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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS VO L . 78, N O. 1

SUMME R 2010

ALL

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Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

Lessons from a global classroom

page s 8 – 9

SOCIAL WORK BY DAY, SEARCH AND RESCUE BY NIGHT

WHAT ESPN DIDN’T TELL YOU

TIGERS DOMINATE NAIA

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page 14

page 13

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snapshots

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02 Contributing Writers Nick Birkey ’07 Amanda Jensen ’04/’06 M.O.L. Casey Manes Kate Morgan

B a j a

Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03 Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited SUBM ITTED PHOTO

Boie

Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

built for the Baja ow ONU engineering majors had fell and he p Jee a Baj a es rac associate professor Zach Boie ’11 six-member team, overseen by The n. itio pet Com ton hing Was SAE Western le “endurance race” istered schools in the grand fina reg 103 of out h 27t ed plac , of Wisconsin, Bob Allen ’71/’73 MA Iowa State University, University a, Iow of ity vers Uni as ools sch n State University. — beating out such gon State University and Michiga Ore ity, vers Uni te Sta sas Kan , University of Arizona

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div.

PHOTOs BY gordon wickersham ’47

Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90

Faculty members gathered in the nearly completed Centennial Chapel to pray for the students who will sit within these seats. Plan to join us for a time of prayer, celebration and dedication for Centennial Chapel, Friday, October 29, during Homecoming.

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAE CHTER ’10

PRAYER PREP

The ninth annual Chicago Bears Training camp drew thousands of fans and dozens of sportscasters to the campus in late July and early August. Before, during, and following training camp, “Olivet Nazarene University” becomes a frequently uttered phrase by Chicago media, who work in the second largest media market in the nation.

training

camp

puppetfest

Of all the visitors that come to campus over the summer, some of our favorites are those less than 3 feet tall — and made of felt. The International Festival of Christian Puppetry and Ventriloquism is one of the largest conventions held on Olivet’s campus during the summer break.

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Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D. Vice President for School of Graduate and Continuing Studies Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2010 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

Cover photo by Tim Stephansen ’11

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

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perspectives

Summer 2010 The Olivetian

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Welcome Now Please Go Away!

By John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./’06 D.Div., University President

J

ill and I were walking through Harvard Square, in Cambridge, Mass., one afternoon when we first saw it. It was very clever. I was enrolled at the time at Harvard University as a postdoctoral Resident Fellow, and we were just starting to get the lay of the land. It was in the late summer; university students were arriving from all over the world to study at Harvard or R ­ atcliff, or down the street at MIT.    As we walked the square, darting in and out of bookstores and coffee shops, taking in the sights and sounds of that rather eclectic place, it was Jill who spotted the sign first. “Look at that,” she said. I turned to see a large, well-lighted sign in the window of a travel agency. The sign said, “Welcome – Now Please Go Away.”

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   We just stood there for a few ­moments taking in the message. The unwritten subtext of the sign was twofold. First, the message was a recognition that almost everyone walking those streets was from somewhere else and would be traveling back home at fall-break or at the end of the semester or taking other kinds of trips along the way. The travel agency, of course, wanted to help them “go away” by booking tickets and making travel plans.    Second, there was, at least to me, more than an advertising implication to the sign; for in a way it was also saying, “We are glad you are here, but we know in reality that you are just passing through. This university town is just one stop on your life-time journey. You are here, but at the same time you are ‘on your way’ to the future, to professions and personal lives that will take you beyond the streets and structures of Harvard Square.”    What was true for those students a few years ago is true for our students, as well. They are with us for a brief time. Thus, part of our work at Olivet is to help students prepare for the world that awaits them.    One way we do this is to provide a multitude of opportunities for

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students to travel, study, and serve internationally during their Olivet years. This provides very real, “hands-on,” educational and cross-cultural experiences. Such experiences help students develop a positive and more realistic world view. Just this summer, Olivet students have traveled to Asia, South Asia, Africa, the C ­ aribbean, Europe, South America, the Middle East, the Caribbean and nearly all points ­in-between.    A couple of years ago, I was talking with a student who was waiting (rather impatiently) for his girlfriend to return from one of our study abroad programs. I said to him,  First chapel “When I was in college, I didn’t service of the know anyone who had been out of the country.” He gave me a fall semester curious look and said, “I don’t in McHie Arena, know anyone who hasn’t been.” Sept. 1, 2010    The world has become a much smaller and much bigger PHOTOS BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10 place all at once. It is smaller in that nearly anyone can reach distant lands rather easily. It is bigger in that it holds so much more opportunity for students. So, one of the messages I will deliver to our incoming freshmen this fall is the message of that sign from Harvard Square: “Welcome – Now Please Go Away.”

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alumni feature JERRY WHALEY ’93 LEADS A DOUBLE LIFE. By day, he is a social worker, husband and father, cooking breakfast for his boys and getting them off to school.

LIVING ON THE

But when free time rolls around, Jerry is bounding after extreme adventure and rescuing others as a trained Search and Rescue military man.

EDGE

BY CASEY MANES

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Change in the air

   Though previously not so sure about Jerry entering the military due to the risks involved, his wife, Beth (Abraham) ’92, said she was ready for him to sign up. After all, he was already feeling the adrenaline rush by backpacking, downhill skiing and competing in Ironman-length triathlons and motor cross competitions.    Jerry recalls, “I swore in with the Ohio military reserve. I was trained as a military policeman. I am E6, staff sergeant squad leader with the 1st Civil Service Support Battalion, Bravo Company, 2nd Platoon.”    He entered the Search and Rescue realm of the National Guard, eventually becoming a SAR technician. Jerry is the guy you want nearby in the case of a national disaster.    Discovering this arm of the military has been like finding the perfect drink to quench his thirst after many years.    “With my love of backpacking and my calling to help others as a social worker, SAR is helping others in the wilderness! How sweet is that?!” he quips.    After several years of intensive training, Jerry now teaches others SUBMITTED PHOTOS

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how to rescue in 21 states. As the world climate has shifted since 9/11, Jerry also became specially trained in bomb searches, HAZMAT, high angle rope rescue, K9 units, under­ water recovery and fixed wing aircraft, among several other risky disciplines.    From the looks of his success since enlisting, Jerry is somewhat of a natural.    He was honored as the Army’s Surgeon General Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year in 2010.    “To be selected by my superiors and peers to receive this honor is extremely humbling with no words to describe,” shares Jerry.

