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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS VO L . 77, N O. 3

W IN T E R 2010

W W W.O L I V E T.E D U

Beyond the

books page s 8 – 9

SUPER SYMPHONY page 4

HEART FOR HAITI

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

page 6

MASTER’S FOR PASTORS and business execs page 10

▲ JAY M A R TI NSON ’86


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snapshots

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02 Contributing Writers Nick Birkey ’07 Amanda Jensen ’04/’06 M.O.L. Casey Manes Kate Morgan Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03

The world-famous

harlem globetrotters entertained a sold-out crowd    at McHie Arena    January 20.

globetrotters

   BILL AND PAM FARREL,    best-selling authors    of Men are Like Waffles; Women are Like Spaghetti and Red Hot Monogamy offered practical — often hilarious — advice for couples during Marriage Inc.’s “Celebration of Marriage” event.

marriage inc.

Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div. Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90 Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D.

hoosier hysteria

Vice President for School of Graduate and Continuing Studies Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

Alum BRAD ZEHR ’99 played the National Anthem for the Pacers vs. 76ers game during Olivet’s Hoosier Hysteria at Conseco Fieldhouse January 23.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2010 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

Dr. Mary Paul, vice president for spiritual development at Point Loma University, challenged and inspired the ONU community during spring 2010 revival services.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to

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Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

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perspectives

Winter 2010

The Olivetian

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Caught as well as Taught By John C. Bowling, President

MISSION STATEMENT: Olivet Nazarene University, a denominational university in the Wesleyan

tradition, exists to provide a liberal arts “Education with a Christian Purpose.” Our mission is to provide high quality academic instruction for the purpose of personal development, career and professional readiness, and the preparation of individuals for lives of service to God and humanity.

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his mission guides all we do on the Olivet campus. I was very pleased a few years ago when an accreditation official, who was giving a report on his team’s evaluation visit to Olivet, said, “There is a clear and pervasive sense of why this school exists with everyone we interviewed — faculty, staff, students, alumni and representatives from the community.”    Those were encouraging words that still hold true. This mission gives meaning and form to our various tasks and responsibilities and is present in every dimension of campus life. One can see it and sense it in the academic program, student development, athletics, music and the arts, in the dining hall, the dormitories, in clubs and organizations and in scores of other venues and activities on campus.    Though this mission is ubiquitous, perhaps the one place where the mission is most fully realized is in the classroom — through the work of a very fine faculty. It is there that faith and learning are harmonized and validated. This issue of The Olivetian celebrates these men and women. As you read, you will see and hear for yourselves the impact that is being made by Olivet — through them. I am pleased and proud to share my days and my life’s work with such a wonderful group.    The faculty of Olivet Nazarene University is a community of Christian scholars dedicated to equipping students to live integrated, Christ-centered lives of service and leadership. The goal of the faculty is to see that students combine their Christian faith, their professional commitment and a broad range of human knowledge into a coherent worldview that recognizes the interrelatedness of all parts of God’s universe.    Through example and instruction, faculty members motivate students to love learning and to pursue truth throughout their lives. Faculty members at Olivet are committed to their profession and particular academic discipline. They read and research and attend conferences to help ensure that they are current with the latest developments — but there is more.    Olivet faculty members are committed to more than their discipline and profession. They are men and women who are committed first and foremost to the Lordship of Jesus Christ in their lives, and they are committed to the mission of Olivet.

   As a result, our faculty members teach students — not just courses or subjects. They see their work as a calling — not just a job. Therefore, much of what is embodied in the mission of Olivet is “caught” as well as taught, as students see the lives of their professors on display. It is not uncommon for students to hear their professors give clear testimonies of God’s grace at work in their lives. Faculty members also model service and leadership in the Church and in the community.    In a very real way, my faculty colleagues are “mission”aries. They are the ones who see that the mission of Olivet reaches each student in class after class, one semester following the next, year upon year, and generation to generation. As I think back to my student days at this University, a gallery of faces comes to mind: Sayes, Snowbarger, Humble, Strickler, Larsen, Jordan, McClain and many others who touched my life.    Mark Hopkins gained a national reputation as an educator while serving for many years as the president of Williams College in western Massachusetts. It was President Garfield who first, at a dinner of Williams alumni, defined the ideal college as, “Mark Hopkins on one end of a log and a student on the other.” In the final analysis, that image of the close personal link between a professor and a student is what characterizes the heart of a fine University. It is certainly true at Olivet!

“… MUCH OF WHAT IS EMBODIED IN THE MISSION OF OLIVET IS ‘CAUGHT’ AS WELL AS TAUGHT.”

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onu news Music group strings together excellence

   Both music and non-music majors are welcomed to audition for the orchestra. In Lauren’s case, she is busy studying for her biology and premed major, but truly appreciates the opportunity to still use her expertise in violin.

A growing trend    The orchestra has more than tripled in nine years since the switch was made to being comprised solely of students in 2001. This year, it boasts 65 players (including 37 string players), a combination of music and nonmusic majors all earning a spot based on auditions.    Those who take a listen to the orchestra in 2010 will be treated to their Viennese Story theme.    “We’re working on selections by composers whose main residence and style was in ­Vienna. We’ve played Symphony No. 6 by Beethoven and will

By Casey Manes

   When it comes to music, Olivet Nazarene University is in a class of its own. Olivet is among few schools of similar size with an all-student orchestra — and filling the seats in this group isn’t a problem.    “Most of our sister schools have community orchestras,” shares Dr. Neil Woodruff, professor of music. “Even larger [state] schools in our area have orchestras largely populated by faculty members and adult players.”

SUPER

symphony    This isn’t the case at Olivet, and it is a unique situation. In the past, the Department of Music hired community players to staff the orchestra programs, such as Messiah performances and ­Commencement.    “There were a number of reasons why the decision to pursue an all-student ensemble was made, including the fact that the funds used to hire community players could be better spent on student scholarships,” explains Dr. Woodruff.    “While the [scholarship] money is certainly a big draw for string players, another element that many students look for is the ability to step up to the challenge of playing the principal chairs and solos on the music. In many schools, there is simply no opportunity for this to happen.”

play ­M endelssohn later in the spring,” says Dr. Woodruff on the theme-based music they focus on each academic year.    For the students serenading audiences through the orchestra, many do so out of an intrinsic desire to make music, and their interest and opportunity will extend beyond their college years.    “A recent graduate auditioned for, and has played in, a great number of different small orchestras in the Chicago area,” shares Dr. Woodruff. “One of the reasons he was selected was because he already had some experience playing the sort of literature that the orchestras were going to play.    “Another student was selected for an orchestra teaching job right out or college over some others with several years of teaching experience, due to the exposure to literature that he had while here, including some time serving as the student conductor of the orchestra.”    And for Lauren, who dreams of becoming a doctor in the future, there’s nothing quite like still having some music in her life.    “I’ve made many new friends and played some great pieces. My favorite thing is the performances; although I always have that ‘butterfly’ feeling, I always feel so accomplished when the audience is clapping at the end.”

A chance to play   Having this opportunity has greatly impacted violin player ­Lauren Hoenig’s ’13 experience at Olivet.    “I joined the orchestra because I’ve always loved to play, but did not have an orchestra in my hometown. I always went to AllState, but being here and having the opportunity to play every week with a group is awesome.”

