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the collective dairy

Olivia Thomas

N0302640

FASH30002


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declaration form Module: Negotiated Project Stage 2 Module Leader: Matt Gill Ref. no: FASH30002 I confirm that this work has gained ethical approval and that I have faithfully observed the terms of the approval in the conduct of this project. This submission is the result of my own work. All help and advice other than that received from tutors has been acknowledged and primary and secondary sources of information have been properly attributed. Should this statement prove to be untrue I recognise the right and duty of the board of examiners to recommend what action should be taken in line with the University’s regulations on assessment contained in its handbook. Signed: Date:

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contents Chapter 1 Setting the Scene Pages: 7-14

Chapter 5 Campaign Inspiration Pages: 40-48

Chapter 2 Methodology Pages: 15-20

Chapter 6 The Concept: Bull or No Bull Pages: 49-64

Chapter 3 Market Place Pages: 21- 30

Chapter 7 Future Recommendations Pages: 65-69

Chapter 4 The Consumer Pages: 31- 39

Chapter 8 Appendix Contents Page: 83

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1

Setting the Scene T

he story of the Collective Dairy begins in New

Zealand with two ambitious chefs named Ofer and Angus. They set themselves the challenge of creating extraordinary yoghurt with an unbeatable taste and before long, the culinary entrepreneurs had done just that. Ten months down the line and the Collective had become the best-selling gourmet yoghurt in New Zealand; but the story doesn’t end there. It seemed unfair that only the Kiwis were granted such a great dairy indulgence, so they set sail to the motherland to share it. With far fewer cattle and a much chillier climate, the UK really was pastures new, so it seemed only right that they team up with some local mavens (also known as Mike and Amelia) to help show them the ropes and spread the word. The partnership has now grown into a small team who work together to make The Collective’s vision come true.

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the Collective Dairy In Context R

ewind 60 years and the yoghurt market in the UK

did not exist, unless you regularly hung out in health shops. After the introduction of Ski in 1963, a yoghurt revolution began. In the 1980s Muller Corner followed suit but packaged it ‘as an outright treat’ says food historian Bee Wilson (Wilson (2010) in Biswas, 2010: online). This opened up the market even further to new consumers and there have been endless product launches since (particularly an increasing number claiming health benefits) (Scientist Live, 2010: online). Mintel expects yoghurt sales to grow by 13% between 2012-2017, reaching a total of £2.06 billion (Mintel, 2012a: online). The Collective Dairy came to the UK in 2011 but were not alone as it was reported to be a record year for new product launches and variants of both yoghurts and desserts (Mintel, 2012a: online). As a new product, in a new market, there are many factors which have an effect on the success of the brand. These include effects of the recession, consumer demand for brand transparency, food provenance and the product itself.

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The economic downturn was the catalyst for a major shift in consumer behaviour. Greedy banks and corporate companies who had long been looking out for ‘me, myself and I’ were finally exposed, shocking consumers and shattering their confidence. The demand for brand transparency spread like wild fire across all sectors, forcing brands to become open, honest and more human. It has now been five years since recession hit in the UK (Parliament UK, 2012: online) and brand transparency is no longer an option. It has become increasingly obvious to spot brands that exude authenticity from those that create ideals solely for their marketing. Consumers have been empowered by the digital revolution and have the ability to speak up against brands wherever and whenever they please. According to advertising veteran Lee Clow ‘the most successful brands have always been the most sincere’ (Clow (2011) in Stylus 2011a: online) Across every platform the Collective Dairy strive to be just that, practising what they preach, engaging consumers in conversation and inviting them to share their journey.

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With the UK facing an epidemic of obesity, (University of Birmingham, 2013: online) transparency within the food sector has become an increasingly important factor for consumers; now more so than ever after the notorious horse meat scandal (Hall, 2013: online). Consumers are not just demanding to know what is in their food but where the ingredients have come from with 45% of UK shoppers stating they think supermarkets should make more of an effort to sell locally sourced foods (Stylus, 2013a: online). Although not all the ingredients from the Collective are sourced in the UK, they are very honest about where they come from and for what reasons. Together, their cartoon cow, branded with a UK flag, and the Red Tractor logo, assure consumers that their milk can be traced back to a British Farm. Amy Price, a senior food and drink analyst confirmed the importance of promoting transparency to consumers, stating a logo such as the Red Tractor is likely to ‘resonate with consumers in the current climate, helping to build credibility and restore trust among consumers’ (Price (2013) in Mintel 2013: online).