New Venture    To add to his already-active schedule, Jerry is in the midst of a new business venture that could help save many lives around the world. He and fellow co-workers trained in high angle rope rescue are months away from patenting and unveiling a rope system that will assist in difficult rescues.    Jerry’s also been busy with new ventures with the family. When they’re not at home together, the Whaleys travel together and all sample some of their dad’s love for adventure. For spring break this year, they headed to Gatlinburg, Tenn. –– and of course Jerry brought the bikes and backpacks.    “Backpacking is where I escape to hear God, see God, find myself and learn how simply I can live again. My boys are starting to like it and it gives us time together too. They look forward to doing the big trip with me each year,” explains Jerry, on the annual week-long hike he takes every year, as he works his way through the length of the Appalachian Trail.    And it appears Jerry won’t be slowing down anytime in the near future.    “I also take time to ski with my buddies. Recently, one of them gave me a computer from one of the bikes and I put it in my pocket. It clocked at 78.8 MPH!    “Sweet!”

friends of olivet

Summer 2010 The Olivetian

‘I would not be

here,

were it not

you.’

for

— JOY M AC DONALD ’13

On the behalf of the students of Olivet Nazarene University, I would like to thank you for the generous monetary help that you provide for us. I know of several people, myself included, who would not be able to attend Olivet without your help.

“I have met many people on this campus who truly have made a difference in my life. From my roommate who has shown me how to be friendly to everyone, to my new best friend who has shown me how to be humble in everything I do, to the upperclassman who has been a spiritual mentor to me. My professors are all amazing people and ­supportive of me, even when I struggle. I love that they all know my name, and I can have conversations with them.

“Olivet Nazarene University is truly a God-ordained place. It is a place where spiritual and academic growth co-exists peacefully. I am so glad that God has brought me here, and I know that this was only possible through the generous scholarship that was offered to me. “So again, I offer you my heartfelt thanks for your support of me and my friends. We truly are appreciative and thank God for what you do for us.” Joy MacDonald ’13, youth ministry major from Danforth, Ill.

Give Today. Change Tomorrow. 815-939-5171  |  www.olivet.edu  |  development@olivet.edu

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onu news

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ONU

Insider NURSING EXCELLENCE | Deborah Raley,

­ djunct nursing professor for the School of a Graduate and Continuing Studies, was recently selected as one of five finalists for the Greater Chicago Nursing Spectrum Nursing Excellence Award. Her nomination reads, “Deborah Raley is known for her unwavering pursuit of creating a culture of inquiry and learning.” Her major educational accomplishments have included chairing the development of a systemwide (eight hospitals) critical care course and basic arrhythmia education program.

STATEWIDE LEADERSHIP | Olivet faculty

and staff continue to be named to top positions for the State of Illinois. Jonathan Bartling ’99, associate professor for the School of Education and director of assessment and accreditation for the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies was elected secretary of the Illinois Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. Dale Hathaway, chair of the Department of Mathematics, was named chair elect for the Illinois Section of the Mathematical Association of America. Mary D. Anderson ’87, director of Career Services, was elected president of the Illinois Small College Placement Association (ISCPA).

Williamson

to lead SGCS academics

PROJECT NExT | Justin Brown, professor

with Olivet’s Department of Mathematics, was appointed a Project NExT Fellow for 2010–2013. Project NExT addresses all aspects of an academic career: improving the teaching and learning of mathematics, engaging in research and scholarship, and participating in professional activities. To be eligible to apply a faculty member must be entering their first or second year of full-time teaching at the college/university level (after receiving the Ph.D.). Each year 100 to 150 applications are received, but only 70–85 are accepted as Fellows.

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Olivet Nazarene University has named Jeff Williamson dean of the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies. A 1984 graduate of Olivet,

TOP HONORS | An Olivet team consisting

Williamson’s career includes 20 years of experience in Nazarene higher education.    “Jeff brings an extensive background in Nazarene higher education,” says Ryan Spittal, vice president for graduate and continuing education. “His prior experience in a variety of administrative positions provides him the depth of knowledge to help lead the academic unit of the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies to new levels.”    Most recently, Williamson served as associate dean of the School of Business at Mount Vernon Nazarene University. In this role, he developed a corporate and alumni relations program as a way to advance collaboration, support and academic program development opportunities. During this time, he was also a professor of organizational leadership for the university.    Previous roles at MVNU include Master of Science in Management coordinator, dean of enrollment services and director of retention. Before serving at MVNU, Williamson was assistant director of admissions at Manchester College and then director of admissions at Southern Nazarene University.    “With experience in many facets of higher education, along with an extensive experience in adult learning, Jeff will provide a critical leadership role in the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies as we continue to look for ways to support the mission of Olivet,” Spittal says.    After graduating from Olivet with a degree in speech communication in 1984, ­Williamson earned an M.A. in communication from Ball State University and an Ed.D. in leadership from University of Sarasota. He completed post-doctoral studies at Ohio State University’s Fisher College of ­Business.    Active in the Lakeholm Church of the Nazarene, Williamson has served as board member, Sunday school superintendent, teacher and men’s ministry coordinator. He volunteered as SIFE business advisory board member at MVNU, Heritage Centre Association executive committee board member, and on several committees for the Mount Vernon/Knox County Chamber of ­Commerce.

of Mark Lockwood ’11, Carl Trank ’12 and Mark Lynn ’13 placed first out of 40 teams from 16 schools at the annual ACCA (Association of Colleges of the Chicago Area) calculus tournament. Graduate and Continuing Studies students Sherri Caffey ’10 and Robert Day ’10 tied for 21st best overall game-to-date score in the international GLO-BUS competition for the week ending July 18.

FULBRIGHT-HAYS | Kashama Mulamba,

professor for the Department of English and Modern Languages will join fifteen other educators from across the country in the prestigious FulbrightHays Seminars Abroad program focusing on China’s history, culture, changing society and rapid economic growth. During the month-long seminar in June and July, the group will visit Beijing, Xi’an, Chongqing and Shanghai, with an option to continue to Hong Kong for four days. Read more about Dr. Mulamba’s experience on page 15.

