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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS Vol. 76, No. 3

Winter 2009

www.olivet.edu

MATTHEW GLENN ’04/’07 MAE:

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

math, science and technology coordinator for Kankakee School District and one of the “30 under 30.” Read more, page 6.

HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS AMUSE AND AMAZE

HODGE AND WILLIAMS JOIN 600 CLUB

HE SAID, SHE SAID. INTERVIEW WITH THE OLNEYS.

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snapshots

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

improv Record-breaking wind chill couldn’t stop students and Purple & Gold Days attendees from coming out for a hilarity-packed evening with the highly popular ComedySportz improv troupe January 16.

Contributing Writers Michael Benson Casey Manes Kate Morgan Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03 Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

happy life In a highly interactive and fun evening, Dan Seaborn taught couples of all ages how to celebrate marriage during the Marriage Rendezvous, sponsored by Marriage Inc., on January 30.

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div. Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90

hoops and    hilarity

Thousands of fans witnessed the comedy, high jinks and incredible stunts of the Harlem Globetrotters during two sold out January games in McHie Arena. No one was surprised to see them beat the Washington Generals, who have only won three games against the Globetrotters since 1962.

Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D. Dean, School of Graduate and Continuing Studies Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2009 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

birthday    boy Dr. Bowling received his biggest card from his biggest fans while celebrating the anniversary of his birth. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

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perspectives

Winter 2009

The Olivetian

By Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./’06 D.Div., University President

Setting an

T

his issue of The Olivetian demonstrates that it doesn’t take long for Olivet graduates to begin to make a huge difference in the world. Our goal for this issue was to identify 30 graduates, less than 30 years of age, who are already having a significant influence as they live out the “Education with a Christian Purpose” they gained during their student years on campus.

I see many of the immediate effects even before our students graduate as I watch as hundreds of students each year volunteer to make a difference on campus and well beyond.

   What surprised our staff was how difficult it turned out to be to limit our focus to just 30. We contacted faculty and alumni to solicit names of individuals to be considered, and we were nearly overwhelmed with scores of strong recommendations.    The first name that came to my mind was Dr. Jonathan ­Pollock. Jon graduated from Olivet in 2001 and then enrolled at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. After graduating with honors, he began his residency at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. He is now in his fourth year.    As I write this, Jon and his wife, Rebecca (Ratzloff) ’01, have just finished an extended stay in Bangladesh, where Jon completed his surgical rotation. Jon is already distinguishing himself as a doctor — but to me the most significant thing about him is who he is as a person. He is a caring, capable man of character. Dr. Pollock’s plan is to invest his education and his skills as a medical missionary. But it is clear that he won’t have to wait to be a missionary. He has already done that at the University of Illinois, at Emory University Hospital and now in ­Bangladesh.    I have known for a long time that the impact and value of an Olivet education are both immediate and long-term. I see many of the immediate effects even before our students graduate as I watch as hundreds of students each year volunteer to make a difference on campus and well beyond. And I have been around Olivet long enough to verify that an Olivet education has staying power and pays dividends across the span of one’s life and career. It is encouraging to look through these pages and see how quickly these individuals are putting into practice the lessons learned here at Olivet.    I am reminded of the admonition St. Paul gave to his young friend and colleague, Timothy. He wrote, “Don’t let anyone look down on you because you are young, but set an example for the believers in speech, in life, in love, in faith and in purity.” (1 Timothy 4:12 NIV)    How rewarding it is for all of us who care about Olivet to know that each year hundreds of graduates take this verse and put it into street clothes as they “set an example” to a watching world!

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olivet online

cafeteria

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Where others might have seen a nuisance, Ed saw an opportunity for growth. And now these two are not only friends, but also passionate food critics working for the same team.

ust a few days into his new job, Ed Daugherty got more than an earful from student Kendall Cramer ’09. “When he came out to talk to me, I voiced my opinion rather loudly and ignorantly,” Kendall admits of his first meeting with the new manager of Sodexo, Olivet’s food service.

RECENT STORIES

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To read Ed and Kendall’s story, go to www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

ROTC cadets hoop it up and win

Olivet continues to make headway in

effort to “go green”

Don Lee returns to alma mater to lead football program DON LEE ’95

ies

A-team expands to include dean of School of Graduate and Continuing Stud

Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

Visit www.olivet.edu and click “News & Events” for the latest news about Olivet Nazarene University. w

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Winter 2009

   When all hope

The Olivetian

was lost,

Rowan counted on the God of

  impossibilities.

At 9 years old, I felt the call to missions. I accepted the challenge and set my life on a course to become a full-time missionary.

“Assured of my call, I applied for admission and was accepted. However, my parents were dismayed at the cost of attendance; they could never afford to send me to ONU.

“When it came time to choose a college, I was certain God wanted me to attend a Christian university. I desired a school that would not only instruct me in success strategies for the real world, but would also mold me into a useful instrument for the kingdom. God led me to Olivet Nazarene University.

“Fortunately for us, God loves to show His grace through triumphing over impossible situations.

“Now I am able to pursue my dream of bringing the mission field home to America through film. I just want to say a huge and heartfelt thank you to all the alumni and friends who helped get me to Olivet.”

“I entered Olivet as a transfer student in fall 2007, with the help of academic scholarships through the ONU Foundation and a scholarship from my home church.

Rowan Woolsey ’11, film studies major, intercultural studies minor, Roby, Missouri

Give Today. Change Tomorrow. 815-939-5171  |  www.olivet.edu  |  development@olivet.edu

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cover story

30 30 under

BY K ATE MORGAN, CASEY MANES and HEATHER (QUIMBY) DAY ’02

The idea for “30 under 30”

was born out of a conversation about how quickly Olivet alumni hit the ground running after leaving their alma mater. Armed with education, talent, and a passion to serve God’s kindgom, hundreds of ONU grads literally scatter around the globe each year, transforming the world for Christ.    This is in no way intended to be a “Best Of” list, but rather a snapshot of what some of our youngest alumni are doing.    May their “success” — in its many shapes and forms — be an inspiration to us all, as we strive to live out God’s purposes for each of us in our daily lives.

