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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS Vol. 79, No. 2

Issue Four, 2011

www.olivet.edu

DEEP AND WIDE In this issue:

Grad school broadens reach, strengthens community page 3

chapel draws big name artists page 5

now recruiting: men’s and women’s swimming page 7

alumni top new york times best-seller list page 18


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onu alumni

 Class Notes,

continued

Pete ’01 and Katie (Sullivan) Bretzlaff ’01: A boy, Henry Sullivan Gustav, Feb. 12, 2011. Henry joined Emma Kate, 8 and James, 5. Pete teaches social studies at Kankakee Junior High School and is the varsity soccer coach for Kankakee High School. James, Emma and Henry Bretzlaff Katie recently completed her M.A. in art education from Ohio State University and teaches art, foundations and photography at Bradley-Bourbonnais Community High School. CORRECTION FROM ISSUE 1: Scott ’04 and Anne ( Wa d s w o r t h ) ’ 0 3 Whalen: A girl, Averie Hope, June 22, 2010. She joins big sister, Ellie, 2. Scott is the executive pastor at the Sterling First Church of The Whalen Family the Nazarene. Anne is taking a year off from teaching to be a stay-athome mom. They reside in Sterling, Ill. Ben ’04 and Stephanie (Quimby) ’04 Kumor: A boy, Luke Michael, born Feb. 12, 2011. He joins big brothers, Caleb, 5 and Nathaniel, 2. Ben is finishing up his medical residency Luke Kumor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, where Stephanie is the president of the House Officers Association Alliance. In July, they will be moving to Anchorage, Alaska, where they will be stationed at Elmendorf Air Force Base. Erin (Ouwenga) ’05 and Nicholas Rogers: A boy, Samuel Alan, Feb. 7, 2011. He joins big sister, Kate. Erin is a stay-athome mom. Nicholas is in his third year of a gastroenterology fellowship at UT Southwestern. The family lives in Richardson, Texas.

Samuel and Kate Rogers

Marissa Lynn ’05 and Michael Coblentz ’99 were married March 19, 2011 in Kansas City, Mo. Michael and Marissa both work for Nazarene Theological S e m i n a r y, w h e r e Marissa is also a student. They reside in Marissa and Michael Kansas City, Mo. Coblentz Jennifer (Opperman) ’05 and Andrew Maynard ’05: A boy, Alexander Clark, Feb. 20, 2011. Andrew works on a team implementing electronic health records at SSM Health Care. Jennifer works in security at Vantage Credit Union. They reside in St. Louis, Mo.

Alexander Maynard

Denise Sullivan ’06 and Michael Caparula were married Dec. 18, 2010, in Chicago. Denise is a family and consumer science teacher at Hoopeston Area High School. They reside in Hoopeston, Ill. Michael and Denise Caparula

Landon ’06 and Kara (Klinger) ’05 DeCrastos: A boy, Josiah Andrew, Oct. 7, 2010. Landon is the pastor of Fishers Point Community Church, a new church in Fishers, Ind. Kara works for Truth@ Work, also in Fishers, Ind.

What’s Not to Love? Josiah DeCrastos

Meagan Hainlen ’07 will graduate from Indiana University School of Medicine in May 2011 with a Doctorate of Medicine. In June, she will start her residency in Neuro­d evelopmental Meagan Hainlen Disabilities at Texas Children’s Hospital/Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Rich Benjamin ’07 MOL, in just his fourth year as baseball coach at Judson University (Ill.), has become the winningest coach in school history. After spending three seasons as an assistant at Olivet, the Tennessee native moved north and has already built the Elgin school into a winner. The program made its first NAIA playoff appearance in 2008, then set the school record for wins in back-to-back seasons. This season, the team is on pace to win 40 games for the first time ever.

A Charitable Gift Annuity offers so much! You can … … supplement your retirement income

In Memoriam

… receive an income tax deduction

• 1950s

… invest in the life-changing mission of Olivet

Sylvia Adeline (Richardson) Jones ’50 passed away April 11, 2011, after a lengthy battle with Alzheimer’s. Sylvia was born Oct. 26, 1928, in Irvine, Ken. She attended Olivet for one year where she became engaged to Richard M. Jones ’50. They were married June 27, 1950, in Ypsilanti, Mich.    Sylvia was a committed and involved Christian, a loving and devoted wife, a gentle and kind mother and grandmother, and a loyal and caring friend. She resided in Ypsilanti, Mich., and was a member of Detroit First Church of the Nazarene. Shirley Ann (Strickler) Crabtree ’55 passed away March 20, 2011. She was the daughter of Dr. Dwight J. ’29 and Mrs. L. Esther (Newman) ’31 Strickler. Strickler Planetarium, on the campus of Olivet, was named after her father. She was married to Rev. Robert E. Crabtree ’56 for 55 years.    Shirley taught public school at the elementary level for 27 years in the Kansas City, Grandview and Olathe school districts. She enjoyed golfing, skiing, hiking, horseback riding and traveling. Habib (Herb) George Abou Samra ’56 passed away Feb. 23, 2011, after a long illness.    Herb was the son of the late Georges Habib Abou Samra and Laurice Mujais Hobeika, the father of Debbie Samra Sellers.   Herb attended the American University of Beirut and graduated from Olivet Nazarene College with distinction and honors. He was an accomplished violinist at the age of 14. His love of classical music continued throughout his life.    He taught elementary school after graduating and in later years, was finance and training director for employees in several General Motor dealerships in Illinois. Thomas C. Murray ’57 passed away Dec. 12, 2010, in Tempe, Ariz. He was born Dec. 22, 1935, to Rev. Charles and Mary Murray. Thomas Murray   Tom excelled in football and track at Olivet, where he met and

Send us your news and photographs. Please submit alumni news,

less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all information, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via email to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through email or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

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815-939-5171 email: development@olivet.edu phone:

married Wilda L. Bennett ’57 on May 19, 1956. The couple moved to Xenia, Ohio. Tom worked as a machine operator for 42 years. He was a member of the Xenia Church of the Nazarene. Dr. Mary L. Shaffer, Nazarene educator and artist, passed away Nov. 22, 2010, one day before her 83rd birthday, in Meridian, Idaho.    Dr. Shaffer served 49 years in higher education, having earned two master’s degrees and a docMary Shaffer torate in education from Indiana University. Fortytwo of those teaching years were in Nazarene colleges and universities. She taught art at Olivet from 1964–1971. While a professor at ONU, she worked tirelessly to improve the aesthetic appeal of the campus, which is still enjoyed today. Dr. Shaffer was awarded the President’s Merit Award at ONU in 1971.   Dr. Shaffer taught at Northwest Nazarene University for 28 years, where she was named Faculty Emeritus in 1998. While at NNU, she assisted in the design of the Brandt Fine Arts and Convocation Center. There is a sculpture park named in her honor on the campus of NNU.   Dr. Shaffer’s award-winning paintings were inspired by her world travels and the beauty of Idaho. Her painting “Watercolor of Sun Valley Idaho” was chosen to go to the moon in the Endeavor Space shuttle in 1992. Many of Dr. Shaffer’s paintings are displayed in the Frieson Art Galleries on the campus of NNU.

• 1960s

Lawrence “Larry” Spaulding ’66 passed away March 2, 2011. He was born Sept. 22, 1940, in Hartford City, Ind. He was married to Linda (Steckhan) ’69 for 43 years.    He and Linda were very active at Indianapolis First Church of the Nazarene.

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Request a FREE, personalized calculation of how a Charitable Gift Annuity could benefit you and Olivet. Contact us today to begin the conversation. Also, request our free guide, ONU Gift Annuities.

Ronald P. Schwada ’68 passed away on April 16 of complications from Multiple Myeloma. He wa s born D e ce m be r 13, 1946, in Columbia, Mo., to Paul and Alta (Slabaugh) Schwada. He married Lynda Dunn on Ronald Schwada November 21, 1970, in Gary, Ind.    Ron worked as the manager of office and staff services at Lane Electric Co-op until his retirement in 2009.

• 1970s

Paul L. Clack ’78 passed away Feb. 17, 2011. Born May 31, 1954, he was the son of former Wisconsin District Superintendent Robert J. Clack, Sr. After receiving his degree in psychology, he moved to San Diego, Calif. where he completed both his masPaul Clack ter’s degree and PhD. in psychology.    Paul will be remembered by many as a courageous friend with a sharp wit and contagious smile who did not let a diving accident and life bound to a wheelchair slow him down.