Fig 1. Red Tractor Logo

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In order to understand the context of the brand’s positioning in the UK, it’s important to take the Collective’s backstory into consideration, as well as the direction it is taking for the future. The Collective describes it’s yoghurt as ‘gourmet’ which in New Zealand means it could easily get lost amongst the herd. Due to the accessibility of dairy and the breadth of retailers that exist, there is an entire gourmet category (Fuller, 2013: App 3: 89). However, in the UK, The Collective is positioned at the top end of the market with little competition in the way of gourmet yoghurts. Although in the UK the brand currently only sells its patented yoghurt recipe, in New Zealand their portfolio of products is much larger and more varied; including halloumi cheese, drinking yoghurts and crème fraiche. This is the direction the brand wants to take in the UK. The Collective are not just another yoghurt brand, they are,

‘dairy pioneers on a quest to revolutionise the category with the greatest dairy imaginable’ (Collective, 2013: App 3: 94)

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Fig 2. Dripping Collective Dairy logo


Ticking all the boxes so far with consumer desires, the team at The Collective are more than on the right tracks but they’re still relatively unheard of. Out of 50 people asked, 94% said they hadn’t heard of the brand (See App 13: 129). This implementation report seeks to create the most effective marketing strategy in order to raise the brand awareness of The Collective Dairy and increase consumer loyalty with a specific demographic.

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Methodology

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Methodology T

hroughout the journey of my project, I have

used relevant and effective research methods to gain insightful responses to determine the most suitable strategy for the brand. Primary Research: 01/03/2013: Contact with the Collective Dairy: See App 3: 88-97 I first e-mailed the brand and was put in contact with their head of marketing, Emma Fuller. Our first conversation focused on the brand’s history, values and where they hope to be in the future. 08/03/2013: Twitter Account: See App 4 : 98-99 In order to direct and collect my research, I created an e-mail and twitter account under the name of nobulldairy@gmail.com and @nobulldairy. The Twitter account was less successful when looking for initial research concepts such as ‘what does gourmet mean to you?’ but very successful when looking for contributors.

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08/03/2013: Research blog: See App 5: 100-101 I created a blog named ‘It’s all about Commoonication’ to record my visual research (www.nobulldairy.tumblr. com). It was a great way of uploading initial primary research and advertising inspiration. I also used the blog as a platform for contributors to get in touch. 10/03/2013-24/03/2013: Gourmet Blackboard: See App 6: 102 - 103 I wanted to find out perceptions of the word ‘gourmet’ so I asked people to write what it meant to them onto a blackboard which I then photographed to easily compare the answers. 10/04/2013: Opinion Informer: 2 week diary See App 7: 104-105 I asked a new consumer to buy the yoghurt for two weeks and write a diary recording relevant dates and comments about the consumer journey. It was interesting initial research but didn’t help to define the consumer. 11/04/2013: Visit to Borough Market See App 8: 106-107 I visited Borough market in London to analyse potential competitors and emerging packaging trends. The visit enabled me to experience an environment relevant to potential consumers.

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11/04/2013: Visit to Magma Bookstore See App: 9: 108-109 I visited Magma bookstore in London to find visual inspiration. I looked specifically for illustrated content, children’s books and unusual production methods. I came away with a much clearer idea of which visuals were best suited to the brand. 19/04/2013-24/04/2013: Industry Insiders: See App 10: 110-113 I contacted Steve Watson from Stack magazines and Polly Glass from Wrap magazine to ask their opinion on my concept. Steve helped me to analyse the validity of the concept and creative outcomes and Polly explained the logistics of putting Wrap Magazine together. 15/04/2013: Visit to Farm Shop and Deli Show at NEC: See App 11: 114-115 I visited the show to analyse competitors and note graphic trends in packaging. I found the talks from members of the industry most interesting as they discussed trends in the marketplace and the future of the industry. 24/04/2013: Consumer Profiles: See App 12: 116-127 I defined my consumer by choosing one male and one female student who exemplify the target consumer. I asked them a number of questions and took photos to build insightful profiles.