Matthew Glenn ’04/’07 MAE is the math, science and technology coordinator for Kankakee School District #111. The former math teacher is now responsible for curriculum and instruction related to math, science and technology for the 5,400 students in the district. He recently implemented and managed the nearly $1 million Enhancing Education through Technology Grant, which provided new technology and professional development in three of the district schools.

Age: 27 Graduate degree: Olivet Nazarene University, Master of Education in curriculum and instruction

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Current position: Math/science/ technology coordinator, Kankakee School District, Kankakee, Ill.

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Most rewarding part of his job: “The most rewarding part is being able to lead and facilitate staff in changes that will affect the students in our school district.”

IMAGE GROUP PHOTOGRAPHY

MATTHEW GLENN ’04/’07 MAE, Math Education


Winter 2009

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Jeff Forgrave ’02,

The Olivetian

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Computer Science

Age: 29 Graduate degree: Indiana University Kelley School of Business, MBA Job title: Team leader – laboratory informatics, Eli Lilly & Company, ­Indianapolis, Ind. Advice for people entering his career field: “IT leaders in non-IT based companies have an important seat at the table to influence strategic decisions within an organization. It’s not only important to keep up with the latest technology trends, but also to develop deep business acumen so that the voice you bring to the table is heard and has a positive impact on the organization you work for.”

Lauren Seaman ’03 (center)

Kristi (Bennett) Gruver ’02,

The democracy dance

Biology

Age: 29 Graduate degree: Ohio State, Ph.D. in molecular genetics Job title: Postdoctoral research fellow, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, ­Cleveland, Ohio Most rewarding part of her job: “There are two equally rewarding qualities of working in cancer research. One is the opportunity I have to daily search for ways to battle cancer and improve the quality of life for those afflicted with the disease. Secondly, as I study intricate biological systems, I have the chance to be reminded of how awesome, complex and perfect God’s design truly is.”

When Lauren Seaman ’03 mentioned his job description to one of his college pals following graduation, he got an interesting response.    “He said, ‘Ah, democracy in Africa — so you’ve got job security!’” shares Lauren. “There is probably some truth to that. News out of Africa is usually rather discouraging. The type of work we do can be complicated and, at times, overLAUREN SEAMAN ’03 whelming; nevertheless, it is extremely Political science and French important.”    Lauren works in Washington D.C. Age: 28 with the nonprofit, nonpartisan organizaJob title: Assistant Program Officer tion International Republican Institute. for International Republican Institute West Africa, Washington, D.C.    “Our mission is to advance freedom and democracy around the world — Graduate degree: M.A. Intercultural Studies - Nazarene Theological no, I don’t get to wear a cape!” shares Seminary Lauren, humorously, on his work that focuses on the IRI’s Africa division.    He handles programming in Nigeria, Liberia and Mali. His political science and French studies directly correlate to the contact work he does within Africa and the administrative tasks that sometimes tend to take too much of his time when he is in D.C.    Lauren frequently participates in the latest foreign policy conversations on Africa, meets with ambassadors and foreign dignitaries, as well as coordinates with IRI’s partners in the U.S. government. In the last year his work travels brought him to Liberia, Cote d’Ivoire and Nigeria.    “While in Liberia, I helped train political party leaders and supported our grassroots women’s and youth programs.”    Having grown up in Cote’d’Ivoire as a missionary kid, Lauren is no stranger to Africa and the myriad of contradictions, beauty and heartache riddled through the core of that country.    Being bound tightly with the people in Africa throughout his growing up years directly impacted his decision to minister there still. But it isn’t an easy or conflictfree process. Much of what he saw growing up and still witnesses now on his work trips builds an uncomfortableness within him that keeps him motivated.    “My job ‘messes me up’ every single day. If you ask my friends and family you will understand I have struggled immensely with trying to wrap my mind around what it is I do. I am constantly growing as the Lord guides me through the maze of inequality and injustice I see in so many places.    “It is impossible to grow up in Africa without being deeply impacted by the people and the circumstances around you. A few months after I left for college, I witnessed the collapse of the place I called home after a military coup ransacked the country and sent it spiraling out of control. Ten years later, the conflict has yet to be resolved. That single event has so far defined the direction of my career,” explains Lauren.    Though his friend’s comment about his job security holds some truth, Lauren has found hope in events in Africa not covered by the media.    “In my job I witness the small steps, the progress that, although most of the world never hears about, is beginning to make a difference.    “One instance stands out in particular. In Liberia many of the women who attended our workshop were illiterate. In fact, most of them pressed their thumb onto an ink pad as a means of ‘signing in,’ because they could not write their names. It was a little discouraging at first.    “As the training session went on, however, I found a fervor and determination in the crowd I did not expect. They may not have been able to read or write, but they could sing. The theme song they shouted in unison was ‘Side by Side.’ The words are simple, yet clear: Side by side, side by side No longer men in the front and women at the back, But men and women working side by side, side by side!    “In a predominantly paternal society, women have taken great strides in Liberia. They elected the first woman president on the continent of Africa in November of 2005. The United States is a 233-year-old democracy and has yet to accomplish that feat,” shares Lauren.    “My job has its challenges, but the greatest reward is knowing I am smack dab right where God wants me.”

Nick Sefton ’02, Elementary Education, Middle School Endorsement

Age: 29 Job title: Director of student ministries, Heartland Church, Indianapolis, Ind. How he chose his career: “It chose me. I taught 7th grade science in an inner city school for three years and coached high school football. Six months into the job, God led my family to Heartland. I served as a volunteer for two years and then was invited onto the team. I said no for a year and then gave in to what God would have for me and my family.”

