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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS VO L . 78, N O. 3

IS SUE O N E , 2011

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double athlete. single focus. “My whole life is focused on Christ.” ► De vin Johns to n ’ 1 3

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

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Fast growing major poised to change the world p age 4

World-class “King of Instruments” finds home at Olivet p age 1 2

NAIA

All-American named head football coach pag e 1 8

snapshots the lord’s table

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

«

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

  At the close of the fall   semester, the ONU community paused for a time of prayer and communion during chapel.

Contributing Writers Nick Birkey ’07 Amanda Jensen ’04/’06 M.O.L. Laura Wasson Warfel Luke Olney ’10

Milby Clock Tower was updated with a new face and dome as part of ongoing campus renovations.

Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03

facelift

Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography or as credited Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

PHOTO BY CAITIE SWEET ’12

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

Olivet Nazarene University

date night «

  Relationship experts and   ONU alumni Les ’84 and Leslie (Young) ’84 Parrott were the guest speakers for Celebration of Marriage 2011. The best-selling authors and speakers have been featured by Focus on the Family, CNN, “Good Morning America,” “The View” and “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” Olivet’s finest competed for the title of “Mr. ONU” during this year’s show themed “Men Through the Ages.”

his royal highness

President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div. Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90 Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D. Vice President for Graduate and Continuing Education Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2011 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

Cover photo by Katrina Holm PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

O

Mentors impact life as well as learning    In contrast to that model, Olivet faculty members are expected to be involved in research and writing, but their primary focus is teaching. We believe this emphasis on teaching puts the student at the heart of the learning process and provides a framework for much more than the simple transfer of information. A focus on quality teaching sets up the possibility of genuine transformation ­rather than simple transference. In this model, professors ­become mentors as well as instructors, and it is in the context of that relationship that real learning takes place.

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The Olivetian 3

   Mark Hopkins was a professor of moral and intellectual philosophy and also the president of Williams College in western Massachusetts. He was a skilled teacher, immortal­ ized by the aphorism attributed to one of his former students, President James A. Garfield, who said: “The ideal college is Mark Hopkins on one end of a log and a student on the other.” This quotation underscores the impor­tance of one-to-one relationships as part of the teaching/learning process.    At Olivet, we actively support and foster the idea of teachers as mentors. A mentor is a wise and trusted guide. The relationship is personal as well as professional. The ­focus goes beyond what a teacher may know to who a teacher is and how learning is integrated with his/her life and character. We understand that mentors have the capa­ city to impact the life as well as the academic development of a student.    In this issue of The Olivetian, you will be introduced to some fine teacher/mentors as well as some gifted students. We are fortunate at Olivet to have a highly qualified faculty who are willing to give of themselves to help students develop personally as well as professionally. This is part of the “Olivet Difference” — and it does, indeed, make a difference.

   Olivet Nazarene University is a teaching ­institution. One might ask, “Aren’t all ­colleges?” The response would be “yes and no.” The ­focus of many, perhaps most, colleges and universities in America today is research first, publishing second, professional development third, and teaching a distant fourth. Often the under­graduate courses at such schools are not taught by a member of the faculty, but by a graduate student or teaching assistant.

“At Olivet, we actively support and foster the idea of teachers as mentors.”

Issue 1 | 2011

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PHOTO BY JONES PHOTO

perspectives

academics A HELPING

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SUBMITTED PHOTO

Department of Social Work encourages students to take action

▲ Tim Jefferies ’11

Jesus as a social worker    “Social work is a good missional fit with Olivet,” notes Dr. Thompson. “It allows a student to be more than just a person of faith. His or her work becomes faith in action.”    He believes that Olivet’s social work students are ­serious about serving the Lord through serving o ­ thers.    Tim has eagerly applied his faith to his area of study. It has become a practical way for him to live out the teachings of Jesus. “Social work is infused with Christianity — it’s what the Bible calls us to do. Christ emphasized helping people.”

  Sex trafficking, drugs, homelessness, unwanted pregnancies. These issues fill up the daily headlines. But for the Department of Social Work, they are more than just societal problems — they represent real people with real needs.   Though a very broad and diverse field, ­social work comes down to one thing: loving people.    No one knows that more than England ­native Tim Jefferies ’11, who is spending his spring semester doing an internship in Long Beach, Wash., to complete the requirements for his social work degree at Olivet Nazarene University.

By Luke olney ’10

Making a difference    And helping people is something Olivet’s social work majors do best. Because application is crucial for students studying social work, they are required to serve 80 volunteer hours in the surrounding c­ ommunity.    With more and more social work majors, classmates are starting to compete with each other for certain opportunities. One of the current initiatives in the department is to give students more options ­for places to volunteer. With more choices, all students will r­ eceive placements that align with their career goals.

Just people    The son of two chaplains — his dad for the military, his mom for a mental health hospital — serving others comes naturally for Tim.    “I have always had an affinity for people,” Tim says in his amiable British accent. “Not numbers, not book work, just people. ­Social work just made sense in my heart.   “I have always been drawn ­toward having direct communication with and influence on people and what they need.”   Dr. Houston Thompson ’97 MCM, chair of the Department of Social Work and Criminal Justice, says social work is “a calling — an opportunity to work a job, make a living and truly live the principles of Christ, day in and day out.”

An adventure   After seven semesters of course work, every senior social work major must spend one semester in a field placement. Most students choose someplace local, but Tim and his new wife, fellow social work ­major Kelsey (Moreau) ’10, wanted an adventure.   Tim is one of very few So they packed their bags male social work majors and headed to Washington at Olivet. He estimates state. that in a class of approxi  Tim’s field placement mately 30 students, there is at a behavioral health were probably only a gency in Long Beach, ­ five males. This where he works with mental is not exclusive health and substance abuse to Olivet; in fact, ­patients. He ­observes other therapists, learning their the entire field various styles, steps and of ­ social work is programs. Eventually, Tim over whelmingly will have his own clients female — close to and will lead his own group 75 percent. sessions.   When asked what it is   Tim always knew he like to be a male in a femalewanted to help and infludominated area, Tim goodence people, but it was not naturedly replied that he until he was a student at does not mind being outOlivet that this desire maninumbered and “kind of fested itself as a calling to likes the difference.” the field of social work.    “Although I may not have been able to pinpoint it right away,” Tim says, “I have been prepared by God through my heart and by Olivet through my mind for the field of social work.”    Along with 31 other graduating social work majors, Tim will receive his diploma from Olivet in May 2011. They will be fully equipped to enter a world in dire need of a helping hand.

Social work: A femaledominated field

Professors count    Tim, who was inducted into the Phi Alpha National Honor Society for Social Workers in April 2010, is just one of 120 social work majors currently enrolled at Olivet Nazarene University. In fact, social work ranks as the fifth largest ONU department by number of student majors.    To serve those in one of the fastest growing areas of study, the department has added two new faculty members in the last three years. There are now four faculty members, which provides more one-on-one time with students.    Olivet is unique for the special relationships that so often develop between students and their professors. The highlight of Tim’s academic experience at Olivet was his relationship with Dr. Thompson, whom he calls “a wonderful man.”    “I enjoyed getting to know Dr. Thompson in and out of the classroom. He has a massive history in social work. There is so much to learn from him.”    Likewise, Dr. Thompson cites the students as the source of his energy. He invests that energy into their lives. In turn, they go out and invest in the lives of others.