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23/04/2013: Questionnaire: See App 13: 128-129 I created a questionnaire on quicksurveys.com, piloted it on 33 people and re-launched the survey after making some adjustments; it was completed by 50 people in total. The questionnaire was sent out via Facebook, Twitter and e-mail as quick and effective ways of engaging respondents. 27/04/2013: Focus Group: See App 14: 130-143 I held a focus group with three final year students at Nottingham Trent University. I asked questions to try and reveal consumer behaviour within student lifestyles. The results were insightful and helped to inform the strategy and consumer journey. Secondary Research: I used a variety of online and offline sources to find relevant inspiration and information. Databases such as WGSN and Mintel were useful in the early stages of my project when establishing key trends in the market place. I used books such as Creative Advertising and Copywriting for useful techniques when formulating a concept. I found niche publications such as Anorak, Wrap and Varoom useful sources of visual inspiration. I also used Pinterest to save visual influences throughout the project. (www.pinterest.com/0livia01/collectivedairy/) (See App 5: 100-102)

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market place

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Current Marketing T

he Collective Dairy have a big personality; inside

The Collective’s most current PR campaign has captured

and out. Every member of the team is passionate about

the most beautiful cows in the land and worked to

the product, the brand and everything they stand

engage consumers of all ages and location with the

for. With the consumer planted firmly at the centre

yearlong competition, ‘Cow of the Year 2013’.

of everything they do, the brand uses its big hearted, honest and daring attitude across all avenues of work.

Using an agency such as Holler, an interactive yearlong PR campaign and having an evolving presence on

Until 2012, the majority of the marketing at The

Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, The Collective is

Collective was carried out in-house, primarily relying on

increasing its brand awareness all the time. However as

Facebook, with sampling at consumer events and

previously seen in the questionnaire results, the brand

in-store. After being highly recommended by social

are still very much under the radar (See App 13: 129).

media kings and previous clients Innocent, The Collective Dairy appointed Holler for a digital campaign

As The Collective try to change this and build their

last spring. As food becomes an increasingly popular

awareness it’s vital to keep an eye on the competition. If

subject to discuss across social media platforms (Parkin

not many people have heard of The Collective, what do

(2012) in Mintel 2012b: online) their decision to create

they know about their competitors?

a ‘clever sampling mechanic that challenges the digital community’ (Ford, 2012: online) was seemingly relevant.

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Fig 3. A beautiful Cow

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Competitors W

hen The Collective came to the UK there was

little competition in the gourmet yoghurt market. As previously mentioned, New Zealand has an entire gourmet category, where they compete with established brands such as de Winkel, Piako, Kapiti and Puhoi Valley (Hill, 2011: online). In the UK, The Collective are in competition with ‘big pot’ brands such as Rachel and Yeo Valley. Emma Fuller from the Collective said large pots tend to give off a natural, homely vibe (Fuller, 2013: App 3: 91). The Collective branding however, is so much more than that; using their daring dairy attitude wherever possible. This is confirmed by the focus group, as they were rated as having the most appealing packaging (and the best flavour) when compared to Rachel and Yeo Valley (See App 14: 139). In terms of product and quality, The Collective’s closest competitors are much smaller brands such as Twekkelo, Good Heavens and Glenilen Farm (Fuller, 2013: App 3: 91). Due to the size of these brands, they are rarely found in the supermarket together. Because of this, it is important to see how these brands go about reaching their consumers away from the supermarket shelves. Fig 4 shows each brand’s current social media status, with Glenilen Farm following closely behind The Collective Dairy.

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Fig 4. Social Media Competition

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Innocent A

s seen in Fig 4 the social media activity of The

Collective’s competitors is somewhat lacking. As a young brand, it is important to look to others which inspire creativity and have engaged consumers over a substantial period of time. Moving away from yoghurt whilst keeping within the food sector, Innocent Smoothie is a success story based on values similar to that of The Collective. Although each brand was built around a different product, Innocent and The Collective Dairy are both alike in their work ethic and attitude toward their consumers. Innocent have a family, The Collective have a herd. In both cases, building a relationship and creating conversation with their consumers is paramount to their business. Since their humble beginnings at a small festival in London, Innocent has always been a brand that listens to consumers and encourages conversation (Rawlins (2008) in Turner 2008: online). They first started doing this by cleverly utilising their packaging as a conversation starter with their ‘family’ of consumers. Innocent use a short blurb on the back of the packaging for charming and engaging images and writing. As the majority of people engage with the brand via their packaging, Innocent marketing Director, Douglas Lamont, said ‘it’s the most important marketing piece we do each year’ (Lamont (2012) in O’Reilly 2012b: online).

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Fig 5. Innocent Smoothie Label

The Collective already use their unique tone of voice across all platforms, including their packaging, but this could perhaps be extended further to encourage engagement and loyalty. Innocent clearly reap the benefits of injecting their personality into the packaging as Britvic’s annual Soft Drinks Report showed they reached value sales of £213.5m in 2012; a market leading increase of 36.6% on the previous year (Reynolds, 2013 : online).