Jeremy Dale ’03,

Communication

Age: 29 Job title: Comic book illustrator/storyteller, Self-employed, Columbia, SC. Highlights since college: “I have worked on several award-winning comics and graphic novels, including G.I. Joe for Hasbro and Popgun for Image Comics, for which I received a 2008 Harvey Award (one of the top honors in the comic field).” Most rewarding part of his job: “For me, it’s all about my readers and fans. They catch every nuance in the expressions I draw, every hidden aside I toss in. Seeing them enjoy my work so much makes my job that much easier when I have another late-night work session ahead of me.”

Chad Hilligus ’03,

Music Performance

Age: 27 Graduate degree: University of Utah School of Music, Master of Music in voice performance Profession: Singer/actor, New York City/San Diego, Calif. Current work: “Right now I’m doing four productions with San Diego Opera and filming a new Web series called ‘Jenn 2.0’ shot in San Diego.” His job as a ministry: “I think most people view ‘entertainment’ as a dark business. I vowed early on to find ways to be a light. My industry is full of people who have been rejected by the Church. Not God. The Church. I believe it’s my responsibility to show God’s love rather than the Church’s judgment.”

Laura (Ober) Kanagy ’03,

Geology

Age: 28 Job title: Project Manager of the Land Application Department/ Hydrogeologist, Goldie & Associates, Seneca, SC Current project: “My favorite project currently involves designing a land application system that will take the treated effluent from a town’s wastewater treatment system and disperse it over a farmer’s fields to irrigate his hay crop. South Carolina has been in a severe drought the last several years, and so it is extremely exciting to be able to solve one problem by helping this man have a healthy, productive crop.”

Lauren Seaman ’03,

Political science and French

Christina Doerr ’04,

Biology

Age: 25 Graduate degree: Southern Illinois School of Medicine, M.D. Job title: OB/GYN Resident, Southern Illinois University, Springfield, Ill. Fact that would most surprise her college classmates: “I joined the military! Once I’m done with residency, I will serve in the Air Force as a p ­ hysician.”

Matthew Glenn ’04/’07 MAE, Jared Parsons ’04,

Math Education

Chemistry

Age: 27 Job title: Fuel & coolant engineer, Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, Ill. What God has been teaching him lately: “God has been teaching me the power of selflessness. It is unbelievable how much you can positively impact a co-worker, your spouse, your kids, or anyone else you come in contact with by putting that person ahead of yourself. It seems so basic and fundamental to being a Christian, but it is so counterintuitive to who we are.”

CONTINUED, NEXT PAGE

SUBMITTED PHOTOS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

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cover story “30 under 30,” continued from page 7

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Bill Radtke ’04,

Mathematics Education

Age: 26 Job title: Volunteer high school pastor/seminary student, Mosaic Church, Los Angeles, Calif. His words to live by: “Don’t take yourself too seriously. Everyone screws up; just say sorry and move on. You are going to try to do it on your own and fail. Don’t quit; just pray and allow God to work through you. Don’t take the easy road. Allow yourself to be challenged and do something crazy!”

On the beat

Nicole (Franz) Radtke ’04, Social Work/Psychology

Age: 26 Job title: Nanny, Los Angeles, Calif. Fact that would most surprise her college classmates: “I started a charity while my husband, Bill, and I lived in Scotland for four years. The charity is a crisis pregnancy center called Hope. I set it up from 2005–2006 and managed it until we left Scotland in 2008.”

Brian Canaday just couldn’t take no for an answer. Actually, he couldn’t take silence for an answer.    There he sat in the hallways of NBC affiliate WAND-TV, Decatur, Ill., dressed in his most professional garb, patiently waiting for a word with the news director. No, he didn’t have an appointment. Yes, his phone calls to the station had all gone Brian Canaday ’07 unreturned. No, that didn’t seem to faze Mass Communication him one bit.    “Do you have any openings?” he Age: 23 asked. Job title: News Reporter, WAND-TV    “No.” (NBC affiliate), Springfield, Ill.    But it turns out, there was an opening … for a cameraman.    While the recent graduate had dreams of becoming a sportscaster, Brian jumped at the chance to get his foot in the door. And within six months he had earned a spot as a reporter at the station’s Springfield bureau.    The persistent attitude that helped him land the job certainly doesn’t hurt as he tracks down stories in the state’s capital city.    “With the recent events surrounding Governor [Rod] Blagojevich, what’s happening in Springfield is now a national story,” he shares.    “I still might be a little ‘green behind the ears,’ but I’m constantly talking with Illinois lawmakers. I’ve talked with [now-Senator] Roland Burris. I talked with Blagojevich several times — before all of this came out; who would have known this would happen? I’m pretty fortunate to be in the right place at the right time.”    Keeping in mind how fortunate you are is key when you’re scrambling to get a story done on time, he says.    “The job is seen as glamorous, with people only seeing the final, polished product. But before that, no one sees you work nine or ten hours for a 90-second story.”    In fact, Brian says it’s not unusual for news reporters to consider themselves a “one-man band.” On any given day he’s finding a story, securing interviews, writing the story and editing the film. Preparing for a 10 p.m. newscast, he could be sweating it out until 9:45, meticulously writing and editing, rewriting and reediting.    While his goal remains to become sportscaster — and he has been called on to fill in for the nightly sports anchor on occasion — for now, he’ll keep to the capital beat.    And to those politicians who tend to prefer to answer questions with a standard, “No comment,”? Fair warning: Brian Canaday isn’t likely to take no for an answer.