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Issue 1 | 2011

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ive Olivet students recently helped to bless a Kankakee food pantry. In the process, they also helped raise awareness about poverty and hunger issues in the Kankakee area and around the world.    Kayla Rolling ’12 (Green Bay, Wis.); ­Danielle Pipal ’12 (Wheaton, Ill.); Brianna Robins ’12 (Bourbonnais, Ill.); Lisa Beyer ’11 (Spring Grove, Ill.); and Emily Del Soldato ’11 (Sparks, Nev.) took Professor Catherine Anstrom’s ’95 M.B.A. class “World Food Problems” during the fall 2010 semester. Working together as a group named “The Egg Flyas,” they developed a creative plan to educate students about hunger problems around them.    “World Hunger Awareness Day” was born and planned for Tuesday, December 7, 2010, on the Olivet campus. The beneficiary of this event would be Center of Hope in Kankakee. Center of Hope serves more than 650 families each week and provides food assistance to more than 6,905 people — 44 percent of whom are children — each month.    “There is hunger. There is also malnourishment,” said ­Danielle. “This is a way I can contribute to the solution.”

offered as giveaways to game attendees. Local media helped promote the event, and Northern Illinois Food Bank and Center of Hope sent representatives to campus to provide more education about the area’s hunger problem and initiatives.    “This event took off because of networking between Olivet and the community, and the students’ use of their experiences and gifts,” said Prof. Anstrom, associate professor of family and consumer sciences.

a successful day

   When they set World Hunger Awareness Day in motion, The Egg Flyas had no idea how the event would benefit Olivet and the community.

The

by Laura Wasson Warfel

PHOTOspin

Student project builds world hunger awareness and community involvement

The Olivetian 5

hunger

celebrating results

problem

   Cooperation among Olivet, Center of Hope, local media and other organizations for the events on December 7 had obvious results: donations of 525 nonperishable items and $140 in cash.    “I’m impressed with the ingenuity and energy of these students,” said Jeff. “They saw a problem and came up with solutions to meet needs in our community.”    An even greater blessing is the education about area and worldwide poverty and hunger issues that everyone received from this project. People experienced firsthand a way that they could make a difference.    “This class and our project were eye-opening to me,” said Kayla. “This confirmed to me my call to missions. Now, I know how much we need people to come together to work on the hunger problem. I would like to see World Hunger Awareness Day become an annual event.”    “I’m more aware of the efforts it takes to make a small event something bigger,” said Brianna. “Don’t limit yourself to what you think you can do. Step outside the box.”

Statistics taken from “The Egg Flyas” class presentation

In Kankakee County:

Word gets out

■ More than 13,456 people live below the poverty level.

  Activities for World Hunger Awareness Day were set: white ribbons tied around tree trunks as a reminder of the millions who die from hunger each year; posters and a display in Ludwig Center; slides about world hunger in chapel; and the “Hoops for Hunger” event in the evening, during the men’s and women’s basketball games at McHie Arena. Admission to this event was a $1 donation and one nonperishable food item.   When Shine.FM learned of the “Hoops for Hunger” event, Jeff Enfield, director of underwriting for the radio station, contacted Kristina Back, a local owner of two Little Caesar’s restaurants in the area. She donated 1,000 gift cards — each good for one free HOT-N-READY® pizza — to be

■ The unemployment rate in January 2009 was 11.6 percent. Worldwide: ■ For the price of one missile, a school of hungry children could eat lunch every day for five years. ■ 1.4 billion people in developing countries live in extreme poverty. ■ Every 3.5 seconds, a person dies from hunger.

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The response of students, staff, faculty and area residents was both encouraging and gratifying for them.    “It was important to me to participate in this event because I’ve gone through periods when I struggled. I worked and bought groceries for my family when I was 15 years old,” said Alexandra Kayser ’13 (St. Louis).    “I am here tonight because Olivet’s Residential Life works with Center of Hope,” said Dwayne Mills ’09 MOL, associate dean for student development, as he walked up with his wife and children to give their donations at the game. “I am also here to set an example for our students and for my three sons.”    “I have a lot of extra food now at the end of the semester, and I’m donating it,” said Nicole Merry ’12 (Erie, Penn.).    After the event, Sodexo, Olivet’s food service, helped by loading up the donated items and taking them to Center of Hope the next day.

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onu news

Heavenly Harmony

Read the full story at www.olivet.edu.

Olivet quartet shows true beauty on and off stage Four women, four harps, incredibly beautiful music. Olivet’s own harp ensemble brings together the talents of Jennifer Wilson ’13 (Bourbonnais, Ill.); Cambria Thomas ’12 (Greenville, Ill.); Rachel Fisher ’12

(Metamora, Ill.); and Emily Heinz ’12 (Zion, Ill.) in an unusual way. Although the music sounds angelic, these four experts say that playing the harp definitely has both joys and challenges.

Recent

HEADLINES:

School of Graduate and Continuing Studies extends reach in Chicago suburbs with new Oak Brook location

Olivet named one of Best Christian Workplaces for 2011

A new year in the new chapel

Shine.FM expansion: Two full power stations added in Chicagoland and North West Indiana

Check out these stories and more at www.olivet.edu. w

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Issue 1 | 2011

ONU

Insider

   “A personal commitment to excel … role models to other students … hard-working … dedicated.” These are the words that The Lincoln Academy of Illinois uses to describe its student laureates. These same words describe Evan Karg ’12 (Freeport, Ill.), Olivet’s choice for the 2010 Lincoln Student Laureate Award.    Illinois’ Old State Capitol in Springfield was the site of the awards convocation November 6, 2010. Each of the state’s 52 Student Laureates received a medallion, a certificate of achievement and an honorarium check. After the ceremony, the students, families and friends walked to the Governor’s Mansion and had lunch together on the second floor.    “I met a lot of people that day, including the trustees of the Academy,” Evan says. “It was wonderful to be with college students who are driven to learn.”

By Laura wasson warfel

NATS | Olivet Nazarene University

had the honor of hosting more than 200 high school and college students on campus for the ­annual Illinois ­National ­Association of Teachers Singing (NATS) competition November 5–6, 2010. ONU students receiving honorable mention i­ncluded: David Rice ’14, Taylin Frame ’13, Wesley ­Taylor ’13, Alicia Carter ’12 and Blake Reddick ’11. ONU finalists included: Calley Seefeldt ’13, Alyssa Norden ’13, Reuben Lillie ’11, Paul Drace ’11, Ashley Raffauf ’13 and Christine Caven ’13. NATS auditions are considered a professional preparation, and are recognized throughout the country and even around the world.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Leading and learning    Well-known around campus as a student driven to learn, Evan has also taken an active leadership role in many areas. Currently, he is the student body president and has served as executive VP for spiritual life, freshman class chaplain, secretary of spiritual life and student representative to the Academic Ethics Committee, and is a member of Sigma Tau Delta, the international English honor society.    He also led this year’s Tom’s Shoes for Children drive on campus, which resulted in nearly 300 pairs of shoes being sent to impoverished children around the world.

NURSING HONOR | The Illinois

▲ EVAN KARG ’12

Board of Higher Education has awarded Patty Kershaw, assistant professor for the Department of Nursing, a Nurse Educator Fellowship of $10,000 to be used toward professional development. Across the state of Illi­nois, only 32 individuals were nominated and 18 a ­ warded.

ASC President

 named

TECHNOLOGY FOR THE FUTURE |

2010 Lincoln Student Laureate

Man with plans    To work toward his goals of grad school and teaching, Evan has mapped out a strategy that will take him to California, Massachusetts, Canada, England and Africa. He has already put the Lincoln Laureate honorarium he received to good use. He made his first payment toward his summer 2011 teaching experience in Burkina-Faso, West Africa, where he will be teaching English as a second language.    After he returns from Africa, he will be part of a summer study program at Harvard University. Also in 2011, he will represent Olivet at the Nazarene Student Leadership Association gathering in Canada; at a student body presidents’ meeting in San Diego; and at the international Sigma Tau Delta conference in Pittsburgh, Penn. He has also applied for the Oxford (England) Study Abroad Program.    “Olivet is a special place where a student receives an excellent education, but also learns about life,” Evan says. “It’s a safe place to grapple with life’s questions before the world tries to dominate our lives. I wouldn’t tell anyone to go anywhere else.    “I’ve spent too much time trying to put words to God. Now I’m learning to let God put the words on me. That’s what’s happening in my life right now. I want to show people, especially my Generation Y peers, that a person can have faith in God and live a joyful, meaningful life.”

