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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS VO L . 77, N O. 4

SP R IN G 2010

W W W.O L I V E T.E D U

FIRST

CLASS

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

Olivet celebrates first-ever doctoral graduates page s 10 –11

▲ SVE A E M E RSON ’10 Ed.D.

A STICKY CAREER page 7

ADVICE FOR THE CLASS OF 2010

HANNAGAN THROWS TWO PERFECT GAMES

page 12

page 17

snapshots

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THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02 Contributing Writers Nick Birkey ’07 Amanda Jensen ’04/’06 M.O.L. Casey Manes Kate Morgan Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03 Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

02-09-10

Artist and evangelist Rick Alonzo portrayed the Gospel in a uniquely vivid fashion during chapel.

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div.

03-17-10

AEC HTE R ’10 PHO TO BY AMY DUE RRW

put winter firmly behind

Anxious to them, students were spotted moving their studies outdoors in mid-March.

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90 Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D. Vice President for School of Graduate and Continuing Studies Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement.

04-01-10

Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2010 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

Getting to class

on time is a breeze for Alex Lord ’12, who utilizes one of the most popular modes of campus transportation.

Playing the role

of Mr. Laurence, Dr. Bowling impressed audiences with his acting ability and vocal chops as part of the cast of Little Women.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to

02-22-10

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Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

perspectives

Spring 2010

IS THERE A

DOCTOR HOUSE? IN THE

By John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div., University President

  One of the highlights of this year’s Commencement activities was the graduation of our first class of doctoral students. These men and women earned the professional interdisciplinary degree Doctor of Education in ethical leadership. This moment marked a milestone in the life of each student, but also for the University.    It was during our recent Centennial Year that the University inaugurated its initial doctoral degree program. It seemed only fitting as we celebrated our first 100 years that we mark the occasion with a new chapter in Olivet’s academic life. Offering a terminal degree was the perfect beginning to the next 100 years, and the Ed.D., in particular, was and is an outgrowth of Olivet’s mission to “equip men and women for lives of service to God and humanity.”    By offering this doctoral degree, Olivet will become a place to prepare senior leaders who will be both dynamic and transformational, within an ethical framework. The Doctor of Education program is designed to address the demands of a wide range of professions requiring exemplary leaders. Admission to the Ed.D. program is highly competitive and attracts applicants from across the country who work in a wide variety of fields: business, education, social work, ministry, government service and others.    These doctoral students are given the opportunity to enhance their professional competencies and further develop leadership skills as they examine theoretical concepts and their application. The instructional

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“It seemed fitting as we celebrated our first 100 years that we mark the occasion with a new chapter in Olivet’s academic life.”

delivery system includes lectures, group work, technology, presentation, and extended time beyond actual class meetings for reflection, reading and research. In addition, an on-campus residency period is required during the three summers of the program.    Learners participate with cohort members, peers and faculty members in scholarly and innovative activities. This experience provides group cohesion, collegial interaction, cultural experiences and inspirational time. The class work, assignments and participation are considered rigorous and rewarding.    Participants work on their dissertations as an integrated part of each course. The dissertation is a comprehensive applied research study of significant importance. It is the intent of the program that the dissertation, regardless of the type of methodologies used, be designed to make a contribution within the researcher’s sphere of influence. Each dissertation must have a clear and precise statement of purpose that includes identification of scope and limits. This dissertation contributes substantially to the body of knowledge that is important to academia, business or other settings.    During the final dissertation phase of the program, the learner conducts original research and generates a dissertation for the purpose of addressing a specific issue and, thus, makes a difference in his or her particular profession. Doctoral students are required to follow the dissertation track and cannot be granted extensions and/or delays by the dissertation team.    The high standards of the Olivet program result in a high degree of accomplishment on the part of the program participants. The demands of the program seemed to make the moment of graduation even more meaningful than it would have otherwise been.    Congratulations to each new “doctor in the house” and to the University as a whole!

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The Olivetian

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the doctor of education program is designed to address the demands of a wide range of professions requiring exemplary leaders.” – Dr. John C. Bowling

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onu news THERE’S A NEW IN TOWN

ONU Insider F

air or not, there’s a certain image that pops into one’s head with the mention of the word techie: a pasty-skinned guy who stares at a computer all day, not wanting to be bothered by outsiders. But as Meredith (Felts) Crowl ’03 proves, the mindset –– not to mention the face –– of the techie cannot always be grouped into a stereotype.

GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA: Olivet’s De-

partment of Physical Sciences was well-represented at the 44th Annual Meeting of the North-Central and South-Central Sections of the Geological Society of America in Branson, Mo. Susan Leib ’09 and Dr. Kevin Brewer presented “Mapping the Bedrock Topography of Kankakee County, ­Illinois,”  supported by the Pence-Boyce Summer ­Research Grant. Prof. Priscilla Skalac ’02/’05 M.A.E. presented an oral paper: “The Traveling Science Circus: Developing PreK-12 Geoscience Educators through Public Outreach Opportunities.” Dr. Max Reams ’00 M.P.C. presented an oral paper: “Visualizing Surface Processes through Geologic Time by Repeat Photography, Revisited.”

   “You cannot survive anymore by just being the mysterious know-it-all techie,” she says.    Of course, she has the technology chops. As a solutions specialist for Center for Business Innovation, she specializes in systems and application support, VoIP phone systems and electronic document management.    But beyond the technical skills, she has a desire to help others with technology-related needs. Meredith, who tacked on a communications minor to her computer science degree, considers herself a people-person, a hot trait in the technology industry. She spends the majority of her time in her company’s call center, assisting partners with support issues and projects.    “You have to have people skills,” she explains. “Yes, employers want someone who has the technical knowhow to do the job. They also want someone who can communicate technical concepts in everyday terminology, understand their business goals and work well with people.”

PENCE-BOYCE: The Pence-Boyce research pro-

When I talked to Dr. Vail, he explained that this field needed people who can translate the technical concepts into real-people terms,” recalls meredith

gram, funded by two anonymous donors in honor of two influential Olivet professors, allowed for two recent presentations. Mark Lockwood and Dr. Dale ­Hathaway will have a paper published in the Journal of Recreational Mathematics titled “Probabilistic Polyforms,” and Ian Smith ’11 presented a paper titled “Efficient Natural Light” at the April 10 meeting of the Illinois and Indiana Section of the American Society of Engineering Educators.  

HAROLD YOUNG RESEARCH AWARD:

Senior psychology major John Adams ’10 has earned the 2010 Harold Young Research Award from the Association of Nazarene Sociologists and Researchers. Adams will have the opportunity to present his paper, “The Relationship Between Grit, Burnout, and Intent to Quit Among Nazarene Pastors,” at ANSR’s annual conference in Kansas City. The Harold Young Research Award is granted each year to a student attending a Nazarene university/college or a Nazarene student attending any university/college. Since 2003, six Olivet students have earned first-place honors, and three Olivetians have received second-place honors. Adams’ faculty adviser, ­Kristian Veit, assistant professor of behavioral sciences, will also receive a certificate of commendation.

Where are the women?    While her communication skills get her noticed at work, her gender also makes her stand out in the still male-dominated profession. Since the dot-com bust, the number of women enrolling in computer science programs has decreased by 80 percent, according to Computing Research Association data.    “At tech conferences and seminars, I am typically one of the few women in attendance,” she says.    In fact, Meredith herself didn’t originally consider computer science as an option. She excelled in math and science, but didn’t want a career as the stereotypical techie. Fortunately, a meeting with CS professor Larry Vail led her in a new direction.    “When I talked to Dr. Vail, he explained that this field needed people who can translate the technical concepts into real-people terms,” recalls Meredith. “I love to talk and to help people. It seemed like a good fit.”    So how does Meredith continue to forge

BURKINO FASO:

A group of eight students are traveling with Dr. Kashama Mulamba, Prof. Kristy ­Ingram ’01, and Dr. Rebecca Belcher-Rankin ’69 this summer to Oagdougou, Burkina Faso, as a follow-up project from Dr. Belcher-Rankin’s Fulbright Fellowship. During their three-week stay, they will supply research materials and expert counsel to seniors completing their 100-page theses, conduct ESL classes for junior high school and adult students, interact with primary school children at various Churches of the Nazarene, and transport theological books to a District Center for the Church of the Nazarene. This service project, funded mostly by a gift from an anonymous donor, is a joint effort of the Department of English and Modern Languages and Tau Theta Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta English Honor Society. w