Kari (Sloane) Sanduka ’04, Computer Science Brandon Barr ’05,

Finance and Economics

Age: 25 Job title: Special assets group portfolio analyst/officer, Bank of America, Chicago, Ill. Most challenging part of his job: “I work with the bank’s troubled loans to try and restructure the debt through equity injections, refinancing or an exit of the banking relationship. So it’s challenging dealing with the troubled economy and its impact on Bank of America’s clients and their loans.”

Kimberly Meiste ’05,

Vocal Performance/Church Music

Age: 26 Job title: Development coordinator/music editor, Lillenas Publishing Company, Kansas City, Mo. Her job as a ministry: “I know that the work I accomplish has eternal implications. The projects we produce are used in churches worldwide as instruments of worship. I’ve seen how our music has touched my heart and can only begin to imagine how He’s using our projects in the local church.”

Bethany Smith ’05,

Music Performance

Age: 25 Job title: Private music instructor, Lafayette, Ind. Fact that would most surprise her college classmates: “I play violin and keyboard in a Christian rock band, TitusJustus. We released our first CD in March of 2007, and currently perform in Indiana and surrounding areas.”

Sherri (Shouse) Smith ’05, Child Development

Age: 26 Graduate degree: University of La Verne (Calif.), Master of Science in child life Job title: Kindergarten teacher, C.T. Sewell Empowerment School, Henderson, Nev. Her first post-college job: “I spent several years as a child life specialist. Teaching hospitalized children about their disease, illness, tests and procedures was my favorite part of the job. Eventually I would like to have a dual role in the hospital where I am able to meet a child’s psychosocial needs, teaching about their disease and illness, and also fulfill the educational component.”

Captain Luke Wadsworth ’05, Business Administration

Age: 25 Job title: Executive Officer, Alpha Company – 110th Technical Escort Battalion, U.S. Army, Fort Lewis, Wash./Iraq How he chose his career: “The ROTC program at ONU was a fantastic way to increase my leadership skills and an opportunity to serve my country.”

Rachel Black ’06,

New frontiers

Nursing

Age: 24 Job title: Registered Nurse, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Ill. What God’s been teaching her: “In the past year, I have had the opportunity to go to Turkey for both medical missions and relational evangelism. My eyes have been opened to the Muslim culture and their desperate need to know a God who loves them and wants to be in relationship with them. At this point, I believe He is leading me to long-term missions work somewhere in the Muslim world.”

Tricia Miller ’06,

Kari (Sloane) Sanduka didn’t anticipate diaper duty being one of her responsibilities. After all, she is a computer programmer for the United Space Alliance in Florida, using her computer science expertise to maintain the databases for the shuttle engineering departments.    But two years ago, there was an even greater challenge in store for her than assisting with the United States shuttle program. This one, she didn’t see coming.    She and her husband got the news she was pregnant.    “I personally feel like I’ve had a lot of chalKARI (SLOANE) SANDUSKA ’04 lenges throughout my life, Computer Science most of which have been rewarding,” shares Kari. Age: 26 “However, I can say that Graduate degree: Information technology the most challenging, but ­management yet most rewarding, was Job title: Web applications programmer, the birth of my son. United Space Alliance, Titusville, Fla.

Journalism

Age: 25 Job title: Editorial assistant, Roll Call newspaper, Alexandria, Va. Why she chose her career: “I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was a kid. Reporting forces me to step outside my comfort zone to explore — and then write about — a wide variety of topics. Reporting on politics is especially interesting because the political process touches everything.”

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Winter 2009

   “Ian was an unexpected gift from God. My husband and I weren’t exactly planning to have a child, but we found out we were pregnant after only being married for seven months.”    Kari’s world centered around her prestigious career and she enjoyed the demanding — but rewarding — work. For most people, dealing with intense computer operations would be petrifying, but it was the thought of a baby that began to tickle Kari’s nerves.    “The thought of having a child scared me a lot. I had fears that I would be the kind of mother who put career first and her child second. As the pregnancy progressed, my fears increased.”    But all it took was one look at her little boy and she was hooked.    “Before I was pregnant, I could never imagine life with a child. Now I cannot imagine my life without him,” reflects Kari.    But what did this mean for the career she has worked hard to achieve?    “I ended up changing my work schedule around so I could spend more time at home with Ian in the evenings. It’s such an amazing feeling to see Ian experience things for the first time,” shares Kari.    Though she thrives at her computer job, originally it is one she didn’t expect to enjoy. When she prepared to graduate from Olivet, Kari planned to work in an information technology field, using her computer science degree, and hoped to avoid programming computers. But then United Space Alliance found her and she started out as an auditor.    Then a programming job opened up.    “I ended up applying for the job on the very last day of its positing timeframe. I’ve been in the programming position for the past three-and-a-half years, and I know I made the right move.”    Even while she continues in this field she didn’t plan on liking so much — working to equip shuttles that take on the universe — Kari’s favorite role continues to be that of mom — diaper duty and all.