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PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

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friends of olivet

Winter 2010

The Olivetian

Lauren saw God in a when she stepped    beyond herself

new way

I never considered college at Olivet, but the moment I visited, I felt God telling me this is where He wanted me. As one of my favorite quotes says, ‘We are never certain of the next step, but we can always be certain of God.’ “My time at Olivet has offered me amazing opportunities to grow and discover my strengths, and I have learned to step out of my comfort zone. “My job as an RA here on campus has impacted and stretched me. Though it is challenging to keep up with 45 girls, I’ve never done anything more rewarding!

“Being a SIFE member has allowed me to be a part of real business projects, the Honors program has pushed me academically, and my amazing professors go above and beyond daily. I love the truth of faith incorporated with the practical preparation from the business department.

“I couldn’t feel more blessed to be surrounded by such an encouraging community that pours into my growth as a student, professional, and individual. “With three siblings, only scholarships could make my investment at ONU a reality. For your generosity, I want to say a sincere ‘thank you!’”

“After graduation I want to use my passion for people to be a positive influence in an industry not always known for Christ-like character. Through marketing and public relations, I can be a servant leader and an example of Him.

— Lauren Blunier ’12, Marketing major East Peoria, Ill.

Give Today. Change Tomorrow. 815-939-5171  |  www.olivet.edu  |  development@olivet.edu

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onu news

HEART FOR

HAITI

By K ate M or g an

Long before THE

magnitude 7.0 earthquake and following aftershocks devastated Haiti, the country’s plight for clean water was put on the hearts of several Olivet students. Banding together, the Olivet community began raising funds for the nation last fall and recently stepped up efforts to provide for Haitians both now and into the future. Forming a partnership    When students traveled to Haiti last spring through Missions in Action, they learned firsthand about the desperate need for clean water.    “Many of the Haitian people have to walk somewhere around 12 hours in a day just to get water in pails for the week,” one student says. “These conditions make for a brutal lifestyle compared to how we life in America.”    Returning to school, two students who traveled with MIA wanted to raise funds for the Haiti Water Project, a program of Nazarene Compassionate Ministries that seeks to create sustainable water resources.    To raise money on campus, though, they needed the backing of a formal campus organization.    Meanwhile, students from Olivet’s Students in Free Enterprise had approached Jennifer McClellan, coordinator of MIA, wondering if she knew of any international projects that could benefit from the group’s business skills.    Jennifer, who co-led the MIA trip to Haiti, put the two groups in touch with each other.    “It was easy to see how God was pulling together all of the right people at the same time — the heart, the skills and the venue ­— to make it all come together,” Jennifer reflects.

now know people there. We have connections and emotional ties with our Nazarene family in that city,” Jennifer says. “But even if we didn’t, something in our spirits begs us to do whatever we can. The overflow of compassion and generosity is a healthy and right thing

specially designed T-shirts and bottled ­water.    They raised $2300 and had plans to continue raising funds until they reached their goal.    When tragedy struck Haiti January 12, everyone involved with the Haiti Water Project efforts knew now was the time to further increase the fundraising. Compassion flowed through campus with students wondering what they could do to help.    “Within a day or two of the earthquake, you could just sense the frustration and helplessness students felt without a clear outlet to contribute in some way,” Jennifer says.    SIFE member Rachel Hoover agrees. “Even though Haiti is a good distance away from us, students were affected by the tragedy — from those in the engineering department who helped design wells in the past to those who went on the missions trip last year with MIA,” she says.    “There was definitely a need to be filled.”    The Office of the Chaplain partnered with SIFE in order to give students an easy and tangible way to help in the time of crisis. SIFE has expanded their efforts, collecting money in Ludwig Center, following chapel services and during home basketball games.    When chapel speaker Ryan Dobson announced that 100 percent of sales of his books purchased using students’ ­Tiger Dollars cards would support the project, he sold out in three minutes.    While many gave out of simple desire to help, some had even more personal reasons.    “ B e c a u s e MIA had just traveled to Port-auPrince, we

Keeping it going    While efforts have surpassed the initial $4500 goal, the Olivet community plans to continue with the project. Donations exceeding the original goal will go toward additional wells as well as provide for more immediate needs, including bottled water.    “The outpouring that has already happened, the efforts that have already been made, we are talking about this being a great start,” says Mark ­Holcomb, assistant professor. “But we want to continue this emphasis throughout our spring s­ emester.”    Additional fundraisers are already in the works and another Missions in Action trip to Haiti is set for March 2011. Moreover, students have been challenged to each give $10 sometime within this semester.    “We aren’t setting a goal, per say. We’re trying not to cap what we believe God wants to do through our community,” says Mark. “But we’re excited by the initial response and believe God will continue to work in the hearts of our campus.”

RECENT HEADLINES from www.olivet.edu

Submitted photos

Stepping up th e efforts    During the fall semester, SIFE members worked with the MIA students to determine an initial fundraising goal of $2500 for the Haiti Water Project, enough money to build one well and provide fresh water for thousands of people. Proceeds came in from the sales of

in the news

Bishop receives American Meteorological Society Seal of Approval

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Dietetics program earns accreditation through the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education

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for the ONU family to do together.”    Within the first four days, students, faculty and staff members raised more than $10,000. In all, including an offering taken during a Wednesday night revival service, the community has raised nearly $14,000 so far.    “The partnership has been awesome and the emphasis this week, after the tragedy in Haiti, has fueled the project beyond what anyone could have imagined,” says Nancy Dodd, assistant to the chaplain and co-leader of last year’s MIA trip to Haiti.

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49 seniors recognized in annual ‘Who’s Who’ publication

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The power to influence: Current SIL student wins WGN-TV Teacher of the Month award

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<< Several onu students traveled to Port-au-Prince last spring as part of the University’s Missions in Action program.

Students recognize Sanctity of Human Life Week

For the love of a T-shirt: Intramural program experiences rapid growth

Ralph Hodge coaches 1000th game


onu online

Winter 2010

olivet nazarene university

The Olivetian

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Recent guest blogs: iPad… iCarumba!

www.olivetnazareneu.blogspot.com

is your

If you’re looking for mostly light-hearted entertainment, with a little wisdom sprinkled along the way, Tiger Bytes — Olivet’s official University blog — is the place for you. It features a unique blend of campus happenings, nostalgia, informative daily posts and fun trivia, plus weekly hot topic and how-to articles written by alumni, faculty, staff and student guest bloggers.

fan.

Will you be ours?

www.facebook.com/olivetnazareneuniversity

A great place to stay connected with the ONU community, as alumni, students, parents, faculty, staff and even future Olivetians post here regularly. Through this fan page, you can also stay informed of the latest ONU news and happenings when they appear as status updates right in your news feed.

www.twitter.com/olivetnazareneu

Perfect for the busy Olivetian on the go! Headlines, sports scores, campus updates and random ponderings, all in 140 characters or less.

Olivet is constantly seeking new guest bloggers for Tiger Bytes, our official University blog. It’s not a paid gig, but you do get at least 15 minutes of fame as your wisdom is shared on a forum that has been read in 64 countries (and counting!).

by Jeff Rice, network manager for Olivet

Super feasts: Making healthy choices during the big game by Heather Gibbs, registered dietician and assistant professor for the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

Facilitating faithful fatherhood by Dr. Bethany Mills, director of counseling services

Tragedy and geology in the recent Haiti earthquake by Dr. Charles Carrigan, associate professor of geology

If you would like to be considered for a guest blog, send an e-mail to us at askus@olivet.edu. Make sure to include your full name, your proposed topic and a brief explanation of whatever qualifies you as an “expert” on that topic.