First and only choice    How did Evan decide that Olivet would be the university where he would develop his leadership skills while pursuing a degree? “I always knew I wanted to come to Olivet, even though no one else in my family has attended here,” he says. “This was the only school I applied to.”    When he first entered Olivet, Evan was studying pastoral ministry. Early in 2010, he began to sense that direction changing. “I decided to go for what I love: English,” he says. “I want to go on to grad school, and then teach English and literature. A year ago, I didn’t even know this.”    “Evan reads voraciously and writes for ‘the fun of it,’” says Rebecca Belcher-Rankin ’69, English professor. “He studies materials not assigned to him in the busiest semester he’s ever had — while maintaining an A average. He loves life, and he loves people. He is transparent in his desire to

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ONU Director of Information Tech­ nology D ­ ennis Seymour ’82 and Network Man­ager Jeff Rice ’99/’03 M.B.A. were featured in an article t­itled “The future is now” in the November/­December 2010 issue of EdTech magazine. The article — citing five “best practices” for colleges and universities needing to support the latest video and wireless applications — recognized Seymour, Rice and Olivet Nazarene University for a network infrastructure upgrade that will ­effectively support YouTube videos, video conferencing and widespread wireless usage for e-mail, F ­ ace­book and o ­ ther highly interactive applications.

be an authentic Christian and to serve his world in whatever ways God will guide him.”

   “Evan manages a heavy academic schedule while leading the Associated Student Council and serving as chair of the Nazarene Student Leader Association [NSLA],” says Woody Webb ’86/’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div., vice president for student development. NSLA includes 80 elected student dele­gates representing more than 20,000 residential students at 11 Nazarene higher education schools in the U.S. and Canada.    “What I appreciate most about him is his diverse circle of friends and his intentional efforts to be inclusive. His love for Olivet and his peers is evident as we meet weekly for conversation and prayer.”

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grad school

grad school

Business unusual by Andy Corbus ’91

▲ THE LESLIES:

Cooper, Brittany, Todd and Emmerson

  Daybreak arrives a full eight hours before it arrives at Olivet. A hemisphere away, Olivet graduates Todd Leslie ’03/’07 MBA and wife Brittany (Driffill) ’05 are serving as missionaries — in a very untra­ ditional sense of the word — in ­Johannesburg, South Africa.    Todd and Brittany were married in 2005, having met at Olivet in 2002. From the begin­ning, it was clear they had similar interests: both majored in education, and both shared a passion for international ministry. They had each independently completed some of their studies abroad, and both had ventured out on a variety of volunteer mission trips, from ­Europe to South America.    It was on one of these trips that Todd began to understand that the plan for his life included ­missions.    “It became very clear to me that God had a non-pastoral plan for me that would take me well outside my stereotype of a missionary. It also ­became clear that additional education would be needed. For me, Olivet was the natural and ­desired choice.”    While Todd knew that his life exper­iences had been preparing him for the mission field, he also knew he needed to deepen his skill set. So he began the masters of business in administration (MBA) program in what he describes as a leap of faith.    “I had not taken any courses in business since high school,” he ­explains, “and I showed absolutely no natural inclination toward business. Much to my surprise, once the decision was made and the courses were ­started, God blessed me with an amazing passion for business, strategy and leadership development.”

▲ Todd Leslie ’03/’07 MBA (3rd from right, back row) oversees daily operations of the Church of the Nazarene’s regional office in Johannesburg, South Africa.

   Upon the completion of his MBA, Todd and ­Brittany, along with new baby Emmerson, accepted a ministry assignment, packed up their belongings, trained for the mission field, and moved to South ­Africa in January 2009. Todd is now the administrative coordinator for the African Region of the Church of the Nazarene. His respon­sibilities include property management, human resources, consultation, labor law consultation, and management of the regional office.    When asked how his education and business degrees apply to the mission field, Todd is quick to explain, “Every course that was a part of the MBA curriculum has proven to be invaluable in my preparation and practice of ministry — everything from the understanding that was gained in managerial accounting and finance, to the teamwork and conflict-resolution required when working in cohorts.”    Regarding his education degree, Todd adds, “I constantly find myself teaching or developing staff and leaders here in Africa, building on the principles and foundation of my undergraduate degree in ­education.”    Both Todd and Brittany are actively involved in the ministry and local community. In addition to supporting the ministry, Brittany helps with curriculum development for their church and is a busy mom with two-year-old Emmerson and one-year-old ­Cooper. She will become even busier with the arrival of their third child in April.    Todd and Brittany are enjoying the family oriented culture of South Africa. Brittany explains, “If there’s a meeting at work, the kids come. That’s been the biggest blessing for me: how understanding and open the church has been to me being a mom first.” Most functions involve family, which helps the Leslies stay connected in a busy time of their lives.    When asked what advice he would give to others uncertain about their future, Todd quotes Proverbs 3:5–6: “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.”

“Every course that was a part of the MBA curriculum has proven to be invaluable in my preparation and practice of ministry .”

ADVANCE YOUR

C A R E E R ! 26 8 1 BUSINESS • COUNSELING • EDUCATION HISTORY • NURSING • RELIGION

master’s degrees certification and continuing education programs doctoral program

www.olivet.edu 877-4-OLIVET w

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SU BMI TTED PH OTOS

MBA offers advanced training to complement life experience

6,305

Individuals and families who financially supported Olivet last year

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feature

RockClimbing Faculty mentor enables Katie Eccles to scale new heights in pursuit of her dream career By Laura Wasson Warfel

   “She was right between the Newton and Galileo of geology!”   That’s how the friend of Dr. Charles ­Carrigan ’96 described his amazement at an ONU student’s placement in the speaker line-up for a recent national conference. But amazed as his friend was, Dr. Carrigan, associate professor of geology and chemistry, was even prouder.    For nearly a year-and-a-half, Dr. C ­ arrigan and Katie Eccles ’11 (Plainfield, Ind.) — ­Olivet honors program student in geo­logy and science education — had been preparing for this moment. They had reviewed literature, done fieldwork in the Southern Appalachian Mountains, worked with geological samples in the lab and collected data using the electron microprobe at the University of Michigan. Their work together culminated with Katie’s presentation at the 2010 meeting and symposium of The Geological Society of America (GSA).    “Reaching New Peaks in Geoscience” was the theme of the 2010 GSA meeting, October 31 through November 3 in Denver, Colo. Katie might use the same phrase to describe her experiences during the past few months.

Laying groundwork for her future

Earning their respect

   While in Denver, Katie also had the opportunity to learn from professionals in her field.    “I learned so much in just two days!” Katie says. “I heard what’s happening now from the people who are doing it. Talking with Jordan (Cupp) Hayes ’07 was really great. She is working on her doctorate in geophysics at the University of Wyoming.”    Dr. Carrigan adds, “At the GSA event, Katie was able to meet several potential graduate advisors. That will be a big help to her in her future plans for attending graduate school.”

  Attending the GSA meeting were 6,540 geology professionals, educators and students representing 49 countries. Sixteen registered media representatives from Nature, Science News, American Scientist, Earth and About:Geology.com worked onsite throughout the event.    Katie titled her presentation, “Preliminary P-T-T Investigation of Rutile-Bearing Pelitic Schists in the Southern Appalachian Blue Ridge”— one of only 189 oral presentations.    “Katie’s presentation went exceedingly well,” says Dr. Charles Carrigan. “Few undergraduates present at GSA, and most who do give poster presentations, not oral presentations. After her talk, a number of people were surprised to find out that she was an undergrad.    “She gave her presentation back-to-back with two very well-known and respected geologists who are professors at highly respected ­research institutions.”

Giving credit where due

   “I’ve really enjoyed working with Katie on her honors thesis,” Dr. Carrigan says. “She has worked very hard and accomplished a lot.”    “None of this would have been possible without the finan­cial support we’ve received from several sources, including alumni,” Dr. Carrigan explains. “We have a lot of people to thank.”    Much of Katie’s project was made possible through the Pence-Boyce Research program, which is funded

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“My professors guided and directed my education. They encouraged me and wanted me to succeed.” — KATIE ECCLES ’1 1

Issue 1 | 2011

The Olivetian 11

Teacher. Mentor.