GEOLOGY HONORS | This past graduation

saw the first two departmental honors graduates in geology: Susan Leib ’10 and Jamie Fearon ’10. Both have received full-ride graduate financial packages to, respectively, University of Kentucky and Montana State University. w

to new levels

By Kate Morgan

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Summer 2010 The Olivetian

Living a legacy

W By Casey Manes

“When I stop to think about my life, it still amazes me that God, in His infinite wisdom, would choose me to be a bold witness for Him. Me? Mary Walker? Painfully shy Mary Walker?”    So begins “Ready and Willing,” the book penned by the late Mary Walker.    Mary J. Walker didn’t have a natural inclination to talk to people she didn’t know. She was described as naturally introverted, but she chose to not let that stop her from sharing Christ with those around her.    Her husband and high school sweetheart, Skip, remembers how often she stepped outside her comfort zone and introduced herself to people in everyday life – on airplanes, at the store, to those in the local neighborhood. Often, she would exchange addresses with these casual acquaintances in order to begin correspondence with them.    In her own words, “I have come to know that is God’s way. He takes ordinary people and empowers them with the extraordinary power and love of the Holy Spirit and sends them throughout the earth to draw men unto Himself and into His Kingdom. I realize now

that God does not necessarily need our ability. What He needs is our availability!”    And available she was.    Even in the face of life’s trials, Mary continued to live out her faith to those around her. In 1982, Mary was diagnosed with breast cancer. Reflecting on this experience in her book, Mary wrote, “My cancer experience has allowed me to witness to people I otherwise would not have met.”    Throughout her lifetime, Mary had a tangible impact in the lives of thousands of people. At the time of her death from Alzheimer’s disease in 2009, Mary had been corresponding with about 1500 of these people who she had already won to Christ or others she was continuing to reach out to and disciple.    Mary met many of these people travelling with her husband who, at the time, was a businessman and CEO of a major corporation. Skip wanted to honor his wife’s memory and devotion to her Lord by assisting young people on their own journeys of faith. So he gave $500,000 to the ONU

Foundation in Mary’s honor to provide two annual $10,000 scholarships to worthy female students who exemplify her heart for Christ.    “Out of his great love and respect for Mary, Skip established this scholarship in order to honor two outstanding female students at the University each year,” explains Dan Ferris, Olivet’s executive director of development and the ONU foundation.

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The first two Mary J. Walker scholarships were granted this year to Amanda ­Mazzaro ’12 and Paige Watson ’11.

MARY J. WALKER

   “These women [were] selected because they demonstrate positive qualities similar to Mary. Such qualities include: outstanding academic performance, strong character qualities and a deep commitment to spiritual values.”    Amanda’s passions are working with children and serving in ministries to the homeless. Majoring in housing and environmental design, her goal is to one day renovate abandoned inner city buildings and turn them into low income housing and homeless ­shelters.    “This scholarship was important because I was starting to doubt the vision God gave me. I am reassured God will provide even when I least expect it,” shares Amanda.    Paige is a corporate communications major, minoring in business. “Receiving the Mary J. Walker scholarship is a huge honor. I am extremely grateful for Mr. Walker’s generosity which allows me to enjoy Olivet’s incredible opportunities!”    Mary’s faith and relationship with her Savior live on through her family and the relationships she built with thousands who were searching spiritually. Through the Mary J. Walker scholarship, her legacy will also continue to be lived out through generations of ONU students who exhibit her character and love for Christ.

f e at u r i n g Dedication Service foR THE

Join us!

Betty and Kenneth Hawkins

Centennial Chapel

  Friday, October 29 

Homecoming Oct. 28–31, 2010

HOMECOMING

Concert 

  Saturday, October 30     fea t u r in g

Selah

Register today by calling 815-939-5258 or www.olivet.edu

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Larnelle Harris

and the comedy of

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Taylor Mason

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cover story

OR ALL

P H O T O B Y R AY S T E P H A N S E N

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NOTHING

Lessons from a global classroom

BY TIMOTH Y STEPHA NSEN ’11

M

y journal smells of leather, and not at all as if it spent a month in Africa. The only evidence that it has been anywhere is the water stain running through the bottom halves of its pages from the time we were caught in a downpour in the rainforests of Ghana.   I probably smell vaguely of the body wash I used this morning, or perhaps the lingering aroma from my encounter with Reed Hall’s bearded dragon has overwritten that by now. The only physical evidence I bear of Africa is red dust on the inside collars of shirts I no longer wear and a half-faded Livestrong-style bracelet made in the colors of Ghana.

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Above: Children from the villages quickly befriended Dr. Mulamba and other ONU team members. Opposite page, top: Jadon Huddleston ’11 assists a student with her paper. Opposite page, bottom: Prof. Ingram, pictured with Jadon Huddleston and Laura Messenger ’11, demonstrates proper formatting for a Works Cited page.

   The funny thing is, when people ask me “how was Africa?” I always tell them that the trip was “wonderful” and “life-changing.” But now, I find myself hardpressed to find any actual changes taking place.    It’s not as if I have forgotten.    I remember spending a solid month with ten other people: professors Dr. Rebecca Belcher-Rankin ’69, Prof. Kristi Ingram ’01, and Dr. Kashama Mulamba; and seven other Olivet students — Jessica Brown ’11, Brittany Frost ’10, Jadon Huddleston ’11, Kayla Koury ’11, Rebecca Lankford ’12, Laura Messenger ’11, and Emily Spunaugle ’12.

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   Spending every waking moment with the same ten people should lead to over familiarity, but we never had even the slightest problem with group dynamics.    I remember spending entire mornings, every week day for two solid weeks, in two small rooms at the University of Ouagadougou in ­Burkina Faso’s capital of the same name, helping the senior-level students organize and brainstorm for their thesis papers.    Each morning was a mixture of emotions. Each of us would help up to four students a day, and their topics were not catered to our interests. In the same day I could have a high point helping a student with a paper examining the role of satire in characterization, and then turn around to feel like I crashed and burned on a political science topic on which I am horribly unlearned.    In the afternoons, we would split off to different high schools and teach ESL classes, while in the evenings we would work with adults.    I remember when the adults killed me inside.    I was alone one night with a class of fairly advanced learners who were given an hour’s time to ask any sort of question of me that they desired.    Those that I was asked were heartbreaking.    “How can I get to your university?”    “If I give you the shipping cost, can you send me a car?”    “How can I get to the U.S.?”    “What help can you give me?”    These were questions for which I had not mentally prepared myself

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Summer 2010 The Olivetian

The traveling

classroom

We under no circumstances drank out of the sink.    Things I still take for granted:    Solid roofs. Reliable air conditioning. Vehicles with adequate airflow. Fast Internet speeds (or the Internet at all). A steady income.    In Burkina, saying “No merci” to buying that random item I did not need may very well have been saying “I’m sorry; I don’t want to pay for your kid’s dinner tonight.”    I don’t have to worry about that.    What I have to deal with is showing that I have been in Africa; that I have been amongst those who have nothing but showed me the all-encompassing nothingness in myself.    That I’ve learned that the last person my life is about is myself.    That I’ve idolized all the wrong things, at the expense of so much.    That I too can sing and dance and

During the summer, many students stick close to campus, taking classes through the break. But a growing number of students are venturing out to discover new classrooms –– clear across to the other side of the world. Here’s a snapshot of some of our other summer classrooms.