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MEREDITH (FELTS) CROWL ’03 ahead in her field? For her, it all comes back to communication.    “Many techies do not really want to deal with people,” she says. “So I interface with people for them. I work with a great team of engineers at CBI. We complement each others’ strengths and weaknesses.”    While she studied communications simply because she enjoyed the classes, Meredith finds that she uses concepts from those classes every day. Whether reading the urgency of the situation, the stress level of the individual or the individual’s technical aptitude, her ability to understand and communicate with her customers has set her apart. The bigger picture    The trend of declining computer science majors is not limited to female students. Overall, programs have seen a decline of 70 percent since 2000, CRA data concludes. According to the Higher Education Research Institute, only 1 percent of students major in computer science. (Only .03 percent are women.)    But even as student interest wanes, the number of jobs forecasted remains strong. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that computer application software engineers and software engineers for systems are among the top 25 most in-demand jobs through 2016.    Olivet’s Department of Computer Sciences has already felt the demands of a nation in need of more CS graduates. Alumni are heavily recruited by Sycamore, a consulting firm that develops technology for defense and aeronautics, and Applied Systems, among others.    Cathy Bareiss, chairwoman of the department, believes students leaving the program will be ready for a variety of experiences. “The programs we offer are about problem solving. Whether or not your job revolves around technology, what you learn can be applied to any career.”    Meredith has found that to be her experience within the technology field, saying, “Dr. Vail always said that they were not teaching us how to be experts in a specific programming language or operating system. They were teaching us how to learn new technology.    “Dr. Vail was right. The ability to keep an open mind, adapt to change and learn new technology quickly is a huge advantage in the computer science field.”    Whether or not you consider yourself a techie.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

By Kate Morgan

friends of olivet

Spring 2010

The Olivetian

‘Without your help, I would not be

the person

I am today.’ — JOSHUA CRAWFORD ’10

“The professors have been a tremendous help to me along my journey. Many times I wasn’t sure that I was going to be successful, but my professors never allowed me to give up. They always urged me to try harder and helped me find ways to succeed. I have lived on the promise of Philippians 4:13, which has been an encouragement to me throughout my time at Olivet. Through the people I have met, the great opportunities I have had, and the challenges I have faced, God has never failed me.

My time at Olivet has been wonderful. I have made lifelong friends. I have experienced missions first-hand through a trip to Argentina. I have also been given the opportunity to grow and use my love for music by playing drums in chapel, at College Church, with Proclamation Gospel Choir, and even as percussionist for the Church of the Nazarene’s General Assembly worship band. These experiences have allowed me to use my talents, grow closer to God, and spend time with some fantastic and talented people. I thank God every day for the opportunities I have been given.

“Thank you for your support for Olivet students. Without your help and the influence of everyone at Olivet, I would not be the person that I am today.”

“I am planning on attending medical school after graduation, and being a biology major has challenged and strengthened me as a person. I know that my education and experiences have opened up a world of endless opportunities to me.

Joshua Crawford ’10, biology major with a pre-med focus from Anderson, Ind.

Give Today. Change Tomorrow. 815-939-5171  |  www.olivet.edu  |  development@olivet.edu

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onu news fresh voice

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Internationally known composer brings

to Department of Music

By Kate Morgan

S

PHOTOS BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

ometimes, you just need a little    Students appreciated his unique outside perspective. For memperspectives and insight as they worked bers of Olivet’s Department of alongside him. Music — who each participate    “Often times, in any establishment, in many of the nearly 50 musione can become numb to the knowledge cal performances on campus that surrounds them,” says Christopher each year –– welcoming interTolbert, a member of Testament. “So nationally known conductor and comit’s refreshing to have someone come poser René Clausen brought a renewed in who brings new knowledge or revamps energy to their work. what we already know.”    Dr. Clausen led work   Neal Woodruff, music shops for members professor, agrees. He adds, of Chrysalis Women’s “It’s valuable for us to look at Choir, Concert Singers, things from a variety of viewOrpheus Choir and Tespoints. This [gives] our choral tament Men’s Choir for students the opportunity to two days, culminating in rehearse and perform music a combined concert on from Dr. Clausen’s standSaturday, April 10. point.”    “There is something    In fact, the choirs perabout working with a formed some music from Dr. well-known composer Clausen’s viewpoint that had Dr. René Clausen and director that brings been composed by the conexcitement and motivation into singductor himself. ing,” says Andrea Richardson, a mem   “It was valuable to hear the mesber of Chrysalis. sage behind the songs and why he    Dr. Clausen is certainly well-known wrote them,” says Andrea. “I especially in the music world. He has served as enjoyed his frequent use of descriptive conductor of the Concordia Choir of metaphors.” Concordia College (Moorhead, Minn.)    The event was funded through the since 1986. He is also the artistic di­Anderson Endowment for Musical Masrector of the award-winning Concorter Classes at Olivet Nazarene University, dia Christmas Concerts, which are established by Gerald and Mary ’87 MAE frequently featured by PBS stations ­Anderson to encourage the promotion of throughout the nation. quality music programs at Olivet.

Olivet Nazarene University and Shine.FM present

2009  Online

Annual Report

Featuring:

Inspirational videos and stories Video greeting from Dr. John C. Bowling A Year in Photos Headlines from 2009 Centennial Chapel construction gallery and video � Interactive charts and graphs � Honor Roll of Donors � � � � �

Visit www.ONUAnnualReport.com

To request a print copy, call Becky Williams at 815-939-5171 or e-mail her at rwillia1@olivet.edu. w

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alumni feature

Lori Torman

   “In an effort to sell more instant photo cameras, the ad solicited readers to ‘tell Britney Spears where to put her Sticky Polaroid I-Zone photos.’     “It seemed that Polaroid had created a clever new product, but the target teen audience didn’t know what to do with the cute little oneinch square photos,” recalls Lori. Launching a business    Lori’s idea entailed creating jewelry on which to place the sticky photos.    “I took the idea to a local jewelry manufacturer and created my first line of jewelry. I called it Sticky Jewelry because it was a catchy name and the Polaroid i-zone photos had a sticky back that we used to attach the photo to the inset of the frame.”

The Olivetian

7

IDENTITY THAT STICKS

   After getting a line produced, it didn’t take long for it to get noticed and marketed. The jewelry was featured in Cosmo Girl and on Good Morning America.     Lori started by selling it through gift shops, boutiques and through her online store. Almost overnight, the Torman’s home was transformed into an inventory, shipping warehouse.    “For the first four years, the business operated out of our living room, and one of the bedrooms, the sunroom, the dining room, and the kitchen. At first, I was the only employee, so I had to do it all. I sub-contracted the engraving until I could afford my first engraving machine.”    Over time, Lori taught herself the many aspects of running her own business. By 2003, she had more work than she could accomplish and hired her first employee.    Since then, Sticky Jewelry has become a family affair. Her husband and her daughter and son-in-law have been added as employees and the company’s niche has widened.

By Casey Manes

Turn for the worst?    But amidst the flurry of success, Polaroid declared bankruptcy — which meant no more ‘sticky’ pictures to put on the jewelry. It looked like a negative turn. But Lori turned it into an opportunity to diversify.    They began to create new lines of bracelets, pendants and personalized, engraved gifts, and the company began offering medical ID alert jewelry designs. The idea hit on a needed market, and sales spiked.    “We discovered many people who needed to wear a medical ID bracelet often avoided doing so for appearance sake.    “So, we evaluated each of the fashion jewelry items we were producing to see which styles could be adapted to become a medical ID.     “Today, we produce over 600 medical ID styles sold through retailers, pharmacies and hospitals all over the world, and nearly 2,000 styles of lockets, men’s and ladies bracelets, and pendants.”

I’M REMINDED DAILY THAT I NEED TO KEEP MY EYES ON THE LORD AND TRUST HIM FOR EVERY DECISION.”

Saving lives    Hitting on the idea of producing attractive medical ID alert jewelry not only benefited Sticky Jewelry and turned a worrisome development into an opportunity — it also changed and improved lives.    “Our jewelry has saved lives. I was especially touched by a letter sent in by one of our customers who had been in a – LORI (DOMAGALSKI) serious car accident. She had blacked out while driving because of a sudden drop in her insulin level,” relays Lori.    “She credits her survival to the fact that she was wearing her Sticky Jewelry medical bracelet when the first emergency personnel arrived at the accident scene, and the inscription on her bracelet helped them know what treatment was needed.”    In the ten years since its inception, Sticky Jewelry has burgeoned into a full-blown operation. No more of Lori poring over orders herself as a one-woman show.    They now have eight engraving machines, 33 employees and more than 130,000 customers worldwide.    “God has been in control from day one,” shares Lori.    “I never could have orchestrated the success we’ve achieved without Him. I’m reminded daily of Proverbs 3: 5–6, that I need to keep my eyes on the Lord and trust Him for every decision. And, we try our best to honor God through our business.”