Friend. A T Olivet, learning goes far beyond   the walls of the classroom. Professors take an active role in the lives of their students, helping them to achieve both personal and professional success.

Merrick Robison

   After playing key roles in eight of Olivet’s theater productions, Merrick Robison ’11 has developed a special relationship with theater professor, Jerry Cohagen. He even considers Prof. Cohagen and his wife Lynda an extension of his family, often going over to their home for a meal. Now, for his honors project, Merrick is writing and directing this year’s spring play.    “Prof. Cohagen is a wealth of insight and direction, not only encouraging me to be creative in the writing and directing of the play, but to also be scholastic in the way that I approach each element of theater.”    Ashlie McIntire ’10 met Dr. Woodruff in the fall of her senior year of high school at a scholarship audition. After talking with him, she immediately knew God wanted her to attend Olivet.    “When I came as a freshman, Dr. Woodruff became my voice teacher and mentor. Because of the ways he challenged me [both vocally and spiritually] and cared about me as a person, Dr. Woodruff has the deepest impact on my life.”

Ashlie McIntire Dr. Neal Woodruff

   On weekends, Communications Professor Mark Bishop works as a meteorologist at ABC 7 News in Chicago. With this position, he has endless contacts in the news industry, which he uses to benefit his students at Olivet.    Most recently, Bishop contacted one of his friends at ABC 7 News, recommending communications major Laura Fleschner ’12 as the perfect choice for an intern. She was offered the position and is currently having the experience of a lifetime.    Laura says, “Thanks to Prof. B., I am now interning at one of the largest television markets in America!”

Laura Fleschner

Dr. Rebecca Belcher Rebecca Lankford

   Dr. Patricia Nielsen, assistant professor in the Department of Nursing, takes a special interest in her students. With three sons of her own, she developed a connection with nursing major and former football player Steve Zaborowski ’11.    “When I found out that I had failed a class and was going to have to take another semester at ONU, I broke down. She was extremely supportive and prayed that God would watch over me and help me. She helped me realize that even though I had to take a step back, nursing was my calling. She helped me find the determination to stick with it. I graduated with my bachelor’s degree in nursing in January 2011.”

Steve Zaborowski

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SU BMI TTED P HOTOS

by two anony­mous donors and named after the donors’ two most influential professors.    “Alumni giving has allowed me a lot of opportunities in the science program,” Katie says. “Gifts have helped with my research. And I’ve been able to go on some awesome field trips out West that wouldn’t have been possible without this ­funding.”    Katie is also thankful for the quality education she has received at Olivet.    “My professors at Olivet took time to get to know me and my strengths,” she says. “They ­guided and directed my education. They encouraged me and wanted me to succeed. As an undergrad at Olivet, I gained experience with research techniques that I will use in grad school.”    What is ahead for Katie? She plans to pursue her doctorate degree and then teach geology at the college level. The next step is finding the right graduate school where she can continue to pursue her dream. There are undoubtedly a lot of successes ahead for her.

  English major Rebecca Lankford ’12 developed a special bond with Dr. Rebecca Belcher while on a mission trip to Burkina-Faso, Africa in the summer of 2010.   Rebecca says, “Dr. Belcher is a true scholar, striving to show her students not only the depth and wealth of the English language, but the depth of Christ’s love. She coached me through a difficult time in my life, inspiring me to continue and not allowing me to quit. She calls me into her office, not to discuss coursework, but to ask me how my heart is and to encourage me.”

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feature

Birth of an instrument Centennial Chapel home to new world-class pipe organ

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   One-of-a-kind, king of instruments, mark of maturity, great gift, world-class, fun challenge, wonderful and unique — a few ways to describe Olivet’s new Ruffatti pipe organ. Its brilliant facade instantly captivates all who enter Centennial Chapel.    In 2004, when Betty and Kenneth ’53 Hawkins first heard about Olivet’s plans for a new Chapel, they contacted Dr. Bowling about a gift they wanted to give. They strongly believed that the Chapel needed an important organ, that it would be a mark of maturity for Olivet as a higher education institution. Their gift for the organ was matched by a second anonymous gift used to create the organ chamber and chancel area, and to provide enhancements for the organ.    Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins requested that professional organist and family friend Dr. Ovid Young ’62 — now artist-in-residence in Olivet’s Department of Music — chair the committee in charge of choosing, purchasing, installing and introducing the new organ.    “Both Betty and Ken love music, although neither are professional musicians,” Dr. Young said. “They are devoted Christians and long-standing friends of the University. They wanted to do something beautiful and lasting for Olivet.”

P H O T O BY G O R D O N C. WICKE RSH A M ’47

by Laura Wasson Warfel

Meet Olivet’s Ruffatti organ • Pipes ranging in size from one inch to 32 feet • Four-manual console • 125 ranks, including 75 ranks of Ruffatti wind-blown pipes and a digital component of 50 additional ranks from Marshall & Ogletree • Tanned leather used in the bellows from a tiny village in southern Italy • Sipo mahogany wood used for the visible casework, windchests, reservoirs, supports and some pipes from Africa • Malaysian tin and 99.99% pure lead used to make the metal organ pipes

organ ready for its dedication and concert on January 28, 2011.

Musical enjoyment for many years to come Beautiful collaboration

result. Our job was to knit the sounds together seamlessly so that the instrument works as a whole.”

   Choosing the organ builder and deciding on the specifications, such as tonal design and size, were the initial responsibilities for Dr. Young and the rest of the committee. They also had to decide on the type of organ; what space the organ would occupy in the Chapel; the building acoustics; how to move the console around the stage; and how to store the console when not in use. Before guiding these important decisions, Dr. Young and Dr. Timothy Nelson, professor of music and fellow committee member, played several pipe organs in the United States.    After several months, they agreed that the obvious choice for the builder was Famiglia Artigiana Fratelli Ruffatti (Ruffatti Brothers, Family of Artisans) of Padua, Italy.    “We gave them a list of stops we wanted for the basic tonal design,” Dr. Young said. “They gave us their ideas and refined our wishes.” The final design was for a hybrid instrument, a pipe organ enhanced by digital components.    Marshall & Ogletree of Boston was brought into the project to provide the digital components. Contemporary innovators Douglas Marshall and David Ogletree had worked with Ruffatti on one previous project and were excited about this opportunity.    “Olivet’s project was a fun challenge for us because of the large room, and because the Ruffatti sound is so wonderful and unique,” Marshall says. “Two very different technologies were coming together for one artistic

Combination of art and expertise

   Building of the organ began in Padua, even before the construction of the Chapel began. Project architect was Michela Ruffatti, daughter of Piero, representing the third generation of this organ-building family.    One challenge was coordinating production schedules so that the Chapel was ready for the organ installation at just the right time. “The organ was to be the last thing to go into the building,” said Dr. Young. “It couldn’t even be shipped from Italy to the U.S. until all work on the building was done. The building had to be dust free and noise free when it was installed.”    Olivet’s organ was designed, built and fully assem­ bled at the Padua facility near Venice. After it was ­tested and approved, it was disassembled and shipped by boat in two large containers to the East Coast.    A truck brought the containers to campus in September 2010. In four weeks, Piero Ruffatti and his three technicians physically assembled the organ in Centennial Chapel.    In November, tonal director Francesco Ruffatti and his voicers arrived to voice and tune the organ. One voicer sat at the console holding down one key at a time for each of the dozens of stops, while the other was in the pipe chamber adjusting and tuning the pipes. Then Francesco did the final voicing. This team departed in early December, pronouncing the

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   “We designed this organ with one main objective: tonal versatility,” says Piero Ruffatti. “This is not always the case for pipe organs. The careful choice of stops — available sound sources — as well as the well-balanced voicing of the pipes allows a very broad, effective use of the instrument with a very wide range of literature, including contemporary music.”    “We took the magic of what the Ruffattis created and fit our work to theirs,” Marshall says. “We are very gratified with the result.”    “This organ can both whisper and roar,” Dr. Young says. “It can play higher and lower than any instrument in a symphony.”    On January 28, the official dedication and concert featured Dr. Nelson, Dr. Young and organists representing each of Olivet’s decades from the 1940s through the 2000s.    “This is a first-rate pipe organ enlarged and ­enhanced by a digital component,” Dr. Young says. “The blend is beautiful. Olivet can be justifiably proud of this great gift.”

