what you think, too. We always love to hear from you.

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FREE PATTERN OFFER You pay

WORTH

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his stylish Lifestyle Wardrobe is ideal for the office or, by cchanging the fabrics, it’s p perfect for formal occasions, including weddings.

Your pattern includes five options: OA lined princess-seamed jacket with peplum and button closures ODarted, sleeveless, knee-length dress with flounced hem and centre-back zipper OFitted sleeveless shell top with centre-back zipper OSemi-fitted, above-the-knee-length skirt with centre-back zipper and slit NEXT O Straight-legged trousers with side seam MONTH’S pockets and mock-fly zipper PATTERN SIZES: 6-22 FABRIC: Tweeds and gabardine *Terms and Conditions: The offer is limited to the first 1,000 applicants and once all have been sent out there will be no more; the pattern is for sizes A5 (6-8-10-12-14) and E5 (14-16-18-20-22). The offer is valid until 10 January 2016 or until stocks run out. Please make cheques payable to Butterick Company Ltd for £2.75. Should you be unsuccessful and there are no more patterns, your cheque will be destroyed and not cashed. No correspondence can be entered into. If you are successful, your pattern will be despatched within a minimum of 7 working days and a maximum of 28 working days.

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Tote Sweet Transform a plain jute bag with this pretty floral design

A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need O Chart on page 68 O Jute tote bag (measuring at least 30 x 30cm) O DMC stranded cotton embroidery thread in the following colours: B5200 (white), 3607 (bright pink), 211 (light violet), 153 (violet), 554 (dark violet), 553 (very dark violet), 3747 (light blue), 159 (blue), 56 (dark blue), 3838 (very dark blue) O Tapestry needle, size 22 O Tape measure

Finished motif size: 18cm diameter; 84 x 90 stitches

To work the embroidery

1 2 3

Use a tape measure to find the centre point of the front of the bag and mark it with your needle. This shows you where to begin your stitching.

The full design is worked in cross-stitch; see our stitch guide on page 65 for how to work this stitch. The chart on page 68 shows the finished design. Each coloured square represents one crossstitch worked over one thread of fabric

using two strands of embroidery thread in your needle. The key with the chart indicates the colour of thread used.

4

Find the centre of the chart, as indicated by the yellow lines on the chart. Working from the centre outward and following the chart, stitch the flower motif, stitching into the grid of the jute fabric in just the same way as you would onto Aida fabric. Note: This design blends four shades of the same colour for each of the petals, which means that if you put a stitch wrong here and there you really won’t notice. So no unpicking – hurrah!

Tip... If you choose a laminated bag (where the inside is coated in a thin layer of plastic), it will help to keep the bag in shape around your stitches. Use your needle to punch through the plastic with each stitch, gently removing any excess that comes away.

Modern Cross Stitch by Hannah Sturrock; photography by Jo Henderson (Cico Books, £12.99) © Cico Books 2015

34 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW


Stitchcraft

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 35


rk'shops o W ' t hat ! k wor '

'

'

'

£69

per person

Would you like to be able to alter a knitting pattern to your own specifications? Now’s your chance. We’ll teach you how to work out a pattern for a simple stocking-stitch cardigan in double-knitting yarn. It’s also aimed at budding designers with some knowledge of knitting. 10am Welcome, with cofee and tea 10.30am Draw line diagram with detailed measurements as required 11am Work out the tension from your own swatch to be used to translate all the measurements into stitches and rows 11.15am Calculating back and front instructions and working out all shapings 1pm Lunch 2pm Calculating sleeve instruction and working out all shapings

£69

per person

3.30pm Tea break 3.45pm How to incorporate a simple stitch pattern into your own instructions 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes You will need to bring with you: ' An old sweater or item that fits you perfectly ' a calculator ' a tension sample knitted in the doubleknitting yarn that you intend to knit the entire sweater. The sample should be knitted on 4mm (No. 8) over 34 stitches thus: K 3 rows. 1st row: K to end. 2nd row: K2, p30, k2. Repeat last 2 rows, 19 times more. Next 2 rows: K2, p30, k2. Cast of pwise.

it & Crochet Tea Party th Freddie and Monika on iday 25 March and Friday June

ou know how to knit and crochet, we’ve perfect day out for you. We have a oice of fabulous yarn projects for you to ake. You’ll need to be confident in basic itting or crochet to join in, but there will emonstrations on knitting in the round, em ro ery, ea ng an a crochet slip (or ‘magic’) ring. WW’s Editor, Diane, will join you for afternoon tea before you go home. 10am Welcome, with cofee and tea 10.30am Start work on your chosen cake project 11am Introduction to pattern reading and basic shaping 11.30 Tea break 11.45am Double-pointed needles knitting demonstration

1pm Lunch 2pm Sewing-up instructions 2.45pm Adding beading and decorative embroidery 3.30pm Tea break 4pm Stuffing cakes and finishing of 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

To book easily, call 0800 024 1212*

How To Design A Child’s Knitted Sweater with Tina on Friday 7 October

How To Design Your Own Knitted Cardigan with Tina on Friday 15 April

Come along to WW’s HQ for our exclusive knitting & crochet workshops and meet the editorial team

£69

per person

We’ll teach you how to create a sweater pattern for your child or grandchild. The pattern will be for a simple stocking-stitch sweater in double-knitting yarn that you make at home. 10am Welcome, with cofee and tea 10.30am Draw line diagram with detailed measurements 11am Work out the tension from a swatch to be used to translate all the measurements into stitches and rows 11.15am Calculating back and front instructions and working out all shapings 1pm Lunch 2pm Calculating sleeve instruction and working out all shapings 3.30pm Tea break

3.45pm How to incorporate motif into front instructions 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes You will need to bring with you: ' An old sweater that fits intended child ' a calculator ' a tension sample knitted in the double-knitting yarn that you intend to knit the entire sweater. The sample should be knitted on 4mm (No. 8) over 34 stitches thus: K 3 rows. 1st row: K to end. 2nd row: K2, p30, k2. Repeat last 2 rows, 19 times more. Next 2 rows: K2, p30, k2. Cast of pwise.

rcular Knitting asterclass

£69 per person

with Freddie and Monika on Friday 17 June For experienced knitters, this introduces you to two circular knitting tools: double-pointed needles and circular needle. You’ll learn how to hold and work on a set of four double-pointed needles, creating narrow knitted tubes, such as socks or a polo neck. In the afternoon, you’ll work on a circular needle for straight and tubular knitting. This workshop is the next step to build up your skills. 10am Welcome, with cofee and tea 10.45am How to cast on and divide stitches on to doublepointed needles and join to form a round 11.05am Working with doublepointed needles 11.30am Tea break 12.30pm Rearranging stitches

and troubleshooting doublepointed needle techniques 1pm Lunch 2pm How to work on circular knitting needles 3.15pm Tea break 3.45pm Working on a circular knitting project 4.15 Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

DATA PROTECTION Woman’s Weekly, published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, will collect your personal information to process your order and alert you of news, new products, services and offers available from Woman’s Weekly and from


Woman’s Weekly Workshops OUR 2016 KNITTING & CROCHET WORKSHOPS IN LONDON TINA EGLETON WW’s Technical Knitting Editor has over 40 years’ experience. She’s designed many of Woman’s Weekly’s knitting patterns and is an expert tutor.

Make The Woman’s Weekly Knitted Bear with Freddie and Monika on Monday 16 May You’ll need to be a confident knitter to make our adorable toy as he needs some complex shaping techniques to create the perfect shape. We’ll take you through the tricky shapings, including turning rows and invisible seaming and facial embroidery. 10am Welcome, with cofee and tea 10.30am Start work on your bear 11am Basic shaping techniques 11.30am Tea break 11.45am Complex sole shaping and attaching legs to body 1pm Lunch 2pm Sewing-up instructions 2.45pm Indenting eye positions and adding embroidery 3.30pm Afternoon tea with WW’s Editor Diane per person 4pm How to stuf your bear 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

£69

Learn To Crochet With Your Child NEW! £60 Or Grandchild per pair on Friday 12 August

This half-day workshop will be fun for you and your child or grandchild to learn together. Our tutors will teach you how to do basic crochet stitches, starting from how to hold your hook and yarn to how to do basic stitches. Ticket price includes one child and one adult. 10am Welcome, with cofee and tea 10.30am How to hold your hook and yarn and make a slip knot 11am Working basic stitches, chain, double crochet and trebles 11.30am Using basic stitches, try an easy project idea 1pm Workshop finishes

FREDDIE PATMORE Our Knitting Assistant has been crocheting since she was a child. She’s gone on to become a published author and designer and loves teaching our workshops.

Learn To Crochet with Freddie and nd Monika on 22 April an nd 16 Septembe er op for The ideal worksho ur beginners. Join ou friendly team of tutors, who’ll teacch you all you need tto per person know, starting with t do how to hold your hook and yarn, how to the basic stitches and how to work from your chosen pattern.