Costa Rica | Dr. Leo Finkenbinder led students from across the sciences — from biology to zoology — on a twoweek ecology excursion to Costa Rica. The group traveled around the country, including the Osa Peninsula, the Pacific coast and the cloud forest, studying the diversity of life in the tropics. Katy Van Donselaar and    The enhanced classroom: “NothZach Martin ing can replace seeing the flora and ­fauna firsthand,” says Kevin Burke ’10. “The opportunity to go to the cloud forest and observe the behavior of a quetzal, for example, made me a lot more excited about learning about the tropics and made me further appreciate its u­ niqueness.”

S U B M I T T E D P H OT O

and am quite certain failed to answer in the best manner. These people had nothing, and I was sitting in front of them with, in their eyes, everything.    I remember seeing that so many of the Burkinabes truly did have nothing — and yet now I am the one trying to make something out of nothing, even though I have everything.    But that’s not true at all; I don’t have everything.    The first people I saw who actually had everything had nothing at all.    On May 16, we attended the morning service at a diminutive Nazarene church clear on the other side of Ouagadougou, back in a segment of town that, like so many other villages in Burkina Faso, was made entirely of clay brick.    Maybe thirty adults were in attendance, and not one of them was by any means wealthy. Yet these people possessed a pulse and a spirit that defied financial, social, and all other bar-

europe, including germany, england and switzerland | In

these people had nothing, and they were singing, dancing, and praising god with everything they had — which truly was everything, because all they had was god.

what has become a yearly tradition, students from Olivet’s Department of Business racked up some international experience through the International Business Institute. Traveling across Europe, students completed classwork and gained handson experience, visiting several corporations along the way.    Eye-opening experience: “Olivet students who have participated in IBI testify that the experience makes international business and economic issues more relevant,” says Dr. Paul Koch, Olivet business professor and IBI instructor. “More than one participant has used the phrase, ‘It opened my eyes to the world.’”

south korea and hong kong | Members of Olivet’s Concert Singers

riers that stood to suppress them.    Watching them made me realize just how half-hearted many Americans behave at church: we have everything, and we are merely attending.    These people had nothing, and they were singing, dancing, and praising God with everything they had — which truly was everything, because all they had was God.    I would like to say that I was never the same after that service, that my experience thrust me into a life wholly devoted to God and devoid of waste.    But I still linger in the shower. In Burkina, water was precious; showers were short and water came in bottles.

revel in my God with as much gusto as do my brothers and sisters in Burkina every Sunday, because He is all that I have.    We went to Burkina Faso to teach students to organize and format thesis papers.    In Burkina Faso, I was taught how to organize and format my life.    I should get to that.    Merci, Burkina Faso. Merci.

Concert Singers

   Spontaneous singing: “On our last day in Hong Kong, we were asked to give an impromptu performance in the middle of town,” says Jenna Dickey ’10. “It just so happened to be Buddha’s birthday, so all of the locals had school and work off. There we were, singing praises to God and proclaiming His name during ­Buddha’s birthday celebration!”

To view more of Timothy’s photos, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the “Quick Links” drop-down menu.

Global scholarship About 20 percent of full-time faculty members have had an international experience over the past five years.

P H OT O S BY T I M OT H Y S T E P H A N S E N ’11

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S U B M I T T E D P H OT O

honed their performance skills while trekking across South Korea and Hong Kong. Led by Dr. Neal Woodruff, students sang at Korea Nazarene University, during church services and at local schools, where they also taught English.

one

centennial chapel

One chapel. One seat. One moment. Changes everything.

Friend. Scholar. Man of God.

Our time spent at Olivet was an amazing and impactful experience on both of our lives. Since graduating from Olivet, we have spent the last several years experiencing and adjusting to ‘real life.’ Soon after graduation we learned that this ‘real life,’ while exciting, came with many challenges. One constant throughout these challenges was God’s providence in our lives. No matter the adversity surrounding our circumstances, we found that God was there to provide for our every need. “On June 9, 2009, we faced an especially challenging day. We received a call that Jason’s roommate from Olivet, Chris Miller ’03, and his older brother, Chad, were involved in a kayaking accident, and both had passed away. Over the last year, we have grieved and questioned this tragedy daily, trying to reason why these two special individuals were taken from this earth so prematurely. While we believe that God is certainly in control, it does not distract from the pain and sadness that come with missing our friend. “We decided very early on that we wanted to do something tangible to remember Chris. Chris was truly one of a kind — a gifted athlete, an outstanding scholar, a great friend and a passionate man of God. Chris was driven to pursue higher education and, in turn, was committed to educating others through his profession. For this reason, we felt that making a gift to Olivet, an institution committed to higher education, would truly embody the spirit Chris possessed.  Together we decided to sponsor a seat in memory of him. SUB MIT TED PHO TO

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ER ’03 ’03 AN D CH RIS MI LL  JAS ON MO NR OE

“Our reliance on God’s providence in our lives has given us the opportunity to remember Chris in this way, and for that we are forever grateful.” — Ja son ’03 and Megan ( Vidt) ’02 Monroe

To sponsor a seat in Centennial Chapel, contact the Office of Development at 815-939-5171 or by e-mailing development@olivet.edu.

Every person who makes a gift of any size to this project will be recognized on the Wall of Thanksgiving.