Organ Dedication Concert A video of the January 28 Organ Dedication Concert can be viewed at www.olivet.edu. Click on the “Olivet Live” graphic and then navigate to the “On Demand” tab.

onu alumni Class Notes 19 60s Dr. Larry Reinhart ’62/’69 M.A. has been appointed chair of the Department of Theology at Malone University in Canton, Ohio. Dr. Reinhart also serves as the director of master of arts in theological studies and professor of educational ministries. His wife, Dr. Loretta (Robson) Reinhart ’72, has been the dean of the School of Nursing at Malone since 1991.

ing with veterans and enjoys woodcarving. His wife, Virginia (Smith) Hunter ’70 teaches reading recovery and literacy at the elementary school level. They reside in DeMotte, Ind.

supported all Olivet-sponsored golf outings, financially and with his participation. He helped start the Olivet Open, which has been an annual event for 30 years. Robert L. Sloan ’68, President and CEO of Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., received The Mars Award for Quality Care in October 2010. In recognition of his outstanding achievements in raising awareness of cancer care and cure, the Tucker Foundation’s Robert L. Sloan Fund was launched with a contribution of $1 million.

Clark G. Armstrong ’76 has completed his Doctorate in Education at the University of Kansas where his dissertation was titled “Choosing a Path: A Study of Clark Armstrong the Theories of Christian conversion and Christian nurture in the confessions of St. ­Augustine and in Christian nurture by Horace Bushnell.” He is a professor at the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Armstrong is a respected member of the Pi Lambda Theta society and was recently inducted into the Golden Key Inter­national Honor Society. He is also the senior pastor at Victory Hills Church of the Nazarene in Kansas City, Kan. and is active in the Kansas City District.

19 70s Harold B. Graves, Jr. ’74 was unanimously re-elected by the Board of Trustees as the president of Nazarene Bible College in Colorado Springs, Colo. Dr. Graves has served as president since 2006.

Selden Marquart and Jeff Domagalski

Selden Marquart ’63 was the recipient of the first Legacy Award at the Olivet Open. The Legacy Award is for those who have helped Olivet carry on the legacy of Larry Watson, long-time Olivet faculty member and athletics director. Selden has

Issue 1 | 2011

Harold Graves Jr.

Dr. Edward A. Thomas ’76 and Dr. Bruce Petersen ’65 have published the textbook “Foundations of church administration: Professional tools for church leadership” from Beacon Hill Press. Dr. Thomas is an associate professor of management at Mount Vernon Nazarene University and an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene. Dr. Petersen is a professor of pastoral ministry and coordinator of the master of ministry program at MVNU in the School of Theology and Philosophy. Dr. Houston Thompson ’97, professor of social work and chair in the department of social work and criminal justice at Olivet, authored a chapter in the textbook.

W i l l i a m H u n t e r, J r. ’ 7 4 / ’ 8 5 M.C.M./’89 M . C . P. h a s ­retired from 35 years in pastoral ministry and chaplaincy in the Church of the William and Virginia Hunter Nazarene. Since retirement, Rev. Hunter has been work-

It’s not too early — or too late

L. Alan Thompson ’78 earned the Doctor of Ministry degree in May 2010, with a specialization in outreach and discipleship from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. His lead professor was Dr. Robert E. Coleman, author of The Master Plan of Evangelism. The title of his thesis-project was, “A Strategy to Change a ‘Come and See’ to a ‘Go and Tell’ Mindset for Evangelism at Grace Church of the Nazarene.” Dr. Thompson is the associate pastor at Grace Church.

Including ONU in your Will can fulfill your own stewardship desires and ensure support for generations of students to come. Extend your commitment to Olivet by leaving a meaningful legacy.

Dan Werner ’79 recently accepted a position as a police lieutenant with the Columbus State Police in Columbus, Ohio. Over the past six years, he has taught counterterrorism studies for the Department of Homeland Security in 33 states and the North Mariana Islands.

19 80s Becky Ray ’87 is employed by Horry County Schools, Conway, S.C.

Contact us today for a no-obligation conversation. Or request our free guide, How to Make a Will That Works. phone:

19 90s

Did you know 60% of Americans don’t have a Will?

Natalie (Creel) ’95 and Cary Chandler: A girl, Hana Lauren, June 21, 2010. She joins proud brothers Kamea, Hana Chandler 6 and Josiah, 2. Natalie is a marriage and family therapist and owner of Imagine Hope Counseling Group in Indianapolis. Cary is director of

815-939-5171 | e-mail: development@olivet.edu

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The Olivetian 13

information systems at Riverview Hospital. They reside in Fishers, Ind. Penny Hartke ’95/’98 M.A. and David Hanania were married November 7, 2009. Penny is a junior high teacher at Medinah Christian School. David is employed in the marketing and public relations field. They reside in St. Charles, Ill. Debra (Pratt) ’96 and Doug Biggs: A boy, Nolan Robert, October 20, 2010. He joins sister Audra, 1½ years old. Debby is currently a stayat-home mom, and Doug is the western sales manager at ULine Corp. They reside in Grafton, Wis. Nolan Biggs Mary (Dillinger) ’97 and Joseph Meek ’98: A b o y, B r a e d e n Paul, October 11, Braeden Meek 2009. He joins big sister Katie Mae, 5 and big brother Tripp, 3. Both parents are active duty Army offi­ cers, with Mary serving an an Army attorney and ­Joseph serving as an Army nurse. They ­reside in Falls Church, Va. Jodi (Dennis) ’98 and Robert Loyd: A boy, Devin William, September 19, 2010. He joins brother Kelvin, 1. Jodi is a cardiology nurse practitioner in Louisville, Ky., and Robert is a student and stay-athome dad. They Devin Loyd reside in Jeffersonville, Ind.

20 00s Aimee (Copley) ’ 98 and Devi n Mulder ’02: A boy, Tu c k e r R e y n o l d s , Novem­ber 5, 2010. Tu c k e r j o i n s b i g Tucker Mulder brothers Ford, 4 and Cooper, 1. Aimee and Devin are senior copastors in Muskegon, Mich. at Breakwater Church of the Nazarene. Aimee and Devin were ordained together in April 2010. Stephanie (Dittmer) ’01 and Sean ­Patridge: A boy, Wesley ­Matthew, August 17, Wesley Patridge 2010. He joins big brother Wyatt, 4. Stephanie is a 3rd/4th grade ESL teacher, and Sean is a police offi­cer. They reside in Freeport, Ill. Stacey (Maberry) ’04 and Adrian Avelar ’06: A boy, Adrian “A.J.” Thomas Avelar, Jr., October 13, 2010. Adrian works at Belt Way Scales in Rock Falls, Ill. and is serving in the Illinois National Guard. Stacey is a stay-at-home mom. Adrian “A.J.” Avelar They reside in Rock Falls, Ill.

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onu alumni

 Class Notes,

SA V E T H E D ATES

continued

Grace (Cook) ’04 and Greg Fields: A boy, ­Wesley Peter, November 13, 2010. Grace is a conservation education specialist at the Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. Greg is an assistant director of Wesley Fields food service for Sodexo at Country Meadows Nursing Center. They reside in New ­Sewickley Township, Pa.

April

29 2011

OLIVET

31st ANNUAL

OPEN

Scott ’04 and Anne (Wadsworth) ’03 Whalen: A boy, Averie Hope, June 22, 2010. He joins big sister Ellie, 2. Scott is the executive pastor at the Sterling First Church of the Nazarene. Anne is taking a year off from teaching to be a stay-athome mom. They reside The Whalens in Sterling, Ill.