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Fig 6. Innocent Smoothies

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Now that Innocent is an international success

As seen, there are certainly aspects of Innocent’s

predominantly owned by soft drink giants Coca Cola,

strategy, such as their commitment to engaging

Lamont expressed the need to think of new ways to

packaging, that The Collective can learn from and

engage with their consumer, explaining ‘there’s no one

adapt to help build their brand into a similar success.

campaign that will do this, it’s about layers of different

Nevertheless, the Collective are very much their

types of activity’ (Lamont (2012) in O’Reilly, 2012a:

own brand with their own voice. Their New Zealand

online).

counterparts were found in the 2012 Social Media 100 list which Innocent topped (Headstream, 2012: online),

This is something which The Collective needs to

so they are taking steps in the right direction but they

start doing more extensively. They already speak to

need adapt their strategy to suit the UK market.

consumers across numerous channels using a genuine, personable tone of voice. However the layering aspect

When discussing the brand’s marketing strategy Angus

that Lamont discusses is instrumental in projecting the

Allan, co-founder of The Collective said, ‘the key is

voice of the brand and extending their reach further,

showing a genuine personality and interest in the herd’

particularly as they are considering product expansion in

(Allan (2012) in Fahy, 2012: online). Picking up from

the future.

Lamont’s comments regarding layering activity, perhaps The Collective would benefit from numerous strategies

Innocent started out as the only smoothie producer in

that each target a specific consumer demographic.

the market offering fresh fruit and juice but over ten years later and many other brands have infiltrated their patch. Having gained trust from consumers, they were able to bring out a kids range, breakfast recipe and even veg pots. Now, their USP has moved towards product development (Rawlins (2008) in Turner 2008: online). Having launched in the UK as one of the only gourmet yoghurt brands, the journey of Innocent’s product expansion is similar to that which The Collective wishes to follow (Fuller, 2013: App 3: 90). By increasing their range on offer they too can become an umbrella brand led by core values and personality. In The Collective’s case this will be to prove that they are ‘dairy pioneers’ (The Collective, 2013: App 3: 94).

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the consumer

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the consumer L

ike most other food brands, The Collective like to

think their product is for all to enjoy. However, as seen from their array of press coverage in supplements such as the Mail Online, The Grocer and Good Housekeeping (See App 3: 94), they subtly target the 25-45 year old age group. Conveniently, Mintel reported the 25-34 year old age group to be the most prolific yoghurt users (Mintel, 2012a: online). When speaking to Emma Fuller from The Collective, it seems another demographic has also caught their eye. Notoriously poor students aren’t the most obvious consumers for gourmet yoghurt, but The Collective saw an opportunity. Despite their attempts to supply student unions across the country (Fuller, 2013: 3: 90), the demands for distribution are currently too high for such a small company but further expansion should allow the brand to meet consumer demand. 96% of people asked in the questionnaire (See App 13: 129), agreed yoghurt can be eaten at numerous times of the day. This bodes well, as students are often accustomed to jumbled meal times. Furthermore, the large pots offer financial benefits for student lifestyles; an investments for the week ahead or a shared venture between housemates.

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A problem that might arise when addressing students is the use of the word ‘gourmet’. As seen on the blog (See App 5: 100) and in the questionnaire results (See App 13: 129), people mostly think the word gourmet means more expensive, high quality and luxurious - and they wouldn’t be wrong. However, when asking the focus group if this description would be off-putting, they said the phrasing alone is not enough; it is totally dependent on the price of the product (See App 14: 140). Furthering this, co-founder Angus Allan, said the recession has actually worked in their favour as consumers choose to stay in and indulge at home (Allan (2011) in Hill, 2011: online). Low-cost luxury items are often described as ‘small affordable luxuries’ which continue to sell well even during economic uncertainty. Gourmet products are often perceived as comfort food, serving as a small indulgence for consumers with otherwise chaotic lives (Market Research, 2013: online). Recession or not, students are accustomed to being cash-strapped most of the year, so The Collective could use this opportunity to become their little bit of luxury. As mentioned the 24-35 year old age group eat yoghurt the most but if The Collective can engage with students before they reach that age, they can build a trusting relationship for the future when they have a little more money to spend. Senior consumer and lifestyles analyst Alexandra Richmond confirms this, stating, ‘encouraging loyalty now could well pay dividends as these consumers will become the family food shoppers of the future’ (Richmond (2010) in Mintel 2010: online).