PHOTO OF JASON AND MEGAN MONROE BY LEMAY PHOTOGRAPHY

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onu alumni Class Notes 19 70s Marcella (Hunter) ­Davis ’71 was installed as president of the National Association for Developmental Education in March 2010. This orgaMarcella Davis nization of 3,000 members in 31 state/regional chapters across the U.S. is dedicated to equality of access to the opportunity of college for all students including those who face academic, social, and physical barriers. Marcella has taught English at the high school and college level for 34 years. She and her husband live in Madisonville, Ky. Ralph ’78 and Cindy (Prior) ’78 ­Osborne have moved to Neenah, Wis., where Ralph is rector of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in ­Menasha, Wis. Cindy is working as a nurse at Theda Clark Medical Center. Brenda K. (Muncie) Bowman ’79 was named one of the six 2010 Nursing Excellence Award winners at Reid Memorial Hospital, Richmond, Ind., in April. Brenda is cancer care coordinator for the hospital, where she has worked since 2006. Brenda and her husband Bob Brenda reside in Williamsburg, Ind. Bowman

19 90s Susan (Gary) ’92 and Bill Ortell: A girl, Josie Mikayla, Oct. 18, 2009. She joins sister Abbie, 7, and brother Evan, 4. Susan is a Josie Ortell stay‑at‑home mom and Bill is self-employed. They reside in Dearborn Heights, Mich. Paul and Dawn (McKendrick) ’93 Kurek: A boy, Blake Ryan, June 1, 2009. He joins big brother B ­ rennan. Susan (Skinner) ’96 and Sean Henry: A girl, Erica Nicole, May 2, 2010. Erica has two big brothers, Thomas and Blake Kurek Luke. Susan is a stay-athome mom and Sean is co-owner of Calabash Animation. They reside in Morton Grove, Ill. Alison Haynes ’97 recently released a new piano solo album. Renaissance: a Rebirth of Classic Melodies features Alison’s arrangements and performances of well-known melodies such as Memory and Send in the Clowns, as well as themes from several movies such as Schindler’s List, Pearl Harbor, and Man from Alison Haynes Snowy River. Aaron ’97 and Dawn Thompson: A girl, Leah Ruby, July 20, 2009. She joins her sister Emilee, 4. Aaron is an assistant professor at ONU and Dawn teaches fourth grade at MBVM grade school. They reside in Bradley, Ill.

Leah Thompson

Summer 2010 The Olivetian

Upcoming Events

David Menendez ’98 has been elected to serve as vice president during the 2010–11 season, and then as choir president during the 2011–12 season of The National Christian Choir in Washington, D.C. The NCC is made up of between 150–200 auditioned Christian singers from the nation’s capital and four surrounding states, representing over 100 churches of different denominations.

PrimeTime Day September 24, 2010 Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais, Ill. $23 per person

FR Iday September

20 00s

24 2010

Adam ’01 and Kristin (Amato) ’05 Asher: A boy, David Robert, Oct. 28, 2009. The family resides in Manteno, Ill.

and

Ben Speer

of the Gaither Homecoming videos

Dr. Chuck Millhuff, evangelist for the Church of the Nazarene

Stephen and Amy Garrison

Sarah (Mastroianni) ’03 and Joshua Luff: A boy, Nathan James, March 5, 2010. Nathan joins his sister Madison, 2. Josh is an account manager at CDW and Sarah is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Wheaton Ill. Nathan Luff

in conjunction with Prime Time Day

Grandparents   Day

Are you the grandparent of a current ONU student?

Lisa (Lockwood) ’03 and Scott ­Hewitt: Twins, ­Lillian and Noah, May 22, 2009. Lisa is a school psychologist and Scott is a state trooper. The family resides in Fort Worth, Texas. Lillian and Noah Hewitt

Join us for Grandparents Day, immediately following the PrimeTime Day scheduled events. There will be free time for you to spend time with your grandchild and then a special dinner hosted by Dr. John C. Bowling.

Prime Time + Grandparents Day = Only $30 per person!

Colleen (Baker) ’03 and Tony ­Mason ’02: A girl, Isla Norine, March 18, 2010. She joins big sister, Ruby. Colleen is an instructor of the Bradley method of husband-coached childbirth. Isla was born at home. The family currently reRuby and Isla Mason sides in Clifton, Ill. Kyle and Brittany (Jackson) ’04 Thomas: A boy, Ivan William, March 14, 2010. Kyle works for Moraine Valley Church while finishing his Master’s degree in church history from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Brittany is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Palos Heights, Ill.

I N CLUD E S : registration, continental breakfast, buffet lunch, dinner buffet with your grandchild (ONU grandchildren eat free) and a special music CD!

WINTER GOLF OUTING Orlando, Florida

February 24–27, 2011 Ivan Thomas

Ladies Day

Nick ’04 and Melanie Griffin: A girl, ­Makiyah Esther, May 30, 2010. Nick is the head volleyball coach at Georgetown College. They reside in Georgetown, Ky. Joshua ’06 and Kara (Pusey) ’06 Gress: A girl, Katelyn Nicole, Feb. 5, 2010. Joshua is a quality supervisor at Swagelok Company and Kara is a stay-at-home mom. The family resides in Twinsburg, Ohio.

April 16, 2011 Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais, Ill.

Patsy    Clairmont   WIT H

For more information about these and other events,

Katelyn Gress

visit www.olivet.edu or     call 815-939-5258.

CONTINUED, NEX T PAGE

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Allison Durham Speer

David Asher

Amy Beckett ’02 and Stephen Garrison were married June 5, 2010, in Hot Springs, Ark. Amy is currently a fourth grade teacher at Lakeside Intermediate School and Stephen is a manager of a local restaurant. They reside in Hot Springs, Ark.

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onu alumni In Memoriam

CLASS NOTES, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

Landon ’06 and Kara (Klinger) ’05 ­DeCrastos have joined the staff at ­Castleton Church of the Nazarene in Indianapolis, Ind. They were brought on staff to start a new church in Fishers, Ind. The church is scheduled to open in Landon and Kara DeCrastos September 2010. Michael Gibb and Megan McGrath ’07 were married on March 8, 2009, in San Antonio, Texas. Michael is stationed at the Pentagon as a 2Lt. in the U.S. Air Force. Megan works for Google, Inc. as an ads quality rater. They reside in Washington, D.C.

Megan and Michael Gibb

Mathew Gerhard ’08 recently earned his Master’s in Music, with an emphasis in choral conducting, from California Baptist University in Riverside, Calif. He currently serves as minister of worship and organist at First Baptist Church in Glendale, Calif.

19 40s Rev. D. Morris Chalfant ’42 passed away May 10, 2010. Rev. Chalfant was born March 16, 1921, in Indianapolis, Ind., the son of Everette O. and Eliza B. Watts Chalfant. He grew up in Olivet, Ill., where his father served in the Church of the Rev. Morris Chalfant Nazarene. A consummate athlete, the Rev. Chalfant excelled in basketball, tennis, softball, and track and field, and set many longstanding records in these sports in high school and college.    In August 1943, he married Margaret Attebury, and they had four children. In 1946, Rev. Chalfant and his family were assigned as missionaries to Swaziland, South Africa. They were transferred to Johannesburg, where he served until 1953.    After the death of his first wife, Rev. Chalfant married Yvonne Vollman of Evansville, Ind., in 1968. They have one son.    Throughout his ministry, he mentored many young ministers. Following his retirement from pastoral ministry in 1989, Rev. Chalfant served as associate pastor of College Church of the Nazarene in Bourbonnais and was active in the Retired Ministers Fellowship. He served as a chaplain at Provena Heritage Village from 1997–2009.