£69

10am Welcome, with cofee and tea 10.30am How to hold your hook and yarn and make a slip knot 11am Learn how to work the basic stitches, chain, double crochet and double trebles 11.30am Continue working on the basic stitches 1pm Lunch 2pm How to read a pattern and work in the round 3.30pm How to change a colour and work a basic project 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

Learn To Knit With Your Child Or Grandchild on Friday 19 August Our tutors will teach you and your little one to knit from scratch on this half-day workshop. They’ll show you how to cast on, knit, purl and cast off and get started on a scarf or a bookmark project, which you can carry on with together ready for the winter. Ticket price includes one child and one adult.

Speedy/Ultimate Christmas Knitting

£69

per person

with Freddie and Monika on Monday 3 October Packed with handy, time-saving hints and gorgeous gift ideas, this workshop is for the confideent begi ginner. 10am Welcome, with tea/cofee 10.45am Start work on some super-speedy Christmas decs 11.30am Tea break 12.30pm Finish of your decs, darn in ends and learn to stifen for a professional finish 1pm Lunch 2pm Quick scarf project using glitzy yarn 3.15pm Tea break 3.45pm Finish of your scarf and learn other time-saving tips and tricks 4.15pm Question time 4.30pm Workshop finishes

It’s easy to book , just call us on

0800 024 1212* Quote code LTM01 *Lines open Monday to Friday, 10am4pm, but closed bank holidays. Call charges from mobiles and non-BT landlines may vary. Booking notes for the Knit & Crochet Tea Party: Please state at the time of booking which craft (or maybe both) you are confident with. This will allow the tutor to tailor the day to suit the group.

Where are the workshops held? ' At our HQ, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU

NEW!

£60

per pair

10am Welcome, with cofee and tea 10.30am How to hold your yarn and needles 10.45am Casting on 11am Learning how to knit and purl stitches 11.30am How to cast of 11.45am Start work on a beginner’s project 1pm Workshop finishes

Time Inc. (UK) Ltd by email, phone and post. You can unsubscribe from emails by clicking unsubscribe from within the email

MONIKA COBEL Our newest member of the team has a calm and patient nature, making her an excellent tutor. She’s now begun designing for Woman’s Weekly.

The workshops do not include lunch, but at our HQ, there is a canteen or you can bring your own. There are also food outlets close to the office. Should your chosen date already be sold out, you will if possible be ofered an alternative date. TERMS AND CONDITIONS Tickets will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Woman’s Weekly has the right to change the itinerary of the day. Please note, tickets to this event are non-refundable, unless it is cancelled or postponed. A guest-list policy will be in operation at the event. Shortly after purchasing tickets, you will receive confirmation: this is your ticket to the event, so please retain it for future reference.

, ops h s ork m/ w r ou kly.co n o e info answets e r mo om en For visit w ev


It’s A Wrap! A mix of modern and retro, this take on the granny-square style teams perfectly with jeans and a winter jacket

EASY PEASY

Measurements 29 x 160cm/11½ x 63in, including edging.

Materials 400g of DK yarn in six contrasting colours. Size 4.00 crochet hook.

Abbreviations Ch, chain; dc, double crochet; st, stitch; tr, treble; slst, slip st.

Note Yarn amounts are based on average requirements and are therefore approximate. Instructions in square brackets are worked as stated after 2nd bracket.

To make Text © Catherine Hirst Photographs: © Loupe Images/Emma Mitchell

With 4.00 hook and 1st contrast colour, make 230ch. 1st foundation row: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook (counts as 1 st), 1dc in each ch to end, turn – 229 sts. 2nd foundation row: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr in first st, [miss 2 sts, 3tr in next st] to last 3 sts, miss 2 sts, 2tr in last st, turn. 1st row: 3ch (counts as 1tr), miss first 2tr, 3tr in gap between last missed tr and next tr, [miss next 3tr, 3tr in gap between last missed tr and next tr] to last 2 sts, miss 1tr, 1tr in top of 3ch, turn. Join in 2nd contrast colour. 2nd row: 3ch (count as 1tr), miss first tr, 1tr in gap between missed tr and next tr, [miss next 3tr, 3tr in gap between last

38 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

missed tr and next tr] to last 4 sts, miss 3tr, 1tr in gap between last missed tr and 3ch, 1tr in top of 3ch. These 2 rows form pattern. Pattern another 21 rows, changing colours on every alternate row. Fasten off.

Edging With right side facing, join in 4th contrast colour to any st along side edge, 1ch (does not count as a st), work 1 row of dc evenly along all sides, working 3dc in each corner and making the total of dc to be divisible by 6, slst in first dc. Fasten off. Join in 3rd contrast colour Next round: 1ch (does not count as a st), 1dc in same place as join, [miss 2dc, work 2tr, 3ch, slst in 3rd ch from hook, 3tr all in next dc, miss 2dc, 1dc in next dc] to end, omitting dc at end of last repeat, slst in first dc. Fasten off.

Tip...IF YOU PREFER,

YOU COULD SEW THE TWO SHORT ENDS OF THE WRAP TOGETHER TO FORM A SNOOD.


Crochet

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 39


Cushy Numbers When there’s no room to sit on the sofa, get comfy on the floor with these contemporary cushions A BIT MORE TRICKY

Measurements Small cushion: 41cm (16in) diameter. Medium cushion: 46cm (18in) diameter. Large cushion: 51cm (20in) diameter.

Materials Small cushion: 4 x 50g (115m) balls of Bergere De France Sonora (50% cotton, 50% acrylic) in Ecume (220.321). Pair of 8mm (No. 0) knitting needles. Round cushion pad 41cm (16in) in diameter. Medium cushion: 6 x 50g (140m) balls of Bergere De France Coton Fifty (50% cotton, 50% acrylic) in Ficelle (239.061). Pair of 6mm (No. 4) knitting needles. Round cushion pad 46cm (18in) in diameter. Large cushion: 7 x 50g (115m) balls of Bergere De France Sonora (50% cotton, 50% acrylic) in Caverne (244.141). Pair of 8mm (No. 0) knitting needles. Round

Photography: Angela Spain Stylist: Kandy Regis

SMALL CUSHION Outer panel: With 8mm needles and using two strands of Ecume together, cast on 28 sts. Pattern row: Sl1, k27. Repeat pattern row, 139 times more. Cast off. Centre: With right side facing and using 8mm needles, working through both strands, pick up first st of every ridge row along one row-end edge of outer panel – 70 sts. Using two strands of Ecume together, join yarn and k picked up sts. K another 2 rows. 1st dec row: [K2tog] to end – 35 sts. K 1 row. 2nd dec row: K1, [k2tog] to end – 18 sts. K 1 row.

40 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

K, knit; st, stitch; sl, slip; tog, together; dec, decrease (by taking 2 sts tog).

Using three strands of Ficelle together, join yarn and k picked up sts. K another 2 rows. 1st dec row: K1, [k2tog] to end – 51 sts. K 3 rows. 2nd dec row: K1, [k2tog] to end – 26 sts. K 1 row. 3rd dec row: [K2tog] to end – 13 sts. K 1 row. 4th dec row: K1, [k2tog] to end – 7 sts. Break off yarn, leaving an end. Thread end through remaining sts, pull up tightly and secure. Work other centre to match. Insert cushion pad and join seam.

Note

LARGE CUSHION

Yarn amounts are based on average requirements and are therefore approximate. Instructions in square brackets are worked as stated after 2nd bracket.

Outer panel: With 8mm needles and using 2 strands of Caverne together, cast on 40 sts. Pattern row: Sl1, k39. Repeat pattern row, 201 times more. Cast off. Centre: With right side facing and using 8mm needles, working through both strands, pick up first st of every ridge row along one row-end edge of outer panel – 101 sts. Using two strands of Caverne together, join yarn and k picked up sts. K another 2 rows. 1st dec row: K1, [k2tog] to end – 51 sts. K 3 rows. 2nd dec row: K1, [k2tog] to end – 26 sts. K 1 row. 3rd dec row: [K2tog] to end – 13 sts. K 1 row. 4th dec row: K1, [k2tog] to end – 7 sts. Break off yarn, leaving an end. Thread end through remaining sts, pull up tightly and secure. Work other centre to match. Insert cushion pad and join seam.

cushion pad 51cm (20in) in diameter.

Tension 12 stitches and 20 rows, to 10 x 10cm, over garter stitch (every row knit), using two strands of Sonora yarn together and 8mm needles. 14 stitches and 24 rows, to 10 x 10cm, over garter stitch (every row knit), using three strands of Coton Fifty yarn together and 6mm needles.

Abbreviations

3rd dec row: [K2tog] to end – 9 sts. Break off yarn, leaving an end. Thread end through remaining sts, pull up tightly and secure. Work other centre to match. Insert cushion pad and join seam.

MEDIUM CUSHION Outer panel: With 6mm needles and using three strands of Ficelle together, cast on 40 sts. Pattern row: Sl1, k39. Repeat pattern row, 201 times more. Cast off. Centre: With right side facing and using 6mm needles, working through 3 strands, pick up first st of every ridge row along one row-end edge of outer panel – 101 sts.