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TORMAN ’81

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

GLANCING AT AN ADVERTISEMENT FOR POLAROID IN HER DAUGHTER’S MAGAZINE SPARKED AN IDEA IN THE MIND OF LORI (DOMAGALSKI) TORMAN ’81.

Spring 2010

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onu news Students awarded

scholarships

    from their peers through

Student for Student

By Casey Manes    When students made their way to class on April 14, they saw curious posters. Banners in the shape of price tags hailed the day as “Tuition Free Day.”    Held on the day when 80 percent of the school year was complete, Tuition Free Day was a day of celebration and awareness on the reality that tuition covers only 80 percent of the cost of an academic year at Olivet. The remaining 20 percent of operational costs — symbolically, the remaining 20 percent of the school year — is covered through the generosity of alumni, churches, businesses and friends of the University.    Tuition Free Day is just one effort led by Student 4 Student, an organization that intends to raise awareness about the role charitable gifts play in making the Olivet experience possible.    “Last year,” explains Jean Martin, director of annual giving, “students formed this new initiative, titled Student 4 Student, which encourages philanthropy among current students.”    This relatively new organization is already making a big difference. Because of it, five students were awarded Student 4 Student scholarships for the first time this year.    All five scholarship recipients were identified as students who would not be able to continue at Olivet without financial assistance. The money offered help beyond what those students could pay from their own pocket.

A total of over $5,400 was raised the first year and $2,500 has already been awarded to select members from each class this year.”

   “Over 40 students contributed to Student 4 Student last year,” shares Jean. “Then, members from the 50th year reunion class of 1959 committed to match their contributions so they could see their efforts multiply.”    “A total of over $5,400 was raised the first year and $2,500

– Jean (Phillips) Martin ’72, director of annual giving

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has already been awarded to select members from each class this year.”    Building on their initial success, Student 4 Student continues to find new ways to ensure current students — and the ones who will be attending in the future — are able to attend and graduate from Olivet because of generous Olivetians and friends of the University.    “The Class of 2010 led the way by giving back to Olivet through this philanthropic program,” explains Jean.    “Each senior was challenged to donate $20.10 or an amount over $5 to the Student 4 Student Scholarship. With their generous giving, we can continue helping others attain an ‘Education with a Christian Purpose.’”

onu online

Spring 2010

Soy un Olivitian

The Olivetian

9

They came from across the U.S. and Canada to earn Olivet’s Master of Ministry in Hispanic Ministry degree. Now, the first 10 graduates of the program — the only program of its kind at a U.S. Nazarene university — continue to minister in their local churches, armed with the resources to lead the rapidly growing Hispanic congregations. Read the full story at www.olivet.edu.

Master of Ministry in Hispanic Ministry degree

in the news

University receives National Science Foundation Grant to create new course

First honors program ­cohorts learn through unique ­interdisciplinary ­approach

amy duerrwaechter ’10

RECENT HEADLINES from www.olivet.edu

Olivet honors ENC president as ‘inspiring example’ to young women

Dr. Corlis McGee named 2010 Maggie Sloan Crawford Award recipient.

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Two Olivetians recognized for community involvement

Oliver R. Phillips, director of Mission Support USA/Canada for the Church of the Nazarene, was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award.

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Olivet awards Phillips with Lifetime Achievement Award

Karg to ‘build strong relationships’ as NSLA chairman

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cover story [ SCHOOL OF GR ADUAT E AND CON T INUING STUDIE S ]

FIRST

CLASS

when i applied for the ed.d., i decided i would apply in 2007 and only once. then, if accepted, there was an open door and i would walk through it.” – Svea Emerson ’10   Ed.D.

SVEA EMERSON ’10 Ed.D.

Doctoral degree an “open door” master’s degree, a doctorate was something Svea seriously considered.    Around the same time, Olivet was launching a Doctor of Education degree in ethical leadership.    Classes for the Ed.D. in ethical leadership began in the summer of 2007. The three-year interdisciplinary program, including the action-research dissertation, was broadly designed to appeal to those who are, or aspire to be, in positions

By Casey Manes

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vea Emerson ’10 Ed.D. has valid reasons why she could give up or simply choose to ­complain.    Instead, with a grateful spirit, Svea has pressed onward to pursue rigorous academic work and a successful career. Give up? She doesn’t have time; she’s too busy serving and learning.    As a registered dietitian and nurse, Svea has served in positions as consultant, director and vice president in a variety of health care settings. After earning her

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of leadership.    “Because I am a health care professional, when you earn a doctorate, the options are limited to teaching and research. I didn’t have a desire to limit my employment options, so I chose instead to diversify my credentials,” shares Svea.

Svea’s advisor, Dr. Melvin Welch, congratulates her during the ceremonial hooding.

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   While her career achievements are challenging in and of themselves, Svea has an additional challenge 24 hours a day to work around.

Partaking of life

   “Some of the greatest challenges that I’ve had in my life center on my physical disabilities. I have been on intravenous nutrition for nearly 20 years and have had multiple back surgeries,” she shares.    “Each day is an opportunity to

Spring 2010

The Olivetian

11

olivet’s doctor of education in ethical leadership inaugural class

 

Doctoral Reflections “The seed was originally planted by my father back in November of 2005, approximately 13 months before he passed away. During that conversation, I committed to him that if Olivet ever offered a doctorate program, I would apply for it. Low and behold, in the summer of 2006, my dearest friend received a letter from the graduate office stating that Olivet was offering an Ed.D. program. My friend encouraged me to apply and reminded me of my commitment to my father. Certainly the divine plan of the Lord was working as I went through the application process and was accepted as one of 30 to represent the first doctoral cohort.”

“My doctoral degree from Olivet has opened new doors to me in the field of education. The opportunity to work with friends from fields such as pastoral care, law enforcement, higher education and medicine allowed me to experience the aspects of leadership that pervade numerous settings. The insights of my cohort members were invaluable and expanded my understanding of leadership even within my own field.”

Peter Babich ’10 Ed.D., mathematics teacher for Lincoln Way-East High School, Channahon, Ill.

“My desire to grow spiritually was equally as important as the desire to grow intellectually. The missional focus of a place like Olivet searches the heart, as well as the mind.  It is not just enough to graduate and become

Dr. David Holstein ’10 Ed.D., director of athletics, Palm Beach Community College, Lake Worth, Fla.

agement and compliance for a large health care organization, so the ethical leadership track of the Ed.D. program had complementary ­applications.    “When I applied for the Ed.D., I decided I would apply in 2007 and only once. Then, if accepted, there was an open door and I would walk through it.”    Walk through it, she did. The title of her dissertation is “The Relationships of Clinical Quality, Performance Improvement, and Internal Risk Scores in Nursing Homes.”    Svea hopes to use her newly minted degree to teach

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“This program has helped me immensely in my field of law enforcement. It has changed my view as a leader — not only within my police department, but also in the world. Thank you, Olivet!”

Danny McGuire ’10 Ed.D., police officer, Chicago, Ill.

“One of the main reasons I chose Olivet’s Ed.D. program was for the opportunity to complete a doctorate with individuals from various disciplines. My background is education, and I wanted a broader perspective. I hope to provide professional development for educators and feel that the leadership skills I have gained from the program will serve me well.”

“This degree better equips me to provide a loving response — not just in the corporate environment, but through every aspect of my life. I have a responsibility to represent Christ to the world. My hope is that through the completion of this degree I will be better tooled and qualified to provide ethical leadership, which best represents the heart of Christ.”

adults in a Christian university setting and through online instruction.    In the process of earning such a lofty degree, Svea learned some valuable nuggets of truth.    “First I learned God provides grace, wisdom and strength to get things accomplished when on paper, it seems impossible. Second, many health care professionals have difficulty objectively evaluating themselves.    “And lastly, completing a doctorate degree is not about intelligence, superiority or supernatural abilities. It’s about a daily walk and long-term sprint, just like the Christian life.”

The go-ahead

Tom Middendorf ’10 Ed.D., associate director of the Center for Leadership, Calling and Service, Trevecca Nazarene University, Nashville, Tenn.

Vicki Good ’10 Ed.D., educator and adjunct faculty member for Olivet’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies, Loda, Ill.

in a lifetime of triumph balance multiple IV drugs, travel for work, and serve in my job. The Lord has provided jobs that have enabled me to work full time and, not claim ­disability.”    Despite her opinion that a doctorate wasn’t in her best career interests, Svea heard about the inaugural doctoral program at Olivet. Her interest was piqued.    “When Olivet’s program was launched, I had a rekindled interest due to the subject matter. I realized that after working full time in health care for nearly 30 years, with many physical disabilities, that teaching was a good option for the future.”    Svea works in risk man-

a smarter person within a particular field. Seek an institution that commits to educating you to become a better person with a sense of purpose in the world today.” 