Mathew Gerhard

Stephen Berry ’09 and Meaghan Rossberg were married June 26, 2010, in Nashville, Tenn. Both Stephen and Meaghan are working as Stephen and science teachers at McMeaghan Berry Gavock High School in Nashville and working to earn their Master’s in Teaching from Belmont University.

Attention Phi Delta Lambda members!

Megan (McGrath) ’07 and Michael Gibb: A boy, Kellyn Paul, March 31, 2010. He joins sister Sara, 8.

Join us for our annual Homecoming gathering.

Roger H. Ward ’45 of Nashport, Ohio, went to be with his Lord on Feb. 3, 2010. He was born Aug. 3, 1922, in Decatur, Ind. He retired after 43 years as a Nazarene minister and was a member of the Coshocton, Ohio, Church of the Nazarene at the time of his death. He pastored churches on the Northeast Indiana District and the East Ohio District (formerly the Akron District).

Saturday, October 30 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 each and can be purchased at www.olivet.edu or by calling 815-939-5258.

Kellyn Gibb

Esther (Kendall) Leach ’45 went to be with her Lord on Oct. 3, 2009. She was born Feb. 20, 1924, in Dayton, Ohio. She married David Leach on Dec. 15, 1944. During her 66 years of marriage, she taught high school English and did substitute teaching, all while raising five children. She worked in the Amway corporate headquarters and was very active in the Nazarene churches she attended. As a devoted wife and mother, she faithfully served God and loved people. She was an outstanding Esther Leach athlete, loved to teach, play the piano and sing, was a great supporter of world missions in the Nazarene church and was a wonderful hostess to all who visited her home. She epitomized what it is to be a Christian wife and mother.

makes “Education with a Christian Purpose” possible! PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

Students featured in this issue are recipients of the following Foundation scholarships: Zach Boie ’11 Terry L. Kochersperger Scholarship Kevin Burke ’10 Ethel Mueller Scholarship Jenna Dickey ’10 Detroit First Church of the  Nazarene Scholarship Naomi Larsen Scholarship Jadon Huddleston ’11 Margaret E. Bloom Scholarship Rebecca Lankford ’12 Better Day Scholarship Susan Leib ’10 Donald N. and Irene L.  Gustavsen Scholarship Frank and Elizabeth Kelley  Scholarship Mark Lockwood ’11 St. Joseph (Mich.) Church of   the Nazarene Scholarship

AMANDA MAZZARO ’12 Detroit First Church of the  Nazarene Scholarship Mary J. Walker Memorial  Scholarship Laura Messenger ’11 Rev. Freeman Brunson  Scholarship Joseph F. and Esther J.  Nielson Scholarship

Rev. Roger Ward

19 60s Robert N. “Bob” Stevenson ’62 died June 14, 2009, in his home. Born Feb. 13, 1936, in Chariton, Iowa, Bob was the son of Charles R. and Mildred Duncan Stevenson. He married Roberta R. Claussen on Aug. 4, 1962, in Quincy. Bob was an active member of Emmanual Church of the Nazarene and enjoyed music and studying American history, especially the Civil War era. Robert Stevenson Family always came first for Bob, and he loved spending time with his children and grandchildren. He earned his Master’s degree from Northeast Missouri State University (Truman State) in Kirksville, Mo., and began his teaching career in 1962 at Mendon Junior High School. In 1964, he began teaching with the Quincy Public Schools and taught sixth grade at Washington School until his retirement in 1984. He later worked at Con Agra Frozen Foods in Macon, Mo., until his retirement in 2001.

paige Watson ’11 Indianapolis First  Church of the  Nazarene Scholarship Mary J. Walker Memorial  Scholarship

19 80s Mark Heckman ’83 passed away May 6, 2010, following a two-year battle with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Mark was an artist who was featured on the pages of both Time and Newsweek by the age of 27. He turned the billboard canvas into a medium for provocative messages about various social, political and environmental issues. His work covered a wide range of Mark Heckman topics including racism, homelessness, recycling and deforestation. In addition to his passion for art, Mark was an enthusiastic skier and bicyclist, a devoted Detroit Red Wings fan and an avid dog lover.

To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing Foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

We’d love to hear FROM YOU!

Send us your news and photographs. Please submit alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu, at www. olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through e-mail or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

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onu sports

Summer 2010 The Olivetian

Tigers send 11 teams to NAIA national ­tournaments, capture Commissioner’s Cup

   But Courtney is ready to put that argument behind her to focus on more pressing matters. After graduating with a degree in criminal justice –– in three years, no less –– she’s off to law school to learn to defend more serious claims. This fall, she’ll start at Chicago-Kent College of Law, studying criminal law, specifically criminal defense.    It’s an interesting future juxtaposition: the petite, bright-eyed, blond former cheerleader sitting alongside alleged criminals, defending their rights. So what led her down this path?    “I believe too many people automatically chalk criminals up to being societal misfits, when in reality they have and deserve the same rights as the rest of us,” she says. “I want to practice criminal defense to ensure that those individuals receive all of their guaranteed rights.”

By Kate Morgan

F

or the Olivet Nazarene University Department of Athletics, “Winning Championships. Building Champions.” isn’t a trite expression. During a remarkable 2009–2010 season, the Tigers made strides on the national level while dominating conference play.    The Tigers continued to launch themselves into the national spotlight, with 11 teams earning trips to their national tournaments: basketball (men’s), cross country (men’s), indoor track (men’s and women’s), outdoor track (men’s and women’s), soccer (men’s), tennis (men’s and women’s), softball and volleyball.    “Our success comes from our coaches knowing what type of athlete can compete in our league and in the NAIA,” says Gary Newsome, director of athletics. “We have recruited outstanding, talented athletes who have a burning desire to win championships.”

making plans

   Courtney realized in high school that she wanted to be an attorney, but it wasn’t until she came to Olivet that she decided on criminal defense. Conversations with her advisor and a guest speaker solidified her plans.    “Prof. [Brian] Woodruff brought a lot of guest speakers in for us to hear from during my freshman year,” she says. “Listening to Chris Shepard, a Chicago criminal defense attorney, really helped to shape my decision.”    Continued affirmation came after job shadowing Shepherd several times and helping with cases.    “I feel that a law degree gives an individual power to change things,” she reasserts. “Every individual deserves their constitutional rights and should be entitled to fair representation.”    After determining the route she wanted to take, she enlisted professor Woodruff’s help to make her plans a reality.    “Law school is a hard choice to make, and you have lots of decisions to make on your own, like when to take the LSAT, the best way to study, finding the best school,” she says. “I was very lucky to have Prof. Woodworth as my criminal justice advisor. He is a lawyer and was able to guide me and help me through the process.”