Knitting

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 41


Understanding Dress Patterns To get the best from your pattern, you’ll need to know how to take your body measurements accurately, choose the right pattern size and then follow it correctly. Here, we show you how Taking body measurements Whether you are planning to make clothes for yourself, your children or grandchildren, you need to determine which size pattern to buy. Do not use your dress size as a guide; sizing varies from brand to brand and you cannot rely on it. You must measure yourself accurately.

Measuring yourself

5 1

6

3

Trying to measure yourself can be tricky, so it is best to ask a friend to help. Do not take measurements over clothing; for the most accurate results, strip down to your usual underwear and put on your shoes. Tie a piece of string around your waist as a helpful guide for taking vertical measurements. Keep a note of your measurements on the chart on page 43; you will need to take them with you when you go to choose a pattern and also refer to them later when you come to make any alterations.

7

8

Text © Jane Bolsover Technical illustrations © Loupe Images/Stephen Drew

Measuring children Children can be difficult to measure as they rarely stay still for long. If you have trouble, take measurements from garments that fit them well and compare these to the garment measurements chart on the pattern envelope. Age is indicated on the children’s and toddlers’ charts but as children’s physical development can vary wildly within an age group, it is best to compare body measurements if possible. For infants’ patterns (babies who are not yet walking), you only need the weight and height (the length of the baby measured with the foot at a right angle to the leg, as if the baby is standing).

42 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

1 BUST Measure around the fullest part; do not allow the tape measure to slip down at the back.

2 WAIST No breathing in! Take this measurement firmly around the waist but make sure it is comfortable.

3 WAIST TO HIPS The distance from your waist to the widest part of your hips, about 7-8in (1821cm) from your waistline.

4 HIPS Take the tape measure around the widest part of the hips. 5 BACK NECK NAPE TO WAIST Measure from the neckbone at the centre of your back down to the string tied around your waist.

6 HEIGHT Remove your shoes and stand straight with your back against a wall. Place

a ruler on top of your head and mark the wall lightly with a pencil, then measure from the mark to the floor.

7 FINISHED LENGTH SKIRT Measure from the string at your waist down to the required hem depth.

8 FINISHED LENGTH TROUSERS Measure from the waist to the floor at the side of the body.


Know-how

Basic measurement chart Keep a record of your basic measurements in the chart below, using a pencil. It is best to re-measure yourself every six months to make sure that you have not changed in size. Note your measurements in the first column, the pattern body measurements in the second and the difference between the two in the third. A difference of 6mm (¼in) in length and 1cm (/in) in width means that you should adjust the pattern slightly.

YOUR MEASUREMENT

PATTERN MEASUREMENT

DIFFERENCE

Bust Waist Hips Nape to waist Waist to hip Height Pattern size

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 43


Types of patterns and what they tell you In addition to commercial dressmaking patterns, there are free sources such as sewing books. Generally, all patterns work in a similar way but there are a few differences in how they look.

Back width at the hemline, and sometimes more; use them as a guide for any envelope information adjustments that you wish to make. will include: Inside the pattern Notions or envelope requirements: These

Commercial patterns These patterns are made from three main parts: the envelope; the instruction sheet; the pattern tissue. Commercial pattern envelopes contain a wealth of information. The front of the envelope gives you the style number, pattern size and illustrations or photographs of each garment and its variations, usually called views, which are included in the pattern. The back of the envelope is printed with all the information you need to prepare for your project and it makes an excellent buying guide.

50 44 0 LOVE O TO MAKE A WITH W HWWW WI

are the trimmings, fastenings and any other items that you will need in order to complete your garment. Suggested fabrics: As recommended by the pattern’s designer to suit the style best, to ensure that you select a suitable fabric. Advice on plaids, stripes and napped fabrics is also given. Fabric quantities chart: This tells you exactly how much fabric to buy for each size and view, in several fabric widths. Interfacing and lining quantities will also be given if required. Finished garment measurements: Usually the length and sometimes the

Here you will find an instruction sheet that provides the following information: O Outline drawings of all views; O Pattern piece diagrams to help with identification; O Cutting layouts; O Step-by-step sewing instructions for the pattern you are going to make, plus important details on how to use the pattern. Finally, of course, the pattern envelope contains your pattern tissue. Each pattern piece is printed separately on the tissue, ready for you to cut out.

Tip... Where the width of your chosen fabric is not included, ask the sales person to help you work out how much you will need – but bear in mind that the pattern will contain no cutting layouts for that width.

m


Complimentary patterns Patterns provided by magazines, such as the girl’s pinafore dress on page 51, are a great way to introduce yourself to dressmaking as you do not have to spend a fortune on the pattern to start with. The fact that they are free does not mean they are no good. Generally with these patterns you will find: OPhotographs illustrating the garment and its variations, which will be printed along with the step-bystep sewing instructions in the main book or magazine. OThe pattern sheet is normally inserted separately at either the centre or back of the publication. You will need to trace out the pattern pieces before you start, as they often have a multitude of different patterns and sizes printed on both sides of a sheet. OThe size chart and fabric quantities chart is normally printed with the pattern sheet although it may appear

with the step-by-step instructions instead. You will need to compare your measurements to find the correct size to trace out and right amount of fabric to buy. OThe recommended fabrics, trimmings and outline drawings may also be printed either with the stepby-step instructions or on the separate pattern sheet.

The main difference between commercial and complimentary patterns is that commercial patterns are sized not only for different body measurements but also for body types. Women’s figures vary greatly in shape from one person to another, so this is an attempt by the pattern companies to cut out as many fitting issues for you as possible.

Recognising your figure type Once you have taken your measurements, you need to assess which figure type you most closely resemble. These figure types are normally printed in the back of each pattern book. Overall height is one indicator but more important are the back neck-to-waist and waistto-hip measurements. Although figure types are not supposed to signify age groups, an age level may be suggested by the styles and designs in that group. It is best to stay in your figure type if you can, as these will tend to fit you better.

Misses, Misses Petite and Misses Plus ‘Misses’ is statistically considered to be the average figure type: height 5ft 5in to 5ft 6in (165-167.5cm) without shoes, with a well-developed and proportioned body. The hips are measured at 8in (23cm) below the waist and the back neck to waist is longer than the other figure types. ‘Misses Petite’ figure is 1in (2.5cm) shorter overall than ‘Misses’, with the hip measured at 7in (18cm) below the waist but the proportions are similar. ‘Misses Plus’ is for the wellproportioned and developed figure.

Misses, Misses Petite and Misses Plus

Y u g u i r/ Te n Teen

Young Junior/Teen

Women’s

This group is for the young developing miss – about 5ft 2in-5ft 5in (157-165cm) without shoes – with a small bust, waist larger in proportion to hips and hips measured at 7in (18cm) below the waist.

For the larger, more fullyy mature figure – average height 5ft 5in-5fft 6in (157-167cm) – with the hip measured at 8in (23cm) below the waist.

Wom n s


Buying the right pattern size Compare your measurements to the measurement charts to decide which of the figure types is most like your own (commercial patterns only). Your pattern size is then determined by your circumference measurements, so refer to the appropriate category again to find the bust, waist and hip measurements that correspond most closely to yours. Few of us have a standard figure, so there are often discrepancies between the chart measurements and our measurements; depending on the pattern you choose, it is best to select a size that corresponds to the most important area of fit. O For a dress, blouse, or jacket, buy a pattern nearest to your bust size and adjust the other measurements to fit. O For skirts and trousers, buy a pattern nearest to your hip size and adjust the waistline to fit. O If you choose a multi-pattern that includes several different garments – blouse, skirt and trousers, for example – select the size that

corresponds to your bust size and adjust the other areas if necessary. If there is a large difference, or you are worried about adjusting the fit, buy two sizes of the same pattern and use the appropriate pattern pieces from each. However, many styles come with a multiple of sizes in one pattern envelope, which can be a great help if your bust is one size and your hips another. O Be guided by the description on the pattern. A blouse may be described as ‘fitted’, ‘loose fitting’ or ‘very loose fitting’. If you don’t want a loose fit, for example, choose a smaller size or another style.

Selecting the right pattern pieces The pattern piece diagrams enable you to identify easily the pattern pieces you will need to use. If your pattern doesn’t have one of these, then it will usually have a list of the pieces. As a last resort, look at the cutting layouts, which can help you to identify them.

6 2

7

3A

1A

4

5 This diagram shows an illustration of the pattern pieces included in a suggested princess-line dress pattern, identifing the pieces needed for each view. It also shows whether any pieces need to be extended. The pattern pieces are labelled clearly by name, number and view, and are listed accordingly. There is often a key that tells you which piece to use view for which view.

1B

3B

1 (1A) Front 2 Side front 3 (3A) Back 4 Side back 5 Sleeve 6 Front facing 7 Back facing


Understanding pattern markings All pattern pieces have pattern markings or symbols, which provide information essential for every step of the making-up process, from identifying pattern pieces and cutting out to constructing the garment. They are fairly standard on all patterns but it helps to understand the functions they perform. They can be split into two groups: (1) Preparation and cutting out; (2) Construction. To follow, are the most common.

Preparation and cutting-out markings These markings help you to cut out the pattern pieces, make simple pattern alterations and lay out your pattern pieces correctly on the fabric.