• 1980s

Kathleen Marie (Doerner) Lunn ’84 passed away April 3, 2011, in her home. She had fought small cell lung cancer for four years.    She was born May 7, 1961, to Ken and Marie Doerner. The family lived in Southern Indiana. She was married to Kevin Lunn ’85 in 1989. The couple had one daughter Margaret “Meg” Lunn.


in this issue

Issue 4 | 2011

The Olivetian 1

14 perspectives ›› Dr. John Bowling: The reach of Olivet is both deep and wide | page 3

onu news

›› Olivet celebrates

establishment of first endowed chair | page 4

onu sports AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

As unlikely of friends as two can be, doctoral students Wendy and Dale are united in their commitment to transform the next generation.

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Best moments of 2011 | page 19

AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

One year later: Chapel shaped by “bigger hands than ours”

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Students Kaylie, Gerald and Sam are excited about their latest assignment — to teach their professors a thing or two.

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home. Germans Patrick and Julian finding comfort — and success — on U.S. soil. | page 6

alumni zone

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c ov er photo by jo nes Foto

›› 4,000 miles from

Barbara Walters. Good Morning America. The New York Times. Les and Leslie Parrott have everybody talking about what makes for a good marriage.

AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

Homecoming 2011: Gaithers headline exciting weekend for the ONU community.

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Students chat it up with top government and media officials

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snapshots Miley Reed ’13 welcomes a future Olivetian to her campus apartment door as part of a trickor-treating event organized by Urban Children’s Ministries and residents of University Place. Urban Children’s Ministries offers Christcentered activities and mentoring programs geared especially to at-risk children in the inner city.

A M Y ( D U E RR WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

OCTOBER TREATS

Audrey Penrod ’12, Amy Price ’12 and Kaitlin Smith ’12 prepare boxes at the annual Operation Christmas Child wrapping party. This year, Olivet students donated more than 250 shoeboxes — each filled with toys, candy and hygiene items, plus money for shipping — to be sent to impoverished children around the world.

Operation christmas child

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The Smith family of Kankakee, Ill., joins Dr. Bowling in a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new “Ruben and Bettie Smith Center for Educational Leadership.” The multi-million 52,000 square foot facility, which will be used for the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies, was gifted by the family — the single largest gift Olivet has ever received from members of the local community.

A M Y ( D U E RR WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

multi-million dollar gift

SOCCER CHAMPS Midfielder and pre-med major Lauren Bowles ’15 of Libertyville, Ill., whips the ball back into play using a flip throwin against Hastings College. The women’s soccer team won a game at the NAIA National Championship for the first time in school history Nov. 19.

KY L I E M C G U I R E ’ 1 3

holiday feast We wish to thank Sodexo for the meal provided for the photo on page 8.

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02/’12 MBA Contributing Writers Caleb Benoit ’06 Luke Olney ’10 Laura Wasson Warfel

Designer Donnie Johnson

Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D.

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div.

Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03

Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90

Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography or as credited

Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D.

Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

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The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement.

Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div.

Photography Coordinator Amy (Duerrwaechter) Smith ’10

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Vice President for Graduate and Continuing Education Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

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Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited.

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Copyright © 2011 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B


perspectives

Issue 4 | 2011

DEEP jones foto

AND

WIDE

contact with each other outside of class. Through this means, learning not only gets reinforced in the shared experiences and perspectives of other students, but friendships are formed that provide continuity and encouragement.   From time to time, I have the privilege of meeting with these groups. Earlier this semester, I spoke as a guest lecturer to a combined gathering of three groups enrolled in our Executive MBA program. One group was just finishing their program, a second group was halfway through, and the third cohort was just beginning; in fact, it was their first night. This cluster of students let me see in one evening the bonding and growth that takes place through our graduate programs. The relationships and friendly banter of the group finishing their program was evident and provided encouragement to those just beginning.

By John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./’06 D.Div. University president

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livet Nazarene University now enrolls   nearly five thousand students. A little   more than half of those students are   part of the traditional undergraduate   program on the Bourbonnais campus.   The rest of our Olivet students are found throughout the greater Chicago area and beyond.   Through the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies, we deliver courses in more than 130 locations throughout Chicagoland, including from our Regional Center in Rolling Meadows and our graduate offices and learning center in Oak Brook, Ill. We also have a vibrant program in Hong Kong, and each year Olivet students study in a dozen other venues around the world. The reach of Olivet is both deep and wide.    As Olivet has expanded its reach and extended its mission to a wider circle of students, we have also sought to go deep. It is vitally important that all of our students, regardless of where or how they enroll, are challenged to be at their best academically and encouraged to go deep spiritually.

We seek to help students of all ages go well beyond learning how to make a living; we also help them learn how to live as men and women of character.    For many of the students who enroll through Olivet’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies, this call to a deeper life is new and sometimes unexpected — but over time it is this aspect of our programs that proves to be most rewarding.   One of the benefits of Olivet’s non-traditional programs is the format of studying with a cohort group — students start with each other and move through the program together. It is through the cohort model that community is established and maintained over time among students who often have no other

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   I came away from that evening reminded that we don’t teach subjects or classes — we teach students. This means that every student, younger o r o l d e r, m e e t i n g i n Bourbonnais, in the Loop, or in Hong Kong, brings into each class session a set of experiences, talents and aptitudes that enrich the learning environment. Our students learn from each other.    One of the highlights of my year is the graduation ceremony for the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies. I see in each face and overhear in countless conversations the reality of men and women who have been impacted by an “Education with a Christian Purpose.” That is the Olivet difference — which is making a difference, both deep and wide.

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as olivet has expanded its reach and extended its mission to a wider circle of students, we have also sought to go deep.” – John C. Bowling


onu news

ONU

Insider

$1.2 million endowed chair

Economic pulse

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usiness professor Don Daake has designed compiled and interpreted the new Kankakee Economic Outlook index, which charts trends   among the economic sentiments of a panel of local leaders over time. The panel is a cross­ section of various business and professional groups in Kankakee County, including political leaders, bankers, educators and business owners. Survey questions focused on the outlook for the local and national economies, cooperation among local communities, consolidation of ▲ DR. DON DAAKE school districts, tax reform and federal government cutbacks.

and walter quanstrom

Check out the latest headlines at www.olivet.edu!

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M J M P H O T O G R A P H Y, I NC .

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▲ DRs. john bowling, fay quanstrom

Women in the Workforce

“Wheel” fame olitical science and criminal justice major Christian Hall ’12 was recently featured as a contestant on “Wheel of Fortune.” Pat Sajak introduced her as a student of Olivet Nazarene University, and she went on to win $8,650 in cash and prizes.

A M Y ( D U E RR WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

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livet Nazarene University celebrated a gift  from Drs. Fay and Walter Quanstrom for   the establishment of “The Reverend Dr. Fay Quanstrom Endowed Chair of Pastoral Ministry” during chapel services September 29. This marks Olivet’s first endowed chair. An endowed chair is established through a financial gift, which is invested to provide ongoing financial support for the employment of a given faculty member in a specific area of study.

ssociate Professor Patricia Krohmer (pictured far left with Robert Anderson, NE Regional   Manager, DCEO; guest speaker and Illinois   Supreme Court Justice, Anne Burke; and Dr. Edward Piatt ’11 Ed.D., NE Senior Account Manager, DCEO ) was featured on a panel of experts at the 5th Annual Women in the Workforce Conference, Thursday, October 27 in Chicago Heights, Ill. Olivet was among the sponsors of the event.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

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▲ Christian Hall

Cloudy with a chance of math

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lementary education major Rachel Williams ’14 and Professor Nicole Enzinger ’05 of Olivet’s math department presented a workshop titled “Using Children’s Literature to Foster Motivation in Mathematics.” Starting with a nonmathematical children’s book, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, they designed a lesson on multiplicative reasoning of rational numbers. Before presenting it at the conference, they co-taught it to a class of fifth graders at Kankakee (Ill.) Trinity Academy.

Speaking of diet

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onors student and dietetics major Martha Harrouff ’12, together with Dr. Cathy Anstrom ’95 MBA , traveled to San Diego, Calif., to present research at the American Dietetic Association’s Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo. With over 300 postgraduate schools represented, Martha was the only undergraduate student at the conference. Her presentation, entitled “The Effect of Nutrigenomics Education on the Dietary Habits of College Students,” focused on how food is utilized by the body, depending on a person’s genetic makeup. “Nutrigenomics is a relatively new subject,” said Dr. Anstrom, “and Martha was the only one giving serious time to that topic during the poster session.”

save the date!