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Home sweet home

Liz Hollenberg sat in her room, listening to her family in the other room, grappling with feelings of homesickness. After months away, working for World Mission Communications in the Philippines, Liz had come home for a visit — and discovered she wasn’t quite sure where home was.    “I found myself missing the ‘family’ LIZ HOLLENBERG ’07 I had created over there,” she explains. Intercultural Studies “Internally, I was trying to figure out what Age: 24 family means, what home means.    “But home isn’t a physical place. Current position: Church of the Nazarene, Asia Pacific Region, And God brings all kinds of people into Kaytikling, Taytay, Philippines your life as family. The more you feel, the more you know God has given you a passion.”    That passion is the work Liz does in resource development for the Asia Pacific region of the Church of the Nazarene.    There, Liz organizes and coordinates training materials for the region.    “We train people to train people, so that they can multiply God’s work in the region. We teach them everything from how to make videos and best use those videos, to how to use cameras and computers.”    Beyond the nuts and bolts of daily operations, Liz has found encouragement in becoming a part of the international community.    “It’s humbling to hear the stories of my coworkers, to hear about the families they’ve left behind — what they’ve given up. They’re longing to be with their families, to return home, so that they can make an impact for Christ,” she says.    The daughter of missionaries, Liz had contacted staff members at the World Mission Communications Asia-Pacific office in Kaytikling, Taytay, Philippines, the last semester of college to see if they had any need for her skills.    An hour later, Liz received a response. “They said they’d been wanting someone to work with them and had just had a meeting to pray about this position. When they received my e-mail, they just began praising the Lord.”    The position is voluntary and self-funded, though, so Liz was back in the States recently to raise more support.    “The Church of the Nazarene has seen a huge increase in the number of people wanting to serve overseas. So the question becomes, ‘How do we equip them?’ ‘How do we support them?’”    Liz has been encouraged by the words of missionary Geneva Silvernail ’75 MAE. “She says, ‘When I got the call, I went. I didn’t wait for the Church to say go.’ I encourage others to just go where God is leading.”    And who knows? Halfway across the world, you might just discover your family is much larger than you thought.

Kari Roland ’06,

The Olivetian

9

English and Spanish

Age: 25 Job title: Missionary, International Teams, San Isidro de Heredia, Costa Rica Why she chose her career: “I grew up as a missionary kid in Bolivia and Costa Rica. Serving as a missionary was simply a natural choice for me. I chose to work here because I believe God is moving in Latin America to bring Latinos to the mission field. Missions is no longer North Americans going out to the rest of the world; it is people going from everywhere to everywhere. I want to be a part of this mission movement.”

Chrissy Shelton ’06,

Criminal Justice

Age: 24 Job title: Group registration consultant, The Revolve Tour, Plano, Texas Most rewarding part of her job: “More than 14,000 teen girls have accepted Jesus Christ as their Savior at Revolve events in just the last two years!”

Brian Canaday ’07,

Mass Communication

Emily (Minnis) Gunter ’07, Communication

Age: 24 Job title: Master control operator/production assistant, WBKO (ABC Affiliate), Bowling Green, Ky. How Olivet prepared her: “I was able to get a lot more ‘hands-on’ experience than I would have had at a big state school. I was able to get high-profile internships during college since I had learned skills such as scriptwriting and Avid editing at Olivet. I left Olivet with a solid résumé in my hands because I was able to edit, direct and learn about the studio in my college years.”

Liz Hollenberg ’07,

Intercultural Studies

Hannah Huguenin ’06,

Dietetics

Age: 24 Graduate degree: University of Kansas Medical Center, master’s degree Job title: Regisitered dietician/licensed dietician, Sheppard Pratt Center for Eating Disorders, Baltimore, Md. Most challenging aspect of her job: “Trying to motivate unmotivated patients, especially adolescents who are in treatment against their will. Some patients are not ready to separate themselves from their eating disorder because it can become their identity or even, ironically, their safety blanket.”

Jon Flores ’08,

Sociology and

Criminal Justice

Age: 23 Job title: Police officer, Seatle Police Department, Seatle, Wash. What has God been teaching him: “No matter what I come across, the good, the bad and the ugly, He is in control. I see a lot of ugly, but God has shown me that I just have to trust that He is in the midst of it all.”

Katie Kalemkarian ’08, Fashion Merchandising

Age: 25 Job title: Associate planner, TJX (includes TJ Maxx, Marshall’s, Home Goods and AJ Wright), Boston, Mass. Advice for job seekers: “Get to know people. Especially with the economy being in the state that it is in, it is important to utilize resources you have that can get your foot in the door. Don’t count out unlikely sources. I actually got my first step in the door at TJX through a neighbor back in Moline, Ill. — and now here I am in Boston, Mass.”

Chad Nelson ’08,

Business Administration

Age: 22 Job title: DFAS liaison to the Joint Contracting Command Afghanistan, Defense Finance & Accounting Service – U.S. Department of Defense, Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan The most challenging and rewarding parts of his job: “The most challenging aspect of my job is living and working in a war zone. I travel to the different forward operating bases in Afghanistan, and that can get pretty dangerous. But the most rewarding part of my job is serving my country and knowing that we are providing the people of Afghanistan an opportunity to grow into a prosperous nation, free from Taliban oppression.”

Lindsey Sherman ’08,

Housing and Environmental Design

Age: 22 Job title: Certified LEED AP, Procurement Coordinator at Getty’s, Chicago, Ill. Most challenging aspect of her job: “Deadlines! As with school, deadlines are set to provide check points designed to help you in your project planning. Learning how to manage my time in college was probably one of the most important things I could have done. Meeting the deadlines of your co-workers, your boss or your client always makes for a challenging task.”

SUBMITTED PHOTOS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

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olivet news

“Education with a Christian Purpose” is made possible for our students because of your generosity.

Experience the life-altering movement of the Holy Spirit during two intense days of worship and holiness preaching.

Students featured in this issue of The Olivetian are recipients of the following scholarships: Kendall Cramer* Michael Eller* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Track and Field Kiersten Ellis* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Track and Field Caleb Erway ▶Olivet Nazarene University ROTC Grant ▶Morenci Church of the Nazarene Scholarship Jealyn Foston* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Basketball Ashley Fozkos* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Track and Field Katie Gremar* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Nazarene Scholarship Courtney Hehn* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Basketball Jerad Koch* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Resident Assistant ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Track and Field Antonio Marshall* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Basketball ▶Olivet Nazarene University Nazarene Scholarship Poppy Miller* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Basketball Rashad Mitchell* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Basketball Danielle Pipal* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Basketball Stephanie Smith* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Nazarene Scholarship ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Basketball ▶Kankakee First Church of the Nazarene Scholarship ▶Rev. and Mrs. Albert Williams Scholarship Randy Terrell* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Track and Field ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Cross Country Kendall Thomas* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Track and Field ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Football Nathan Ticknor* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Nazarene Scholarship ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Track and Field Tyler Wallenfang* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Athletic Scholarship: Basketball Rowan Woolsey* ▶Olivet Nazarene University Nazarene Scholarship

MARCH 22–24, 2009 Featuring the biblical insight of JK Warrick and Nina Gunter (general superintendents, Church of the Nazarene), John C. Bowling (president, Olivet Nazarene University), Howie Shute (field strategy coordinator, Horn of Africa), Mark Quanstrom (professor, Olivet Nazarene University), Louis Bustle (director, World Mission), Mark Fuller (senior pastor, Grove City, Ohio), Tom Hermiz (general superintendent, Churches of Christ in Christian Union) and Frank Moore (director of ONU’s Center for Faith and Culture Studies).