April 17, 2010 9 a.m.–3 p.m.

(Registration from 8–8:45 a.m.)

Chalfant Hall

SATURday

April

17 2010

$30 registration includes continental breakfast and a hot buffet lunch

Featuring: Liz Curtis Higgs, author-speaker www.lizcurtishiggs.com

Plus the music of Orpheus Choir, the Olivetians, and the ONU Jazz Band.

Kim Tabor, musician www.taborministries.com

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To register, call 815-939-5258, or go to www.olivet.edu and select “Online Store” from the Quick Links drop-down menu.

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cover story

Students within the Department of Communication look to Jay Martinson ’86 as a friend and mentor.

Beyond the

books

What I really learned from my Olivet professors By Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

   It’s an interesting verbal dance when I encounter one of my former professors around campus these days. After five years of working at Olivet, I still can’t — for the life of me — figure out how to address them.    I suppose it’s appropriate, eight years after graduation, to call them by their first names. They are, after all, wonderful, down-to-earth people who would never bat an eyelash at such salutations. But, as silly as it sounds, it feels a little like calling my mom “Becky.” They have played such a vital role in shaping who I am today that I feel the need to honor them, even if it’s just with my greetings.

The Olivet Experience

   Recently, a conversation with a young man named Andrew threw me into full-blown nostalgia about my Olivet experience. Andrew and his dad had flown all the way out from Los Angeles to check out whether or not ONU was the place for him to attend college. I asked him what he was thinking about studying, and then got overly excited when he told me he was considering my department of origin: communications.    “Dude,” I said (trying to sound hip, but I’m pretty sure I didn’t), “you HAVE to go over and meet the professors. They are the main reason I picked my major.”    It was true.    I thought back to my crisis freshman moment when I suddenly realized I should not continue to study pre-med since I neither excelled in, nor enjoyed, the sciences. I went into quasi-panic mode because I couldn’t think of a single profession I wanted to pursue, or for that matter, anything I was overly good at.    Within days of this realization, my Speech 101 professor, Dr. Jay ­M artinson, pulled me aside after class to compliment me on a presentation I had given. He told me I had a gift and that he always enjoyed when I gave speeches.    It was that simple and that profound. A gift? You mean talking? ­Seriously?

Dale Oswalt provides personalized attention to education students in and out of the classroom.

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   With nothing to lose, I started taking more classes from that department and soon declared communications as my major. I had no idea how I was going to use it for a living, but I knew it was where I b ­ elonged.    My communication professors were smart. My communication professors were funny. My communication professors were engaging. And in the process of being smart, funny and engaging, they taught me the information and skills I needed to know to build a successful career.    More than that, my professors genuinely cared about me and my classmates. They mentored us, prayed with us, invited us into their homes. When they’d ask me, “How are you doing?” I knew they really wanted to know.    I found this to be true in my general studies courses, as well. In fact, perhaps I was even more acutely aware of these professors’ teaching prowess because they helped me navigate those areas of study where I did not have natural ability or ­interest.    Across the board, my professors were gifted and caring professionals, passionate in their support of the Olivet mission. They provided me a well-rounded education that I not only needed, but enjoyed.

P a y in g t r i b u t e

   In the past few months, I have decided that I’ve avoided figuring out the greetings conundrum for far too long. I’ve tested the waters with a “David” here and a “Sue” there. It feels strange, but inevitable.    Fortunately, as editor of The Olivetian, I have the unique advantage of off-setting my guilt by printing formal tributes to these men and women.


Winter 2010

Champions in the classroom    And so, for all that they have done and all that they are, I say thank you …    … to Larry Ferren, for taking time outside of class to explain the complexities of science that were way over my head.    … to Jay Martinson, who helped me discover my unique gifts and how they fit into my ­calling.    … to Sue Rattin, who, when I told her I’d be leaving Olivet for financial reasons, picked up the phone and made a way for me to stay.    … to Mark Bishop, for making classes something we all looked forward to, and for awarding me first place in our costume contest when I dressed like him for Halloween.    … to Beth Patrick-Trippel, for being a friend and for always pushing me to work harder.    … to Stephen Brown, for overcoming my bias against math — making his class something I actually enjoyed —with his patience and ­humor.    … to David Van Heemst, for helping me understand, and care about, Israeli-Palestinian ­relations.    … to Sue Williams, for fueling my love of the English ­language.    … to Jeff Wells, for providing a stage for building priceless memories and meeting lifelong friends.

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Joan DeHamer Lyons Dr. Franklin Wise, Christian Education ­Department. Dr. Wise was a very kind and gentle man. He did not raise his voice, and he was extremely patient. If a student had a different viewpoint other than his, he ­listened and agreed to disagree. He didn’t talk down to students. He made a great impact on my life at Olivet.

We asked our Facebook fans and Twitter followers to tell us about their favorite professors. Here’s what some of them had to say.

Brad Wolpe

The Olivetian

Prof. Joe Noble. He exemplified Jesus to me!

Carol Foor Watson Prof. Bonita Marquart (elementary ed) required us to develop a HUGE notebook of ideas that proved to be so helpful for the beginning teacher!

Chrissy Williams Dr. Shirlee McGuire … was eccentric but fun!

Cnel23 (Chad Nelson) Any1 can spout off info. TEACHING is getting people to THINK for themselves, and Dr. David Vance can teach.

Sharon Hiatt Jorden Hayes

Dr. Max Reams. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about geology from a Christian viewpoint. He made what could have been a boring class about dead things come alive. But the best part of the class was devotions. His devotions took God’s Word and applied it to our lives, right where we were.

Dr. Charles Carrigan took time for each student and was never afraid to challenge them. He wasn’t just interested in making better geologists, but better scientists and people, as well. He encouraged me to go to graduate school, which has led me to some amazing adventures. I could never thank him enough for that encouragement.

Esther Langford Henderson Leora Legacy. Loved her excitement. You could tell that she loved teaching and was passionate about what she was doing. I still remember her telling about how her husband came to Christ. It was a great testimony!

Stephanie Rogers

Joslyn Williamson Keathley

Dr. Dale Oswalt. He is the most godly man I’ve ever met, and he was always willing to take personal time for any of us. He is so real and honest, it was amazing!!

Dr. Brock Schroeder. Even though I have never been a “science” person, he grew a passion for teaching science and also a passion for astronomy. Brock always did devotions before every class. And they were real and applicable. Sometimes it was a simple story he read; sometimes it was a verse and his thoughts on it, but there was always something. Thank you!

Charlene Robinson Clevenger Prof. Gunnell Jorden. I would say she was tough, but fair. She would mark me down for using a cliché. She stretched my mind, helped me appreciate good literature, and was always a woman of God.

Kathy Street Wright Dr. Rose Burkhardt!!! She brought her harmonica, played “You Are My Sunshine,” cried and told us how we really were her sunshine! From what I understand, she did the same in every class, but that’s OK! Even after she quit teaching she took an art class and TENNIS. I think she was 80+!!!