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Dr. Joseph Bell ’10 Ed.D., pastor, Church of the Nazarene, Liberty, Mo.

“I work in a field where the ethical lines are frequently blurred. This degree gave me a compass to navigate through the difficult issues I face every day. When I talk to many people about the degree they focus on the first word ‘ethical.’ I remind them that we spent just as much time focused on the word ‘leadership.’ The biggest benefit from this program is that it improved all facets of my leadership.”

Brian Kelly ’10 Ed.D., director for worldwide systems engineering for Fusion-io, Inc., Arlington Heights, Ill.

For more information about the Doctor of Education in ethical leadership or other programs offered by the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies, call 877-4OLIVET.

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commencement

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Record number of degrees awarded

during Olivet’s 97th annual Commencement ceremonies

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   he largest graduating class in Olivet Nazarene University’s history r­ eceived degrees during the 97th annual ­Commencement ceremonies Saturday, May 8. The University conferred more than 1,500 diplomas — including a record 560 traditional undergraduate, 198 continuing studies, 733 master’s, two honorary doctoral degrees, and 16 degrees for graduates from Olivet’s firstever doctoral cohort.

Parting Thoughts

We asked our Facebook fans and Twitter followers if they had any advice for the Class of 2010. Here is what some of them had to say.

Carolyn Klaus: Remain humble, have faith, and never give up.

Know your talents, skills, attributes, and your opportunities. Now more than ever, employers are looking for individuals who are sure in their abilities to succeed. Margo Poole:

▶ Hugo S. K. Chan, a prominent Christian businessman and lawyer from Hong Kong, delivered the Commencement address during the traditional undergraduate ceremony. He also received the honorary Doctor of Letters degree.

Christine Becker Case: Don’t fret if you never

use your earned degree. It was worth it in other ways. Life is hard by the yard, but a cinch by the inch.

Bob Evans:

▲ Dr. Rebecca Belcher-Rankin, professor of English, was honored with the inaugural Samuel L. Mayhugh Award for Scholarly Excellence for her commitment to scholarship.

▲ Dr. Stan Tuttle, professor of education, accepted the Richard M. Jones Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence.

▼ Rev. Glen Gardner, senior pastor of Flint Central Church of the Nazarene, received the honorary Doctor of Divinity degree.

◀ University President John C. Bowling spoke during the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies ceremony.

◀ The Ralph E. Perry Student Award for Excellence recognized Chris Baglio, a member of the first class of Doctor of Education in ethical leadership graduates, for exemplifying excellence in academic and community endeavors.

▲ Sarah Clark, a biology student from New Castle, Ind., was awarded the Maggie Sloan Crawford Award. Daniel Allen, a political science student from Kings Mills, Ohio, received the Robert M. Milner Award. These two awards are given annually to one female graduate and one male graduate for their outstanding character, academics, leadership and extracurricular involvement.

Vanessa Howard, an adjunct faculty member for the SGCS and registered nurse, received the Willis E. Snowbarger Award for Teaching Excellence.

Liz Love: Our plans for life do not always work out the way we think they should — and that’s a good thing. By following God and His plans for our lives, we can do so much more than we ever thought possible. James Tew: Don’t think you will stop learning just because you’re not going to classes any more. Your college education has given you the necessary skills to begin a career, but you will be training on the job for the rest of your working life. Rebecca Ibrahim: Look back at what God has brought you through and how much you have grown. Look forward in excitement for His plans for you! Ray Neuman: “He must become greater; I must become less.” John 3:30 Steven Alvarado: Keep your eyes open; the CEOs of some of the best companies in America state that they got to where they are for two reasons: 1) they were prepared and 2) they were in the right place at the right time.

@Emilyyupthatsme: Take a job — any job. “Janitor” looks better on a job application than “couch warmer.” Denise Carson Fries:

The Class of 2010 was recently polled about their post-graduation plans.

   As of the end of April, 25 seniors reported being accepted into graduate programs at schools including Asbury Theological Seminary, A.T. Still University, ­Benedictine University, Central Michigan University, Eastern Illinois University, Georgetown University, Michigan State University, Olivet Nazarene University, Roosevelt University, University of Illinois, University of Notre Dame, ­Vanderbilt University, and Western Michigan University.

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Shirley Budd Williams Valk: Follow your God, your

heart and your dreams. Thomas Rockrohr:

Love justice, show mercy and walk humbly with your God.

To see the entire list of ­comments, visit www.facebook.com/ olivetnazareneuniversity and www.twitter.com/ olivetnazareneu. While there, don’t forget to become a fan/ follower.

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

and they’re off!

   In addition, 14 have been accepted into professional programs for law, medicine, physical therapy, psychology and bioengineering.    Of those who responded, the most popular plan for this year’s seniors is still to head directly into the work force. Some of the job titles for exiting seniors include teacher, pastor, social worker, admissions counselor, programmer/analyst, director of media ministries, nurse, management ­trainee, ­s upervisor, case manager, dietetic ­intern, NYI field coordinator for India, director of events and accountant.

Cherish the memories, keep in touch with your ONU friends, and, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart.”

one

centennial chapel

Spring 2010

The Olivetian

13

One chapel. One seat. One moment. Changes everything.

Fond memories, fervent hope

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livet Nazarene University has a large place in the history of the Pitts family. So it is only fitting that I sponsor two seats for the new chapel: one for my wife, Charlotte Ellen, and one for our youngest great-granddaughter, Madeleine Jane Biedess.    I met Charlotte Carmony at ONC in 1946 when we were both students there. We married in the fall of 1947 and became parents of three children in our 61 years of marriage. She helped me complete my education, then finished her own bachelor’s and master’s degrees and was a beloved elementary teacher for 20 years. Charlotte was a gifted pianist and a charming hostess in our home, but was perhaps best known for the delightful manner in which she invariably exhibited the Spirit of Jesus Christ. Charlotte’s seat represents to me a cherished memory of our lifetime together.    Madeleine Biedess is Charlotte’s youngest greatgranddaughter. At two years of age, she is a bubbly, chattering, loving, bundle of innocence and promise. Although she understands little of what ONU means to our family now, as the years rush on, the day may come when she and her family may consider the many advantages of an “Education with a Christian Purpose” at Olivet Nazarene University. Madeline’s seat symbolizes my optimism and hope for her future.   Jesse E . Pitts ’48

To sponsor a seat in Centennial Chapel, contact the Office of Development at 815-939-5171 or by e-mailing development@olivet.edu.

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Every person who makes a gift of any size to this project will be recognized on the Wall of Thanksgiving.

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onu foundation

students featured in this issue are recipients of the following Foundation Scholarships

Alex Lord

Susan Leib

Mark Lockwood

Dr. Ralph E. Perry Scholarship

Donald N. and Irene L. Gustavsen Scholarship

Harry Taplin Scholarship

Frank and Elizabeth Kelley Scholarship

St. Joseph (Mich.) Church of the Nazarene Scholarship

Ian Smith

Josh Crawford

Terry L. Kochersperger Scholarship

Culp Family Scholarship

Christopher Tolbert

Daniel Allen

Donald and Faith Bell Family Scholarship

Ethel Mueller Scholarship

Caleb Erway

Joe Reisinger

Morenci (Mich.) Church of the Nazarene Scholarship

Rev. Joseph T. and Connie H. Myers Scholarship

Lauren Versweyveld Marion Fry Scholarship

makes “Education with a Christian Purpose� possible! Katie Thorne

Bekah Regenfuss

Jordan Reynolds

William Brandenburg Scholarship

Larry D. Watson Ambassador Scholarship

ONU Foundation Board of Directors Scholarship

Rev. Harvey E. and Mary Edna Doud Scholarship

John Adams

Justin Jones

Ethel Mueller Scholarship

Hugh G. and Gladys E. Kelly Scholarship

Sarah Clark Deborah Anne Colling Scholarship

To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing Foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

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onu alumni Congratulations to the new members of the Alumni Board!

Spring 2010

Melinda (Davis) Weber ’81, Fenton, Mich.

Sylvia (Freeman) Reed ’82, Huntington, Ind.

Roy Wood ’76, Nashville, Tenn.

to catch fire in the lives of new believers who were once hostile or indifferent to God. The book also shows readers how those tipping points from doubt to faith continue to operate throughout the Christian life as believers confront spiritual crises and grapple with questions that will bring them deeper into relationship with God. Dr. Bentz, who taught English at Olivet from 1986 to 1991, now teaches American literature at Azusa Pacific University in Southern Calif., where he lives with his wife and two children. Bentz holds an M.A. and PhD in American literature from Purdue University.