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Issue 4 | 2011

The Olivetian 5

COME AND

GORDON C. WICKERSHAM ’47

DWELL Chapel services have been marked by a “heightened sensitivity” to God’s voice

By Heather (Quimby) Day ’02/’12 MBA

On October 29, 2010, more than 3,000 students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends gathered to dedicate the Betty and Kenneth Hawkins Centennial Chapel. Through the words and songs of the morning, the Olivet community prayed, “This is Your house. Come and dwell.” One year later, it is abundantly clear that prayer has been answered time and again. uncertainty among the staff before chapel services were moved from their more than 50-year home in Chalfant to the new facility. “We were concerned about whether it would change the dynamics by being ‘too’ big. But what I’ve seen is exactly the opposite. Speakers are constantly commenting on the warmth and intimacy of the room — and students seem to feel more at ease in the less cramped space. ”    The difference is also felt beyond the designated chapel hours. Because of limited seating in Chalfant, students were on a rotating chapel schedule which meant that during any given service, at least one-third of the student body was missing. Now, all students attend the same chapel services on Wednesdays A M Y ( D U E RR WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

   “I have been amazed at the heightened sensitivity and engagement of our students,” remarks Mark Holcomb, chaplain for the University. “I haven’t given a formal altar call once this semester, yet students just spontaneously flood the altar in almost every service.”    In fact, the first time he spoke this fall, more than 150 students streamed from their seats to line the front of the chapel. Mark recalls a freshman who came up to him following that service and said that he had wanted to go up to the altar, but didn’t know that if it was okay until he started seeing his peers doing so. He laughs, “I told him, ‘You certainly don’t need my permission. If God’s speaking to you, that’s much bigger than me.’”   Mark confesses there was a bit of

Holcomb: “When we’re in the same room at the same time, it shapes our conversations throughout the week.”

and Thursdays. “When we’re in the same room at the same time, we’re also on the same page,” says Mark. “It shapes our conversations throughout the week.”   The spring and fall semesters of 2011 have brought in several outstanding speakers to Centennial Chapel: Tony Campolo, Scot McKnight, Leonard Sweet, Jon Acuff, Mike Breaux and many more. But Mark says the life-changing moments that students have experienced can’t be explained by speaking ability alone.    “Bigger hands than ours are shaping Chapel.”

Besides enhancing weekly chapel services, Centennial Chapel has opened new doors for Olivet. Shine.FM Station

If you build it, they will come

Patsy Clairmont, April 16, 2011

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Switchfoot, October 1, 2011

The Gaither Vocal Band, November 16, 2011

A M Y ( D U E RR WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

KY L I E M C G U I R E ’ 1 3

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Manager Justin Knight says, “Having 3,100 seats allows us to bring in the top Christian artists. We’ve always been able to host concerts on campus, but with a larger capacity, we can now draw the largest tours.” Gary Griffin, director of alumni and university relaStephen Moore, tions, agrees. Wall Street Journal “The Chapel is Contributor, September 18 big enough, and nice enough, that people want to bring their events to it. For example, we are among a handful of college campuses the Gaither Vocal Band has been on in recent years.” KY L I E M C G U I R E ’ 1 3

Centennial Chapel: One year later

Chris Tomlin, November 16, 2011

Coming October 2012 women’s conference

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onu sports

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THE

DEUTSCHLAND By Caleb Benoit ’06

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DUO

efore starting the fall  semester at Olivet, the  closest thing freshman  Paddy Hoepp ’15 had to  a campus visit was a trip   to Stuttgart, Germany.    Last summer, Hoepp made the two-hour drive south from his hometown of Frankfurt to see two people he had never met: Julian Kurz ’14, a tennis player and Olivet’s only German student, and Chris Mast ’11, a soccer player from Ohio who had just graduated from Olivet and was visiting Kurz.    Hoepp, recruited to play soccer at Olivet, was leaning toward coming to Bourbonnais this year but had never stepped foot on campus. Kurz and Mast, unofficial ambassadors for Olivet, assured Hoepp he was making the right choice.    One semester later, the only German students on campus are finding both athletic success on Olivet’s teams and comfort in each other, all an ocean away from family, friends and all things familiar.    “I’m really enjoying my time here,” said Hoepp, who led the Olivet men’s soccer in scoring this fall and was named the conference’s freshman of the year.    “It’s a nice experience to be in another country,” he said. “I had a good start, personally, and the team is great, so the transition was easy for me.”    Kurz and Hoepp took different routes to Bourbonnais. Kurz, a junior, transferred in 2010 from Auburn University in Montgomery, Ala., where he helped his tennis team win the NAIA National Championship two years ago. Hoepp attended a soccer camp at Northern Illinois University over the summer, where he caught the eye of Olivet head coach Justin Crew ’01/’08 MOL.   Now, on Olivet’s campus together, the two athletes from Deutschland are close friends.    “It’s really nice to have someone here like Paddy,” said Kurz, who took seventh place this fall in the NAIA portion of the USTA/ITA National Small College Championships.    He, like Hoepp, had never visited Olivet before starting classes. But also like Hoepp, the more time he’s spent at Olivet, the more comfortable he’s become.    “I’m really happy,” Kurz said.   For both Kurz and Hoepp, injuries created roadblocks on their paths to professional sports careers, but the detour to Bourbonnais was an ideal choice. On athletic scholarships

— which don’t exist in Germany because there are no college sports teams — they can earn college degrees while experiencing American culture and life in a foreign country.    Kurz plans to continue his education, earn an MBA and possibly follow in the footsteps of one of his older brothers, who also studied in the U.S. and works for the pharmaceutical company Johnson & Johnson. Hoepp, 20, is studying international business and hopes his experience in the U.S. will one day appeal to potential employers.    Studying and playing sports in the U.S. is a unique opportunity for a foreign student. They describe it as “perfect.”   Not everything about their transition has been simple, but despite being a transcontinental flight from home, Kurz and Hoepp use each other to help Germany feel a bit closer than 4,000 miles away. Both are fluent in English, but they spend the weekends together speaking German. (Kurz knows Spanish, too, after spending his high school years studying and playing tennis in Spain.)   Cultural discoveries have made it easier. Kurz has managed to find small slices of Germany in Illinois, including Chicago’s German

4,000 MILES FROM HOME, GERMANS FINDING COMFORT — AND SUCCESS — ON U.S. SOIL Christmas market, Christkindlmarket, and the Peotone Bierstube, a family-owned German restaurant in nearby Peotone, population 4,918, where the specialty is giant schnitzel.    Hoepp, who has only been in the U.S. for a few months, follows Kurz’s lead, but not just for planning social events. Kurz advice helped bring Hoepp to Olivet, where both are helping the Tigers’ athletic teams excel while getting an international education.    It’s an opportunity they couldn’t pass up.    “If you don’t do it now, you’ll never do it again,” Hoepp said. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance.”

EUROPEAN FLAVOR ›››

JULIAN KURZ AND PADDY HOEPP WEREN’T THE ONLY EUROPEAN EXPORTS PLAYING FOR ONU THIS FALL. Londoner Eugene Burndam ’14 played in 18 matches as a midfielder on the men’s soccer team, and women’s tennis player Aurelie Hascoet ’13, from a small French town near the German and Swiss borders, advanced to the USTA/ITA National Small College Championships — the season-end national tournament for all divisions of college tennis.

hoepp hascoet ku rz

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Issue 4 | 2011

FO R TH E L ATE S T S C O R E S AND S P O RTS NE W S , VI S I T W W W.O L I V E T. E DU .

The Olivetian 7

men’s basketball

recap

fall sports

  Sophomore Mitchell Dale (Rochester Hills, Mich.) and freshman Dylan Creger (Almont, Mich.) crossed the finish line together, in 53rd and 54th place, at the NAIA National Championships in Vancouver, Wash. The underclassmen were the top finishers for the Tigers, who finished 20th among 32 teams at the eight-kilometer national event. The trip to the West Coast marked the fifth time in six seasons the team qualified for the NAIA national meet under head coach Mike McDowell ’09 MOL.

men’s soccer

   A three-game win streak to end the year capped a remarkable turnaround under firstyear head coach Brian Fish ’97/’00 MAT. One year after a winless season, the Tigers won four of their last five games and finished with a 5–6 record. Perhaps the most encouraging sign was that many of the best performances came from young players: Michael-Ho Lewis (Boise, Idaho) turned in four straight 100yard rushing performances, and linebacker Brandon Ruemler (Williamsport, Ind.) led the team with 90 tackles. Both are freshmen.