Cheering on the defense

c

By Kate Morgan

ourtney Smallwood

is used to having to defend her   case, at least when it comes to the court of public opinion. After all,

in the world of competitive sports — where even hot dog eating can get props as an athletic achievement — a cheerleader still has to make her case about whether or not her sport is, in fact, a sport.

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inding even more success in conference play, the Tigers claimed their third consecutive Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Commissioner’s Cup. The CCAC annually gives the award to the university that collects the most combined points in relationship to placement in leaguesponsored sports.    The Tigers claimed first place by capturing the regular season and tournament titles in both volleyball and softball, the men’s cross country championship, the men’s and women’s outdoor track championship, and the men’s soccer tournament championship.

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ut victory for the Tigers has not been limited to the win column. Olivet has once again been recognized as an NAIA Champions of Character school. Earning the award, which emphasizes servant leadership, integrity, respect, responsibility and sportsmanship, is always a top-three goal for Newsome and the department.    The Tigers also averaged a 3.1 GPA in the classroom, with 61 students being named NAIA Daktronics ScholarAthletes.    “Our outstanding grade point average is due to our coaches recruiting quality studentathletes. Our staff looks for outstanding students who can handle the rigor of an athletic schedule as well as the academic schedule,” Newsome says. “We do an excellent job of recruiting high ACT students combined with an outstanding high school GPA.”    Looking forward to the 2010–2011 season, Newsome hopes teams continue to lead the conference while increasing their national presence. “We want to finish in the top 10 in the NAIA Director’s Cup standings,” he says. “To do that, we must win on the field and get back to the national tournaments, winning once we get to that level.”

PHOTO BY GINA RUPERT ’08/M.A.P.C. ’11

l ook ing a head

   While she’d like to start in a defense firm following law school, Courtney also sees the advantages of working for the public defender’s office: namely, getting a lot of trial experience with a myriad of clients.    One thing she’s sure of: She’s ready for the long hours it takes to be a top defender. “I’m positive that I want to work 80 hours a week. So I guess I should invest in a cot for my office!” she laughs.    As she heads off to law school and beyond, one may wonder if her earlier experiences as a captain of a cheerleading squad will give her a boost at all.    Laughing, she makes a resounding closing argument: “If I can organize and handle more than 20 girls in the same room, then I think I can handle a courtroom.”

Can’t get enough OLIVET ATHLETICS? Check out the new live streaming options at www.olivet.edu

Live play-by-play Video feed of all home games and select away games Up-to-the-minute stats

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onu sports TIGER ALUMNI FORMER OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY

TRACK AND FIELD STANDOUT

MARK HOLLIS ’07 T O O K H O M E T H E P O L E VA U LT C R O W N AT THE 2010 USA OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS ON FRIDAY, JUNE 25. FOLLOWING THIS VICTORY, HOLLIS WILL CONTINUE TO TRAIN TO MAKE THE USA OLYMPIC TRIALS AND OLYMPIC TEAM FOR THE UPCOMING 2012 OLYMPICS HELD IN LONDON, ENGLAND. CURRENTLY, HOLLIS IS IN EUROPE COMPETING IN VARIOUS COMPETITIONS, RECENTLY CLEARING HIS UNOFFICIAL PERSONAL BEST OF 18'10" IN GERMANY. (AP PHOTO/DOUG WELLS)

beyond the hype already headed to Nationals thanks to his team’s score, and Seth and Grant were to shoot it out in a playoff round for the individual title.    “At the first tee of the playoff hole, Grant told me that he planned on throwing it. Then he proceeded to hit a ball way into the woods on purpose. Both of our teammates were right there, and we all just laughed. Even though he told me his plans, I didn’t know he was going to do it, or make it so obvious,” laughs Seth at the crazy shot.    But not everyone thought it was a laughing matter. Type Seth’s name into your favorite search engine and any number of diverse — often fiery — opinions surface.

By Casey Manes

Seth Doran

Healthy perspective    Being the recipient of this athletic move landed Seth at NAIA Nationals, but also stirred up a small media blitz that still surprises him. His name and the story landed him an interview on ESPN’s Sports Center, amongst a slew of other online sports news outlets.    “Both of our teams laughed about it. We’ve played with each other so many times, we are all friends. Grant is such a nice guy, and I would have done the same thing for him. None of his teammates were upset about it.    “I really feel I played good enough to beat him and to earn the position. Reading people’s criticism was sort of funny to me because other people didn’t know the real story or the real people involved,” comments Seth.    As the controversy continued to brew and be discussed on talk shows and online, Seth headed to nationals May 18–21 at Deere Run in Silvis, Ill. The course was one of the most challenging ever, as it is the site of one of the PGA Tour’s classics.

’10 is that guy. He might have started hitting a golf ball when he was 5, aspires to help kids through social work, hails from a hometown of Bloomington, Ill., and be married to his college sweetheart, Megan (Ochs) ’10. But those are ­details most people haven’t heard.    Mostly, people just know he is that golfer guy. That guy who was on the receiving end of an opponent throwing a golf playoff shot to purposely lose at the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference tournament, April 27.    It was the final spring golf game that decided who would make it to NAIA Nationals. The University of St. Francis (Ill.) team had already secured their team’s position as victors, and they were all headed to Nationals. Opponent Grant Whybark of St. ­Francis was

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More to his story    A laid-back, soft-spoken sort of guy, Seth didn’t feel like how he got to Nationals impacted his time there.    “This was my first time at Nationals. I didn’t feel any undue pressure. It was a tough course, but I played my best, finishing in the top 49 out of 150 players. That was a good way to go out as a senior,” he shares.    “The only comments people made in regard to me were a few, ‘Oh, you’re that guy,’ when they recognized who I was. Overall, it was a great ­experience.”    Though the news is starting to become less juicy, it is still swirling out there. But Seth has definitely moved on.    He landed a job shortly after his May graduation as a case manager assistant for One Hope United, where he previously served as a social work intern. He is enjoying life with his wife of one year, and together, they are hopeful about their ­future.    “We feel called to work with kids or orphans. My wife has a passion for Hispanic cultures, and I do too. When I came to Olivet, I wasn’t sure what career would best fit that.”    These parts of his life won’t land him on a news show or even be known by the people still sharing their opinions about that golfer guy they read about.    But Seth and his wife smile at the moment in the spotlight and look ahead to other goals.    “My advisor suggested social work when I began as a freshman at ONU. It has been challenging, but good for my interests. I don’t know exactly what our future holds, but we are prayerfully considering whatever God might have in store.”

ten questions

Summer 2010 The Olivetian

15

WITH

KASHAMA MULAMBA PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND MODERN LANGUAGES

So to speak !