Construction markings Other marks are used to help you match pieces of fabric together correctly and to show where zippers, buttons and other garment features, such as darts and pockets, are to be positioned.

Cutting lines: Multi-sized patterns have dierent cutting lines for each size. See the key for the correct line for your size and follow it around each pattern piece carefully.

A

Notches: These are marked as triangles or diamonds and are used for matching pattern pieces when sewing. You will ďŹ nd notches are placed in groups of one or more notches but they will correspond with adjoining pieces. Small circles or squares are sometimes used as extra matching aids for joining pieces, such as a sleeve to an armhole.

B

Extension marks: These are used when two pieces of a pattern have to be joined together to make one complete pattern piece. The symbols may vary depending on the pattern brand; they could appear as a shaded area (A) or a row of crossed circles (B) at the edges to be joined. Overlap the matched symbols to join the pieces together to form a whole.

Dots: Dots show the position of pockets, buttons, zippers and eyelets, for instance. They are also used as positions to sew up to or cut in to.

Darts: On a dart, notches or dots should be brought together. The solid or broken lines shown are stitching lines that meet at a point.

Alteration lines: These double parallel lines show you where to lengthen or shorten a pattern piece.

Straight grain or grainline: A straight line with arrowheads means place on the straight grain of the fabric, an even distance from the selvedge.

Fold: Place your pattern piece exactly on the folded edge of the fabric. Make sure it is lined up carefully with the fold, as it is easy to increase or decrease the size of your garment piece.

Buttons and buttonholes: The line shows the position and length of the buttonhole; the button position may be marked with a broken line or a dot.

LLOVE TOMMAKE WITH H WW W 47 WW 1


g paper rns

Tracing a complimentary pattern

e in too much of a tissue patterns tear ; it pays to take your to prepare the pieces perly. Here are four mple steps.

1

Open out your pattern tissues and, using the pattern piece diagram, identify the pieces you need view and size you are making. aining pieces back in the to avoid confusion.

Tip...If you are going to be tracing a lot of patterns, invest in a roll of tracing paper from a graphic design shop. However, you can also use greaseproof paper or a tracing wheel to trace the pieces onto brown paper or left-over wallpaper.

Using cutting layouts Now that your pattern pieces are ready, it is time to study the cutting layouts. These show how your fabric should be laid out and where the various pattern pieces should be placed to achieve the economical fabric usage given in the fabric quantities chart. Always read the key for the cutting layouts – it provides the essential details you need to be able to cut out your pieces successfully.

ooth out the pieces and press out e creases with a warm, dry iron if sary, then cut your pieces apart from est, cutting well away from the actual ing lines; the excess tissue is useful if you have to make pattern alterations.

Complimentary patterns generally have a multitude of different patterns and sizes printed on both sides of a pattern sheet, so you will need to trace off the pattern pieces before you start. Follow our four easy steps to getting this right.

1

Make a note of the pattern pieces you require and check the key to find out which line you need to follow for your size.

2

Carefully trace around the appropriate lines onto paper (see tip, far left) and cut out each pattern piece following the lines you have traced.

3

If your measurements do not match those of the chart size exactly, you may need to adjust the fit and/or length.

Lay the pieces back onto the pattern sheet to double check that you have traced along the correct lines, then transfer all information, including the words and pattern markings, onto each pattern piece.

4

4

3

When you are satisfied that the fit and length are correct, trim the pattern pieces along the cutting lines for your measurements.

Make sure that you add extra length to pieces if required; join relevant pattern pieces if requested and place pieces to fold of paper where stated.

A shaded pattern piece is placed with the right side of the pattern piece facing down.

When a pattern piece is shown more than once, cut it out as many times as it is shown.

Selvedges

1

1 2

5

4

3 6

6

Fold Each layout gives the numbers of the pattern pieces required for that view, so you can check that you have not missed any out. It also shows whether any pattern pieces have to be extended or lengthened and whether they need to be cut from lining and/ or interfacing, as well as from fabric. Find the layout(s) for your view, size and fabric width. Place all the pattern pieces on the fabric as shown in the diagram, bearing in mind that pattern pieces may fit more closely together for smaller sizes.

48 5 LOVE LOV O TO MAKE WITH W T WW WW W

A pattern piece extending beyond the fold is cut from a single layer of fabric. After cutting the other pieces, open out the fabric flat with the right side of the fabric uppermost, then line up the pattern grainline with the original fold.


Cutting out your fabric pieces

Transferring pattern markings

With the pattern pieces in position, it is time to think about cutting out. Accuracy is vital: not only will the fit be better but cutting too far inside or outside the cutting lines can make a difference to the size. This guide is pretty much a guarantee against making mistakes, so use it as a checklist:

After cutting out the fabric pieces, transfer all your construction pattern markings from the tissue pattern to the fabric before unpinning it or, if you are using a traced pattern, carefully place the pattern pieces back on top of the corresponding cut pieces ready to transfer the pattern markings. For dots, circles and darts, make a small hole in the pattern and mark the position with a chalk pencil on the top layer of fabric. At the dot position, push a pin straight down through the fabric layers and mark the dot on the other layer of fabric with a chalk pencil. If you n also draw in the dart lines ruler to help you

O Make sure the grainlines on pattern pieces run parallel to the selvedge by measuring from each end of the grainline arrow to the selvedge and moving the pattern pieces until the distances are equal. O Check that foldlines on pattern pieces are placed exactly on the fold of the fabric. O If you are using a tissue pattern, pin the pattern pieces to the fabric, spacing the pins about 20cm apart and pinning through both fabric layers on a double thickness, or weight them down with something heavy.

Notches ca around the the diamo snip abou allowan

O If you are using a traced pattern on thicker paper, weight down your pattern pieces and mark carefully round each piece with tailor’s chalk, then remove the weights and pattern pieces. Carefully pin inside each cutting line, pinning through both fabric layers on a double thickness. O Before cutting out, double check the pattern pieces against the cutting layout to make sure that they are correct. O If you pinned your pattern pieces onto the fabric, carefully cut around the edges. Do not trim the pattern or cut too far away from the edges. If you have chalked around your pieces, cut along the lines. O Do not cut through any fold lines!

You are now ready to start sewing, so turn to page 33 for details of our FREE Butterick Lifestyle Wardrobe pattern or have a go at the girl’s pinafore dress on pages 51-53.

Page 33

Page 51

L

O

W


Winter Accessories To Knit Printed Patterns By Post

Keep your dog warm this winter, too

Baby Jacket, Sweater, Hat & Bootees Set Knitting Pattern, £4.99 WOWE14FH006O

Kids’ Pompom Hat Knitting Pattern, £2.99 WOWE14ID000C

Dog Coat Crochet Pattern, £2.99 WOWE14KS0011

Winter Wrap Knitting Pattern, £1.99 WOWE14FH005X

Ribbed Hat Knitting Pattern, £2.99 WOWE14KS0046

Hat, Scarf & Mittens Set Knitting Pattern, £4.99 WOWE14KD0004

Hat & Scarf Knitting Pattern, £2.99 WOWE25ST9603

Stripy Boot Socks Knitting Pattern, £1.99 WOWE14JV0000

Each pattern will be printed on A4 card and delivered to your door

To order, call 0800 024 1212* or complete the coupon HOW TO ORDER TO: LTM01 Winter Accessories Knits Offer, WW Shop Customer Care, Blue Fin Building, Room 06-C06, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU Product code Product name Price Qty Total WOWE14FH006O Baby Jacket, Sweater, Hat & Bootees Set Knitting Pattern £4.99 WOWE14FH005X Winter Wrap Knitting Pattern £1.99 WOWE14KS0011 Dog Coat Crochet Pattern £2.99 WOWE14ID000C Kids’ Pompom Hat Knitting Pattern £2.99 WOWE14KS0046 Ribbed Hat Knitting Pattern £2.99 WOWE14KD0004 Hat, Scarf & Mittens Set Knitting Pattern £4.99 WOWE25ST9603 Hat & Scarf Knitting Pattern £2.99 WOWE14JV0000 Stripy Boot Socks Knitting Pattern £1.99 Postage and packaging £0.99 GRAND TOTAL £

Order By Phone Call 0800 024 1212* MasterCard, Visa or Maestro cardholders can order direct on this number quoting LTM01. Lines open Monday to Friday, 10am-4pm, but closed bank holidays. Fill In The Coupon Payment must be made by cheque, sent with the coupon to the address provided. For more patterns, visit womansweekly.com/ patterncollections

I enclose a cheque made payable to Woman’s Weekly Shop (no cash, please) for the sum of £ ..................................................... (please write your name and address clearly on the back of your cheque) Mrs/Miss/Ms/Mr (delete as applicable) Name ..................................................................................... Surname ................................................................................ Address ................................................................................. ................................................................................................. Postcode ............................................................................... Daytime tel no (incl code) ................................................ ................................................................................................. Email address ....................................................................... .................................................................................................