   The Tigers’ final record of 8-10-1 didn’t match performances from recent seasons, but there are plenty of reasons for optimism. After a difficult start, they racked up all eight of those wins in the final 12 matches, and underclassmen turned in the best individual performances. Freshman midfielder Patrick Hoepp (Frankfurt, Germany) tallied 10 goals and five assists, and was named the CCAC Freshman of the Year. Sophomore defender Yonda Abogunrin (Vernon Hills, Ill.) helped the team to three shutouts. Both were named to the All-CCAC Second Team.

volleyball

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women’s soccer   Olivet has never been better: the Tigers won a game at the NAIA National Championship tournament for the first time in school history. The team’s top offensive players — sophomore Rachel Kilbry (Spring Lake, Mich.), junior Meghan Pipal (Wheaton, Ill.) and senior Janel Schmitt (Geneva, Ill.) — also helped the team clinch at least a share of the CCAC regular-season title for the first time and reach a No. 9 ranking in the final NAIA Top 25 poll before the postseason began. Juniors Devin Johnston (Bloomingdale, Ill.), Katrine Holm (Antioch, Ill.) and goalie Wendy Espejel (Ontario, Calif.), meanwhile, helped the defense record 12 regular-season shutouts.

A M Y ( D U E RR WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

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N o . 18 janel schmi tt

Four inducted into Athletic Hall of Fame

women’s cross country

  Led by seniors Molly Goldbach (Redondo Beach, Calif.) and DeeAnn Garvin (Bloomington, Ind.), the Tigers qualified for the NAIA National Championship tournament for the fifth time in six seasons. Goldbach led the team in attack percentage while Garvin, the team’s top defensive player, tallied more than 800 digs. The trip to nationals was Olivet’s ninth under head coach Brenda Williams. The Tigers, who finished with a 28–13 record, also won at least a share of the CCAC regular­ season title for the fourth straight year.

NO . 24 ANTO NIO MAR SHAL L

A M Y ( D U E RR WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

men’s cross country

  Junior K o r t n e y Ellingboe (Hamilton, Ill.), senior L a u r e n Versweyveld (Delavan, Wis.) and junior Hannah Endrizzi (Normal, Ill.) all f inished among the top 35 individuals at the NAIA National Championships in Vancouver, Wash. Those performances helped the Tigers to a sixthplace team finish out of 32 teams — the best finish at the national meet in school history. Ellingboe led the way and came in 24th after running the 5K in 18 minutes, 24 seconds. It’s the second year in a row she’s been the team’s top finisher at nationals.

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   Former Olivet athletes Ben Colling ’03 and Ben Richardson ’03 were among four inducted into the ONU Athletic Hall of Fame on Friday, November 11.    Also inducted were current head volleyball coach Brenda Williams, who has taken the Tigers to nine NAIA national tournaments, and current head softball coach Ritchie Richardson, a 700-game winner.    A right fielder and catcher, Colling was a three-time NAIA All-American and helped Olivet to back-to-back NAIA World Series appearances in 2002 and 2003. Among his 11 school records is his 25-game hitting streak in 2001.    Richardson, a two-time NAIA All-American, played defensive back and helped lead Olivet to its most recent NAIA playoff berth in 2000. Following his college career, he performed in tryouts for both the NFL’s Houston Texans and New York Jets.

endr i z z i

Swimmers wanted for Tigers’ new team    The Olivet Nazarene University men’s and women’s swimming teams are recruiting for their first season, which will begin in the fall of 2012.    Each team of 20 swimmers will be coached by veteran Scott Teeters, the former head women’s coach at NCAA Division I schools Eastern Michigan University and Oakland University. Teeters also coached the Oakland Live Y’ers, an acclaimed swimming club that produced more than 30 national qualifiers. teeters    The Tigers will compete in Olivet’s new Student Life and Recreation Center, a 168,000-square-foot facility under construction. The program’s brand-new home features a 10-lane competition pool with a uniform depth of two meters, which is designed for fast performances.    Prospective swimmers are invited to contact Teeters at spteeters@olivet.edu.

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women’s basketball    The Tigers’ high-flying ways landed them No. 12 in the NAIA Top 25 preseason poll, and behind senior guard Danielle Pipal (Wheaton, Ill.), they’re looking for back-to-back trips to the NAIA National Championship tournament for the first time in school history. P IPAL

Editor’s Note: Sports statistics are as of November 21, 2011. For the latest scores and sports news, visit www.olivet.edu.

KY L I E M C G U I R E ’ 1 3

football

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   Senior point guard Antonio Marshall (Bowling Green, Ind.) is leading a young team in Olivet’s run toward a third straight trip to the NAIA National Championship tournament in Kansas City, Mo. Marshall surpassed 1,000 career points last season and is on pace to finish with more than 200 career three-pointers.


The Felesenas installed a well in Argentina today. They programmed software in Toledo, then taught low-income children in the Bronx. Right now, they’re just focused on keeping yams out of Dane’s hair.

Together.

Generosity is a family tradition for the Felesenas. Their gifts to Friends of Olivet equip the next generation of Olivetians to make         an impact in their homes, in their churches, in their communities. Join them today! Together, our reach spans the globe.

Olivet Nazarene University.

Carol (Lockwood) Felesena ’56 and her son and daughter-in-law, Marty ’96 and Jeanne (Moslener) ’03 MAPC Felesena, are faithful supporters of Olivet through the Felesena Family Scholarship and Friends of Olivet.

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feature story

Issue 4 | 2011

The Olivetian 9

FAITH in the PUBLIC SQUARE fostering a generation of hope

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Meeting the press

   The conference proved to be a reinvigorating experience for the students in attendance, many of whom are interested in cultural issues, media and politics.    Public policy major Ethan Burch ’13 said, “At a time when I was wavering and questioning my decision to pursue a political degree more than ever, the conference reminded me of why I want to make a difference.”

  Indeed, all seven of the major Republican presidential candidates at the time made a stop at the Values Voter Summit, each giving an impassioned speech at some point during the weekend. After each one had spoken, attendees were encouraged to participate in a straw poll, which received national news coverage.    Other keynote speakers included some of the top leaders in government and the media — author William Bennett, Speaker of the House John Boehner, radio host Laura Ingraham, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and more.    Olivet students had the opportunity to meet several of the featured authors, pundits and politicians, including Edwin Meese, 75th Attorney General of the United States under President Ronald Reagan, who was honored during the gala dinner at the weekend’s conclusion.

Tim Goeglein

   Also featured at the conference was Tim Goeglein, former special assistant to President George W. Bush and current vice president for external relations at Focus on the Family. Goeglein recently published his memoir, The Man in the Middle: An Inside Account of Faith and Politics in the George W. Bush Era (2011). Between sessions at the conference, several members from Olivet’s group met and spoke with him at his book signing.    One week after the conference, Goeglein visited the campus of Olivet Nazarene University to speak in chapel and present the keynote address at the Marriage, Inc. stakeholders’ dinner.   His presentation, “Why marriage matters now more than ever,” inspired community leaders from churches, businesses, civic organizations and educational institutions.    The following morning, he delivered a powerful message in Olivet’s chapel service. With his articulate style, Goeglein captivated the audience with the story of his incredible rise to success in the White House; a devastating fall; and the grace and forgiveness shown to him by God, his family and the president of the United States.    Beth Olney, director of Marriage, Inc., said, “Tim’s authentic presentation at both the dinner and in chapel left an indelible mark on the Olivet community.”

SUBMITTED PHOTO

n October 6, a group   of eight students   from Olivet Nazarene   University traveled   to the nation’s capi  tal for the 2011   Values Voter Summit.   For the third year, this trip to Washington, D.C. was sponsored by two Olivet alumni in an effort to encourage college students to engage in the cultural issues of the day.   With more than 3,000 in attendance and major media attention, this was the largest event in the history of the high-profile conference, which Reuters calls, “a ‘must attend’ on the political calendar of any serious candidate for the Republican presidential nomination.”

Some of us were fortunate enough to meet Newt Gingrich, and I had him sign my book. I never imagined I would be able to shake hands with such an incredible public servant!” — Erinn Proehl ’14

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KY L I E M C G U I R E ’ 1 3

By Luke Olney ’10

We have never needed young Christians in public life more than now. The way to get students interested in the public square is to connect them with people who shape and give form to public policy in America.” — Timothy S. Goeglein, vice president for external relations at Focus on the Family, who was featured at the Voters Value Summit and one week later as a chapel speaker at Olivet.