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I have chosen two consumers which embody the type of student The Collective should be targeting. According to Malcolm Gladwell’s the Tipping Point,

‘In a social epidemic, Mavens are data banks. They provide the message. Connectors are social glue: they spread it. But there is also a select group of people, Salesmen, with the skills to persuade us when we are unconvinced of what we are hearing.’ (Gladwell, 2000) Josh, a final year Geography student at The University of Nottingham is a Connector and one of the few people who had heard of The Collective. Josh has a large circle of friends, all from different backgrounds; he always tells them about new products, brands and music he’s just heard of. Bryony is a final year Fashion Communication and Promotion student at Nottingham Trent University and is very much a Salesman. Bryony hadn’t heard of the brand but was keen to get to know more as soon as she was introduced to them. Bryony is often very convincing when she wants to be, twisting people’s arms when they don’t quite see what she does.

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It is important not to assume that all students take part in the same clichÊd university lifestyle. The Collective are an intelligent brand, using their wit to their advantage and simply making consumers smile. Josh and Bryony discover brands their own way - what they do with the information is dependent on the experience they’ve had. Together, their social skills are critical to the tipping point of word-of-mouth epidemics. Both Josh and Bryony answered a series of questions about the type of objects they surround themselves with on a daily basis, their interests and their aspirations. Using this information I have built a detailed picture of their lifestyles in order to understand their habits and behaviour, as seen in Fig 8 and 9. The campaign needs to appeal to their interests and catch their attention without disturbing them. In order to address the most relevant touchpoints for the campaign I asked Josh and Bryony to outline which social platforms they use most often. Fig 7 shows the most popular choices.

Fig 7. Top Social Media Platforms

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The last thing I bought and loved was a zippo lighter If I had to limit my shopping to one neighbourhood in one city it would be Venice Beach, Los Angeles My most precious piece of technology is my Macbook Pro The last music I downloaded was Boiler Room’s free download The magazines on my bedside table are mostly GQ In my fridge you’ll always find; chicken, eggs, broccoli, yoghurt The best film I’ve seen recently is Silver Linings Playbook My favourite website is: theclassyissue.com An unforgettable place I’ve travelled to in the past year was Berlin If I could be anything I’d be a fighter pilot


n o t t e r G Josh

Fig 8. Consumer Profile : Josh


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Bryony Friend The last thing I bought and loved was a bag from And Other Stories If I had to limit my shopping to one neighbourhood in one city it would be London, Oxford Street and Regent Street My most precious piece of technology is my Macbook Pro The last music I downloaded/bought was Kendrick Lemar’s album The books on my bedside table are Wonderland magazine and Grace Coddignton: a Memoir In my fridge you’ll always find, eggs, yoghurt, scotch eggs, salad dressing and ketchup The best film I’ve seen recently is The Impossible My favourite website is Daily Mail An unforgettable place I’ve travelled to in the past year was Berlin If I could be anything I’d be Head of Events at British Fashion Council

Fig 9. Consumer Profile : Bryony

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campaign inspiration

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Campaign inspiration I

n order to create a timely on-brand campaign, it’s vital

A great example of this comes from the ’cult beer of

to look at marketing trends and influential campaigns

Belgium’, Vedett (James Clay, 2012: online). The brand

from recent years.

asks consumers to submit cool projects, awesome blogs, original artwork or anything which they say has ‘the

In an era where brand transparency is a priority

power to inspire’ (Vedett Gazett, 2012: online) to their

for consumers, successful brands understand that

website. Once approved, submissions are put up online

everything they do advertises their unique behaviour.

and selected images from the best entrants are printed

These brands are using this to their advantage and

onto the back labels of over 1000 Vedett bottles.

enticing consumers with content marketing. Alongside the labels, the brand launched its own free Avoiding ‘logo-slapping’ and hard-selling like mad-cow

newspaper called Vedett Gazett which is a collection of

disease; branded content is one of the least obtrusive

the brand’s favourite submissions. Distributed to places

ways to engage with consumers. Creating an idea that

where you’ll find Vedett, the paper is in pubs, bars and

people want to spend time with invites conversation.

restaurants around the UK as well as galleries, vintage shops, museums, and markets in major cities across the

Angus Allan, co-founder of The Collective explained that

UK.

with all their communications they want to ‘drive people to us [The Collective], not drive people crazy’ (Allan

The concept is an engaging piece of co-creation with

(2012) in Fahy, 2012: online). Keeping this in mind, it is

quirky elements that can certainly be applied to socialite

important that the strategy encourages consumers to

students. Using newsprint in particular is a clever way of

seek the brand out, rather than interrupt them.

engaging consumers with tangible product that often has nostalgic connotations.

Angela Courtin, President of The Story Lab suggests brands need to look ‘beyond traditional advertising

Steve Watson from Stack magazine spoke about Vedett

formats’ and think more about the ‘share-ability of

(Watson, 2013: App 10: 111) and the benefits of using

content’ (Courtin (2013) in Stylus 2013b: online). This

newsprint as a really cheap medium with the additional

is something The Collective can harness and tailor to

distribution benefits of being able to put them

attract different consumer groups.

anywhere.