Opening Sunday service will take place in Chalfant Hall. All other services will take place at College Church.

* General Olivet scholarship or grant

To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

www.holiness-summit.org  Part of the Fruin Holiness Series

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onu alumni Class Notes 19 50s Wil Watson ’52 has written his first book, The Principle Centered Life: Paradox – or Positive Living? It presents 13 paradoxical, thought-provoking principles designed to aid in living life to the fullest, and is a guidebook that will point readers in the right direction, keep them centered and guide them along the right path toward purpose and meaning in their lives. The book is meant for easy reading and for use in small groups to encourage study about how to live a full and satisfying life. Wil lives in Bourbonnais, Ill., with his wife, Carol (Moore) Foor-Watson ’66.

19 70s A n d re a ( M e a d o w s ) ­P hillips ’72 will direct her Putnam City West High School Concert Choir at the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Musical Salute this April in Washington D.C. Andrea Phillips This event is sponsored by the Library of Congress and the Congressional Bicentennial Committee. The choir is the only group to be selected as representatives for the State of Oklahoma. Accompanying the choir on piano will be another ONU alumnus, Marilyn (Dagliest) ­Rosfeld ’64. Sr. Margaret Robbins, S.V. ’76 announces the opening of another convent, this one in the Bronx, in October 2008. This convent houses the newest members of the institute, with seven new members this fall. The Sisters of Life, of which she is a member, have seven additional foundations in New York, Connecticut and Canada. The Sisters of Life ministry includes spiritual and material assistance to pregnant women, as well as “Days of Prayer and Healing” for women and men suffering from the effects of abortion. The Sisters also offer retreats of prayer and quiet reflection in a relaxed setting. Gary Ingle ’76 was recently honored by the Martin L. King, Jr. Committee for the City of Mesa, Ariz., with the Veora E. Johnson Spirit of Unity Award: Mesa Educator of the Year. As recipient of the award, Gary rode in the city’s Martin L. King Jr. Day parade. Brenda (McCorkle) Nixon ’76 has written a second parenting book, The Birth to Five Book, released by Revell in January. She and her husband, Paul, live in Ohio, where he is the librarian at Mount Vernon Nazarene ­University. Thomas Lorimer ’77/’81 M.A., executive vice president at Kentucky Mountain Bible College, has published a devotional book on humility based on the book of Daniel titled, Who Do I Think I Am? He and his wife, Becky (Mathes) ’80, live in Vancleve, Ky.

19 90s Eric ’91 and Sharon (Kagey) ’91 Fritz: A boy, Geric Duncan, May 7, 2008. He joins sister Gabrielle, 12, and brothers Graydon, Gabrielle, Geric, Gideon 11, and Gideon, 7. and Graydon Fritz Eric is a youth pastor at the Newport Church of the Nazarene, and Sharon is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Newport, Ore. Eric ’92 and Jennifer (Hewitt) ’95 Johnson: A girl, Noelle. She was born September 2, 2006, and then adopted by the Johnsons. Eric is pastor of the Chattanooga First Church of the Nazarene. Jennifer is a stay-at-home mom and continues to love music, Noelle Johnson teaching voice and piano. The family resides in East Ridge, Tenn.

William ’96 and ­Amanda Clark-Mikolajczyk ’95: A son, Liam, October 26, 2008, in Scottsdale, Ariz. Bill is the new afternoon radio personality at KNIX Country in Phoenix, Ariz. Mandy is an RN but is currently a stay-at-home mom.

Winter 2009

UPCOMING EVENTS

Ladies Day 2009

Liam Mikolajczyk

Julie (Bisgeier) ’97 and Craig Jenkins: A girl, Carissa Renae, August 6, 2007. Carissa joins big sister Kyndall, 5. Craig is a special education teacher, and Julie is a food scientist for H.J. Heinz in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Kyndall and Carissa Jenkins

Eric ’97 and Alexis Richter: A boy, Ean Xavier, July 15, 2008. He joins big brother Tristan Xander, 3. Eric is a photographer and owns Elite Images Photography. Alexis is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Olathe, Kan.

11

The Olivetian

Ladies, join us for a much needed getaway filled with great food, great inspiration, and as always, lots of great fun!

April 25, 2009

Special guest Carol Kent is a gifted author and an outstanding speaker who is hilariously funny, biblically sound and culturally relevant. As a keynote speaker for Women of Faith and Extraordinary Women arena events, she has been featured with Point of Grace, Sandi Patti, Nicole C. Mullen, Mandisa, Kathy Triccoli and Nicole Nordeman.

Ean and Tristan Richter

Tim ’98 and Kacy (Pike) ’98 Bensch: A girl, Quinlyn Riley, June 2, 2008. She joins big brother Aidan, 3, and big sister Madeleine, 2. Tim is a writer and stay-at-home dad, and Kacy is the director of rehabilitation at the California Spine Institute. The family resides in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

featuring

CAROL

KENT

A ND T HE M U S I C OF

CYNDI

FRAME

The Bensch Family

Laurel (Saunders) ’98 and Jack Lalicker: A girl, Bethany Ruth, August 4, 2008. She joins brother Travis, 3. Parents say, “She is our little miracle through embryo adoption.” Laurel works full time as a nephrology nurse and is a master’s candidate at the University Bethany Lalicker of Northern Colorado. Jack is a detention corporal for the local Sheriff’s office. They reside in Wellington, Colo.