Hope is just ahead

   The current generation of college-aged students has often been plagued with a bad reputation. They have grown up in a culture of brokenness, especially in the family — high divorce rates, out-of-wedlock births and Internet pornography are just a few of the obstacles.    “Wisdom would tell you that being this broken would cause young people to lose hope and become pessimistic,” Tim says. “I’ve found just the opposite. Despite living in this roughand-tough culture, they have come through — and they are hopeful.”   He continues: “This generation wants to build something stronger than what they lived through. They want to get married and have a family, and I have a sense they want to get it right.”   With a quiet confidence, Tim reiterates: “America’s best days are ahead. Hope is real and is just ahead.”


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main feature story How the pursuit of a degree led to so much more

Improbable By Luke Olney ’10

▲ doctoral candidates wendy ellis

’12 Ed.d. and dale jerome ’12 ed.d.

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endy Ellis ’12 Ed.D. and Dale Jerome ’12 Ed.D. are two unlikely friends.   S h e l i v e s n e a r Chicago; he lives near Detroit. She is a single, extroverted, AfricanAmerican woman in her 30s; he is a married, introverted, Caucasian man in his 50s. Wendy exudes creativity as the assistant director of marketing and membership services at Northwestern University. Dale thrives in the details as the president and co-owner of an architecture firm.    But somehow the two have developed a kinship that transcends all their differences.   How did this unlikely duo — along with 14 others — become like brothers and sisters? It happened through the Doctor of Education in ethical leadership program at Olivet Nazarene University.

Wendy: My way out

   Growing up, Wendy Ellis did not excel in school, but rather, on the field. She was a top runner in Illinois, and a 10-time All-American in track and field. She quickly became known as a disciplined athlete, but her studies suffered.   Eventually, Wendy realized she could apply the principles she used as an athlete in the classroom. She went on to become the first person in her family to receive a college degree,

earning a B.A. in communications at Loras College (Iowa) in 1999.    “I realized I didn’t just have to be the jock, sports girl,” Wendy says. “Education was my way out.”   Motivated after completing her college degree, Wendy went on to receive a master’s in sports administration at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse.    In 2005, Wendy heard about a job opening for the new WNBA team, the Chicago Sky, and pursued the position like it was already hers. “I emailed them,” she recalls. “I said, ‘You don’t know me, but it would be your loss not to have me working for you.’”    Wendy became the number two season-ticket sales executive in the entire league, working as senior account executive for the Chicago Sky until 2007.    As much as she enjoyed the role, Wendy began to wonder if she was meant to do more. During a brief fourmonth stint working for the Chicago park district, Wendy realized her true calling — working with children. It was this experience that inspired her to pursue further education in Olivet’s Ed.D. program.

god orchestrated it … i was supposed to be in this class.” — Wendy Ellis ’12 Ed.D.

Dale: Giving back

   Ever since he was a young boy, Dale Jerome only wanted to be an architect. He was always fascinated with how things were put

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together. After graduating with a degree in architecture from Lawrence Technological University (Mich.) in 1983, his childhood dream became a reality.   Dale became a registered architect, and in 1991, he joined French Associates, an architectural firm located in Rochester, Mich. Eventually, Dale was offered ownership in the company, and currently serves as president of French Associates.   In his spare time, Dale enjoys playing golf and cycling. “It’s a great way to set aside many of the day’s worries,” he explains. “I’ve had some of my best conversations with God as I pedal along.”   He is also an active member of his church’s praise and worship team, and is the song leader for one of their services.    In 1998, he went on to receive a master’s degree from Walsh College (Mich.) in management and communications. But Dale’s life goal has pushed him to pursue yet another degree.    “At the end of my career, I would like to give back to the community by teaching at a college or university,” Dale explains.   His goal of transitioning into teaching inspired him to look into doctoral programs. Because his wife Karna (Wentworth) ’82 and two children all attended Olivet — and he is


Issue 4 | 2011

FO R I NF O R M ATIO N A B O U T T HE S C HO O L O F GRADUAT E AN D CO N TI NUI N G S T U DIE S , V IS IT G R A DU AT E . O L IVET.EDU OR CA L L 8 77 -9-O LIV E T T O S P E A K W IT H A N E N R OLL MEN T COUN SELOR.

The Olivetian 11

I could tell my cohort was going to be like an extended family. i got a very diverse, unique group of friends that i know i never would have created on my own.” — Dale Jerome ’12 Ed.D.

A second family

  Olivet’s Ed.D. program uses the cohort model, which means students go through their entire program with the same classmates. Classes meet one Saturday per month, in addition to a nine-day residency during each of the three summers of the program.   When Wendy and Dale began the program, they expected to gain a quality education from a Christian perspective; they didn’t expect to gain a second family. But that’s exactly what they got.   “Very quickly, I realized this was going to be different than other programs I had done,” Dale says. “I could tell my cohort was going to be like an extended family. I got a very diverse, unique group of friends that I know I never would have created on my own.”   From Ohio to Oregon, a police officer to an interior designer, their 16-person cohort is about as diverse as can be. “God orchestrated it,” says Wendy, who originally signed up to be in another cohort, but got into this one instead. “I wasn’t supposed to be in that class. I was supposed to be in this class.”

The beginning of a beautiful friendship

  At the outset of the program, Wendy volunteered to be the class

president, which made sense to everyone right away.    “She’s one of the ring leaders of our cohort,” Dale explains. “I’m more of the sit-in-the-corner-and-wait-tosee-how-things-shake-out kind of guy. I’m definitely more reserved.”    Though Wendy and Dale may be different in many ways, they quickly developed a long-lasting friendship. “I’ve gotten to know Wendy pretty well,” Dale says. “She has a lot of unique talents that I admire. It’s really been a positive experience to become her friend and get to know her.”   To Wendy, Dale is like a big brother. “He’s the kind of person I would call to ask for prayer if I was struggling,” she explains. But she is also grateful for the humor he adds to the class. Wendy laughs, “Dale is an absolute clown! I didn’t know this reserved man would be so funny.”

   Wendy and Dale have also taught each other about their cultural differences, including the use of words, expressions and language.    One day, Wendy told a story to the class and used the word “holler.” Dale interpreted the word to mean “shout” or “yell,” but Wendy actually meant “flirt,” which changed the story entirely. This confusion elicited a big laugh from the group, and is a favorite memory of theirs.

We’re gonna make it

  Over the past three years, the group has gotten to know each other on a personal level, sharing prayer requests and helping each other through various struggles — both academic and personal.   “Everybody, at one point, was thinking about throwing in the towel,” Dale admits. “It was so important to have someone else saying, ‘We’re gonna make it!’”    This spring, each student will be completing his or her dissertation as they all prepare to graduate in May 2012. Her eyes well▲ Students in Olivet’s graduate and continuing studies ing up with programs form close relationships with their classmates as a result of the cohort model where students start and tears, Wendy finish a program together.

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confesses, “I get emotional thinking of what life will be like without them.”   Dale adds, “I could have easily driven 20 minutes to a nearby university in Michigan and gotten a doctoral degree. But I wouldn’t have seen the same investment on the part of the professors, or had the close-knit relationships that I formed with this cohort.    “No question,” Dale continues emphatically, “this was the right program for me.”

Live it, walk it, talk it

   Wendy and David appreciate the transformational practicality of what they’ve learned through the doctoral program. “We’re not just learning superficial theory,” says Wendy.   “We are learning how we can change the world with the information we have taken in.”    Both Dale and Wendy plan to do just that. They each have a heart for influencing the lives of a younger generation — Dale plans to invest in college students, and Wendy will follow her calling to open a youth agency.    “Olivet’s Ed.D. program has prepared us to do what we say we’re going to do,” Wendy says. “It’s not just about what we learned, but how we live it, walk it and talk it!”

A M Y ( D U E RR WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

a lifelong Nazarene — he decided to enroll in Olivet’s Ed.D. program.


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feature story

Students team with crossdepartmental faculty to chart new course By Laura Wasson Warfel

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am Craven ’13, Kaylie  Church ’12 and Jerald  Obotte ’14 are on the   front lines of progress at  Olivet, doing what many  academics never get to enjoy.    Working shoulder to shoulder with six professors, they are part of the team that is developing a new course: Computing Foundations for the Scientist.   Although neither Sam nor Kaylie is a computer science major, both are learning to appreciate the importance of computational thinking in all areas of life — including their major fields of study.   Kaylie, a biology major from Wheaton, Ill., is preparing to enter medical school. Sam, a biology and biochemistry major from Frankfort, Ill., has graduate school ahead of him. Both are part of Olivet’s Honors Program. They are working as research assistants now and preparing to be teaching assistants when this course is offered for the first time in spring 2012.    Jerald is from Nairobi, Kenya, and has lived in the U.S. for 1½ years. Recently, he transferred to Olivet to study computer science and is designing a website about the course. Using jGRASP software, he is also writing custom programs to design models and perform scientific calculations. Students who take the course will use these in their labs.