Lynda Allen ’83/’88 M.B.A. meets in her home with Students in Free Enterprise and a local business owner they are assisting.

Lynette Dering Outler Dr. Harlow Hopkins. Such a humble, gifted man!! Whether in class, on tour, or anytime, he was so even tempered and such a steady man of God. Even under great stress, he showed Jesus and strength!!

Carolyn Daugherty Hulliberger

   … to Kent Olney, who could have taught our class for twice as long, and I still would have hung on every word.    … to Larry Murphy, who provided historical context for biblical passages, and in the process made them come alive.    And to all of the dozens of other professors, who taught me, encouraged me, challenged me and inspired me to be more than I could have ever been had I not been blessed with them in my life.

Damon Spurgeon

Dr. Lynda Allen: She truly cared about her students and desired 4 us to succeed.

Tanner Griffin

Dr. George Dunbar - The Silver Fox!!!!! What a godly man.

Dr. Robert Branson challenged me academically and spiritually. Plus, the trip to Israel allowed me to get to know him a bit better.

Submitted photos

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All of them were my favs, but Vicki Trylong stands out. She was my first and only foreign language prof. Her love of life and people awakened in me a love of other cultures and learning about the heritages of myself and others!

BeeRad21 (Bradley Luchene)

Carole Leake in the business department. I would love to be able to catch up with her now. Her mentoring was invaluable to me.

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To view all the responses, visit www.facebook.com/ olivetnazareneuniversity and www.twitter.com/ olivetnazareneu. While there, make sure to become a fan/follower to stay in touch with ONU and your fellow Olivetians.


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onu news [ SC HOOL OF GR A DUAT E A ND CON T INUING STUDIES ]

Advanced pursuits New master’s programs designed with busy pastors and business executives in mind By Kate Morgan

Olivet’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies recently launched two new master’s degree programs: the Executive Master of Business Administration and the Master of Arts in Pastoral Leadership.

   The Master of Arts in Pastoral Leadership is designed for those currently serving as ministry leaders. Classes for the program will be offered entirely online.    The program is a partnership between Olivet and Nazarene Bible College. Olivet will serve as the teaching university, while NBC will provide the online delivery.    “We’re trying to creatively leverage resources of the denomination to meet pastors where they are,” says Gregg Chenoweth, vice president of academic affairs. “This kind of online program can work well for those who are fully committed, but need ­convenience.”    Intended to nurture theologically informed and missionally ­effective pastoral leaders, the program will address the question, “What does it mean to be an effective leader of a community that embodies and nurtures the life of the Kingdom as we understand it?”    “The Master of Arts in Pastoral Leadership will equip and provide resources for current ministers,” explains Carl Leth, dean of the School of Theology and Christian Ministry. “It will go beyond basic competency to focus on theological leadership.”    Because of the online format, ministry leaders from across the U.S. will lead courses. Instructors include Leth, Ron Lush, Mark Quanstrom, Bruce and Mary Paul, and Dan and Vicki Copp.    “This program and format allows Olivet to get the best faculty available, including those already teaching within the School of Theology and Christian Ministry,” says Leth. “These are leading voices in shaping pastoral leadership.”

“THIS KIND OF ONLINE PROGRAM CAN WORK WELL FOR THOSE WHO ARE FULLY COMMITTED, BUT NEED ­C ONVENIENCE.”

   The Executive MBA will focus on the ethical elements of leadership, alongside traditional business studies.    Students in the 16-month program will complete three sequential online courses, followed by an intensive leadership-infocus weekend. Weekend sessions will include class time, relevant speakers and a leadership development course presented by McKinley Leadership.    “We intentionally designed the Executive MBA for business professionals who want to advance their education but can’t put everything else on hold,” says Ryan Spittal, dean of the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies. “The blended format offers the convenience and flexibility of online learning with five residential weekend sessions.”    Designed to be relevant, current and challenging, the Executive MBA equips students to meet the demands of today’s business world.    “Today’s business leaders face unique challenges,” Spittal says. “Some of the topics covered within the Executive MBA will include developing character-driven leadership, thriving in a global environment, and creating and measuring value.”

For more information, contact the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies at 877-4OLIVET.

“Education with a Christian Purpose”

Students featured in this issue of are recipients of the following Foundation scholarships:

is made possible for our students because of your generosity.

Stephanie Smith

» Rev. and Mrs. Albert Williams Scholarship Cara Sunberg

Joshua Ayers

Sara Byrne

O’Malley King

Bekah Regenfuss

» Virgie Stewart Scholarship

» Dixie Turner Scholarship

» Larry D. Watson Ambassador Scholarship

Lauren Blunier

Machel Cromwell

» Detroit, Mich., First Church of the Nazarene Scholarship

» Dr. Richard T. Lind Scholarship

» Crawford International Scholarship » John and Leah Marangu Scholarship

Matthew Buller

» Alumni Scholarship » Larry D. Watson Ambassador Scholarship

» Perry A. and Florence L. Cook Scholarship » Florence Hyde Scholarship Kenneth MacDonough

» Friends of Olivet Scholarship » Larry D. Watson Ambassador Scholarship

» Felesena Family Scholarship

» Detroit, Mich., First Church of the Nazarene Scholarship

Darcy King

OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY

JANA HACKER ’02

Joe Reisinger Katherine Kulchar

Danielle Johnston

Lukas Burr

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» Ethel Mueller Scholarship

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» Rev. Joseph T. and Connie H. Myers Scholarship

Lauren Versweyveld

Tara Schmidt

Houston Wheeler

» Donald and Faith Bell Family Scholarship

» Marjorie L. Mc Coy and Harold E. Phillips Scholarship

» Marion Fry Scholarship

To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing Foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

Poppy Miller

» Marjorie L. McCoy and Harold E. Phillips Scholarship

FOUNDATION

» Fort Wayne, Ind., Grace Point Church Scholarship » Professor Harvey Humble Scholarship

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one Winter 2010

The Olivetian

One chapel. One seat. One moment. Changes everything.

SPIRITUAL FOOTING

   “We have the awesome privilege of being back at Olivet, and happened to be in the meeting where the idea of seat sponsorships was first discussed. So we talked about how we could be involved, and it was an easy decision to turn in our pledge card. The chapel seat was given in memory of Jean’s mom, Marie Phillips, who attended Olivet in the 40s. We had no idea until later that it was the first chapel seat to be pledged!    “For us, making a gift was the natural thing to do since we both got our ‘spiritual footing’ in chapel. We are also delighted that our two daughters came to Olivet and had similar experiences. They are both settled in their careers and continue to maintain contact with their Olivet ‘lifetime’ friends.    “We would like our grandchildren to follow in the tradition. This is a small way that we can invest in the future of Olivet.”           

— Stan ’74 and Jean (PHILLIPS) Martin ’72

“For us, making a gift was the natural thing to do since we both got our ‘spiritual footing’ in chapel.” — T HE M a rtin S

To sponsor a seat in Centennial Chapel, contact the Office of Development at 815-939-5171 or development@olivet.edu.

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Every person who makes a gift of any size to this project will be recognized on the Wall of Thanksgiving.

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onu alumni

Class Notes 19 40s Dr. E. Drell Allen ’44 and Mrs. Geraldine M. Allen celebrated their seventieth anniversary, Aug. 5, 2009. They also turned 92 and 89, respectively.