Woman’s Weekly, published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, will collect your personal information to process your order and alert you of news, new products, services and offers available from Woman’s Weekly and from Time Inc. (UK) Ltd by email, phone and post. You can unsubscribe from emails by clicking unsubscribe from within the email. Please tick here if you prefer not to be contacted by phone or post F This offer ends 11 January 2016 LTM01 11/01/16

TERMS AND CONDITIONS Subject to availability to readers in the UK. Offers cannot be used in conjunction with other promotions. Prices are correct at time of printing. All correspondence concerning this offer should be sent to: WW Winter Accessories Knits Offer, LTM01, WW Shop Customer Care, Blue Fin Building, Room 06-C06, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU. Items will be despatched within 2-5 days once payment has cleared. You’ll be notified if a longer delay is expected. This offer ends 11 January 2016.*Call charges from mobiles and non-BT landlines may vary. DATA PROTECTION Woman’s Weekly, published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, will collect your personal information to process your order and alert you of news, new products, services and offers available from Woman’s Weekly and from Time Inc. (UK) Ltd by email, phone and post. You can unsubscribe from emails by clicking unsubscribe from within the email.


Sewing

Flower Power

A jazzy print lines the bodice of this pretty pinafore dress and provides the flowers that are appliquéd onto the skirt. It’s finished with ribbon waist ties and fastens at the shoulders with matching buttons


A BIT MORE TRICKY

Fabric suggestions O For the dress: needlecord, corduroy, lightweight denim, cotton drill. This style is not suitable for large checks, stripes or diagonals.

AGE

2-3

4-5

Height

92-98cm (36¼-38½in)

104-110cm (41-43¼in)

Chest

53-55cm (21-21/in)

57-59cm (22½–23¼in)

Waist

52-53cm (20½-20/in) 54-55cm (21¼–21/in)

Finished length 53cm (21in) (back neck to hem)

O For the lining and appliqué: coordinating printed cotton, polycotton or linen, with a simple design that can be cut out easily for appliqué.

60cm (23½in) Back view

FABRIC QUANTITIES 112cm (45in) wide fabric Fabric 0.9m (1yd) Lining 0.5m (½yd) 150cm (60in) wide fabric Fabric 0.6m (/yd) Lining 0.5m (½yd) 90cm (36in) wide iron-on interfacing 0.2m (¼yd)

You will also need: O Pinafore dress pattern pieces traced off from pages 69 to 73 O Matching sewing threads

1yd (0.9m) 0.5m (½yd) 0.6m (/yd) 0.5m (½yd) Front view

0.2m (¼yd)

PLEASE NOTE: Fabric quantities and cutting layouts are given for one-way fabrics only. If you choose a fabric with a two-way design, you may be able to lay your pattern pieces into a smaller amount of fabric – always remember grainlines must still run parallel to the selvedge.

O Pack of fusible web O Two 20mm diameter buttons O 1.5m of 10mm-wide ribbon in two matching colours for the tie belt

CUTTING OUT YOUR FABRIC Use pattern pieces 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

O Lightweight iron-on interfacing (see chart for quantity)

Pinafore – all sizes 112cm (45in) wide fabric

Fold 2

4

Key for cutting layouts

112 cm (45 in)

Selvedge

4

Right side of fabric Wrong side of fabric Reverse side of pattern

Selvedge 3

5

Selvedge 1

4

150cm (60in)

Fold 5

Pinafore lining – all sizes 112–150cm (45-60in) wide fabric 1 2

Fold

1

2

2

Fold Selvedge Selvedge

1 3

Selvedge 52 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

6 90cm (36in)

3

115-152cm (45-60in)

90cm (36in) wide fabric

Pinafore all sizes 150 cm (60in) wide fabric

Interfacing – all sizes

Fold PLEASE NOTE: Save the remaining lining fabric for appliqué flowers.

Selvedge Selvedge 7

Fold


To make Please note O 1cm seam allowances are included unless otherwise stated. O Stitch seams with right sides together and notches matching.

the strip measures 1cm wide. Edgestitch 2mm in from each pressed edge. Cut the belt loop strip into four equal lengths.

5 1

Following the appropriate cutting layout, cut out all your fabric pieces. Using an iron, press the interfacing to the wrong side of the bodice, lining neckline and armhole edges. With right sides together, pin, tack and machine stitch the front bodice to the front bodice lining around the armhole and neckline edges, starting at one side seam edge and finishing at the other. Trim and layer the seam allowances and notch the curves (see diagram).

Work a buttonhole on each back bodice shoulder extension at the positions marked on the pattern (see your instruction manual for details of how to work buttonholes on your particular sewing machine).

6

Following the manufacturer’s instructions, fuse adhesive web to the wrong side of your remaining lining fabric and cut out the motifs that you want to appliqué. Apply them to the right side of the front and back skirt pieces, then set your sewing machine to a close zigzag stitch and stitch around the edges of your motifs, enclosing the raw edges.

2

Turn the front bodice to the right side. Press the seamed edges flat, making sure the seamlines are placed exactly on the edge. Repeat steps 1 and 2 with the back bodice and backbodice lining.

3

With right sides together, pin and tack the front bodice and lining to the back bodice and lining at the corresponding side seam edges, matching the raw edges and armhole seams. Stitch the bodice and lining side seams in one continuous line of stitching. Press the seams open.

4

Pin and tack the bodice and lining waist edges together, matching the side seams. Then edge stitch around the bodice neckline and armhole edges, working about 2mm away from the garment edges.

9

Press the short ends of the belt loops to the wrong side so each one measures 3.5cm long. Pin and tack the loops to the dress with the pressed ends to the dot positions on the bodice and skirt. Set your machine to a close narrow zigzag and stitch the loops in place. Then, machine stitch a single row of straight stitches across the centre of each loop, reverse stitching at each end to secure, to create two channels for the ribbon ties.

10

Neaten the hem edge. Pin, tack and press it to the wrong side by 2cm. Topstitch in place with two rows of stitching 6mm apart. Sew buttons to the front bodice at the positions marked on the pattern. Thread the ribbon lengths through the belt loops; the dress is now ready to wear.

7

With right sides together, pin, tack and machine stitch the front skirt to the back skirt at the side seams. Neaten the seam allowances and press toward the back skirt. Matching the side seams, pin and tack the bodice to the skirt at the waist edges, then machine stitch them together. Neaten the turnings together and press them toward the bodice. Working from the right side, topstitch around the skirt waist 2mm up from the seamline.

8

Neaten one long edge of the belt loop strip. Fold the raw edge over to the wrong side of the strip by 1cm and press. Press the neatened edge over the raw edge, enclosing it, so that

Sewing Machine Basics by Jane Bolsover (Cico Books, £14.99). See page 59.

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 53


Draught Dodger Keep winter chills out and bring a touch of summertime fun in with this easy-to-make draught excluder, stuffed with a rolled-up towel

A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need O 71 x 38cm of plain fabric O 51cm zipper O A towel, measuring 66cm across

O Scraps of brightly coloured fabric

O Free-motion embroidery foot O O O O

for your sewing machine Repositionable spray adhesive for fabric A strip of fusible interfacing measuring 71 x 18cm Black sewing thread Quick unpick

Note: A 1cm seam allowance is included, unless otherwise stated.

1 2

Cut your plain fabric along its length to create one strip of fabric that measures 71 x 18cm and one that measures 71 x 20cm.

Take the piece that measures 71 x 20cm and cut it in half lengthways. Sew it back together again, taking a 1cm seam allowance, then press the seam open.

5

Take the other piece of fabric, measuring 71 x 18cm, and iron the interfacing onto the reverse side. This will help to keep your fabric in shape when embroidering.

6 3

Place the zip teeth-side down over the pressed seam and pin. Tack all the way round the zip to secure it, then remove the pins. Put the zipper foot on your sewing machine and sew the zip in place.

4

Using a quick unpick, cut through the stitches over the teeth of the zip – you’ll have a few little

54 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

threads in the seam so remove these (tweezers may help here) as well as the tacking stitches.

To make the beach huts, cut six rectangles from different coloured scrap fabrics, each measuring 7.5 x 10cm, then snip off the top two corners to form the roof shape.

7

Spray a little adhesive on the back of the huts and space them evenly across the fabric.


Stitchcraft

8

Cut two rectangles measuring 7.5 x 2.5cm for each roof, using different colours for each hut. Spray the back of each with adhesive then place over the top of each hut, overlapping the ends as shown.

the wavy-stitched line. Free-motion stitch a few times around each triangle then snip away any loose threads.

best if you draw around the outline two or three times. Don’t worry if your lines aren’t straight – that’s all part of the sketchy look. Free-motion stitch around doors and add windows if desired.

9

The doors are created from six rectangles of contrasting fabric, each measuring 5 x 6cm. Spray the back of each with adhesive and place in position on the front of a hut.

10

Attach the free-motion embroidery foot to your machine. Using a straight stitch, begin to ‘draw’ around each hut with black thread so it stands out (see Stitch Guide, p. 65, for details). It looks

12

Partly open the zipper and place the decorated front of the draught excluder right sides together with the zipped back section. Sew all the way around the edge then turn so the right sides face outwards and press. Stuff with a rolledup towel and close the zipper.