SHOULDER

With professors as peers, students Kaylie

  (biology major), Jerald (computer science    major) and Sam (biology and biochemistry major) are augmenting their tech knowledge, experiencing real world team work and building their résumés.

Persistence pays off    Funding for this project came through a grant of $200,000 from the National Science Foundation — the first ever NSF grant received by Olivet as a university.   Dr. Catherine Bareiss (computer science) had been pursuing this grant for several years because she was convinced of the importance of teaching how technology intersects other disciplines.

   “Computers have changed academics and our society,” she says. “This is as major as the Industrial Revolution! We have a responsibility to figure out what that means for our students and for our curricula.”   Five professors have joined Dr. Bareiss, Sam, Kaylie and Jerald in the project: Dr. Larry Vail ’78 (computer science), Dr. Kevin Brewer (geology), Dr. Greg Long

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’84 (biology), Dr. Joe Schroeder (engineering) and Dr. Willa Harper ’91 (chemistry). One interest they share: relating computing to science.    Since receiving this grant and while working on developing the course: • The team has hosted and heard from important guest speakers on Olivet’s campus:

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Robert M. Panoff, executive director of Shodor.org, a national resource organization for science education; and Amber Settle, director of the Innovation in Technology Education Center (iTec) at DePaul University. • Some team members have received funding to attend conferences within and across their disciplines.

Student input   “Sam, Kaylie and Jerald are doing a variety of tasks for us,”


Issue 4 | 2011

Course close up

The Olivetian 13

So what exactly will Computing Foundations for the Scientist (CCSIS 331/NSCI 331) look like?

 Taught by Dr. Larry Vail, with several science professors as guest lecturers  4 computing modules and 10 science modules  Designed for second semester freshman and sophomore science majors who have completed one lab course and calculus  Brings students from various science disciplines together in the same class to study:  Computing foundations and computational science  Math/numerical analysis — roots of equations and curve fitting  Biology — bioinformatics and cladograms  Chemistry — kinetics and molecular modeling  Engineering — analysis/design and data acquisition  Geology — geographic information systems (GIS)

   Jerald says, “This experience enhances my programming skills. Interacting with students from the biological sciences department is fun, too.”   Kaylie is appreciating the power of bioinformatics, applying computer science and information technology to the fields of biology and medicine.    All three are excited about adding this experience to their résumés.   “We have the opportunity to learn beyond what we are learning in the curriculum for our majors,” Kaylie says.    “I’ve already used one module to teach myself binary [code],” Sam adds. “I wouldn’t have learned that otherwise.”    Kaylie interjects, “We’re learning the ideas and foundations of computing that Dr. Bareiss and Dr. Vail understand so well — and that are completely foreign to us. This is a new language for us as science majors, a different playing field.”

TO SHOULDER

Professors as learners says Dr. Vail. “Organizing and docu­menting research. Validating the modules we’re writing from the student’s perspective. Alerting us to any confusing explanations. Designing custom software programs. They are part of the selection, writing, reading and assessment right along with us. They are integral to the development and teaching of this course.”    Sam, Kaylie and Jerald have been impressed by the level of trust the professors have in them. “There’s not a lot of checking in,” Kaylie says. “They know we will get the information to them when they

   During team meetings, six professors — each with a Ph.D. in his or her field — often speak separate languages. They have to take time to explain concepts, ideas and terminology to one another.   “Seeing faculty members brave enough to ask questions is important for these students,” Dr. Vail says. “They need to see us step away from what we’ve done for so long and learn something new.”    “There is a lot more debate among the professors than I expected,” Kaylie says. “They will debate the direction of a module, theme or format. They have a lot of very different opinions, which

need it. We know that we have to make our work for them a priority because they are depending on us to keep the development process moving along.”

Merging languages: science and computing    One of the challenges the students face is completing research assignments while keeping up with their other studies and homework — but their strong interest in learning keeps them going.    Sam enjoys the work he is doing with NetLogo, a multi-agent programmable modeling environment.

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makes for very interesting team meetings!”    “Watching the students watch this happen has been interesting,” Dr. Long says. “They already understand that these days, you can’t do biology without using computers. The better a scientist understands the software programs as tools, the better he or she will understand and do his or her job.”

Training better scientists    Still in the experimental stage, this course is much more than a computer science course. With Dr. Vail as the instructor and a variety of science professors as guest lecturers, students will learn a lot of new information in a way that’s easy to grasp.    “Each module is designed to ramp up from the previous ones,” Kaylie says. “Working through this will give science students a new appreciation for technology.”    “This course is unique and different from other science courses offered at Olivet,” Jerald says. “It’s exciting to be part of it.”   “As people think about educational requirements for a new century, there is a lot of talk about technological literacy,” Dr. Schroeder says. “We want to train better scientists at Olivet — teach them not just how to function with a computer, but to think about ways to use computing to analyze and solve problems. We want our students to have new ways of making a difference in God’s kingdom.”


in review

Homecoming in Review AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

The Gaither Vocal Band entertained a sold-out crowd in the new Betty and Kenneth Hawkins Centennial Chapel on Saturday evening, alongside Olivet’s choirs.

Robert Wall ’57, president and owner of Wall Investment Group, Inc., is the recipient of the 2011 Lay “O” Award, while Neil B. Wiseman ’55 was recognized with the Ministerial “O” Award for serving as minister, teacher, mentor and friend to congregations and college campuses around the country. For full bios of Robert and Neil, visit www.olivet.edu.

CORONATION

FOOTBALL

Shelbi Miller ’12, a business administration major from Downs, Ill., was crowned the 2011 Homecoming Queen.

In their final game of the 2011 season, the Tigers championed over McKendree University (Ill.) with a final score of 17-13.

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AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

“O” AWARDS

KYLIE MCGUIRE ’13

›››

GAITHER VOCAL BAND

AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

From the opening Coronation ceremony to the closing President’s Prayer Breakfast, Homecoming 2011, November 9–12, was an exciting and memorable experience for the entire Olivet community.

AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

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Issue 4 | 2011

The Olivetian 15

WOMEN’S AND MEN’S BASKETBALL The women’s basketball team pulled out a nail biting 92-91 win over Davenport University (Mich.). The men’s basketball team narrowly lost their match-up against University of St. Francis (Ill.)

GORDON C. WICKERSHAM ’47

REUNIONS

YOUNG ALUMNI AWARDS

Want to see more photos?

AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

Jessica (Allison) Swanson ’06, who currently works for The New Teacher Project, and Lauren Seaman ’03, who recently served as a political consultant for the International Republican Institute, were recognized with the first annual Young Alumni Awards, made possible through the support of Mel ’73 and Judith (Tucker) ’73 Sayes. For full bios of Jessica and Lauren, visit www.olivet.edu.

PRESIDENT’S PRAYER BREAKFAST

Hundreds of alumni enjoyed reminiscing and catching up with their former classmates during class reunions.

These are just a small sampling of the photos taken at Homecoming 2011. Check out more of our favorites by scanning this code with your smart phone or by visiting www.flickr.com/ photos/olivet/collections.

Mark your calendars! Homecoming 2012 October 31– November 4, 2012

AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

Just before hitting the road, several alumni and friends were inspired by a special message from Dr. Bowling during the annual President’s Prayer Breakfast.

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Celebrating reunions:

Classes of ’07, ’02, ’97, ’92, ’87, ’82, ’77, ’72, ’67 and ’62 and Purple and Gold Grads.

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onu alumni

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Class Notes

• 1970s

sister Ginny, 2. Brad works for Ford Motor Company, and Marissa is currently a stay-athome mom. The family resides in Farmington Hills, Mich.

• 1990s

Sherri (Sloan) ’96 and Scott Bohinc: A girl, Bella Victoria, September 1, 2011. Bella joins big sister Ava, 6 Ava, Landon, Braxton and and big brothBella Bohinc ers Landon, 4 and Braxton, 2. Scott is a Finance Manager at PAE. Sherri is a stay-at-home mom following an advertising and marketing career at Google.com and Georgetown University. The family resides in Washington, D.C. Grandparents are Bob ’68 and Janet Sloan. Bob is the president and CEO of Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C. He also serves on the Olivet Alumni Board of Directors, among other Board positions in Washington, D.C.

Debra J. (Chessman) Wilson ’76 graduated with a Doctorate of Philosophy in education from Capella University in Minneapolis, Minn. She currently Debra Wilson serves as an instructional coordinator in Warren County Schools in Tennessee. Debbie and her husband, Frank Wilson ’66, live in McMinnville, Tenn.