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Fig 10. Story for Vedett

Fig 11. Vedett Gazett

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Fig 12. Wrap Magazine

When speaking to Polly Glass from Wrap Magazine (Glass, 2013: App 10: 113) she explained why consumers will always have an appreciation for printed products…

‘As much as online content has its place now, people will always enjoy actually physically being able to hold and smell something. People naturally appreciate something that has had time and effort put into its production, and this is often much easier to appreciate from a physical, tangible object than something online.’

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Fig 13. E4 E Sting

Wrap is a beautifully illustrated publication that ‘bridges

Entrants are given a 10 second window to fill with E4’s

the gap between being a magazine and a product’

logo and one of their soundbeds. Although these are

(Wrap Magazine, 2013: online). Each themed edition is

designed for TV, content in general is becoming more

full of features and interviews from a range of creative

‘snackable’ as consumers are increasingly on the move

sources but it also includes ten illustrated wrapping

(Flint (2013) in Stylus 2013b). The Collective are a small

papers. The aim of the magazine is to showcase the

brand with an equally small budget (Fuller, 2013: 3: 90)

work of up and coming illustrators, an art form which is

- perhaps bite-sized content is a feasible way around

currently on trend. This is seen from events such as The

budgeting limitations.

Vice Illustration Show and Pick Me Up - The UK’s original contemporary graphic arts festival which celebrates

Not only are E4’s entertaining stings a source of

graphic art, design and illustration (Somerset House,

inspiration to The Collective but so is their ability to

2013: online) (Gosling, 2013: online).

resonate with Generation Y. In 2012 E4 celebrated its most successful year since it began twelve years ago as

Similar to Vedett Gazett and Wrap, another great

the most viewed and loved digital channel in the 16-34

marketing platform for showcasing creative talent

age group (Channel 4, 2013: online).

comes in the form of Channel 4’s E Stings competition (Fig. 13 shows a popular still). It beckons ‘weird and wonderful ideas’ to be submitted with the intention of becoming the channel’s latest sting. The results are often completely random but always very entertaining.

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Looking further into TV advertising, the questionnaire results (See App 13: 129) revealed consumer’s favourite adverts both past and present. Looking at the collection on the blog (See App 5: 100) it is clear to see that consumers enjoy and remember adverts that make them smile. ‘Evian’s babies’, ‘Cadbury’s Gorilla’ and the ‘Three’s horse advert’ were all mentioned numerous times. Not only does humour appear to be more memorable, it is also more ‘share-able’. When conducting the focus group, respondents said they most often pass on media that they think is funny (See App 14: 141). This encourages word of mouth marketing and sparks conversation. Although TV advertisements are one of the most expensive media platforms, The Collective’s light-hearted approach and witty tone of voice are free. Finding a way to inject that into their campaign is an essential part of creating entertaining content specific to their brand values. As seen there are numerous marketing communication strategies that are creatively inspiring and relevant to The Collective. The brand needs to harness these techniques to work in favour of the brands limitations such as their budget.

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Fig 14 Evian: Dancing Babies

Fig 15. Cadbury’s Gorilla

Fig 16. Silly Stuff Matters


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6

the concept : bull or no bull

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the concept: Bull or No Bull I

ntroducing Bull or No Bull, a marketing campaign

aimed at the UK student demographic which seeks to increase the brand awareness and consumer loyalty of The Collective Dairy. Bull or No Bull is a proactive campaign that gets consumers talking about the brand by prioritising engaging entertainment. Like The Collective, the consumer is at the heart of the strategy, every aspect of the campaign has been geared towards the behaviour of students like Josh and Bryony. The authenticity and honesty of the brand is at the core of the concept. The Collective Dairy themselves are all about ‘no bull’. The campaign uses this telling slogan to project the values of the brand whilst entertaining consumers and inviting them to join the conversation. Before the campaign begins, The Collective will notify relevant press such as student magazines and publications to help spread the word (See App 16: 163). The concept is executed across 4 channels:

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Collective Bull the Newspaper Every two months for a year the brand will release a free, illustrated newspaper called Collective Bull. This will be a collection of short stories, facts and riddles all relating to a theme of the issue. However some of the content is true and some is false; it is Bull or No Bull. The use of illustration will bring the stories to life, and in a nostalgic fashion the answers are listed upside down in the back of the newspaper. In order to engage with the right kind of consumer, such as Josh or Bryony, the papers will be distributed to relevant social spots such as independent cafes and bars. For example in Nottingham, this would be places such as Brew Dog, Spankey Van Dykes, and Homemade CafĂŠ. The first issue will be based on New Zealand due to the origins of the brand and called A Kiwi is not a Fruit; Tales of New Zealand. The following issues will each be based on a different country, following the journey of the brand from New Zealand to the UK.