11

For the bunting, stitch a wavy line across all the beach huts and, again, go over it a couple of times. From scraps of fabric, cut little triangles about 1cm across the top and 2.5cm deep. Spray the backs of them with adhesive and space evenly along

Taken from Half Yard Gifts by Debbie Shore (Search Press, £9.99). See page 59.

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 55


Take One Coffee Table… and give it a designer edge with one of our four stylish looks

Wood Veneer Table A chunky wooden coffee table works well teamed with neutral shades HARDISH

You will need O MDF coffee table, such as O

www.timeinukcontent.co.uk

O O O O O O O

Ikea’s LACK side table Sheets of wood veneer to fit table Sheets of marquetry glue film Sharp craft knife Metal rule Cutting mat Wood filler to match veneer Sandpaper for bare wood French polish

56 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

1

Measure the table top and divide it into quarters. Cut four pieces of veneer to fit. Cut four more strips for the sides of the top and 16 pieces to cover the legs.

2

Cut the marquetry glue film to fit the veneer pieces you cut previously, then iron them onto the back of the veneer pieces with a dry iron. Cool, peel off the backing paper

and iron veneers onto the table. Make sure they are stuck firm or they may blister when polished later on.

3

Smooth wood filler into joints and corners and, when dry, rub lightly over the surface with sandpaper.

4

Finally, apply a few coats of French polish to the table, according to the manufacturer’s instructions.


Photograph: Delphine Adburgham

Be inspired

Glass Display Table Add a glass panel to the top of a table and place memorable images underneath A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need O MDF coffee table, as before O 6mm-thick MDF O Centre glass panel (see step 1) O Eggshell paint O Wood adhesive O Paint brush

Faux Leather Table This timeless look adds a touch of class HARDISH

You will need

1

Make a border for the edges of the top from strips of 6mm MDF; the glass panel then sits inside. Stick the border strips to the top, then paint the whole table using eggshell; leave to dry.

2

Place your photos, or whatever you wish to display, in the centre of the table, then insert the glass panel.

O O O O O

MDF coffee table, as before Large piece of faux leather Impact glue Matching thread Fabric scissors

1

Cut a top and four side strips from faux leather, adding 1.5cm seam allowances to all sides.

2

Stitch side strips to edges of top, along long edges, starting and finishing 1.5cm in from each end (you’ll end up with a cross shape). Open seam turnings out flat and topstitch in place 5mm each side of the seamline. Stitch short ends of side strips together, then fold up and stitch a 1.5cm hem around the whole lower edge.

3

Cut strips of faux leather to wrap around each leg and, using impact glue, stick to the legs. Slip top section in place and glue down around side edges.

Venetian Glass Table If you like sparkle then this table is the perfect look for you A BIT MORE TRICKY

You will need O MDF coffee table, as before O 4mm mirrored glass cut to fit O O O O O

your table (see step 1) Impact glue Glass frosting/etching spray Artist’s paint brush Black satin paint Paint brush

1

Ask a glazier to cut a piece of mirrored glass to fit the top of your table and four pieces for the sides.

2

Spray the glass frosting/etching paint into the lid of the can. Using the paintbrush, paint a tiny half daisy in each corner of the glass pieces and a few along the edges. Join up with dots and leave to dry. Meanwhile paint the legs black and also leave to dry.

3

Glue the mirror to the table top; leave to dry. Turn upside down and glue the side sections in place; leave to dry. LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 57


Best Of Our

Printed Patterns By Post

Vintage Knits Vintage Cable Jacket With Collar Knitting Pattern, £3.99 WOWE14FH009H

Vintage Kangaroo Toy Knitting Pattern, £2.99 WOWE14ID0006

The Three Bears Knitting Pattern, £2.99 WOWE14GI0000

Vintage Mohair Wrap Knitting Pattern, £3.99 WOWE14ID0009

Vintage Red Jacket Knitting Pattern, £3.99 WOWE14FH00AL

Vintage Girl’s Bolero Knitting Pattern, £3.99 WOWE14FH0072

Vintage Classic Jumper Knitting Pattern, £4.99 WOWE14JA0003

Each pattern will be printed on A4 card and delivered to your door

To order, call 0800 024 1212* or complete the coupon HOW TO ORDER

Order By Phone Call 0800 024 1212* MasterCard, Visa or Maestro cardholders can order direct on this number quoting LTM01. Lines open Monday to Friday, 10am-4pm, but closed bank holidays. Fill In The Coupon Payment must be made by cheque, sent with the coupon to the address provided. For more patterns, visit womansweekly. com/patterncollections TERMS AND CONDITIONS Subject to availability to readers in the UK. Offers cannot be used in conjunction with other promotions. Prices are correct at time of printing. All correspondence concerning this offer should be sent to: LTM01 Vintage Knits Offer, WW Shop Customer Care, Blue Fin Building, Room 06-C06, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU. Items will be dispatched within 2-5 days once payment has cleared. You’ll be notified if a longer delay is expected. This offer ends 11 January 2016. *Call charges from mobiles and non-BT landlines may vary. DATA PROTECTION Woman’s Weekly, published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, will collect your personal information to process your order and alert you of news, new products, services and offers available from Woman’s Weekly and from Time Inc. (UK) Ltd by email, phone and post. You can unsubscribe from emails by clicking unsubscribe from within the email.

✁ TO: LTM01 Vintage Knits Offer, WW Shop Customer Care, Blue Fin Building, Room 06-C06, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU

I enclose a cheque made payable to Woman’s Weekly Shop (no cash, please)

Product code Product Price Qty Total WOWE14FH009H Vintage Cable Jacket With Collar Knitting Pattern £3.99 WOWE14GI0000 The Three Bears Knitting Pattern £2.99 WOWE14FH0072 Vintage Girl’s Bolero Knitting Pattern £3.99 WOWE14ID0006 Vintage Kangaroo Toy Knitting Pattern £2.99 WOWE14ID0009 Vintage Mohair Wrap Knitting Pattern £3.99 WOWE14FH00AL Vintage Red Jacket Knitting Pattern £3.99 WOWE14JA0003 Vintage Classic Jumper Knitting Pattern £4.99 Postage and packaging £0.99

for the sum of £ ............................................ (please write your name and address clearly on the back of your cheque)

This offer ends 11 January 2016

Grand total £

Mrs/Miss/Ms/Mr (delete as applicable) First name ................................................................................. Surname .................................................................................... Address ..................................................................................... ..................................................................................................... ..................................................................................................... Postcode ................................................................................... Daytime tel no (incl code) .................................................... .....................................................................................................

Woman’s Weekly, published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, will collect your personal information to process your order and alert you of news, new products, services and offers available from Woman’s Weekly and from Time Inc. (UK) Ltd by email, phone and post. You can unsubscribe from emails by clicking unsubscribe from within the email. Please tick here if you prefer not to be contacted by phone or post F LTM01 11/01/16

Email address ........................................................................... .....................................................................................................


Bookshelf From sewing to felting, jewellery making to Scandi style, here are some of the craft books that have inspired us recently SEW SCANDINAVIAN

HALF YARD GIFTS

30MINUTE JEWELLERY

By Kajsa Kinsella (Cico Press, £12.99) The trend for all things Scandinavian is still strong, for which we are grateful. This stylish new book by Kajsa Kinsella is full of beautiful, handstitched projects inspired by her childhood in Sweden (think Scandi hearts, folklore motifs, Dala horses and Sami slippers). The book is divided into four chapters – The Home, Accessories, The Nursery and Celebrations – and every project has clear, step-by-step instructions and detailed step images. Kajsa’s introductions are evocative and will leave you wishing you’d enjoyed a Swedish childhood.

By Debbie Shore (Search Press, £9.99) Debbie Shore is a genius when it comes to making a lot from just a little bit of fabric. In her latest book, she presents 22 ways to make pretty yet inexpensive presents for everyone. Working with a half yard of fabric or less, you can create cushions, a draught excluder (see pages 54 to 55), purses and even a gardener’s kneeling pad, plus many other fun and functional items. These easy-to-make designs will help you use up your fabric stash and try out some new skills, including free-motion embroidery, ‘Cathedral Window’ quilting, fabric slashing and many more.

By Beverly McCullough (Search Press, £9.99) Beverly McCullough, founder of the Flamingo Toes craft blog, is passionate about crafting, sewing and jewellery making. Her style is a mix of modern and vintage, and she incorporates her love for sewing, cross-stitch and embroidery with jewellery making to create unique pieces. In this new book, Beverly shows you how easy it is to make beautiful jewellery in just a few minutes. Whether you are starting out on your jewellery adventure or you’ve been making accessories for years, this book has all sorts of projects that will inspire and excite (see page 60).

FELT & FIBRE ART

LOVE TO SEW  LITTLE BAGS & PURSES

By Val Hughes (Search Press, £17.99) This book is part of a series showcasing the techniques and talents of some of the UK’s most innovative textile artists. Felt is at the heart of Val Hughes’ extraordinary textile artwork and through this book you can explore her stunning collections of wearable art and wall-hangings, while she leads you through the history, landscapes and imagination that inspire her. This book is a powerful and personal introduction to the art of felting, with clear, step-by-step instructions on how to make different types of felt; an ideal source of information and ideas for all.