Shawn (Smith) Lantz ’91 had her second women’s Bible s t u d y, “ E n c o u n t e r i n g the Healing Power of Forgiveness,” released November 8, 2011. The eight-week study examines biblical forgiveness and reconciliation in families Shawn Lantz through the story of Joseph in the book of Genesis. Shawn is a Christian women’s event speaker and has authored three books. She lives with her family in Nashville, Tenn. Brad Jones ’94 and Marissa Jones: A girl, Caroline Ann, May 23, 2011. She joins big brothers Jackson, 5 and Will, Ginny, Jackson, Caroline 4, and big

coffee shop. Jane and her family reside in Monroe, Mich. Althea (Burgard) ’97 and Robert Todd Russell: A boy, Cailen Allen, July 15, 2011. He joins big brother Cailen Russell Ayden, 3. Todd is a police officer for the city of Sandwich, Ill. and is a retired captain of the Illinois Army National Guard. Althea is a labor and delivery RNC for Valley West Community Hospital in Sandwich. They reside in Sheridan, Ill. Bruce ’98 and Dana (Smith) ’98 Heavner: A boy, Oscar Nathaniel, April 3, 2011. He Oscar Heavner joins brothers and sisters Keegan, Jacqueline, Maverick and Louisa. Dana is currently homeschooling the kids, and Bruce is a senior consultant for Glasshouse Technologies.

Benjamin Sowles ’96 has opened HandCrafted Physical Therapy in Charlotte, N.C. Benjamin has a Master’s of Science degree in physical therapy. His wife, Lillian, works for Kraft Foods as an account manager.

Suzanne (Bell) ’98 and Josh Warren: A boy, Zachary W illiam, January 4, 2011. Suzanne is a tenZachary Warren ured associate professor of industrial and organizational psychology at DePaul University in Chicago, Ill. Josh is director for Global Risk at Equity Risk Partners in Chicago. They reside in Oak Park, Ill.

Jane (Dunshee) Wells ’96 has published a book titled, “Glitter in the Sun: A Bible Study Searching for Truth in the Twilight Saga.” Jane Wells This book came out of a women’s Bible study Jane taught at her local

and Will Jones

• 2000s

Joel ’00 and Stephanie Newsham: A girl, Annabelle Rose, May 17, 2011. Annabelle Newsham Annabelle was adopted May 19, 2011. She was welcomed home by big brothers Levi 4, and Wesley, 2, who adore her.

Joy — for everyone!

Impact students now. Receive payments for life!

Merideth (Densford) ’00 Spriggs started an organization called Caridad, which means “charity” in Spanish. It gives clothing to homeless shelters in the San Diego and Los Angeles areas. They receive donations from the lost and found items in local businesses and give them to the appropriate shelters.

Four Olivet alumni with the 82nd Airborne Division deployed to Iraq in support of Operation New Dawn. They met at Camp Ar Ramadi. From left to right, Captains Jason Hartman ’01, Matthew Boersema ’08, Lori Kuyt-Boersema ’08 and Stephanie (Pauls) Parisi ’06. Jason works as a nurse anesthetist, Matthew as a logistics officer, Lori as a nurse and Stephanie as a physical therapist. Shawna (Herbert) ’01 and Robert Rushing, Jr.: A boy, Trey Robert, March 12, 2011. He joins big sister Jenna, 3. Robert Trey Rushing is a veterinarian, and Shawna is a stay-athome mom and freelance proofreader. They reside in The Colony, Texas.

Jason Ellis

Jason Ellis ’03 has released a CD titled, “The Storyteller’s Road.” The music is acoustic folk with Christian worship elements, similar in style to James Taylor. When Jason is not traveling as an evangelist, he is youth

The Olivet Experience equips students to share the hope of Christ and make an impact in their careers, churches, communities and the world.

makes “Education with a Christian Purpose” possible!

The Olivet Charitable Gift Annuity helps make that a reality.

It also benefits you: • Favorable, consistent payout rates • Immediate tax deduction for your cash gift • No capital gains tax for gifts of appreciated Securities or Real Estate

KYLIE MCGU IRE ’13

Life impact for students and life income for you. What could be better? Establish your CGA or make other gifts before December 31 for a 2011 tax deduction!

contact us for a no-obligation discussion:

815-939-5171 development@olivet.edu

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KYLIE MCGUIRE ’13

Students featured in this issue are recipients of the following Olivet ­Foundation scholarships: RACHEL L. WILLIAMS ’14 Edna A. Roach Scholarship Erinn M. Proehl ’14 Walter Charlie Brozek Scholarship

katrina m. holm ’13 R.D. and Lydia Bredholt Scholarship

samuel j. craven ’13 Dr. John Q. Dickey Pre-medicine Scholarship

Lauren l. versweyveld ’12 Marion Fry Scholarship

shelbi r. miller ’12 Earl Becke Scholarship oluwayonda o. abogunrin ’14 Sharon Ann Roth Scholarship

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To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing Foundation scholarship, email the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.


Issue 4 | 2011

pastor and worship leader at Woodlawn Community Church of the Nazarene, in Clarksville, Tenn. He and his wife, Claire, reside in Woodlawn, Tenn. Kristin (Heppe) ’05 and Matthew Collins: A girl, Lia Grace, September 24, 2011. Kristin teaches fourth grade in Chatham, Ill. Matthew owns his own business, GreenSweep Professional Power Lia Collins Sweeping. They reside in Springfield, Ill. Erin (Hall) ’07 and Greg Jones: A b o y, N o l a n Dean, January 7, 2011. Erin teaches Nolan Jones Spanish part-time at St. Susanna School. Greg is the pastor to students at Southland Community Church. The family resides in Plainfield, Ind. Matthew ’07 and Nicole (Maberry) ’08 Pollock: A boy, Britton Matthew, June 27, 2011. Matt is a youth pastor at Lafayette First Britton Pollock Church of the Nazarene. Nicole is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Lafayette, Ind.

The Olivetian 17

SAVE THE DATES

Lindsay Carroll ’08 and Zach Chupp were married June 18, 2011, in Highland, Ind. Lindsay works for School City of Mishawaka as a program/administrative assistant at Madison Elementary in Wakarusa, Ind. Zach is the benefits coordinator at Keystone Lindsay and Insurance and Benefits Zach Chupp Group in Mishawaka, Ind. They reside in Elkhart, Ind.

9th ANNUAL

Winter Golf Outing

FEB

23–26 2012

Part of the Larry Watson Memorial Golf Series

Brittany Anderson ’09 graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in May 2011, after completing an advanced standing program. She received a Master’s of social work degree, focusing on direct practice in healthcare. Brittany During her studies, she Anderson completed an internship in social work and case management at North Carolina Children’s Hospital. She now works as the main social worker on the Alzheimer’s/Dementia unit at Regency Healthcare Centre in Taylor, Mich.

For more information and to reserve a foursome or individual golfer, email Jeff Domagalski at jdomagal@olivet.edu or call 815-928-5455.

APR

featuring

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Lysa TerKeurst,

2012

  president of Proverbs 31 Ministry and a New York Times and best-selling author

Paul Aldrich, Christian comedian For more information, call 815-939-5258.

In Memoriam William D. Beaney, former biology professor, passed away August 12, 2011. He taught at Olivet from 1961 to 1991. He served as the department chair.    William was born July 21, 1930. On July 2, 1954, he married Mary Louise Ridall. He earned his B.S., graduating cum laude, in 1952, and William Beaney his M.S. in 1953, from Brockport State University of New York. He was a 50-year member of College Church of the Nazarene in Bourbonnais, Ill.

MAY 2012

This trip will include

• 1950s

Staff members from the Office of Development know how to connect your interests and Olivet’s mission. Bequests? Life Income? Scholarships? Learn more by calling our helpful team at 815-939-5171.

Send us your news and photographs. Please submit alumni news,

less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all information, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via email to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through email or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

• 1960s

Jean Clark

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featuring

For more information and to reserve a spot, please contact Olivet’s Office of Alumni and University Relations at 815-939-5258.