Kankakee Country Club

Part of

Jorden Hayes ’07 won first place in the Society of Exploration Geophysicists International Challenge Bowl, with a fellow graduate student at the University of Wyoming in November 2010.

May

9–14

In Memoriam Lois Faith (Kendall) Blanchard Eades ’41 died January 9, 2011. Born in Dayton, Ohio in 1919, Lois has lived a life of faith as a writer and teacher. She is a former faculty member of Trevecca Nazarene College and wrote the poem “If Jesus Came to Your House,” which was originally published by the Nazarene Publishing House.    Both of her husbands, Craig Allen Blanchard and James H. Eades, were Nazarene preachers. Both husbands preceded her in death.

2011

For DETAILS AND REGISTRATION for these events, contact the Office of Alumni & University Relations at 815-939-5258.

Fonda (Bearinger) Dickerson ’42 died November 23, 2010. Fonda Lucille was born October 10, 1918, the eldest child of the Rev. Clayton and Ada “Meda” Bearinger, in Potterville, Mich. In 1936, she won a scholarship from the Dow Chemical Family to attend Olivet Nazarene College in Illinois. She was a voice major.    In 1942, she married the Rev. Kline F. Dickerson. They had two sons, Donald and Stephen. As a preacher’s wife, she used her musical talents to direct the music program of every church they pastored.    In 1970, she moved to Venice, Fla., where she and her husband pastored until 1976. In addition to her love for music, she also had a love for fashion, showing a sense of style wherever she went. Even toward the end of her life, she volunteered at a nursing home, bringing cheer to those she attended. Wherever she went, she brought with her a dignity, humor and grace that will be deeply missed.

Ta k e ac ti on now

to strengthen ONU in the years ahead!

Heritage Society

recognizes and honors The those who include Olivet in their estate plans.

Explore the impact you can make by calling

815-939-5171.

Heritage Society

We’d love to hear FROM YOU!

Please submit alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used,

Send us your news and photographs.

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and content may be edited. News should be sent via e-mail to TheOlivetian@ olivet.edu, at www.olivet. edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue,

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Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through e-mail or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

onu online LIVE EVENTS

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The Olivetian 15

Live Streaming | 

ON DEMAND

Depending on the speed of your Internet connection, the page may take several seconds to load. Click on the event up to 10 minutes prior to the scheduled start time.

Olivet

Chapel: Rev. Duffy Robbins, associate professor of youth ministry for Eastern College, March 3

Chapel: Rev. John Fischer, Purpose Driven Life senior writer, songwriter and recording artist, March 16

Chapel: Dr. Chap Clark, vice provost of Fuller Theological Seminary and president of Foothills Ministries, March 30–31

Chapel: Rev. Mike Breaux, Heartland Community Church, April 6

Check out the live

streaming and

On Demand  |  Free, archived recordings

archived videos of ONU chapels and other events at www.olivet.edu.

of ONU chapels and other events • Revival services with Dr. David Busic, Bethany First Church of the Nazarene, January 31–February 2 • Organ Dedication Concert, January 28 • Chapel: Julianna Zobrist, Christian recording artist, January 27 • Chapel: Ben Zobrist, Tampa Bay Rays, January 26 • Chapel: Dr. John C. Bowling (First chapel service in Centennial Chapel), January 12

00:00

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

Ladies Day 2011

makes “Education with a Christian Purpose” possible!

Patsy  Clairmont  W ITH

Calley N. Seefeldt ’13 Julian and Betty Jean Jarvis Scholarship Alyssa B. Norden ’13 Donald and Michael Bankston Scholarship Byron Carmony Scholarship Orpheus Memorial Scholarship

April

16 2011

Reuben L. Lillie ’11 James V. and Louise Cook Scholarship Hale-Wilder Scholarship Kathryn A. Eccles ’11 Ethel Mueller Scholarship

Author of God Uses Cracked Pots, Normal is Just a Setting on Your Dryer, Sportin’ a ’Tude, The Shoe Box and several other best-selling books April 16, 2011 Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais, Ill.

TWO BIRDS PHOTO GRAPH Y

Students featured in this issue are recipients of the following Olivet ­Foundation scholarships:

Evan D. Karg ’12 Associated Student Council Scholarship Joysong Memorial Scholarship Northwestern Illinois Prime Time Scholarship

For tickets and more information, call 815-939-5258

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Kayla T. Rolling ’12 Marion Fry Scholarship Brianna N. Robins ’12 William A. and Anna R. Cox Scholarship Boyd and Libby Harshman Family Memorial Scholarship Cambria L. Thomas ’12 Friends of ONU Scholarship Della Munson Scholarship

MERRICK C. ROBISON ’11 Boyd and Libby Harshman Family Memorial Scholarship Dr. Ray H. Moore Scholarship Theatre Scholarship Rebecca K. Lankford ’12 Better Day Scholarship Timothy L. Jefferies ’11 Social Work Scholarship

To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing Foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

onu sports

16

double athlete.

single focus. Dual athlete and math education major

  Devin Johnston

“My whole life is focused on Christ.” ► D e vin Johns to n ’ 1 3

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U.S. She is also involved in Best Buddies and Fellowship of Christian Athletes. For relaxation, she likes to play the piano. And all this while maintaining a 3.9 grade point average!    Devin’s family members are her greatest encouragers in pursuing the plans that God is revealing to her.    “My parents come to every game, even when we travel,” Devin says. “My dad helps me with my basketball skills.    “My two older sisters, Dennea and Danielle ’10, have always been a huge inspiration to me in athletics. Their hard work, dedication, passion, positive attitudes and competitive drive inspire

PHOTO BY KELSEY WARP

  Dribbling a soccer ball is much different than dribbling a basketball, but both come easily to Devin Johnston ’13 of Bloomingdale, Ill. This energetic Olivet sophomore plays stopper on the women’s soccer team and forward on the women’s basketball team. Quite an athletic feat!    Her sports participation at Olivet has already taken Devin across the Atlantic and Pacific.    In summer 2010, she and the women’s soccer team visited Nairobi and Mombasa in Kenya. “I loved meeting the African people,” Devin says. “They are so positive and friendly. We visited Kibera, one of the largest slums in the world. The people there have so little, but they are so happy and positive.”    “They love playing soccer,” she continues. “So we dribbled the ball through cones with them. Then we talked about how that is like getting through the trials of life. We related soccer to the Bible.”   In December 2010, Devin traveled with the women’s basketball team to Honolulu for the NAIA Hoop N Surf Classic tournament. The team played two of their best games of the ­season, winning one by 29 points and the other by 46.    She also experienced the beauty of Hawaii for the first time. “I’m the unofficial photographer for our team,” she says. “I took tons of photos of everything we saw. Pearl Harbor, the ocean, the sights on the island of Oahu.”    Devin’s desire to play both soccer and basketball greatly influenced her decision to come to Olivet. “I played with both teams before I came here,” Devin says. “The coaching staff really impressed me, along with the welcoming atmosphere.” She was also impressed by the quality of the coaching staff and the Christian basis for everything that happens here.    After a few weeks at Olivet, Devin declared her major of math education. One of her dreams is to teach outside the

L aur a Wa s son Wa r f el

By

and encourage me. I’m so blessed to have them.” Devin and Danielle played soccer together at Olivet during Danielle’s senior year.   Devin looks forward to finishing her education at Olivet. “Here, I am learning what it really means to have a relationship with Christ,” she says. “Devotions in classes and with our teams, Chapel and my whole life are all focused on Christ.”

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SPORTS SHORTS Men’s basketball

  The Tigers are vying for their fifth NAIA National Tournament appearance in the last six years, but the first half of the season hasn’t been an easy one. Some inconsistency has mixed wins Hainlen with losses, but Olivet won four out of five games to start the month of January, including an 80–77 victory in the Aloha State over NCAA Division II BYU-Hawaii. Guard/ forward Cory Hainlen KLOMSTAD ’11 (Bloomington, Ill.) leads the team in scoring. Center Nick Klomstad ’11 (Waukesha, Wis.) averages a team-high 8.1 rebounds per game. Guard Antonio MARSHALL Marshall ’12 (Bowling Green, Ind.) is shooting for another all-conference selection with an assist-toturnover ratio of better than 2:1. The biggest challenge will be getting through the rugged Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference (CCAC) schedule, which includes two games against Robert Morris (Ill.), ranked No. 2 in the NAIA Top 25 poll.