PrimeTime Day

Class Notes

19 60s

Leora Legacy with 18 Olivet students in Jacksonville, Fla.

Leora (Windoffer) Legacy ’68, a former professor at Olivet, was delighted to find 18 Olivet students attending her local Church of the Nazarene in Jacksonville, Florida. The Olivetians were passing through during their spring break. Leora and her husband, Jim ’83, host an Olivet alumni gathering in their home each year.

19 70s Lyndell Leatherman ’75 recently published the book, Best-Loved Hymns I, released by the FJH Music Company, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. This 160-page volume is the first in a series which documents the entire spectrum of Christian hymnody. Lyndell served as music editor at Lillenas Publishing Company from 1977–1997 and since has been freelancing. He and his wife, Barb, reside in Kansas City, Mo.

19 80s Dr. Joseph Bentz ’83 has published a book titled, God in Pursuit: The Tipping Points from Doubt to Faith. This book identifies and celebrates the sparks that allow faith

September 25, 2010 Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais, Ill.

SATURday September

25 2010

Jenifer (Osbo) ’91 and Brad Youngs: A boy, Jonathan David, September 5, 2009. He joins big brothers Hayden, Nicholas and Hayden, Nicholas, Daniel. Brad was a wid- Daniel and Jonathan Youngs ower and dad of three boys for four years when he and Jenifer married in 2007. He is an engineer and she works part-time as a pediatrician. They reside in Byron Center, Mich. Stephanie (Burggraf) ’94 and Jeffrey Scott ’94: A girl, Anneliese Joy, January 8, 2010. Anneliese joins her brother, Aidan, and sister, Ashlynn. Jeffrey is a pastor at Calvary Church in Northern Virginia and Stephanie is a full-time mom.

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Upcoming Events

19 90s Leslie (Young) Parrott ’84, Seattle, Wash.

The Olivetian

FEAT U R IN G :

Allison Durham Speer and

Ben Speer

of the Gaither Homecoming videos

Dr. Chuck Millhuff, evangelist for the Church of the Nazarene

Hayden, Nicholas, Daniel and Jonathan Youngs

B re n t ’ 9 6 a n d R e n e e (­Jorgensen) ’02 Wright: A girl, Lydia Renee, October 20, 2009. Brent is the CEO for Oak Orthopedics in Kankakee, Ill. Renee is a stayat-home Lydia Wright mom. They reside in Bourbonnais, Ill.

6th Annual

TRAINING CAMP GOLF OUTING

Friday July

(in conjunction with the Chicago Bears Training Camp)

30 2010

Matt ’97 and Kristen (Stokes) Grills ’97: A girl, Susannah Michele, December 29, 2009. She joins Peter, Susannah and her brothers SiJonah Grills mon Peter, 10 and Jonah Matthew, 7. Matt is the managing editor for the American Legion Magazine. Kristen is the community and corporate relations director for the Salvation Army of Indiana. They reside in Greenwood, Ind. Kevin ’98 and Rachel (Ewing) ’01 Donoho: Adopted a girl, Tamara Betzaida, 8, and a boy, Jarol Odir, 6, October 12, 2009, from San Miguel, El Salvador. Kevin is the senior pastor at Grace Church of the Nazarene in Salem, Ill. Rachel is a school social worker in Kinmundy, Ill. They reside in Salem, Ill.

Friday, July 30, 2010 Kankakee Country Club Kankakee, Ill.

For more information about these and other events, visit www.olivet.edu or     call 815-939-5258.

20 00s Travis ’00 and Erin (Alderson) ’01 McEowen: A girl, Tessa Jean, February 3, 2010. Tessa McEowen Travis is an investment specialist with Grabill Bank and Erin is a credit analyst with Wells Fargo Bank. They reside in Columbia City, Ind. Scot and Jill (Stipp) ’00 Riggins: A boy, Noah Timothy, September 21, 2009. He joins

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big brothers Aden, 3, and Wiley, 2. Scot and Jill serve as missionaries with the Church of the Nazarene to the Melanesia and South Pacific Fields. They reside in Papua New Guinea.

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Noah Riggins

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Annette Orr ’00 and Thomas Smiley were married October 24, 2009, in Tacoma, Wash. Annette works at Chicos and as a preschool teacher at First Presbyterian Church School in Tacoma. Thomas works for FedEx and as a ski instructor.

Thomas and Annette Smiley

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onu alumni

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

Jessica (Graper) ’01 and Shawn Hilborn ’99: A girl, Ella Reese, September 23, 2009. She is welcomed by big brother, Ethan, 4, and big sister, Emma, 2. Jessica is a part-time emergency room Ella Hilborn nurse. Shawn is a commercial project manager and estimator for Portzen Construction. They reside in Dubuque, Iowa.

Corey Wilson ’02 and Cathy Branson were married November 7, 2009, at Calvary Church of the Nazarene in Crestwood, Ill. They reside in Fort Wayne, Ind. Dave and Meredith (Felts) ’03 Crowl: A boy, Bryce Michael, July 1, 2009. Dave is an electrician. Meredith is a solutions specialist for Center for Business Innovation. They reside in Mason, Mich.

Bryce Crowl

Charles ’03 and Heather Ogborn: A girl, Hannah Joy, February 25, 2010. Charles is Hannah Ogborn a mechanical engineer at Packer Engineering. Heather is a stay-at-home mom. The family resides in Naperville, Ill. Holly (Stultz) ’05 and Robbie Johnston ’05: A boy, Tucker Drew, March 9, 2010. Tucker has Tucker Johnston a big brother, Tate. Holly is a stay-at-home mom and Robbie is a staff accountant at Simon Property Group in ­Indianapolis, Ind. The family resides in ­Fishers, Ind. Rob ’03 and Michelle (Botzum) ’05 Doyle: A girl, Emily Leilani Rose, March 19, 2009. ­M ichelle is a stay-athome mom, and Rob is a Spanish teacher for WarEmily Doyle ren Central High School. They reside in Indianapolis, Ind. Sarah Gonzalez ’04 and Roger Lee Chamberlain II ’07 were married March 21, 2009, in Kokomo, Ind. Sarah is on staff at First Church of the Nazarene in Danville, Ill., as pasLydia Wright tor of worship and youth. Lee teaches 6th grade science at Mary Miller Junior High School in Georgetown, Ill. They reside in Danville, Ill. Kelly (Carpenter) ’05 and Robert Gibson ’04: A girl, Sally Joy, January 30, 2010. She joins Sally Gibson big sister, Leyna, 21 months. Rob works at Olivet in admissions and student development. He is also pursuing a PsyD at Wheaton College. Kelly is a stay-athome mom. They reside in Bourbonnais, Ill. Andy and Beth (Johnson) ’06 Long: A girl, Edith Noel, October 27, 2009. Andy works for the Royal Automotive Group and Beth stays

Homecoming 2010

Jonathan and Mollie (Tippitt) ’07 McClelland: A boy, Jonathan Bennett, January 27, 2010, in Raleigh, N.C. Mollie is a fourth grade teacher and Jonathan is studying at Southeastern Baptist Seminary. They reside in Wake Forest, N.C.

 

October 28–31, 2010 Edith Long

Dedication Service for

Centennial Chapel

  Friday, October 29  HOMECOMING

Concert

Jonathan McClelland

  Saturday, October 30     fea t ur in g

Deena Drake ’08 and Tom Maher were married on September 26, 2009, in Merritt ­Island, Fla. Both Tom Deena and Tom Maher and ­Deena work for East Coast Christian Center in Merritt Island, Fla., and reside in Rockledge, Fla. Linissa Lantz ’08 and Michael Wirtes ’09 were married June 12, 2009, in Valparaiso, Ind. Linissa works as a 5th grade teacher and Michael is employed as a firefighter. They reside in Union Mills, Ind.



Jennifer (Gray) ’02 and Michael Lewellen: A boy, Sawyer Job, December 25, 2009. Sawyer Lewellen He joins his brother Lorne, 9, and sister Alida, 3. Jennifer is a hospital social worker and Michael is a physical therapist. They reside in Anderson, Ind.

at home with Edie. They reside in Bloomington, Ind.

Selah

Larnelle Harris

and the comedy of

Taylor Mason

Watch for details and registration information in the summer 2010 Homecoming mailer.