19 70s J. Barry Wilson ’77/’99 B.S./’02 M.A. recently published the book, Psycho Bible — Where Modern Psychology Meets Timeless Wisdom. The book reveals the wisdom from which much of modern psychotherapy borrows its fundamental models, the Bible. Barry teaches Bible classes at Olivet, works at Riverside Medical Center and does private counseling. He and wife, Lisa (Workman) ’77, reside in Bourbonnais. Ellen (Brammer) Morrison ’79 spent three weeks teaching a medical course for African physicians in Kampala, Uganda, in early 2009. She found a warm, spirit-filled community of Christian physicians and had a great experience.

19 80s Kevin Jay Bigelow ’87 has written his first book, A Biblical Quest for Truth released by Tate Publishing and Enterprises in December. Kevin Jay Bigelow The book will help Christians answer deep, heart-felt questions about life and God’s word. It will encourage every Christian that it is possible to be an authentic believer with a zealous passion to serve and persuade others to follow Jesus. Kevin and his wife, Amy (Crawford) ’95, along with their two children, live in Linden, Mich. Kevin is a union carpenter, and Amy is a homeschooling mom.

Kathleen (Davis) Klynstra ’03 has accepted the position of Natural Resources ­S p e c i a l i s t I I I w i t h the State of Alaska’s ­Department of Natural Resources. Kathleen lives in Fairbanks, Alaska, with her husband, Josh. Josh is a chemist Kathleen and Josh Klynstra for an environmental consulting company.

The Cook Family

Cyndi (Doyle) ’99 and John Hail: A girl, Anna Noel, Nov. 20, 2008. She joins brother, Brendan, 6. Cyndi is self-employed, and John is a math teacher. They reside in Olathe, Kan. Anna Hail

A m a n d a ( A r t e rburn) ’00 and Eric Bressler ’98: A girl, Anna Christine, Aug. 21, 2009. Anna joins big brother Lukas, 21 months. Eric is a geophysicist, and Amanda is a financial analyst, both with ConocoPhillips. They reside in Houston, Texas.

Rachel (Lewandowski) ’03 and Nicholas Cunningham ’04: A girl, Adleigh Rose, Dec. 9, 2009. She joins siblings Kylee, 3, and Elijah, 2. Nicholas is employed by Applied Systems in University Park, Ill. ­Rachel is a stay-athome mom. They reside Adleigh Cunningham in Bourbonnais.

Lukas and Anna Bressler

20 00s Jason ’00 and Emily Lee: Twin boys, Nathaniel Edwin and AlekNathaniel and sander Marshall, Aleksander Lee Sept. 22, 2009. They join sister Abigail, 4. The family resides in South Hero, Vt. Natalie (Chovancek) ’00 and Samuel Ebnet, Jr. ’00: A boy, Weston Christopher, Dec. 12, 2009. Samuel is a music minister, and Natalie is a television editor. They reside in Valley Village, Calif.

Weston Ebnet

Brady and Shannon (Boyts) ’00 Peikert: A girl, Mackenzie Hope, Feb. 27, 2009. Brady works for Flight Safety International. Shannon is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Ballwin, Mo.

19 90s Duane ’90 and Shelley Romey: A girl, Kendall Paige, Dec. 2, 2008. She joins her brother Chase, 3. Duane is a pilot for Delta Air Lines, and Shelley is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Newnan, Ga.

Ryan and Marcy (Miller) ’01 Secor: A boy, Evan ­K ristopher, Nov. 23, 2009. Marcy teaches fourth grade at Evan Secor Fulton Elementary School in Tinley Park, Ill. Ryan is a commercial airline pilot. They reside in ­Mokena, Ill.

Keri (Gaskill) ’99 and Trevor Cook: A boy, Trace Curtis, Jan. 19, 2009. Trace joins his two older sisters, ­Kianna, 3, and Kaylee, 5. Keri continues to enjoy being a stay-at-home mom to her three kids in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

Joelle (Morrice) ’03 and Lt. Ian Kemp: A boy, Camden Alexander, Oct. 1, 2009. Joelle is a stay-at-home mom, and Ian is a jet pilot for the U.S. Navy. They reside in Virginia Beach, Va.

Camden Kemp

Phil ’03 and Erin (Erwin) ’03 Rexroth: A girl, Harper Katherine, Feb. 11, 2009. She joins big sister, Haley, 3. Phil works in Federal law enforcement, and Erin has her own photography business. They currently reside Harper Rexroth just outside of Washington, D.C. in ­Alexandria, Va. Nick Griffin ’04 accepted the position of head volleyball coach at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Ky. His team finished the 2009 season 45-4 and as the NAIA National Runner-Up, the strongest showing in the program’s history.

Mackenzie Peikert

Brandon Barr ’05 and Nickole Meadows were married April 18, 2009, in Broken Arrow, Okla. Brandon works as a  portfolio officer, and Nicki works as a bank manager, both for Bank of America. They reside in Chicago, Ill.

Nickole and Brandon Barr

Amy (Schweigert) ’05 and Jordan Smith ’05: A girl, Kaylee Rebecca, Dec. 2, 2008. Amy works parttime as an independent skills instructor for a homeless youth shelter, and Jordan works as an accountant for Abraham and Gaffney, P.C. Kaylee Smith They reside in St. Johns, Mich. Jessica Payne ’06 and Melvin Smith were married July 3, 2009, in LaGrange, Ill. Jessica works as a paralegal in Chicago, and Melvin works at World Kitchen in Crete. They reside in Park Forest, Ill.

Melvin and Jessica Smith

Sharon (Swart) ’06 and Kevin Van Kley ’06: A girl, Elizabeth Sue, May 13, 2009. Sharon teaches sixth grade science and eighth Elizabeth Van Kley grade U.S. history at Kouts Middle School, and Kevin is a police officer with the Porter County Sheriff’s Dept. They reside in Kouts, Ind. Seth Hurd ’06/’08 MOL, also known on Shine.FM as “tower,” hosts “The Merge Out Loud,” a Christian music interview show for DirecTV, channel 378. Amanda Bosworth ’07 is a corps member of Teach For America in New York City. She currently teaches eighth grade social studies and English language arts in the Bronx. She graduated from the UniverAmanda Bosworth sity of Michigan in May 2009 with her Master of Social Work degree. Amanda resides in New York, N.Y.

Kendall Romey

Linae (Kendall) ’91 and Robert Hahn: A girl, Ruthann Louise, Jan. 1, 2009. She joins big brother Keith and Ruthann Hahn Keith, Aug. 30, 2007. Robert is an aeronautical engineer for the Illinois Department of Transportation, and Linae is a homemaker. They reside in Bloomington, Ill.

Online Alumni Board Voting Running as new members for the 2009–2010 Alumni Board:

Natalie (Creel) ’95 and Cary Chandler: A boy, Josiah Joe (Jojo), May 6, 2008. He joins brother, Kamea, 5. Natalie is a marriage and family therapist and owner of Imagine Hope CounselJosiah Chandler ing Group in Indianapolis. Cary is an I.T. manager and Web developer. They reside in Fishers, Ind.