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New Zealand is home to the world's only flightless parrot,

the kakapo Fig 17. Kakapo

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Fig 18. Collect-a-Bull Postcards

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Collect-a-Bull Postcards For every issue released there will be four postcards distributed to similar places. If one set of postcards are collected and placed together, they make an image which when photographed can be shared on Twitter #bullornobull, Facebook or Instagram. This automatically enters the consumer into a competition to win a year’s supply of Collective Dairy yoghurt. A complete set also can also be redeemed as a money-off voucher, adding extra incentive to find the postcards, and the pots in store. As seen from the focus group, students are encouraged to engage with brands on social media platforms if there is a discount incentive (See App 14:138).

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Teaser Animation In order to promote each issue, the campaign, and ultimately the brand, a short animation will be produced to intrigue consumers and continue the conversation. Each animation will be based on one piece of content from the issue. As the only execution which runs solely online, it will be released on relevant social platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. The combination of intrigue and entertainment will ultimately drive traffic to the website where the clip will also be featured and the rest of the campaign explained. Fig 19 shows the animation stills from the first issue.

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Fig 19. Cannibal


collect-a-bull yoghurt pots In order to create a cohesive communication strategy, each story, riddle and fact will be printed onto the pots as a small blurb. The packaging will be changed every two months alongside the newspapers, with two variations of each SKU. Working in the same way as the postcards, next to each blurb will be one third of an image. If all three pots with the correct images are collected, the customer is entitled to one free pot of Collective Dairy yoghurt. This adds an incentive to buy the Collective Dairy and increases engagement with consumers picking up pots.

Fig 20. Fence

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Fig 21. Collect-a-Bull Pot

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The main thrust of the communication strategy is to drive traffic to the Collective Dairy website. Here consumers will find all they need to know about each aspect of the campaign as they showcase the personality and character of the brand. Due to the nature of the campaign, consumers will interact with it at different stages and in numerous ways. Fig 23 shows the potential consumer journeys of Josh and Bryony, outlining each execution and consumer touchpoint.

Fig 22. Bryony and Josh

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collect-a-bull yoghurt pots

collect-a-bull postcards collective bull newspaper

animation collectivedairy. com

animation collect-a-bull postcards

collectivedairy. com

collective bull newspaper

collect-a-bull yoghurt pots 61

Fig 23. Consumer Journey


Measuring the Success of the Campaign As mentioned the campaign will initially run for one year, allowing time to release six issues in total. It is essential that the success of the campaign is measured throughout the year. Focusing on a percentage growth rate every two months (in line with the release of each issue) The Collective will be able to see like-for-like statistics and focus in on growth areas. This will ensure the campaign works together to ultimately increase the awareness of the brand. The success of the campaign will be calculated by measuring Reach and Exposure, Engagement, Influence and Conversions. Here are some of the ways in which this can be done.

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£% Twitter: number of new followers / number of re-tweets from followers and non-followers / number of times the #bullornobull is used / number of clicks a link receives (to website or animation) Facebook: how often posts are liked, commented on and shared by fans and friends of fans / number of clicks a link received On YouTube: number of channel views / number of new subscribers / amount of ratings and type (positive or negative) / number of comments Instagram: number of new followers / number of times the #bullornobull is used and photo of postcards taken Website: increase in traffic and bounce rate (percentage of visitors who leave the site or ‘bounce’ rather than look at other pages) Newspapers/Postcards: number of people that: take the newspaper and postcards away with them / enter the competition by taking a photo of the postcards / use the set of postcards as a 50p-off voucher / collect the three pots and redeem the free pot / sign up to the mailing list All parts of the campaign will help to increase the brands Search Engine Optimisation, particularly the additional elements created on the website.

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64


7

future recommendations

65


Future Recommendations D

epending on the success of each execution there

Another opportunity is to adapt the content of the

are many options which The Collective can take to

newspaper to become more orientated around the

further the campaign.

product’s attributes. For example, a story about somebody turning yellow from nasty e-numbers

As the concept evolves, it will move from a page on

may remind consumers how great ingredients of The

collectivedairy.com/uk across to its own website www.