Women’s basketball

   With more national records in their crosshairs, the Tigers are on pace for their best season ever. An eight-game win streak that started in midDecember yielded a 116.4 point-pergame average, and their overall average of 105.7 is the highest at all levels COBURN of women’s college basketball this year. The Tigers are also forcing 39 turnovers a game, a total that would break yet another of their own national records. The team’s top scorer, forBEYER ward Simone Coburn ’11 (North Chicago, Ill.), leads NAIA Division I in field-goal percentage (.685). Point guards — Lisa Beyer ’11 (Spring Grove, Ill.); Danielle PIPAL Pipal ’12 (Wheaton, Ill.); and Danielle Tolbert ’13 (Pontiac, Mich.) — have taken care of the team’s ball-handling duties. And it’s hard to ­argue with Olivet’s strength TOLBERT of schedule: The Tigers notched a 46-point win over Morning-

Issue 1 | 2011

The Olivetian 17

side (Iowa), ranked No. 4 in NAIA Division II. They’ve played both of the NAIA’s topranked teams: Union (Tenn.) and Davenport (Mich.).

TIGER TRACKS

Tampa Bay Rays’ Ben Zobrist

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

B

efore starting his sixth season in Major League Baseball, the Tampa Bay Rays’ Ben Zobrist ’04 returned to Olivet Nazarene University on January 26 to speak in chapel and to lead a free baseball clinic for little leaguers. Zobrist led Olivet to back-to-back NAIA World Series appearances in 2002 and 2003 before being drafted and making his Major League debut in 2006. Known for his defensive versatility and patient approach at the plate, the Eureka, Ill., native helped the Rays reach the World Series in 2008 and earned a spot on the American League All-Star team in 2009. Catch archived recordings of Zobrist’s chapel address at www.olivet.edu.

Cory Hainlen ’11 - Men’s basketball   The Tigers’ scoring leader has emerged as one of the best players in the CCAC. After earning all-conference honorable recognition in each of the last two seasons, the 6-foot-6 senior guard/ forward is averaging a team-best 16.2 points per game, which includes a .429 shooting percentage from beyond the three-point line. The Bloomington, Ill., native has scored at least 20 points in seven games and currently sits tied with Andy Roberts ’03 for 15th place on the school’s all-time list for career threepointers made at 123.

NEWS AND NOTES

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he next Olivet Nazarene University women’s soccer team has a tough act follow. Led by the play of defender Brittany Hengesh ’11 (Canton, Mich.) and junior midfielder Janel Schmitt ’12 (Geneva, Ill.), the Tigers not only won their first CCAC tournament, but also qualified in November for the hengesh NAIA National Tournament for the first time in the history of the program.    Thanks to an effi­ cient offense and stingy defense, the Tigers won 15 of their schmitt last 17 matches before falling to Hastings College (Neb.), the eventual national runner-up, in a shootout in the first round of the tournament. Still, it was a season to remember. Hengesh and Schmitt were each named to the NAIA AllAmerican Third Team. Forward Michelle Davis ’11 (Bourbonnais, Ill.) broke the school’s all-time scoring record with 62 goals. The ­Tigers finished ranked No. 19 in the NAIA Top 25 poll.    “We have a new davis standard,” head coach Bill Bahr ’96/’02 MBA said.    Bahr posted an impressive number of his own. In his 12th season as coach at

Lexie Heinold ’12 Women’s basketball    In the Tigers’ up-tempo, high-octane offense, the junior guard is the sharpest of the long-range shooters. The Washington, Ill., native leads the team in shooting percentage from beyond the threepoint line. She was at her best in a game played in Honolulu, Hawaii, in December. Against Morningside (Iowa), ranked No. 4 in NAIA Division II, she buried 9 of 12 three-point attempts and finished with a career-high 27 points. One month later, she made 6 of 6 long-range shots and tallied 22 points against T­ rinity Christian (Ill.).

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Olivet, Bahr won his 150th career match, an accomplishment he couldn’t have reached by himself.   “I have been blessed to be able to coach great players of good character,” he said. “It’s these players, along with a great coaching staff and a supportive family, who have enabled any kind of success for me. I’m so thankful to the Lord for giving me an opportunity to coach at Olivet Nazarene University.”

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n the Tigers’ first event of the season,   Ashley Fozkos ’11 (Valparaiso, Ind.) pole vaulted 3.5 meters — about 11½ feet — to qualify for the NAIA Indoor Track & Field National fozkos Championships, held on March 3–5 in Geneva, Ohio. Heights are nothing new for Fozkos, though. Last season, she finished fifth at the national indoor meet and sixth at the national outdoor meet.

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ormer Olivet men’s soccer player Cory  Miller ’11 (Zionsville, Ind.) was ­selected to participate in an invitationonly combine for the Portland Timbers, a ­M ajor League Soccer expansion team. A sweeper for the Tigers, Miller earned All-Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference honors as a miller senior in 2009. The Timbers’ season opener is March 19.

NOTE: All statistics are as of January 23, 2011. For the latest scores and sports news, visit www.olivet.edu.

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onu sports

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Former Tiger, NAIA All-American named Olivet head football coach By Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

he gleam in his eyes reveals just how much the memory means to him.   “Before I got married, it was probably the single greatest day in my life.”    New ONU Head Football Coach Brian Fish ’97/’00 M.A.T. remembers the exact moment the goal post was torn down following the December 5, 1998 win against Tri-State that would send the Tigers to the NAIA National Championship Game.   “People were hanging from it. I watched one of my buddies do a back flip off the cross bar as it bent backward toward the ground. They didn’t walk carrying that thing to the Quad; they ran.”    His classmates hoisted the goal post to the Tree of Knowledge, where it would remain for the rest of the semester. Brian, on the other hand, remained on the field — celebrating with his teammates, taking in the moment.    “I remember just hanging out that night, not wanting to leave Ward Field, because I knew it would be the last time.”

Directing his steps

Beyond the wins and losses

  One of the reasons the memory is so special for Coach Fish is because he knows he shouldn’t have been there in the first place.    NAIA rules stipulate that a student is eligible to play for four football seasons, and so Brian redshirted his sophomore year. During his years on the field, Fish donned the #9 jersey as a receiver and tight end, planning to play through the end of the 1997 season.   In the second game of his senior year, however, Brian took a hit that would send all his well-laid plans crashing to the ground. His collar bone was broken — a season-ending injury.   What could have been a tremendous emotional blow, however, turned out to be a blessing in disguise.    NAIA allows a player to medical redshirt if they are injured within the first two games of the season. So Brian decided to finish up his undergraduate degree in biology and come back for one final season of play while he pursued his master’s in teaching.   During his final season, he was named 1998 Academic-All Conference, 1998 NAIA All­ ­ American (Tight End, Honorable Mention) and was recipient of the Dr. Selden Dee Kelley Award for Leadership in Academics and Athletics. Oh, and by the way, he was a member of the 1998 NAIA National Championship Runner-Up team.    “It’s amazing how the Lord directs our steps without us even realizing it at the time,” Coach Fish reflects. “I could have just as easily been standing on the sidelines.”

   As proud as he is of being on the ’98 team, Coach Fish also knows what it’s like to struggle through disappointing seasons. Early in his career with the Tigers, the team finished with a record of 2–8.   “You don’t always get a clear picture of success and excellence by looking at the wins and losses,” he says.    And this is a message he wants his new players to hear loud and clear.    “We are inundated by a world that teaches us to ‘win at all costs.’ So that’s why we have athletes who turn to steroids or coaches who break the rules and businessmen who ‘fix’ numbers. If winning is the only goal in athletics, then it is not for me.”    “Don’t get me wrong,” he continues. “I want to be really, really good on the football field. But the focus and motivation is not going to be winning; it’s being excellent in all we do. When the motivation is to be excell­ent, then winning becomes a natural byproduct.”