Registration is available by visiting www.olivet.edu. Click on “Online Store” from the drop-down menu. You can also register by phone at 800-648-1463 or 815-939-5258, or by mail:

Office of Alumni Relations Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue Bourbonnais, IL 60914

PLACE: Chalfant Hall TIME: 9 a.m.–3 p.m. COST: $30

CST

Registration begins at 8:45 a.m. with continental breakfast. A hot lunch will be included

Bryan ’99 and Jill Smith: A boy, Dylan Wesley, June 5, 2008. He joins sister Lindsay, 2, and brother Casey, 1. Bryan works as a teller supervisor at Wells Fargo Bank in Davenport, Iowa. Jill is a stay-at-home mom. They live in Moline, Ill. Dylan Smith

20 00s Ryan ’01 and Julie Hendricker: A boy, Matthew Askins, October 9, 2008. Ryan is an otolaryngology resident at The Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. Julie is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Hilliard, Ohio. Matthew Hendricker Angela (Ringenberg) ’03 and Jesse Hansford: A boy, Moxley Grant, November 28, 2008. Angela is a nutrition educator, and Jesse is a financial adviser. They reside Moxley Hansford in Greenville, S.C.

Cost per person: $650 (Non-refundable deposit of $100 due by March 1) Registration is available by visiting www.olivet.edu. Click on “Online Store” from the drop-down menu.   You can also register by phone at 800-648-1463 or 815-939-5258, or by mail: Office of Alumni Relations, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914

Colleen (Baker) ’03 and Tony Mason ’02: A girl, Ruby Lillian, September 6, 2008. Colleen and Tony currently reside in Bourbonnais, Ill.

and Danette is a ministry assistant at Johnson Ferry Baptist Church. The couple resides in Atlanta, Ga.

Ruby Mason

Danette Meador ’03 and Greg Ramsey were married on September 28, 2008, in Marietta, Ga. Greg is a network administrator,

Danette and Greg Ramsey

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Church of the Nazarene in Norwood, Ohio, and ­Charryse works in the local school district.

Timothy ’03/’05 M.A. and Charryse (Blom) ’04 Brooks: A girl, MackMackenzie Brooks enzie Nichole, January 27, 2008. Timothy is the senior pastor at Norwood

Grace (Cook) Fields ’04 has received her master’s in science education from the University of Pittsburgh and is currently a conservation education specialist at the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium. She and her husband, Greg, live outside of Pittsburgh, Pa. CONTINUED, NEXT PAGE

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onu alumni

Nicole Garde ’04 and Troy Supple were married on April 26, 2008, in Huntington, Ind. Nicole works at Pro Resources Staffing as a regional marketing manager. Troy is employed at The River Christian Church as the youth and children’s Pastor. They reside in Huntington, Ind.

In Memoriam 19 40s

Troy and Nicole Supple

Brian and Jennifer (Bast) ’05 Durbin: A boy, William Lee, October 7, 2008. Jennifer teaches high school English at Pleasant Plains High School in Pleasant Plains, Ill. Brian is the retail sales manager for T-Mobile in Springfield, Ill. Will joins big brother Jake and big sisters Elisabeth and Kayla. The family resides in Chatham, Ill. Nickolas Allen ’06 has accepted a position as regional director for Congresswoman Debbie Halvorson (D-Ill). He previously worked as the public education advocate for Hospice of Kankakee Valley. He lives in Bourbonnais, Ill. Jessica (Caudle) ’06 and Tim Thompson ’06: A boy, Noah William, December 5, 2008. Tim is the assistant director of development operations at Olivet, and Jessica is a homemaker. The family resides in Kankakee, Ill. Noah Thompson Melinda Ivey ’06 and Eric Cockrell were married on July 7, 2007 in Chicago, Ill. They reside now in Bradley, Ill. Mindy is working as a psychiatric mental health nurse at Riverside Medical Center and Eric works as a graphic illustrator for The Sterling Group.

Melinda and Eric Cockrell

Kevin Sandell ’07 was recently promoted to first lieutenant. After graduating with his officer’s commission through the U.S. Army ROTC program at Olivet, he went on for additional training at Fort Still in Okla., Fort Leonard Wood in Mo., and Fort Campbell in Ky. He was deployed last march and is now serving with the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), based in Afghanistan. Laurryn Trojanowski ’08 and Matt McDaniel ’08 were married on September 6, 2008, in Manteno, Ill. Matt is currently finishing police academy with the Louisville Metropolitan Police Department in Louisville, Ky. Laurryn is planning to attend graduate school at the University of Louisville in fall 2009. They currently reside Laurryn and Matt McDaniel in Jeffersonville, Ind.

Career

Fair

2009 Explore the Possibilities! MARCH 2, 2009 Recruit the best and the brightest by representing your company at the 2009 ONU Career Fair. There is no registration fee. For more information, contact the Center for Student Success at 815-928-5665.

in elementary education from the University of Michigan. Mr. Chwala married Julia Kathryn Dennis, his wife of 58 years, on October 14, 1950. He was employed as a teacher for Saginaw Public Schools for 21 years, until his retirement in 1984. He was a member of the First Church of the Nazarene, in Saginaw, Mich., for 71 years and also a member of the Gideon Bible Society. He enjoyed bowling, table tennis, horseshoes and shuffleboard.