R. Paul Meyer ’59 passed away November 18, 2011. Paul was born March 22, 1934, in Kankakee.    From the time Paul became a polio quad survivor during the 1951 epidemic, his parents devoted their lives assisting him to pursue an active, relatively independent life. After finishing his degree from Olivet, he earned a Master of Arts in education from Arizona State University and did post-master’s study at the University of Illinois, R. Paul Meyer Urbana-Champaign.    Paul was employed by Kankakee School District 111. He initially taught English and U.S. history for three years at West Junior High School, followed by three years of service as a counselor. In 1966–67, he transferred as a counselor to the newly opened and accessible Westview High School. He retired in 1999 from Kankakee High School, where he continued in counseling and served as department chair. Following retirement, he continued to assist Kankakee High with preparation of its annual School Improvements Plan and North Central Association reports and evaluation activities. Active in the community, he chaired the Kankakee-Iroquois Mayors’ Committee for employment of the handicapped, served as an officer and board member for the Kankakee County Training Center for the disabled; chaired the American Cancer Society’s Education Committee for Schools; and more recently, served as an officer and board member of the Kankakee-Iroquois Options-CIL. He also had been a member of the Rotary Club of Kankakee.

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Family Fest 2012

the Gaither Vocal Band and other Gaither artists.

Marion (Perkins) Sheckler ’52 passed away in August 2008. She was married to Lewis Sheckler ’53.    As a teenager, Marion realized God had given her a special talent and dedicated her singing to God’s service. She was a soprano soloist in Olivet’s annual performance of Handel’s “Messiah” in 1950. She was also a member of two trios while at Olivet.

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Nashville and Gatlinburg, Tenn.

23–28

Howard Dybedock passed away in September 2011. Howard and his wife Charlene (Hertz) ’88 MBA owned and operated Midwest Tower and were instrumental in getting the 89.7 radio signal for WONU/Shine.FM. Charlene will continue to run the business.

Jean P. (Gadbow) Clark ’63 passed away October 19, 2011. She was a lifetime musician; she played and taught organ and piano for many years before retiring as district secretary for the Church of the Nazarene. Jean attended Grace Point Church of the Nazarene in Fort Wayne, Ind. She enjoyed Bible study fellowship, spending time with family and watching her grandchildren’s many soccer games.

ONU PrimeTime Tours

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onu alumni Alumni Spotlight

By Laura Wasson Warfel

MANY PEOPLE say that they’d never want to work with their spouses,” says dr. leslie (Young) Parrott ’84. “Les and I love it!”   Since they met as teenagers, became Olivet students in the early 1980s, married in 1984 and attended graduate school, Drs. Les ’84 and Leslie Parrott have thrived in their life and work together. Their passion for cultivating strong and healthy relationships has grown into a national Internet, media, publishing, teaching and consulting ministry that blesses thousands each year — including their own marriage. Practical help    Les and Leslie approach their ministry with ears and eyes open. They receive thousands of emails at their website (LesandLeslie.com) and also hear from thousands of people during their numerous live events, seminars and classroom teaching sessions.    “We listen carefully to what people need most when it comes to their relationships. Then we work hard to meet the needs that are being neglected,” says Les.   “It’s so fulfilling to hear from someone who has been helped in a practical way through one of our books, an online assessment or a relationship strategy we’ve taught,” Leslie says.    Their newest book and already a #1 New York Times best-seller, The Hour That Matters Most coaches families on how to make dinnertime the best part of the day.   “We were astonished by the research about families sharing meals together that was coming out of Harvard and other places,” Les says. “The food doesn’t matter as much as the emotional nourishment family members get from one another. Kids who eat dinner

Name :

Drs. Les ’84 and Leslie (Young) ’84 Parrott

Locati on: Seattle, Wash. O ccupati on: Relationship experts, best-selling authors and speakers

WHAT

MATTERS

Love, family and the New York Times

MOST learned from making mistakes. We’re certainly not standing on a platform to say we’ve got it all together. God has given us a passion to help others, and we’re doing our best to be faithful to his call on our lives.”

with their families regularly are less depressed, less likely to be drug users, do better in school, have more friends — the list goes on and on.”

Family first   Even with the synergistic and dynamic nature of their work, Les and Leslie face challenges similar to those of many families in our country.   During the week, they teach and work in their offices at Seattle Pacific, write and consult from their home offices, and manage a team of employees located across the country. Still, they have found ways to keep order in their personal lives.    “We don’t talk about work when Les and I have a ‘date night,’” Leslie says. “We just have fun. And we enjoy our family life together. Our sons, John (13) and Jackson (9), help us with that! They pull us out of our work life and help us connect with one another.”    “Travel is our biggest challenge,” Les says. “We’ve intentionally cut down on that so we can be at home more often with our kids. We usually have only one night away from home at a time.”   “We’re pilgrims on the journey, too,” Leslie adds. “At our marriage seminars, we’re sharing what we’ve

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The Olivet difference   Les and Leslie continue to say “thank you” to Olivet for helping them develop the foundation of their life together.    “My Olivet education was such a formative experience for me,” Leslie says. “I had professors who expanded my thinking so much. So many of them cared enough to sit down and talk one-on-one with me. They mentored and transformed me. Olivet was a life-changing place for me.”    “Olivet has been home to me — quite literally,” adds Les, the son of one former Olivet president, and the grandson of another. “I grew up on this campus and never considered graduating from any other university. It’s all about the people who cared enough to invest in me and help me see beyond the ‘borders’ that might have unknowingly limited my life and my efforts to make a difference. Olivet is in my DNA, and I’m forever grateful for my ONU heritage.”

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Career highlights ■ Guests on CNN, “Good Morning America,” “The Today Show,” Fox News, “Oprah,” “20/20,” “Prime Time,” “Focus on the Family,” “The View,” and more ■ Relationship experts featured in Redbook, Family Circle, Bride’s Magazine, USA Today, New York Times, and others ■ Authors of more than 40 books that have sold more than 2 million copies in more than 24 languages, including their best-selling and Goldmedallion winner Saving Your Marriage Before It Starts and their latest #1 New York Times best-seller, The Hour That Matters Most ■ Speakers who present in more than 40 cities each year ■ Co-founders of “eHarmony Marriage” and other online tools Find out more about what Les and Leslie are doing at their website: www.lesandleslie.com.


alumni zone TIGER

Issue 4 | 2011

The Olivetian 19

OLIVET Olivetians show us their true colors!

k Katelyn Dunkman ’13 of Frankfort,

, At home in Dallas, Hope Warfel, granddaughter of marketing writer Laura Warfel, shows where she hopes to go to college someday.

, Recently married Scott ’06 and Amy (Duerrwaechter) ’10 Smith pose in their Olivet t-shirts while passing through a town near Ontario, Canada, named in their honor — or so they claim — on their honeymoon.

How do you show your colors? Send us pictures of you or your family wearing ONU colors or apparel, or sporting your Tiger Pride in some other way, to

Best of 2011

A

TheOlivetian@olivet.edu for possible inclusion in a future issue of The Olivetian! When emailing, please use “Tiger Pride” as the subject and include a full description of the persons in the photo, including class years for Olivet alumni or students. Due to space constraints, not all submitted photos will be printed.

s we wind down another wonderful year,   we asked our Facebook and Twitter followers:

What were the best moments of 2011?

Here’s what some of them had to say. “Hanging in the dorms with my lifelong friends!” ama nda a rme r-i rps

“Easy choice. Senior Class flash mob during last chapel of the year. I thought it was ‘Dynamite’ ;)” A dam hin es

“The seniors’ Ollies Follies skit, Broadway Revue, and the Tigers win in OT at the first home game!” ama n da wi n kle

“Revival with Dr. Corey MacPherson. By far one of the best weeks of the semester. :)”

“Walking across the chapel stage on May 7, 2011, 13 years post high-school graduation, with my 5 year-old daughter giving me a standing ovation!” jea nette kirc h n e r

Stay Connected!

a n gela r i vas

“My best ONU moment was visiting the campus for the first time and knowing within 10 seconds that Olivet was for sure the place I wanted to attend!”

“The Ruffatti organ dedication concert tops my list!”

aa ro n phillips

www.facebook.com/olivetnazareneuniversity twitter.com/olivetnazareneu

joh n atkin so n

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Ill., and Linnea Orne ’13 of Eden Prairie, Minn., proudly represent Olivet as part of the 180-member Marching Tigers band.


Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

Education is about more than earning a degree. Just 50 miles from Chicago is Olivet Nazarene University, where students focus on being, becoming, believing — in the classroom and around the world.

800-648-1463 www.olivet.edu

UPCOMING EVENTS

2012

Purple and Gold Days For high school seniors

Feb. 3–4  ■  Feb. 24–25  ■  March 16–17

Just for Juniors: Day@Olivet jones foto

March 30

Deep and Wide  
Deep and Wide  

University life often brings together people who never would have met anywhere else — in the classroom or laboratory, on the court or field,...

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