Linissa and Michael Wirtes

Matthew Gaskill ’08 and Ashley Moore ’08 were married July 11, 2009, in Northville, Mich. Matt is  currently attending medical school at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences. Ashley teaches Ashley and kindergarten  at  UniverMatthew Gaskill sity Academy Charter School. They currently reside in Kansas City, Mo. Sarah Mullin ’08 and Patrick O’Bryan were married October 9, 2009, in Wheaton, Ill. Patrick is in the U.S. Army. They reside in Marysville, Wash.

In Memoriam

for youth camps. She traveled in 49 of the 50 states and in the Holy Land. She taught 2nd grade for ten years in Benton Harbor, Mich.

19 30s

19 50s

Zelma (Atkinson) Rothman ’38 passed away December 23, 2009, at the age of 93, in St. Joseph, Mich. She was born August 4, 1916, to Everett and Helen Atkinson, both ordained elders in the Church of the Nazarene. She was married to Wm. “Everett” Rothman on Christmas Day, 1939. She was a member of Orpheus Choir and received a Bachelor’s degree in theology and later in elementary education. She was ordained along with her husband in Indianapolis, Ind., in 1945.    She was a devoted minister, pastor’s wife, mother and grandmother. She preached occasionally, served as director of Bible Schools and church choirs as well as serving in various other ministerial capacities as pastor’s wife. She served on the Indianapolis District as a member of the missionary council and as dean of girls

Kenneth T. Hawkins ’53 of Garrett, Ind. died Friday, October 16, 2009. He was born March 2, 1921, in Monroeville, Ind. He married Betty M. Agler on December 13, 1941 in Berne, Ind. Rev. Hawkins pastored seven different churches in northeast Indiana, for a total of 34 years in ministry, retiring in 1986. He was a WW II Army Veteran. In the “In Memoriam” section of the winter 2010 issue of The Olivetian, we incorrectly listed Kenneth T. Hawkins of Garrett, Ind., as being part of the class of 1975, when he should have been listed as a 1953 graduate. We apologize to the family and friends of Mr. Hawkins for this error, and are gladly rerunning a corrected memorial in his honor.

We’d love to hear FROM YOU!

Send us your news and pictures. Please submit alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet. edu, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through e-mail or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

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onu sports Sophomore softball slinger throws two perfect games in one week

Name: Katie Hannagan ’12 Her good week: On April 8, Katie

threw a perfect game –– no hits, no walks, no errors –– against Trinity International University. It marked only the sixth perfect game in Tiger softball history. Five days later, she completed another perfect game against Cardinal Stritch University.

15 years experience: Katie start-

ed playing softball at the age of 5 and has been a pitcher from the beginning. While she threw a couple of perfect games in high school, the magnitude of what she has accomplished on the college scene is still sinking in. “I look at college as more of a big deal because it’s a much higher level of competition,” Katie says. “It’s pretty awesome.”

A nice surprise: She didn’t have

to battle a case of the nerves when inching closer to a first perfect game. In fact, she didn’t realize what had happened until a teammate congratulated her after the game. “I go into pitching thinking, ‘OK, I’m going to go in doing the pitching plan coach wants us to do. Just get

Spring 2010

the ball to move; let the defense do what they’re supposed to do.’ I don’t think perfect game. I try not to think that far ahead.”

congratulated her on the first perfect game, Katie knew this accomplishment wasn’t a onewoman feat. “I just kept saying, ‘I didn’t do this. You guys did this.’ It’s one thing if I struck out every single person, but I didn’t. My team played awesome defense. Catching was outstanding. Without Nora [Duffy], I wouldn’t have thought to throw some of those pitches. Everyone works extremely hard, and it makes my life easy.”

Girl talk: Heading into NCCAA

and NAIA national tournament action, the Tigers post an impressive 51-11 record. Team chemistry plays a role in the success, Katie says. “We really are all friends. Energy is way up and everyone is just always ready to play.” The chemistry is apparent on the field, as teammates encourage each other throughout the game. “I’ll turn around and everyone will be talking, ‘You’ve got this,’” she says. “It’s a huge boost in confidence; it helps a lot. If you don’t have a team that backs you up, you’re down. But this team is really here for me.”

Take two: As usual, Katie head-

There’s no “I” in perfect game, part II: When asked about per-

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more than I try to pitch for myself,” she says. “I don’t want to go out there and let my team down, so I try to do what I’m supposed to do for them –– I expect the same thing from them; they would have my back as well.”

There’s no “I” in perfect game: As her teammates

ed into the game against Cardinal Stritch with no thoughts of another perfect game. But when someone mentioned she had a perfect game going heading into the fifth inning, Katie experienced a short moment of panic. “I’m thinking, ‘Oh no! It’s the fifth inning; why would you say that?!’” she says. “It was kind of on my mind, but I just had to remember a perfect game is not what I’m going for. I’m just going for a win.”

The Olivetian

KATIE ’12 HANNAGAN

queen

of the

MOUND

sonal goals, Katie can’t help but relate her goals back to the bigger picture of the team goals. “I try to pitch for my team

By Kate Morgan

tigertracks  Baseball  With a CCAC Champi-

onship on their mind, the ONU baseball team has worked hard and is playing well in the pursuit of their first championship since 2005. As of April 24, the Tigers hold a 25-13-1 overall record and 16-7 CCAC record, good for third in the conference and just two games back of the University of St. Francis (Ill.).    The Tigers play a two-fold schedule that begins with a spring break trip to Ormond Beach, Fla., for 11 games, going 7-4, and coming back for a long, but important, CCAC conference schedule. During conference play the Tigers currently have two separate winning streaks of five games.    Individually for the Tigers, junior Chris Hammett ’11 is batting .349, with 45 hits and seven home runs. He also has 33 RBIs and .991 fielding percentage. Along with him is senior Phil Colling (’10) with a .361 average, 44 runs, 48 hits, five doubles, 25 RBIs and 19 stolen bases. Off the mound, Tyler Shore ’12 has been untouchable for the Tigers as he currently holds a 7-0 record (eight starts) and a 4.98 ERA, giving up only 38 earned runs in 68.2 innings pitched.

 MEN’S GOLF  Thus far in 2010 the Olivet Nazarene University men’s golf team has competed in five events and in all but one has finished in the top three. With seven of their 12 players being seniors, leadership and experience is not lacking. ONU is also looking to make a run in the NAIA National Tournament as an atlarge bid, which is May 18 through 21.    In their first tournament the Tigers traveled west to Rock Island, Ill., to compete in the Augustana College (Ill.) Invitational. ONU finished third of 14 teams, with a team score (36 holes) of 599 (+31). The Tigers were led by freshman Andrew Woodhull ’13 with a 143 (72-71). He finished tied for third overall. For the second match of the year the Tigers traveled just north for a one-day event in Joliet, Ill., playing at

ONU came away with the 7-2 win. The Tigers also have two losses by only one to two ranked opponents and have played two other teams that were ranked at the time.    ONU concluded their season with a trip to NAIA Nationals. This was followed with play in the NCCAA National Championships in Mobile, Tenn..

Wedgewood Golf Club for the University of St. Francis Spring Invite. ONU would come away with the win out of 16 teams, with a score of 297 (+9). Matt Compton ’11 led the way for the Tigers with a 73, finishing tied for fourth. That same week Olivet went to South Bend, Ind. for the Bethel College (Ind.) Big Time Challenge, finishing third of nine teams, with a score of 634 (+58) (316-318). Senior Seth Doran (’10) played well shooting a 153 (78-75), finished tied for second for 36 holes. In the most recent tournament, ONU played in the University of St. Francis (Ind.) Invite, finished eighth of nine, scoring a 637 (+61) (319-318). Once again, Matt Compton led the way with a 36-hole 158 (78-80), finishing tied for 33rd.    The Tigers competed in the inaugural CCAC Championships on April 26 and 27 at the Heritage Bluffs Golf Club in Channahon, Ill. ONU finished second overall (614, +38) behind the University of St. Francis (Ill.) (609, +33), after holding a one-stroke lead after day one. Seth Doran was honored as the CCAC Golfer of the Year as well as an All-Conference selection. Freshman Andrew Woodhull was also an AllConference selection. Matt Compton received Honorable Mention All-Conference honors.