  Why did you decide to participate in the Fulbright-Hays   Seminars Abroad program? Although I consider myself to be a multicultural person, I always felt the need to visit one of the Asian countries, and this was a great opportunity for me to do so. I teach Understanding Language, World Literature, Studies in Literature and ESL Education courses. All these courses involve cultural, social, political and economical aspects of life. When I teach these courses in the future, I’ll be able to infuse in them my experiences about the Asian continent as I’ve been doing for the continents of Africa, Europe and the Americas.   Tell us about your experiences in China so far.   The group is composed of professors from different fields: economics, curriculum design, art history, business ethics, media laws, and a China expert. It is interesting to see how, after listening to the same lecture, all of these colleagues come up with questions and/or comments with different p ­ erspectives.    As for my experiences in China so far, I’m amazed by the number of cranes (mechanical devices not birds) that I see in every city that I have visited so far. China is “a country in a building boom.” There are construction projects everywhere.    From a cultural and historical point of view, the Chinese show respect for elders, they have a sense of family and group. It is fascinating to learn about their 5000-year cultural history, about their dynasties and about the Cultural Revolution. I have experienced so many things that I’ll be able to share with my students and colleagues.

@

  You lead ESL studies at Olivet. Why is this a growing need for ­graduates?   We live in a global society; our students can go anywhere in the world; and students from any place on the planet earth can be found studying in the U.S. It’s very important that our education majors be prepared to face the challenges of encountering non-native speakers of English in their classrooms. What is true for our education majors also holds true for students in other majors who may have the opportunity to go overseas after completion of their degree. From my own experience, countries where English is taught as a second or foreign language will always ask a native speaker to teach English if he or she happens to live in the country. It is very important for our students to understand the significance and importance of ESL education in the context of a global society.

^

  What have you learned from an educational perspective?   I have had a chance to visit schools for minorities and migrant children. It is amazing what the government does to help low income and ethnic minorities to have access to both high school and a college education. Also, China wants to export its higher education students. There is not enough room in colleges and universities in China to accommodate high school graduates. As one of the solutions to the problem, China has established with some American universities what is called a One-to-One program. The program consists of sending Chinese students to the U.S. to enroll in a number of courses in their field of interest and returning to China to complete the rest of the program of study. At the end of the program, the students receive two degrees, one from the U.S. institution and another from the Chinese home university.

  What does it mean to be a globally minded Christian?   A globally minded Christian is ecumenical; he or she sees in other religious denominations the same value of Christianity as he or she sees it in his or her own denomination. A globally minded Christian is a Christian who believes in reconciliation of races, ethnic and cultural groups rather than in their separation. He or she knows Christianity has no borders; it doesn’t belong to a continent, a country or a people.

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  What is your favorite course to teach?   Understanding Language is my favorite course. I like analyzing languages as well as observing people interacting verbally. And it happens to be one of the required courses by the state of Illinois for ESL education. The field of second/foreign language learning and teaching is my passion.

*

  What piqued your interest in language and culture?   My background explains why I’m interested in language and culture. Since my father was in the army, and we were moving from one place to another, I had the advantage of using different languages in school, depending on the province where the language was spoken.    Language and culture interact, and as such, it’s difficult to try to separate them. For instance, each speech community has its own way of expressing ideas, thoughts, feelings, etc. The way an American expresses an apology, a complaint, a compliment, or any other act, is not the same as a Chinese, a French, a Congolese speaker does. This explains why one cannot deal with language without including culture. In order for two individuals or more to interact appropriately, they must share the same language and culture; otherwise, there may be a socio-cultural clash.

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  You’re also a teacher of world literature. What is a book or author you would recommend to those looking to expand their reading lists?    I always ask my students to read something from a “less-read” culture: Africa or Asia, for example. One novel I suggested to the group that Dr. Belcher, Prof. Ingram and I led to Africa was The River Between, by James Ngugi (or Ngugi wa Tshiongo). We had an interesting discussion after our evening devotional one evening. The students liked it a lot, especially from the religious point of view.

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You’re originally from Congo. What brought you here? I came back to the U.S. to complete a post-doctoral program at Ball State University. Since the political conditions in the Congo kept deteriorating while I was here, I decided to apply for political asylum. I was granted political asylum, and my wife and my four children joined me later on. Our older daughter is still in the Congo with our three grandchildren.    As of the writing of these words from China, I’ve been informed by my wife that finally, after 17 years of separation, my daughter’s case has been approved by the U.S. Naturalization and Immigration Service. She and her family will be able to join us. That’s another chapter of my life, finding the means to get them here.

  How many languages do you speak?   I speak Lingala, Ciluba, French, and English, of course, and can converse moderately in Swahili and Kisonge, although I don’t have an opportunity to practice the latter two very often. Code switching is part of my daily life. ­Depending on the situation, the topic and the place of interaction, I may switch from one language into the other without thinking.

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admissions Education is about more than earning a degree. Just 50 miles from Chicago is Olivet Nazarene University, where students focus on being, becoming, believing — in the classroom and around the world.

PHOTO BY TWO BIRDS PHOTOGRAPHY

800-648-1463 www.olivet.edu

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PURPLE AND

High school sophomores and juniors, take an up-close and personal look at Olivet Nazarene University! Sit in on classes, worship with friends, come to our bonfire, go to a football game and much more!

carpetDAYS

An in-depth look at life on the ONU campus for high school seniors and their parents

OCTOBER 1–2, 2010

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DAYS

Schedule a visit today! Call 800-648-1463.

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Upcoming Dates: ▶ October 15–16 ▶ October 22–23 ▶ November 5–6 ▶ November 19–20 ▶ February 4–5 ▶ February 25–26 ▶ March 18–19


The Olivetian, "All or Nothing," summer 2010 (Digital edition)