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 Sylvia (Freeman) Reed ’82, Huntington, Ind. — Representing Northeast Indiana

 Melinda (Davis) Weber ’81, Fenton, Mich. — Representing Eastern Michigan

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 Leslie (Young) Parrott ’84, Seattle, Wash. — Member at large

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 Roy Wood ’76, Nashville, Tenn. — Member at Large

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For full bios, and to cast your vote, go to www.olivet.edu and click on “Alumni & Friends.” Voting goes through March 31.


Winter 2010

Kerry Steines ’08 and Heather Caldwell ’08 were married June 27, 2009, in Rockford, Ill. Kerry is employed at General Mills, and Heather is employed at CCSI International, Inc. They reside in Belvidere, Ill. Matthew Ryba ’09 and Laura Maiolo ’09 were married May 30, 2009, in Va. Matt works for a sports promotion company. Laura teaches special education and is currently attending graduate school at George-Mason University. The couple resides in Woodbridge, Va.

The Olivetian

13

Upcoming Events 19 50s Helen L. (Barrick) Stroud ’56 passed away Oct. 5, 2009. She and Glendon D. Stroud were married on Aug. 17, 1963. She taught school for 43 years before retiring. Helen was a pastor’s wife and a member of the Nazarene Church.

30th Annual

OLIVET OPEN

Heather and Kerry Steines

19 70s

Matthew and Laura Ryba

20 10s Jamie and Michael Vesely Sr. ’11: A girl, Autumn Hope, Sept. 14, 2009. ­Jamie is currently a Autumn Vesely radiology technologist and Michael is a manager at Jewel Food Stores. They have two other children, Michael Jr. and Emily Cathrine.

In Memoriam 19 40s Alva “Al” Shipman ’44, of Bourbonnais, passed away on Dec. 31, 2009, at the age of 92. He was born in Ney, Alva Shipman Ohio on Nov. 28, 1917, the second of 14 children.    While a member of the first class to attend Olivet Nazarene College in Bourbonnais, in 1940, he was called to active duty in the U.S. Army.    Alva married Dorothy (Koos) Habel, adopting her two children, Daryl and Linda Habel. They added three more sons to their family: James, Terry, and Dennis Shipman. In 1962, Alva married Ethel Howerton.    Al owned his own business, AES Builders, a home-building company. After his retirement, he followed his love for aviation and became a flight instructor and charter pilot serving the Kankakee area airport until 1990. James Bresee Green ’45 of Canton, Ill., passed away peacefully on Nov. 28, 2009. He was born Dec. 18, 1920, in ­Modac, Ind.    While majoring in music at Olivet Nazarene College, he met Rosemary Arnett. They were married Aug. 30, 1946. They became ministers of music in Louisville, Ky., for two years and then in 1948, they made the decision to James Green become full-time song evangelists in the Church of the Nazarene. They ministered together for over 63 years. They had no children, but “adopted” several across the years, who remain close even today. Jim’s hobby was photography, and he was also an avid sports fan.

Joyce A. McKimson ’74, of Homestead, Fla., passed away Jan. 5, 2010. She was born in Kankakee, Ill., Oct. 14, 1952. Joyce taught ele­ mentary school at Princeton Nazarene School in Princeton, Fla., and later at Westminster School in Miami.

Friday, April 30, 2010 Kankakee Country Club Kankakee, Ill.

Friday April

30 2010

Support ONU scholarships while enjoying fellowship and networking opportunities on the green.

Entry donation of $175 per golfer includes green fees, cart, lunch, driving range and a gift.

Joyce McKimson

Kenneth T. Hawkins ’75 of Garrett, Ind., died Oct. 16, 2009. He was born March 2, 1921, in Monroeville, Ind. He married Betty M. Agler on Dec. 13, 1941, in Berne, Ind. Rev. Hawkins pastored seven different churches in northeast Indiana, for a total of 34 years in ministry, retiring in 1986. He was a World War II Army veteran.

For more information and to reserve a foursome or individual golfer, please e-mail Jeff Domagalski at jdomagal@olivet.edu or call 815-928-5455.

19 80s Duke Camp ’87 died Nov. 16, 2009, in Terre Haute, Ind. He was born June 20, 1957, in Arkansas. He lived in Indiana for several years and graduated from Clay City High School in 1977. Duke moved Duke Camp back to Arkansas and began preaching in the towns of Cabot, Mansfield and Ozark. In 1990, he moved to Kankakee, Ill., where he worked at Riverside Hospital in the mental health unit. In 1991, he moved back to Indiana. He was a member of the Free Methodist Church in Clay City. In his free time, he enjoyed spending time outdoors, camping, fishing and spending time with his grandson.

e Take me out to th June 25, 2010 • 7:05 p.m. Parkview Field, Ft. Wayne, Ind.

FRIday

June

25 2010

Tricia (Salerno) Elson ’89 peacefully passed into glory Nov. 20, 2009. Tricia battled cancer for nearly 11 years with courage and strength of faith that impacted hundreds of people. Tricia followed up her B.S. in Zoology from ONU with a Master’s Degree in Education from Westchester Tricia Elson University. Tricia taught in the Rochester (Minn.) School system for several years before becoming a full-time mom. She was married to Lance Elson ’88 and they have one son, Nolan. She loved volunteering at Oakland Christian School, where Nolan attends, and was involved in ministries at both Warren Woods Church of the Nazarene and Clarkston Community Church. She will be dearly missed by her family and many friends.

Alumni and friends in the Ft. Wayne area, join us for a fun-filled evening as the Ft. Wayne Tin Caps take on the Bowling Green Hot Rods!

Tickets are $10 and include admission to the game and free giveaways.

vs. For more information, contact the Office of Alumni Relations at 815-939-5258.

19 90s Heather S. (McMillan) Mattern ’99 of Nappanee, Ind., died Nov. 30, 2009, in a motor vehicle accident. Heather was born March 18, 1977. She was married to Dustin Mattern and had two boys, Charles “Charlie” and Brennan. She attended the Nappanee Missionary Church.

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We’d love to hear FROM YOU!

Send us your news and pictures. Please submit alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through e-mail or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

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onu sports

VISIT WWW.OLIVET.EDU FOR THE LATEST SCORES, SCHEDULES AND SUMMARIES.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Tiger Tracks

Filling their (basketball) shoes

 Men’s Basketball >> The Tigers, led by head coach Ralph Hodge, knew expectations would be high coming into the 2009–10 season. After 20 games played, the Tigers are currently ranked #19 in the January 18 NAIA Division I poll and hold a 14-6 record, 3-0 in CCAC play.    The Tigers also have a number of quality wins. They’ve taken down #11 Union University (Tenn.) 69-66 and #RV Campbellsville Uni­versity (Ky.) 78-63, 2009. On Dec. 17, the Tigers beat NCAA Division 1 opponent Chicago State University, 75-68, for the first win over a NCAA Division 1 opponent in program history. Most recently, they beat CCAC opponent #RV Robert Morris University (Ill.) at Hoosier Hysteria in Indianapolis, at Conseco Fieldhouse, 64-59.    After 20 games the Tigers are getting contributions from a host of players. Guard Josh Bronke ’10 is averaging 12.1 points and 2.7 assists. Point guard Antonio Marshall ’12 is pitching in with 10.8 points and 4.4 a game. Forward Jordan Harks ’13 is adding 10.2 points and 5.9 rebounds a game and has started ten games in his first season. Also, the Tigers’ forward Tyler Wallenfang ’10 returned from his knee injury on Tuesday, January 19, against the University of St. Francis. As a team, the Tigers are shooting 44.9 percent from the field and 34.2 percent from the 3-point line.