By Saskia Abel (Search Press, £7.99) For those who love to make bags, this book has a delightful collection of practical and usable styles. Part of the Love To Sew series, there are 16 projects, including a phone cover, makeup bag and bag organiser. There’s nothing exactly new but they all look so good that you’ll want to make them – and, as we all know, a girl can never have too many bags! All projects have step-by-step instructions and the templates are included at the back of the book. The designs are suitable for all skill levels and ages.

SEWING MACHINE BASICS By Jane Bolsover (Cico Books, £14.99) Well, it seems odd to write a review of my own book but as we have featured it in this month’s issue, I thought I would mention it! Sewing Machine Basics is a step-by-step guide to learning to sew using your sewing machine for beginners and those wanting a refresher. The book is designed in two parts: the boring but essential ‘Getting Started’ bit is at the beginning; then the second part is set out in workshops with projects to undertake at the end of each one, which increase in the level of skill required as you work your way through the book. Turn to pages 42 to 53 for a taster. Happy sewing!

To buy these books, visit searchpress.com. Free postage within the UK LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 59


Chain Reaction These eye-catching earrings are just perfect for a party or special night out. Make the chains even longer if you really want to glam up your outfit A BIT MORE TRICKY

To make

You will need

1

Begin by cutting the lengths of chain (for two earrings) as follows: two pieces 38mm long; four pieces 33mm long; four pieces 31mm long; four pieces 29mm long; four pieces 27mm long.

Two lever-back ear wires Two eye pins Two 8mm crystal beads Two square jump rings 66cm length of small chain – links need to be large enough to fit over the square jump ring O Wire cutters O Round-nose pliers O Flat-nose pliers

O O O O O

2

Thread half of the chain pieces onto a square jump ring, starting with the shortest, moving to the longest, then back to the shortest. You will have a total of nine chain lengths on the jump ring. Close the jump ring.

3

Place an eye pin through the crystal bead and create a loop at the other end. Open one of the loops slightly and add the top of the square jump ring – it will hang with a point at the top and one at the bottom.

attach it to the ring on the lever-back ear wire. Repeat steps 2 to 4 to make the second earring.

Tip: To measure and match your lengths of chain easily, feed one end of a long piece of chain onto a piece of wire or a head pin. Hold the pin horizontally so the chain hangs freely. Cut to the desired measurement. Add the next piece of chain to the wire and you can easily match up lengths to the first piece of chain as they hang side-by-side.

Taken from 30-minute Jewellery by Beverly McCullough (Search Press, £9.99). See page 59.

4

Open up the other eye loop at the opposite end of the crystal bead and

Jewellery Techniques Here are a couple of basic jewellerymaking techniques that will be helpful for creating these earrings and other jewellery projects.

How to open a jump ring Jump rings are metal rings with a cut in them. They come in a wide variety of sizes, colours and thicknesses. Choose the ring size and colour that works best for your project. To open jump rings, hold the ring with flat-nose pliers on one side. Hold the opposite side with

distorts and weakens the shape. Close the ring by twisting the ends back together. Make sure the metal pieces are touching and closed tightly, otherwise wire or cording could slip through the gap.

Adding a bead to a head pin and forming a loop at the top

1

Place your bead on a head pin. Make sure the head pin you choose is long enough to extend over the top of the bead to form the loop size you want to create.

2 round-nose pliers. Always open jump rings by twisting the open ends away from each other, so the ends stay in a vertical line. Don’t open them by pulling the ring wider or horizontally as this

60 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

Place the wire in the round-nose pliers, so that the bead is just below the section where the pliers meet. The end of the wire should be pointing upwards. The tips of the pliers are angled, so keep in mind where you place the wire in the pliers. If the bead is further back towards the handle, you will

have a larger loop. A smaller loop can be created towards the tips of the pliers.

3

To start the loop, bend the pin at a slight angle at the top of the bead. Wrap the pin wire around one side of your roundnose pliers, away from the way you created the bend, to make a loop. Wrap the wire tightly around the nose of the pliers and cross the end of the wire over the bead so the wire makes an ‘X’.

4

Clip off the end of the wire without the bead, just above the bead, using your wire cutters. Make sure to point the flat side of the cutters away from you. Bend your pin wire just a little more to create a complete loop. Make sure that when you open the loop that you twist the wire open, rather than separate it, just like a jump ring.


Fashion makes

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 61


Night, Night, Sleep Tight This is a great first sewing project – make a sweet felt mouse, then a tiny bed, and tuck him in with his teddy bear EASY PEASY

You will need Templates on page 66 Empty mint tins Scraps of felt Piece of polyester toy filling, or cotton wool O Pink, black, blue, beige stranded embroidery thread O Double-sided sticky tape O Fade-away marker pen O O O O

To make the mouse

1

Trace the mouse templates from page 66 and cut out two: bodies, arms and legs from grey felt or colour of your choice. Then, cut two ears from contrasting coloured felt.

bodies together around the edge, using a mixture of small running stitches and whipstitch. Fasten the legs, ears and arms in place at the same time but leave one side seam open below an arm for stuffing.

4 5

Using a pencil to help you, fill the body cavity with polyester toy filling or cotton wool, and then sew up the last side seam. Make a tail by knotting three lengths of stranded embroidery thread together and plaiting them to the required length. Knot the ends together and trim off excess thread. Stitch tail to back of body.

To make the teddy

1 2

Trace the teddy templates from page xx and cut out two: bodies and ears from brown or yellow felt.

Follow steps 2, 3 and 4 of the mouse to make your teddy, omitting reference to stitching a mouth, making tucks in the ears (his are flat) or attaching the arms and legs, as the teddy already has these attached.

To make the bed

www.timeincukcontent.co.uk

2

Using the templates and photos as a guide, embroider the eyes, nose and mouth at the narrower end of one body piece, using two strands of embroidery thread in your needle. Make a small tuck in the flat bottom edge of the ear by pinching them between your fingers to form a shallow cone; stitch tucks in place.

3

Pin the ears, arms and legs to the front body and then, with wrong sides facing, stitch the two mouse

62 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

1

Look out for rectangular metal tins of mints, which will make great bed shapes once empty. They can have

hinged lids or lids that come off completely, it doesn’t matter.

2

Choose three colours of felt, one for the bed base, one for the pillow and one for the blanket. Place your empty tin on top of each piece and draw around the outside edge with a fade-away marker pen. Cut out the pieces.

3 4

Using the double-sided sticky tape, stick one piece of felt to the inside base of the tin, making sure it lays flat. For the pillow, make a small sausage shape from polyester toy filling or cotton wool the width of the tin and roll it up inside a second piece of felt; place pillow in tin at the top of the bed, with the seam underneath.

5

Place your mouse and his teddy inside the bed and then tuck them in and make them cosy with the third piece of felt, folding the top edge down to form a blanket.

Tip..YOU CAN CLOSE

THE LID TO KEEP YOUR LITTLE FRIENDS SAFE – IT WILL BE YOUR SECRET –AND TAKE THEM WITH YOU WHEREVER YOU GO.


Love To Make for Kids

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 63


Stitch Guide All the stitches and techniques you will need to complete the projects in this issue

FREESTYLE EMBROIDERY STITCHES Satin Stitch

Following the outline of the shape, work straight stitches close together as illustrated. Keep the tension even and stitches close for a smooth, flawless finish with no background fabric visible.

French Knot

BASIC HAND STITCHES Whipstitch A. Whipstitch is generally used to sew two finished edges together. B. It can also be used to hold a raw edge neatly against a flat surface. Insert needle at right angles and close to the edge, picking up just a few threads. Slanted floats will be produced between the tiny stitches. Space between the stitches can be short or long, depending on your project.

COUNTED THREAD STITCHES Cross-stitch

Bring the thread up through the fabric, hold it with the thumb and first finger of your left hand and turn the needle round it once or twice or as necessary. Still holding the thread firmly, turn the needle and reinsert it close to the point where it first emerged. Pull the thread taut so the knot slides down the needle to touch the fabric, then release as the needle goes through the fabric leaving the knot on the surface.

To work cross-stitch, bring the needle through at the lower left-hand side, insert the needle one block up and one block to the right and bring it out one block down, forming a diagonal stitch. Continue in this way to form a row of stitches.

Blanket Stitch

Bring needle out at 1, reinsert at 2 then, trapping the thread under the needle, out at 3. Gently pull the loop taut, then reinsert needle at 4 ready for next stitch.

Complete the upper half of the crosses as shown. Cross-stitch may be worked from right to left or vice versa, but the upper half of all the crosses must lie in the same direction.