 MEN’S

OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD  The outdoor track and field season started just as soon as the indoor season ended. The Tigers first traveled to West Lafayette, Ind., Friday and Saturday, April 2 and 3, to compete in the M. Poehlein Invitational hosted by Purdue University (Ind.). Individually, Senior Caleb Erway ‘10 finished ninth in the men’s 3000 meter steeplechase with a time of 10:31.41. Jesse Carlson ’12 finished fourth in the men’s 10,000 meter run with a time of 36:27.15. The Tigers competed next in the Chicagolands meet hosted by the University of Chicago (Ill.) on Saturday, April 10; ONU finished sixth of 21 teams. Mike Eller ’13 finished second in the men’s long jump with a jump of 6.64 meters in the finals. Joe Reisinger ’12 finished fourth in the men’s shot put with at throw of 16.28 meters. Recently the Tigers competed in the first CCAC Championships held at Olivet Nazarene University, on Saturday, April 17, finishing first of six teams. Justin Jones ’12 won the men’s 1500 meter run with a time of 4:00.01 to gain 10 points for the Tigers, and he won the men’s 800 meter run with a time of 1:57.25. Marcus Reynolds ’13 finished second in the men’s javelin throw with a finals throw of 48.94 meters, and he won the men’s high jump with a finals jump of 1.68 meters. ONU most recently competed in the Drake Relays in Des Moines, Iowa, (Drake University) from April 21-24 and the Stan Lyons Invitational in Indianapolis, Ind. (Butler University) on April 24.    The Tigers competed in the Dr. Keeler Invitational held at Naperville, Ill. (North Central College) Thursday, May 13. They then traveled to Rock Island, Ill., to compete in the Augie Twilight. Following that, the Tigers will compete

 MEN’S TENNIS  Olivet’s men’s tennis team has maintained an NAIA national ranking throughout the 2010 season and currently is receiving 36 votes nationally. The Tigers were ranked as high as 22nd the week of March 23. With a 10-6 overall record and schedule that puts them up against four ranked opponents, the Tiger s have been constantly tested throughout this season. Playing one freshman, two sophomores and three seniors, the Tigers have a great mix of youth and experience.    So far this season Olivet has beaten a host of good teams. On February 20, the Tigers defeated Wheaton College (Ill.) 7-2. On February 26, the Tigers beat St. Ambrose University (Iowa) 7-2. In Florida, the Tigers defeated Moravian College (Penn.) 9-0. One of their bigger wins to date was on March 17 at home against the Indiana Institute of Technology.

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in the NAIA National Meet in Marion, Ind., May 27–29 hosted by Indiana Wesleyan University.

womEN’S OUTDOOR TRACK AND FIELD  The Tigers opened their indoor season Apr. 2 at the Mike Poehlein Invitational hosted by Purdue University. The Tigers placed well, concluding the meet with two top-five finishes. Lauren Versweyveld ’11 took third in the 10,000 meter run with a time of 37:37.56, while teammate Ashley Fozkos ’11 finished fifth in the pole vault with a final height of 12-02.50. The Tigers then competed at the Chicagoland Championships, which was hosted by the University of Chicago. Four individual Tigers posted point-awarding performances, while their 4x800 meter relay squad took top honors with a first place finish. Fozkos placed second in the pole vault, while Katie Thorne ’11 placed third in the 3000 meter steeplechase. Bekah Regenfuss ’10, placed sixth in the 1500 meter run, and Kelsey Warp ’13 finished in seventh place for the 400 meter hurdles.    The Tigers went on to capture the title of the first Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference champions for their sport on Apr. 17. ONU recorded 36 top-five finishes, including six first place, 11 second place, seven third place, six fourth place and six fifth place honors. Hannah Endrizzi ’13, O’Malley King ’12, Warp, Thorne, Fozkos and Caitlin McPherson ’13, all placed first in their respective events. The Tigers most recently competed in the Stan Lyons Invitational hosted by Butler University on Apr. 24, which was followed by the Pacesetter Invitational hosted by Indiana State University on May 1. The Dr. Keeler Invitational and the Augie Twilight before their season will conclude at the NAIA National Meet, which is scheduled to take place May 27–29 at Indiana Wesleyan University.

 women’s tennis  The Olivet Nazarene University women’s tennis team, under the direction of first year head coach David Vance, has had some highs and lows thus far this season. With a current record of 9-8, the

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women have been consistently able to come through in the clutch. The fall season started off strong, with the women winning their first two matches, but things quickly started to go downhill as they ended up losing six out of their next nine matches. The Tigers tried to rebound in their spring season as they defeated Evangel University, but the women came up short in three of their first four matches. They were able to put it together at the right time, however, as the Tigers were able to defeat Aquinas College and No. 1 seed McKendree University in the NAIA regional tournament. With the two victories, ONU has earned an automatic bid to compete at the NAIA national tournament that was May 16 in Mobile, Ala.

 women’s

softball  After a disappointing 31-24 record from last season, the Olivet Nazarene University softball team had a lot to prove as the women returned to the 2010 season with the loss of just two players. With the return of Rachel Comoglio ’10 (2009 CCAC player of the year) and Jordan Reynolds ’12 (2009 CCAC Freshman of the Year), along with CCAC All-Conference selection Marisa Baker ’10, the team went into the season with a well balanced offense that could produce runs throughout the line-up. Currently, Reynolds is leading the team in a number of categories, including batting average (.497), home runs (9), walks (28), slugging percentage (.785), on-base percentage (.568) and assists (182). Comoglio tops the list in RBI’s (68) and hit-bypitch (23), while Baker is leading in hits (90), runs scored (81), triples (7) and stolen bases (40). Katie Hannagan ’12 is having a fantastic year on the mound as she has put together an impressive worksheet on the year, giving up just 18 walks to go along with a 19-5 overall record with a 2.15 ERA. Thus far on the season, the Tigers have put up an impressive 47-10 overall record, while capturing the CCAC regular season championship with a 17-1 CCAC record. The Tigers earned 2nd place in the CCAC Conference finishing that season strong.

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onu sports

THROWING THE By Casey Manes

when joe reisinger ’12 describes his workout for his hammer, discus and shot put events, it sounds a bit like a foreign lingo.

   “The training focuses on power lifts such as squats, clean and jerks and snatch, coupled with a wide variety of ply metrics, springs and technique drills that ensure we are explosive but coordinated in such a confined space,” explains Joe on the musclebuilding it takes to perform his field events.    “This is a year-round system of t­raining.”    In laymen’s terms, Joe and his fellow strength field performers on the ONU team work hard to develop agility and power to launch a seemingly innocent, inanimate object on an expertly released ride that will beat out everyone else in distance.    If you’ve never witnessed one of these events that require such brawn, what you missed was an exercise in sheer strength and mental focus. Not to mention gusto grunts.

sports shorts Scherer, Mitchell and Harks earn national honors | Two Tigers represented Olivet nationally-earning NAIA Division I Men’s Basketball All-American Honorable Mention awards. Freshman David Scherer ’13 (10.9 ppg, 7.0 rpg, .518 FG%, 136 offensive rebounds, seven double-doubles) was named to the team for the first time. Senior Rashad Mitchell ’10 (10.8 ppg, 4.8 rpg, 2.5 apg, .496 FG%, .771 FT%, 49 steals) was named to his first team as well. Both players were honored as CCAC All Conference selections, and Harks was named Freshman of the Year in the CCAC. Hodge named IBCA Coach of the Year | The Illinois Basketball Coaches Association honored Olivet Nazarene University head men’s basketball coach Ralph Hodge by naming him a co-winner of

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   Joe became interested in hammer, shot put and discus while attending high school in Georgetown, Ill. Some of his friends worked on him and persuaded him to join and give it a try. It was a move he has never regretted.    As a freshman on the Tiger track and field team, Joe secured a position at ­nationals, placing seventh. His collegiate PRs include: shot put - 16.22m (53'3"), hammer - 48.03m (157'7"), discus 43.38m (142'4").    Joe ranks his athletic goals for this year as hoping to secure a spot as an All American and to make it to Nationals for a second time.    To make those hopes a reality, Joe must focus precisely on technique throwing such heavy objects when it is go time.    “When I am preparing to throw, I am thinking about the technical side of throwing. I visualize the event in my head and how it is supposed to look with the correct ­technique.”    Joe doesn’t spend all of his time in the field. He’s also rigorously studying for a ­career in computer science. But he continues to plan on field events to also be a part of his future.    “My plans for beyond college would be to pursue a career in computer programming while also staying pretty serious about throwing,” Joe adds.    And when it comes right down to it, ­

the 2010 IBCA NAIA Division I Coach of the Year. He shared the honor with fellow coaches Harry Statham (Mckendree University), Al Bruehl (Robert Morris University) and Tom O’Malley (St. Xavier University). The 2009–10 season was a good season by Tiger basketball standards. The Tigers finished with an overall 19-11 record and a 8-2 CCAC record, finishing second in the league. The Tigers earned an at-large bid into the NAIA Division I National Tournament for the 15th time in program history. During the season, the Tigers held an NAIA Division I national ranking every week, receiving a ranking as high as No. 11 on February 8. The Tigers finished the season ranked No. 21.