B y C as e y M anes In the heart of the men’s basketball season, you’d expect the team to never leave the court. But for the last four years, they’ve been making it tradition to get off the hardwood and go do a little modeling — role modeling that is.    Four years ago, Jeff Hale ’91, the director of athletics at Chicago Heights Church of the Nazarene, approached coach Ralph Hodge about a partnership. The hope was to connect established, successful collegiate basketball players who have a strong faith and character with impressionable kids craving heroes they can look up to.   Hodge saw the partnership as a tremendous opportunity.    “Volunteering and reaching out to others through basketball is an important part of building our team,” he says. “Character on and off the count is important for our players, and so it is important to offer them a chance to give back.”    In essence, it was all about asking college men to be role models worth children’s adoration and emulation. In turn, Jeff prays these young, impressionable kids will choose the right “shoes” to try and fill as they grow into adulthood.    So for one weekend, the kids from Jeff’s church trek to the Olivet camp’s for a Tiger basketball game. Then, the Tiger men return the favor by visiting Chicago Heights church services on Sunday and offering a fundamentals basketball clinic afterward.    “Our intent is to interact with the kids in a clinic and church service,” explains Hodge. “We share the Gospel through a player testimony and introduce them to our Academic All-Americans. We hope the kids will realize the importance of being more than a basketball player.”

 Men’s Indoor Track and Field >> The Tigers would first travel to Kenosha, Wis., on Saturday, Jan. 16 to compete in the Private College Invite hosted by Carthage College. ONU showed well, finishing third of eleven teams with 59 points. Individually, Thomas Powers ’12 finished first in the one mile with a time of 4:29.24. Ben Fay finished second in the 800 meter dash (2:01.97). The Tigers gained another five points from Marcus Reynolds ’13 in the 55 meter hurdles with a time of 8.13. Reynolds also finished sixth in the men’s long jump with a distance 6.14 meters.    The Tigers then headed to Grand Valley State University for the Bob Eubanks Invitational. Kenny MacDonough ’11 competed in his home state, finishing second in the men’s 5000 meter run with a time of 15:24.50. In the field, Brandal Miles ’13 finished seventh in the men’s triple jump with a distance of 12.75 meters. Joe Reisinger ’12 finished seventh in the men’s shot put with a throw of 15.09 meters. He also finished 11th in the men’s weight throw with a distance of 14.17 meters.  Women’s Basketball >> The Olivet Nazarene University women’s basketball team has had a rough go of things to start the 2009–2010 season. Currently, the Tigers are 9-14 overall and 1-2 in conference action. After starting the year strong with a 112-94 win over Lindenwood Univeristy (Mo.) on Nov. 2, the young team consisting of 10 freshmen and four sophomores has had a bumpy ride.    There have been a few bright spots on the year, beginning with junior college transfer Simone Coburn ’11. Coburn is having a great season, averaging a team-high 15.4 points and 6.9 rebounds per game, as well as posting a .545 shooting percentage. Danielle Pipal ’12 has been doing a great job of distributing the ball, as she has accumulated 102 assists. Jaimie Buckman ’12 has also been a force as she currently stands with an impressive 52 blocked shots thus far. The women hope to get things back on track as they continue to prepare for the conference tournament that is set to begin March 2.

   Not only does it impact kids from the local church, it also has made an impression on Olivet’s team.    “This experience has really been a blessing to our team and the kids’ sports league at the Chicago Heights church,” says Hodge. “Watching young kids respond to the players is encouraging.”    “The experience is something I always look forward to,” adds Antonio Marshall ’12, a starting guard for the Tigers. “It is a chance for me to do two things I love. I get to teach and coach at the same time. Working with the kids is so fun because they want to learn so much and they really look up to us. It is definitely a blessing getting to work with them.”    Jeff’s program and connection with the Tigers continues to grow stronger. In the last ten years since he began the youth sports league program — which also includes sports such as baseball, soccer and flag football — at his church, the numbers have grown from 10 kids to over 800.    Senior pastor Randy Dodd explains, “The program teaches character and Scripture on purpose. We are about sharing the Gospel. We see it making a difference every week, without fail.”    “We use the ball as a tool to teach Jesus,” adds Jeff, who majored in physical education at Olivet.    “The kids are so excited and always anticipate the team coming. They enjoy hearing the testimony of a college student. Our big goal and dream is to see our students grow up for Jesus and that one day, one of our students would go to Olivet and play there too.”

Submitted photos

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 Women’s Indoor Track and Field >> The Tigers opened

their indoor season Jan. 16 at the Private College Invitational hosted by Carthage College. The Tigers placed well, concluding the meet with one champion and four second place finishes. Lauren Versweyveld ’11 took first in the 3000 meter run with a time of 10:40.14, while teammate Katie Thorne ’11 finished second in the race at 11:14.27. O’Malley King ’12 placed second in the 55 meter hurdles, crossing the finish line in 8.80, Bekah Regenfuss ’10 took second in the one mile run with a time of 5:29.86, and Caitlin McPherson ’13 also placed second in the shot put with a distance of 38-00.25.    The Tigers then went on to compete in the Bob Eubanks Invitational hosted by Grand Valley State University on Jan. 22. Versweyveld again took home a victory for her squad, the lone one of the day for ONU. Versweyveld competed in the 5000 meter run and crossed the finish line in a time of 18:03.59, 28 seconds ahead of the competition. Ashley Fozkos ’11 also finished notably, as she took fifth place in the pole vault with a height of 11-03.75. The indoor season will conclude March 4–6 as the Tigers hope to qualify for the NAIA National Meet.

 Women’s Soccer >> With the conclusion of the 2009 season,

the Olivet Nazarene University women’s soccer team had a tremendous year. With a final overall record of 18-3-3, the Tigers dominated the competition on the soccer field, finishing with the best record in program history to date. The team ranked No. 18 in the final NAIA coaches’ poll, but they slowly climbed up the charts throughout the season to top off at No. 12 on Oct. 27. With a loss to Robert Morris in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference semifinal game, the women traveled to Florida to defend their NCCAA title. It was a rematch of the 2008 title game, but The Master’s College came out on top this time defeating the Tigers 4-1. ONU finished the season ranked No. 3 in the NCCAA.

SPORTS SHORTS 22 named Scholar-Athletes | 22 Tigers have been named Daktronics-NAIA Scholar-Athletes for the fall season. Football: Matt Buller ’10, Aaron Caldwell ’10, Marty Pritchett ’11, Tyler Doersam ’10. Men’s cross country: Drew Collette ’10, Ben Fay ’10, James Nuxoll ’10 and Houston Wheeler ’10. Men’s Soccer: Josh Ayers ’10, Cory Miller ’10, Machel Cromwell ’11 and Jose Villa ’10. Women’s Soccer: Mackensie Duvendack ’10, Danielle Johnston ’10, Katie Gremar ’10, Darcy King ’11, Katherine Kulchar ’11 and Cara Sunberg ’11. Volleyball: Sara Byrne ’11, Tara Schmidt ’12, Stephanie Smith ’10 and Laura Kirst ’11.

k The Tigers mentor young athletes in partnership with Chicago Heights Church of the Nazarene.