FREE-MACHINE EMBROIDERY O Use this style oidery embro to‘draaw’ details on to a project with the t sewingmachine needle o ‘colour in’ areas. and to You can go over stitching several times to give a sketchy, scribbled look; it doesn’t have to be neat to give a great effect. O If you haven’t tried free-machine embroidery before, practise first on scraps of fabric. To embroider, you will need to adjust your sewing machine by dropping the feed dogs (these are the teeth that come up through the needle plate as you sew and move the fabric along in a straight line); refer to your sewing-machine manual to do this. O You will also need a free-machine embroidery foot, sometimes called a darning foot or a free-motion foot. This stops the fabric from lifting while you sew. You might also find it helpful to fit the fabric into an embroidery hoop while you sew to keep the fabric flat and taut and prevent any puckering. O Once you’re ready, set the stitch length on the machine to zero. You will need to move the fabric around manually to create the stitches, otherwise you will just sew on the spot, so start slowly to get the feel of the stitching and to see how fast you need to move the fabric to achieve the look you want. Think of the fabric as a piece of paper and the needle as a pencil and reverse it in your mind so you’re moving the paper (fabric) to make the design. Warning! Be very careful to keep your fingers away from the needle as you move the fabric about under it.

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 65


FROM THE HEART PAGE 27

Swiss Darning Chart

15 14 13 12 11

SWISS DARNING TECHNIQUE Fig 1

10 9 8

Fig 2

7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Thread a blunt darning needle with a length of yarn in your chosen colour. Bring point of needle through from back at base of the stitch to be worked and draw yarn through, leaving an end at the back; take needle behind the 2 loops of the stitch above from right to left (Fig 1) and draw yarn through. Insert needle into same place as before and bring through at base of next stitch to be covered (Fig 2). Draw yarn through to the tension of main knitting. Continue in this way until entire motif is embroidered.

KEY FOR SNOWFLAKE Red (Red Hot 167) Cream (Alabaster 003)

NIGHT, NIGHT, SLEEP TIGHT

EARS Cut 2

PAGE 62

Shown actual size

EARS

ARMS

Cut 2

Cut 2

BODY Cut 2

BODY

LEGS

Cut 2

Teddy Templates 66 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

Cut 2

Mouse Templates


HOME SWEET HOME SAMPLER PAGE 17

Cross-stitch chart

Each coloured square represents one cross-stitch worked with two strands of thread.

Key to cross-stitch chart 1021 Dusky pink

108 Lilac

186 Pale Jade LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 67


TOTE SWEET PAGE 34

Cross-stitch chart

Key to cross-stitch chart Each coloured square represents one cross-stitch worked with two strands of thread. 68 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

B52 200 White

5 Dark violet 554

156 6 Dark blue

360 07 Bright pink

5 Very dark violet 553

383 38 Very dark blue

211 Light violet

3 3747 Light blue

3 Violet 153

159 Blue


FLOWER POWER PAGES 51 TO 53

Ne

ck lin

e

ed

ge

Shown actual size

But Posit ton ions Age

Age

4-5

2-3

Armhole edge

Place to fold

Dress front bodice grainline

1 DRESS FRONT BODICE

Age 2-3

Belt loop positions Waist edge

Side seam edge

Cut one to fold of fabric Cut one to fold of lining

Age 4-5

Waist edge

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 69


FLOWER POWER

7

PAGES 51 TO 53

Shown actual size

DRESS FRONT BODICE INTERFACING e Ag

Cut one to fold of interfacing 5

n tto Bu

4-

Grainline e lin ck Ne

i sit Po

ge

ed

le

-3 e2 Ag

ho

Place to fold

s

on hole

Arm

Cut one to fold of fabric Cut one to fold of lining

fold Place to

DRESS BACK BODICE

n e Grainli ck Bodic Dress Ba

edge

2

e

Age 4-5 Age 2-3

Side seam edge

sitions o P p o o Belt L dge Waist e


2Cm hem included

Dress extending edge

4B

DRESS FRONT SKIRT EXTENSION

2Cm hem included

2Cm h e m includ ed

2Cm h e m includ ed

5

Dress belt loop strip grainline

Fold

Side se am edg e

DR E S S B E L T L O O P STRIP

Side sea m edge

3B

DRESS BACK SKIRT EXTENSION

Cut One

Dress extending edge

Fold edge


FLOWER POWER

Cutting Line Size Key

PAGES 51 TO 53

Shown actual size

Girl’s Pinafore Dress Age 2-3 Age 4-5

*Note: For details on how to extend your skirt pattern pieces, see page 73.

Age 4-5 Age 2-3

4A*

DRESS FRONT SKIRT Cut one to fold of fabric

Place to fold

Belt Loop Positions

irt Dress Front Sk Grainline

Side seam edge

Waist edge

ge Dress extending ed

ge Waist ed

Age 4-5 Age 2-3

rt

Side seam edge

Cut one to fold of fabric

g edge

tendin Dress ex

72 LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW

fold Place to

DRESS BACK SKIRT

ck Ski Dress Banline Grai

3A*

Belt Loop Positions


Dress Front And Back Skirts – How To Extend Your Pattern Pieces

1

Stick a piece of spare paper to the extending edges of pattern pieces 3A (front skirt) and 4A (back skirt). Lay a long ruler along the straight fold edge and draw along it extending the fold edge by 27cm for pattern piece 3A and 26cm for pattern piece 4A.

4A

Draw a line to join all the marks and stick the extending edge of pattern pieces 3B (for the front skirt) and 4B (for the back skirt) up to the new line, making sure that the fold lines are all lined up.

26cm

27cm

3

27cm

2

26cm

3A

Measure 27cm (3A) or 26cm (4A) down from the extending edge at two further intervals between the fold line and side seam edge; mark these positions in pencil.

4B

3B

4

Lay a ruler along the side seam edges and draw along to complete the skirt pattern pieces. Cut out.

6

Cut one to fold of interfacing

Place to fold

ne Grainli

DRESS BACK BODICE INTERFACING

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WOMAN’S WEEKLY, Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU. Call: 020 3148 5000. Email: WomansWeeklyPostbag@timeinc.com. Advertising: 020 3148 3680. Offers: 0800 138 2826. Back issues: 01733 385170; mags-uk/ipc. Unless otherwise stated, all competitions, free samplings, discounts and offers are only available to readers in the UK, Channel Islands, Isle of Man and the Republic of Ireland. All details correct at time of going to press. Pre-press by Rhapsody Media. Covers by Polestar Chantry. Printed by Polestar Chantry. ISSN 2056-5739. WOMAN’S WEEKLY® is a registered trademark of Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, and is sold subject to the following conditions, namely that it shall not, without the written consent of the publishers first given, be lent, resold, hired out, or otherwise disposed of by way of trade at more than the recommended selling price shown on the cover, and that it shall not be lent, resold or hired or otherwise disposed of in a mutilated condition or in any unauthorised cover by way of trade or affixed to or as part of any publication or advertising, literary or pictorial matter whatsoever. All designs used in this magazine are subject to copyright laws. Patterns are for personal use only and cannot be sold. Multiple copies of any part of this publication may not be made, and no part of this publication whether in its original form or a reproduction thereof may be sold. All patterns featured within Love to Make With Woman’s Weekly are reproduced in good faith that they do not infringe any copyright. © Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, 2015.

LOVE TO MAKE WITH WW 73


o You...

What you are doing, sharing and making this month

FACEBOOK FEEDBACK Are you a fan of colouring?

Sandi Hilton: I prefer drawing.

Jill Faulkner: I have about four books on the go and I love it! Takes me back to my childhood…

Ann Oliver: Yes, I really enjoy colouring, it calms me down.

Wendy Straker: Not as yet, I prefer to knit, cross-stitch and paint watercolours.

Donna Duncan: Yes I am, not getting much crochet done though.

Shirley Sloan: Love it! Helps to relieve stress, too.

What have you been crafting lately?

Jen Reynolds: Just finished making a winter coat.

Teddy bear’s picnic ingly been

Reader Beth Shearing has lov dy bear for niece stitching this sweet little ted teddies. ‘Tiny’ Olivia, who absolutely loves ia’s other bears is now nestled amongst Oliv dmade toy in but stands out as the only han re special as mo n her vast collection. He’s eve in Olivia’s tie bow on he’s adorned with a ribb . ow favourite colour: yell

Elizabeth Williamson: I’ve made myself a little brooch.

Angela Downing: Costumes for belly dancing!

Melonie Pickering: I have been making cards using a die-cutting machine.

kshops Woma s Weekly Regional Wor d of

Our autumn roun regional workshops at the Stitching, Sewing & Hobbycrafts shows has come to an end, however, more workshops will be coming soon so keep your eyes open for details. The wrap skirt proved to be the most popular sewing workshop, closely followed by the bag; lovely readers (from left) Zibho Kayile, Michaela Sterrt, Makahosi Msezane and Ann Sterry show off the fabulous tote bags they ntly. As made at the NEC Birmingham rece by all. had was time fun a you can see,

Bling bauble

Knitting assist ant Freddie ha s rece taken up bead ing, having taug ntly ht herself how to bend w ire and string w ith beads. One result of he r hard work is this beautiful silver bauble. Freddi e says it was a surprisin gly simple craf t to learn and it’s the type of hobby that feeds her love of all thin gs sparkly.

We’d love to hear from you, so please get in touch.

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Love to make with womans weekly [january 2016]