Collective are.

collectivebull.com. This will be a platform to explain every execution of the campaign and invite consumers

Bull or No Bull is a year-long campaign built for students.

to get involved. As the year goes by and more issues

As mentioned before, layering activity is essential when

are released, a library of newspapers, postcards and

engaging with different consumer groups. The Collective

animations will be built up. For a small postage fee,

could adapt the content again to appeal to a different

consumers can order individual copies or subscribe

audience, for example a family.

to the newspaper and receive a set of accompanying postcards. Subscribing to the newspaper means they will also be added to the mailing list and receive the Babble and Bull newsletter via e-mail. As mentioned earlier, a great way to encourage conversation is using co-creation. There will be a page on the website that asks consumers to send in facts, stories and riddles relating to theme of the next issue. The best submissions will be chosen for the newspaper, postcards or pots. Also illustrators and animators are invited to get in touch and contribute to the artwork.

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Fig 24. Future Website

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Fig 25. Fence

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Overall, The Collective Dairy are a big-hearted, intelligent brand that use their roots and values to engage with their ‘herd’. With the product at the heart of the company and their ‘no bull’ slogan, The Collective are growing into a great brand that consumers can not help but love. The Bull or No Bull campaign engages with students in their own environment using ‘snackable’ content in a humorous and entertaining way. The communication strategy and executions address the most relevant touchpoints whilst projecting the brand values and extending their reach. Focusing on one consumer group allows the brand to layer their activity and build loyalty for the future.

#BullorNoBull

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list of illustrations Fig 1, 2013. Red Tractor. Red Tractor Logo. [Online] Jaspers. Available at: http://www.jaspersonline.co.uk/helping_the_environment.asp [Accessed 15 May] Fig 2, 2013. Thomas, O., Dripping Collective Dairy Logo [Own image] Fig 3, 2013. Thomas, O., A beautiful cow [Own Image] Fig 4, 2013. Thomas, O., Social Media Competition [Own image] Fig 5, 2013. Thomas, O., Innocent Smoothie Label [Own image] Fig 6, 2013. Thomas, O., Innocent Smoothies [Own image] Fig 7, 2013. Thomas, O., Top social Media Platforms [Own image] Fig 8, 2013. Thomas., Consumer Profile Josh [Own image] Fig 9, 2013. Thomas O., Consumer Profile Bryony [Own image] Fig 10, 2012. Vedett. Story for Vedett. [Online] James Clay. Available at: http://www.jamesclay.co.uk/beer-suppliers/ news/583-news-vedett-labels-gazett [Accessed: 2 May] Fig 11, 2012. Vedett. Vedett Gazett. [Online] Picsto Pin. Available at: http://www.picstopin.com/1920/wallpaper-suppliersglasgow-amor-love-heart-corazon-91-hd-/http:%7C%7Cwww*fondoswallpapers*net%7Cwallpapers%7Cimages%7C2011% 7C05%7Coriginal%7Cwallpaper-amor-love-heart-corazon-91-hd-3726*jpg/ [Accessed 17 May] Fig 12, 2013. Wrap. Wrap Magazine. [Online] Wrap Magazine. Available at: http://www.wrapmagazine.com/about/ [Accessed 15 April] Fig 13, 2013. SIXofONE. E4 Esting. [Online] Vimeo. Available at: http://vimeo.com/58536807 [Accessed 5 May] Fig 14, 2011. Evian. Evian: Dancing babies. [Online] The Drum. Available at: http://www.thedrum.com/opinion/2013/04/25/ trademark-toddlers-how-dancing-babies-brought-virality-evian [Accessed 1 May 2013] Fig 15, 2011. Fallon. Cadbury’s Gorilla. [Online]. Fallon. Available at: http://www.fallon.co.uk/work/show/id/22 [Accessed 12 May 2013] Fig 16, 2013. Three. Silly Stuff Matters. [Onlne] Sian Lovatt Blogspot. Available at: http://sianlovatt.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/ danceponydance-from-three-uk-what-can.html [Accessed 30 April 2013]

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Fig 17, 2013. Powis, M., Kakapo. Illustration Fig 18, 2013. Thomas, O., Collect-a-Bull Postcards [Own image] Fig 19, 2013. Luu, J., Cannibal. Animation Stills. Fig 20, 2013. Balance, W., Fence. Illustration. Fig 21, 2013. Thomas, O., Collect-a-Bull Pot [Own Image] Fig 22, 2013.Thomas, O., Bryony and Josh [Own image] Fig 23, 2013. Thomas, O., Consumer Journey [Own image] Fig 24, 2013. Thomas, O., Future Website [Own image] Fig 25, 2013. Balance, W., Fence. Illustration.

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