Women’s soccer Seven named to All-CCAC squad | Seven Tigers in total were named to the CCAC All-Conference squad. Forward Michelle Davis ’11 (14 goals, 3 assists), mid-fielder Janel Schmitt ’12 (7 goals, 1 assist), defender Brittany Hengesh ’11 and goal keeper Danielle Johnston ’10 (104 saves, 14 shutouts) were awarded first team honors, while forward Meghan Pipal ’13 (10 goals, 4 assists), defender Devin Johnston ’13 and defender Katherine Kulchar ’11 were announced as second team selections. Head coach Bill Bahr ’96/’02 M.B.A. was named co-coach of the year. He shared the title with Josh Lenarz, head coach at Trinity Christian College.    Two Tigers were also named to the NAIA All-American team as honorable mentions. Schmitt and Johnston were honored with the award for their successful seasons. volleyball Sikora named CCAC MVP and Setter of the Year | Erin Sikora ’10 was one of six Tigers represented on the All-CCAC volleyball squad. Sikora (10.22 assists/game, 1.1 kills/game, .310 attacking percentage, 27 service aces, 300 digs) was named Most Valuable Player and Setter of the Year. Sara Byrne ’11 (469 kills, 22 service aces, 90 digs, 29 solo blocks, 133 assisted blocks), Tara Schmidt ’11 (381 kills, 5 solo blocks, 84 assisted blocks) and Stephanie Smith ’10 (446 kills, 58 service aces, 506 digs, 35 assisted blocks) also received first-team honors, while Terese Byrne ’12 and Molly Goldbach ’12 were named honorable mentions. Coach Brenda Williams was named CCAC Coach of the Year.    Sikora was also named to the Tachikara-NAIA/AVCA All-America

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second team, while Schimdt was named to the third team and Sara Byrne took home honorable mention honors. men’s cross country MacDonough named Runner of the Year | After earning a fourthstraight CCAC Championship, the Tigers were well represented for All-CCAC honors. Kenny MacDonough ’11, who won the 8K conference race with a time of 26:29.88, was named CCAC Runner of the Year. Joining him on the all-conference squad were Andrew Clausen ’10, Kyle Boone ’13, Drew Collette ’10, Kasey Ferrigan ’13 and Justin Jones ’12.   Head coach Mike McDowell was named CCAC Coach of the Year for the fourth consecutive season. football Scherer and Burr lead honors | Two Tigers represented Olivet for the MSFA All-League honors. Tight end David Scherer ’10 (8 touchdowns, 11.9 yards/reception) was named to the offensive second team. Lineman Lukas Burr ’10 (25 solo tackles, 17 assisted tackles, 14 tackles for loss, 8 sacks, 1 fumble recovery, 3 blocked kicks) was named to the defensive second team. men’s soccer Four named to first team | Josh Ayers ’10 (12 goals, 8 assists), Raphael Correa ’12 (9 goals, 6 assists), Cory Miller ’10 (1 goal) and Vincent Mkwhanazi ’10 (2 goals, 2 assists) were named to the All-CCAC first team. Kenny Huber ’11 (61 saves, 8 shut-outs) received honorable mention honors.


ten questions

Winter 2010

The Olivetian

15

HAILING FROM COURTSIDE

1

You had a strong basketball career at Olivet as a forward. How does it feel to now be coaching girls who are former teammates?    It’s been an interesting transition from playing to coaching, especially with those girls I played with. You just can’t forget about that relationship you’ve built as teammates, and I wouldn’t want to anyway. I think that relationship has helped in my attempts to coach those girls because I’ve already established that credibility with them as a former teammate. It’s been difficult to make that transition, though, because in my heart I’d much rather be playing with them than coaching them.

2

What is your favorite part of this role as one of the team’s assistant coaches?    The best part about it is that I’m able to stay involved with basketball and with our team. I love this game, and coaching is the next best thing to playing. I loved playing for this team, and I’m glad to be a part of another season of Tigerball.

3

Is there a story behind your unique name? (And are you tired of people asking you this yet?!)    I do get asked about my name, but for good reason! My mom wanted unusual names for her kids, so she named my older sister Molly. That quickly became more common, though, so she searched even harder for a name for me. She actually found it in a baby name booklet next to her hospital bed, and she fell in love with it. She was afraid my dad would think it was too odd, but he loved it, too. I didn’t like my name when I was in kindergarten because it was too different, but now I really love it and am glad to have a unique name.

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What kept you playing bas ketball beyond high school and into college?    I fell in love with basketball at the age of 4 after watching Michael Jordan play. I’ve never been able to get enough of it since then, and I knew I wanted to play for as long as I possibly could. I love being part of a team, and basketball has always brought me an incredible sense of joy that I don’t want to be without.

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Do you have a favorite glory  moment while you were an ONU Tiger?    A couple of moments stick out in my mind. One was my junior year when we beat our rival, St. Xavier, in a conference tournament championship game. It was a great victory for us and secured our spot in the national tournament. Another moment was during my senior year when we played Huntington. We were down by 15 at halftime and came back to win by two. The five of us seniors played in the same group, and we all scored in double digits that game. It was a special moment because I loved playing with those girls, and we made some great plays together in that game.

we play here at ONU. I love the fastpaced style and the way coach has always gotten his players to play hard and relentlessly. It’s what makes our style so unique, and I enjoy being a part of that.

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Ever have a game that you kept replaying in your head because of a mistake you made? How did you get beyond that cycle mentally as a player?    I’ve always been my own toughest critic, and I would always replay my mistakes after each game. It was hard to sleep some nights,

10 Questions with

Poppy

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What are  your future aspirations?    I just finished my degree in physical education/health, but it’s not likely that I’ll pursue a job in that area. I really enjoy coaching and I would love to stay involved with basketball in the future. That may very well mean coaching, but I’ve not completely decided on anything yet. I will follow where the Lord leads me!

Miller ’09 olivet tiger women assistant basketball coach

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What are some of the benefits you gleaned beyond the court from being part of a team at the college level at ONU?    Playing a sport in college teaches you a lot. It teaches you better time management, responsibility, and the importance of communication to name a few. And even as cliché as it sounds, athletics really does teach you about the importance of teamwork and hard work. I benefitted from learning more about all of these things, and I became a better leader and communicator because of my basketball career here. What is it like  to go from such intense physical training as a collegiate athlete to not having that same physical regiment?    It’s been very strange to not have the intense physical exercise that I’ve been accustomed to for so many years with sports. My body needed a rest so I took it, but now I’m getting back into a new exercise routine. I lift light weights a few times a week and run some days, as well. There’s a group of us alumni players who get together and play pickup basketball games, and we’re playing intramurals now too. It’s hard for an athlete to lose the sense of competition that comes through their sport, so it felt great to start playing again and having that competitive outlet.

What is something about the coaching style you’ve served under at ONU that you hope to take with you and make your own?    I’ve always liked the structure and routine of coach [Doug] Porter’s practices, and I could see myself structuring mine in a similar way. Mostly I really enjoy the run-and-gun system that

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but I learned to channel that frustration into working harder to correct those mistakes. That helped me become a better player.

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