JOE REISINGER ’12

college athletics is much more than achievement or stats for Joe.    “The thing that I like the most about ­being on the ONU track team would have to be the people I meet.”

University (Ill.) and a three-game sweep over Cardinal Stritch University (Ill.). In the five games combined, he scored five runs and knocked in 11 and had three doubles and three home runs. In a 9-7 win over St. Xavier, Hammett went 3-for-4 with five RBI. In a 9-2 victory over Cardinal Stritch, he went 2-for-2, with both hits being home runs tallying three RBI.    Also in five games this past week, Chris finished with 21 total bases, a (.556) on-base percentage, and (.923) fielding percentage, with 11 put-outs. With five wins the Tigers move to 19-10-1 (10-4) on the season, good for second in the CCAC. Tiger Baseball earns win number 1,000 in program history | With a win over Purdue-North Central University (Ill.) in the first game of a doubleheader on Thursday, April 22, the Tigers earned win 1,000. The Tigers went on to sweep the Panthers in the doubleheader.

Hammett earns CCAC Player of the Week honors | Chris Hammett (‘11) was honored as the CCAC Baseball Player of the Week for the week ending April 11. He collected nine hits in 17 at-bats to lead Olivet offensively in a two-game sweep of St. Xavier

   Eight coaches have led the Tigers throughout the 43-year history of the program. Currently the program holds an all-time record of 1,001-705-6 for a .585 winning percentage. Head coach Todd Reid has 83 wins for the purple and gold. Richardson and McDowell inducted into respective Hall of Fames | Head softball coach Ritchie Richardson ’93 and head cross country/ track and field coach Mike McDowell ’09 were recently inducted into their respective hall of fames this past year. Richardson, a native of Union County, Tenn., was inducted into the Union County High School Legacy Hall of Fame on Dec. 29, 2009. Richardson, a standout athlete at Horace Maynard High School, competed in three sports including football, basketball and baseball from 1976-1980. He earned 12 varsity letters and was named most valuable player in all three sports. He was an all-conference/all-region selection six times

during his high school career. Richardson went on to play baseball at Lincoln Memorial University, where he was elected into the LMU athletic hall of fame in October of 2009. McDowell, a standout athlete at Black Hawk College, was inducted into the BHC hall of fame on Feb. 5, 2010. McDowell competed in the sport of track and field at BHC from 19751976, where he earned NJCAA All-American honors. He held title as conference champion and also claimed the regional champion title. McDowell then took his abilities to the University of Iowa for the remainder of his collegiate career and later competed with the University of Chicago Track Club. There he became the State of Illinois Prairie State Game Champion and a two-time United States National Indoor ­Qualifier. VISIT WWW.OLIVET.EDU FOR THE LATEST SCORES, SCHEDULES AND SUMMARIES.

Tiger Sports app for Facebook  CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF THE ONU TIGERS? CHECK OUT THE NEW FACEBOOK APPLICATION, WHERE YOU CAN STAY UP ON THE LATEST HEADLINES, VIEW UPCOMING EVENTS, AND EVEN SEE WHICH OF YOUR FRIENDS WILL BE ATTENDING THE NEXT BIG GAME! Go to http://apps.facebook.com/olivet-athletics/# today. (Note: You must be logged into Facebook to view and use the app correctly.)

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  What will be your top   priorities in your new role as chaplain?    My role and function will be built on four legs:    Coordinate the chapel experience for our campus. We are in the middle of planning and dreaming what that could look like for the fall, and our plan is to eventually work one year ahead.    Develop a discipleship approach for our campus, built on a small group structure. We currently have many Bible studies and groups happening on campus, but I don’t think anyone knows exactly how many or the purpose they each serve. We want to be more intentional about ramping up this ministry so it becomes a part the DNA of our campus.    Support the office staff and what we already have going on. There is a learning curve for me in finding the gifts and passions of the staff, and then turning them loose. They — Jennifer McClellan, Nancy Dodd and Jonathan Burkey — are all very capable, and I’m glad they are on our team in the Office of Spiritual Development.    Finally, serve as the campus pastor for students, faculty and staff.   How do you see your role as   chaplain as an extension of your lifetime of youth ministry?    I see a lot of similarities. The needs of college students are varied and unique, but not all that much different from high school students as they are continuing to solidify their faith and belief systems. On their own for the first time, university students are asking big questions related to how they want to spend the rest of their lives. So we try our best to create space for God to speak, and for them to be able to hear. I think that’s how I functioned as a youth pastor, and that will continue as we work with the emerging adults on our campus.

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  What lessons did you learn   about ministry through your father?    My dad was a pastor, and a great lover of people. He wasn’t the best preacher in the world, but he was a great pastor.    He never met a stranger, and never judged anyone; he just loved them. He would know the high school principal, and the guy who owned the muffler shop in town. He was just as comfortable sitting in a school board meeting as he was standing in a smoke-filled car auction. He loved people, prayed for them, and loved

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we try our best to create space for god to speak, and for them [students] to be able to hear.”

them some more. I hope I’ve inherited his ability to love without condition. That would be one of the greatest compliments anyone could give me.   What advice would you offer to   rookie youth ministers?    Wow, that’s not an easy answer. I’m finishing a semester-long class where we have been trying to answer that question, so here are my top three.    First, keep your spouse and family first. Always make time for them. Date your spouse weekly, and as your kids grow up, make sure you’re not just going to the games of students in your youth group; your kids are first. Take good vacations. Use the time off your church provides. Never feel guilty for spending time with your family, and if you do, get over it.    Two, support your pastor. Find someone you can work with, who you know supports you, and never leave. If he or she leaves and you can go, go with them. Die with him or her if you can, but your relationship with your senior pastor is primary to your ministry.    Third, know that parents are not the enemy. You are ministering to the family more these days than ever, so get to know the parents of the students in your ministry. It shouldn’t matter whether they go to your church or not, you need to know the parent. I tell my students that as a young youth pastor, you can’t tell someone how to parent teens, or begin to pretend to know what it’s like. But you can help the parents know what their student is thinking. You can bring the parent into the world of the student, and be the advocate of both.

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community because of the Internet, and all that brings into their lives. There is a lot for students these days that is based on what is virtual, so helping them determine what is really real is tough.    I think from 20 years ago, this generation of student desires to give their lives away to something that matters. They want their lives to have meaning, so at the end of the day, they will have a sense of accomplishment, like they made a ripple in the pool of humanity. Not that my generation didn’t care, but today’s students are wired differently than the previous generation in that they are a service-oriented generation.   After 20+ of working with   youth, you’ve probably experienced your fair share of pranks. Do you have an all-time favorite?    Oh man, there have been a lot. I remember one junior high camp I directed, some of the young men that were there slathered my sleeping bag with peanut butter. I mean, it was everywhere.    I’ve also found my underwear up flagpoles, my room moved from inside to outside and set up exactly as it was inside.    But I think one of the best was done early on in my ministry. I had been out of the office for a week, and when I got back to my office, my chair had all the screws removed, so when I sat down and leaned back, the top of the chair slid off the base. I went crashing into my bookshelves behind my desk, and I can still remember the associate pastor laughing hysterically from his office when he heard the crash.    And by the way, I never got mad, just got even. Payback can be fun — and duct tape is a GREAT tool to use.

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  If you were to describe your   wife, Terry (Hodge) ’82, in five words, what would they be?    Five words is tough, but I would say passionate, loving, loyal, friend and gaga (translation being “grandma” if you were wondering).

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  Of the books you’ve read in the   past five years, what are your three favorite?    Soul Survivor by Phillip Yancy    Searching for God Knows What by Donald Miller    Divine Conspiracy by Dallas Williard

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  Generally speaking, how is this   generation of college students different from those of 10 years ago? 20 years ago?    I think from 10 years ago, they are less certain of themselves. It’s not that they don’t have confidence, but they don’t want to make mistakes and will wait around longer to make sure they do things right. They also have to continually live with a false sense of

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  Finish this sentence: “People   would think I was crazy if they only knew … ”    I cry at Hallmark commercials.

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MARK HOLCOMB

Are there any TV game shows or reality competitions for which you think you’d be particularly well-suited?    I’d love to be on Survivor one time. Not sure how well suited I am for it, and I’ve never applied or downloaded an app, but I think I would love the experience.

UNIVERSITY CHAPLAIN w

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admissions

800.648.1463 www.olivet.edu

PURPLE AND

An in-depth look at life on the ONU campus for high school seniors and their parents

GOLD DAYS

For more information, call the Office of Admissions at 800-648-1463.

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Fall 2010 Dates: ▶ October 15–16 ▶ October 22–23 ▶ November 5–6 ▶ November 19–20


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