A culture of excellence   As he takes the helm at Olivet, Coach Fish will imple­ ment a coaching philosophy built on what he calls “3 Pillars.”   First, he says, the team will pursue excellence. “Whatever we do, we want to do it with great passion and excellence,” he explains. “This transfers to every area of our life: spiritually, academically, socially and athletically.”    Secondly, they will live with intent. “We understand that life is temporary, and that motivates us to take advantage of and enjoy each and every day. It is an extreme honor and gift to be able to play football and to attend a university like Olivet.”

In pursuit of

excellence    Finally, they will bear fruit. “A seed cannot bear fruit unless it dies. Becoming a part of a team necessitates individuals humbling themselves, living sacrificially and investing in others. As those actions happen, they will multiply within a community, and the result will be a harvest that is so plentiful no one goes h ­ ungry.”

Vital Stats Name:

Brian Fish

’97/’00 M.A.T. hometown: Lakeville, Ind.

Right people. Right place. Right timing.

coaching experience:

  As he makes his return to Ward Field, one can’t help but wonder if Coach Fish can also take the Tigers back to the NAIA National Championship game.    He certainly believes it’s possible. “It’s about having the right people in the right place at the right time.”   “I feel really good about those who are here and those who will soon join us,” he says. “And getting to the National Championship game is something that has already been done here, so we know the place is right.”    And what about the timing?    “It all is in the Lord’s hands,” Coach Fish concludes. “So we’re just going to work like crazy trying to become the right kind of people. If He chooses to bless us with that opportunity again, we’ll give Him the honor.”

Offensive Coordinator, Sterling College (Kan.) and Assistant Football Coach, Malone University (Ohio) collegiate pl aying experience: Receiver and

Tight End, Olivet Nazarene University, 1993–1998

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ten questions with Dr. Jim Upchurch Professionals

dean of the school of education

Influencing Lives

1. When and how did you know you were destined to a life in ­education?    Everyone has a moment in time, an experience, an individual who encouraged you, and a memory that ­motivates/drives you to the point of decision making. I have had several. A fourth grade teacher [Mrs. Ranch] was the first to encourage me when she said, “You might someday want to be a teacher.” Vacation Bible School, Caravans, church camps, and youth group experiences offered more wonderful opportunities to work with children. The sensing of God’s call into a ministry/career of teaching and working with children was persistent and real.

The Olivetian 19

   This process is only accomplished and achieved with the dedicated work of the entire teacher education faculty. We are blessed with faculty members who embrace the mission of Olivet; practice the integration of faith and learning in their classrooms; and are dedicated to the rigor and standards set forth by NCATE. 7. What is the greatest challenge today’s teachers face?    The balance of “accountability” and the “desire to see every child succeed academically.” Teachers are faced with the reality of reporting their students’ test scores to the general public and community. At the same time, they must recognize that all children can learn, but do so with differing ability and achievement levels. The teacher is called to help all students improve academically while not placing them under great stress as to impact their selfesteem and self-worth.

2. Was there a particular faculty member who made an impact on your life as a student at Olivet?    Many faculty members impacted my life, but one individual who stands out is Dr. Vernal Carmichael. His compassion, soft speech, willingness to listen and pursuit of God’s guidance were always in his conversations. While his physical stature was short, he was a “giant of a person” to me. His wisdom and encouragement still remain in my thinking today.

8. Olivet’s School of Education is among the top six teacher-producing colleges and universities in the state of Illinois. How would you define the “Olivet difference” that continues to draw so many ­students?    The “Olivet difference” is embedded in our conceptual framework of the teacher education program: “Professionals Influencing Lives.” I am so pleased with our candidates and their eagerness to serve in community activities that impact the lives of children. All our candidates embrace a Scripture passage that is found on the wall in the School of Education: “Let my teaching fall like rain and my words descend like dew, like showers on new grass, like abundant rain on tender plants”(Deuteronomy 32:2). Their involvement and service takes on many different forms that model a Christ-centered approach, and their values and actions acknowledge to others directly and indirectly that becoming a teacher is a “calling.” This is the “Olivet ­difference.”    Additionally, School of Education faculty members play a pivotal role in defining the “Olivet difference.” The dedication, compassion, mentoring, excellent teaching and instruction, and seeking the highest scholarship for their students is a hallmark of this faculty. The impact of their efforts is realized in the exemplary teaching alumni who are influencing the lives of many students in all parts of the world today.

3. What is the greatest advice you were ever given as an educator?    Early in my teaching career, a colleague who was retiring after 35 years stated, “Jim, remember to always see each child for his or her potential, listen to them and keep them always in your prayers.” This advice and wisdom has served me well over the years. 4. Think back to your early days in teaching. What do you know now that you wish you’d known then?    I can remember conducting those first years of ­parent-teacher conferences. I would offer teaching a­ dvice such as, “just use this technique or strategy at home, or work with your child on his/her homework. You should have no problem!” After becoming a parent, I realized I had no idea what I was asking parents to do. “Just simply do this, everything will be fine” doesn’t always work! Becoming a parent made me a more understanding and caring teacher.

9. Tell us a little bit about your involvement with Nazarene Educators Worldwide.    Nazarene Educators Worldwide is an organization ­established by the Church of the Nazarene to embrace, encourage, and empower all Nazarene educators worldwide who serve in Christian, public, private and home schools, including universities. I have the privilege of serving as chairman for the council.    This coming summer, several council members and I will be going to Kenya, Africa. The delegation has been asked to assist, listen to and support the faculty at ­Africa Nazarene University. Additionally, we will work with teachers and children in several elementary schools in the ­region. The focus will be to establish a partnership link with other Nazarene educators internationally, in the hopes of empowering each other as we continue to serve God.

5. Briefly describe your journey from the classroom into a ­ dministration.    I was given the opportunity to serve as a school admin­istrator early in my teaching career. After obtaining my administrative certification, I applied for several administrative positions and accepted a position in the south suburbs of Chicago. At that time, I did not realize I would remain in school administration for the next 32 years. This wonderful experience has shaped my life in ways I have greatly appreciated. Psalms 90:12, “Teach us to remember our days aright, that we may gain a heart of wisdom,” is very real to me and has stayed with me over my entire ­career. 6. The School of Education is preparing for the NCATE accreditation visit this October. What does this mean for the ­University?    Every seven years, all teacher education programs are evaluated as to their rigor, candidates’ performance in field/clinical placements, student teaching performance, mission, faculty scholarship, diversity, financial support from the university and documented “continuous improvement” from the last campus visit. When the National Council Association of Teacher Education grants a continuation of the accreditation of the teacher education program with “full recognition,” it demonstrates

Issue 1 | 2011

the highest achievement that can be obtained by any university and is recognized by all other educational agencies. Further, all graduating candidates from our university can apply for any teaching position, in any state school system, without any additional certification or coursework needed. This recognition brings with it the assurance to any future educational employers that our candidates are highly trained, skilled and prepared to enter the teaching field.

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10. What would the perfect weekend look like for you and your wife, Corie?    Corie and I enjoy many wonderful weekends where we go for long walks or explore new hiking trails. We also enjoy going to a play or concert followed by a dinner in Chicago. Frequently you might find us at the ballpark enjoy­ing our favorite baseball team, the Chicago White Sox. However, the “perfect weekend” for Corie and me would be spent with our five grandkids doing “fun things.” We are so blessed with two sets of twin boys and a precious little girl.

Education is about more than earning a degree. Just 50 miles from Chicago is Olivet Nazarene University, where students focus on being, becoming, believing — in the classroom and around the world.

800-648-1463 www.olivet.edu

UPCOMING EVENTS

Purple and Gold Days

Junior Day

For high school seniors and their parents

April 8, 2011

March 18–19, 2011


Double Athlete. Single focus.