Luther Stanley Watson ’48 of Mount Juliet, Tenn., died Jan. 11, 2009. He was born May 5, 1920, in Somerset, Ky. He graduated from ONU and later earned a graduate degree from Ball State University. He received an honorary doctor of divinity degree from Olivet in 2004. Luther and his son, Larry Watson, were the only faLuther Watson ther and son to receive the prestigious “O” Award from Olivet.    Watson joined the U.S. Marines on the Thursday following Pearl Harbor. He served in the Pacific and was believed to be the last remaining survivor of his unit. His ministry began as an assistant chaplain while in the service.    Upon his return to the U.S., he finished his work at Olivet and, in his senior year, became the senior pastor of Springdale Church of the Nazarene in Cincinnati, Ohio. After a successful 23-plus years at Springdale, he went to Mount Vernon, Ohio, as the founding pastor of Lakeholm Church of the Nazarene, which is adjacent to what is now Mount Vernon Nazarene University. His other pastorates were Warren First in Warren, Pa., College Hill (now Trevecca Community) on the campus of what is now Trevecca Nazarene University, and Pompano Beach and Plantation, Fla. He also served as chaplain at Trevecca. Watson served for more than 10 years at College Church on the Olivet campus as senior adult pastor before retiring. He was instrumental in clearing the path for intercollegiate athletics at Olivet and had participated in 62 consecutive Olivet Homecomings. He served on the Board of Trustees and on the Alumni Board at Olivet for several years.   He was on the planning committee of the Community Prayer Breakfast for 13 years and had served as chairman for the last four. Then Mayor Robert Latham said, “I’ve come to love this guy as a great Christian leader and a great source of blessing of the village of Bourbonnais.” He had been the Midwest Regional Chairman for Nazarene Disaster Relief and played a major role during the community’s response to the Amtrak passenger train wreck.    Since his retirement, he has served as pastor to the pastor at Covenant Fellowship Church of the Nazarene in Mount Juliet. At his home-going, he had been in the pastoral ministry for 68 years.

Erwin F. “Erv” Chwala

19 70s Marla J. Miracle ’76 died Wednesday, October 8, 2008, in Indianapolis. She was born April 2, 1955, in Greenfield, Ind. Ms. Miracle was a certified oncology nurse and a member of the Oncology Nursing Society. She was an accomplished pianist and singer, and a member of her church choir. Evelyn J. Armstrong, of Hamilton, Ind., passed away November 26, 2008, in her home after a 23-month battle with ALS/Lou Gehrig’s Disease. She was surrounded by her three loving sons and many family members as she joined Earl, her husband of 57 years, in heaven. Mrs. Armstrong was a graduate of Montpelier High School, a graduate of Olivet Nazarene University and received her master’s degree from Ball State University. She was a devoted pastor’s wife, serving alongside her husband for 51 years in the ministry. She was a member of the California United Presbyterian Church in California, Mich., where she and her husband had served for 36 years. She was an elementary school teacher, serving Hudson, Farmland and Hamilton school systems, retiring with 25 years of service. She was past president of Delta Kappa Gamma women’s professional teachers association.    Mrs. Armstrong was born on September 4, 1929, in West Jefferson, Ohio. She married Earl Armstrong on July 5, 1949, in Montpelier, Ohio, and he preceded her in death on December 28, 2006.

20 00s Phillip C. Okoro ’07 of Murphysboro, Ill., departed this life December 23, 2008, in Heartland Regional Medical Center in Marion. Phillip was a former standout athlete in soccer and basketball at Carbondale Community High School. After graduating, he attended classes at Olivet Nazarene University, where he played soccer and was a resident ­assistant.

19 50s Erwin F. “Erv” Chwala ’50 went to be with the Lord Tuesday, October 28, 2008. He was born May 10, 1922, in Saginaw, Mich. After graduating from Arthur Hill Trade School, he served in the U.S. Army during WWII in England, France and Germany. He graduated from Olivet Nazarene College with a Bachelor of Arts and later received his Master of Arts

Phillip C. Okoro

We’d love to hear FROM YOU!

Send us your news and pictures. Please submit alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu, at www. olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through e-mail or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

the

Epworth Pulpit

Epworth Pulpit is a new, virtual “meeting place” where Olivet will host meaningful conversation between people involved in various forms of ministry.

Site features: • Thought-provoking articles by experts in theology and Christian ministry • Ministry resources • Book reviews

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• Discussion boards • Opportunities for continuing education • Monthly e-mail newsletter

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Visit www.epworthpulpit.com to join the conversation today!


onu sports

Winter 2009

Winning Championships.

By Michael Benson, chaplain

   The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics recently recognized Olivet Nazarene University as a “Champions of Character Institution” for the 2007–08 school year. This award is given to universities for their commitment to high standards and to the principle that participation in athletics serves as an integral part of the total education process. The mission of Champions of Character is to restore character values and raise a generation of students who understand and demonstrate respect, responsibility, integrity, servant leadership and sportsmanship in everyday decisions. • Twenty-two Tigers were named to the first team, All-Academic Teams for the 2008 season by the CCAC. • Two of our student athletes competed with perfect 4.0 GPAs: soccer player Katie ­Gremar ’10 and volleyball player Stephanie Smith ’10. • The 2008 softball team ended the year ranked seventh in the country academically with a team GPA of 3.406. Eleven players received Academic All-American.

THE

CLUB Coach Ralph Hodge joined the ranks of an elite few varsity basketball coaches when he picked up his 600th career win on December 2 against Illinois Wesleyan. That win brought his 30-year record to 600-362, for an impressive .623 winning percentage. He has coached the Tigers to 11 Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference regular season championships and 14 NAIA national tournament appearances. In the national tournament, the Tigers have made six sweet 16 appearances, four elite eight appearances,

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   And there’s more. Learning to work together in competition on the court or ball field teaches them how to work together in other areas too. A few weeks before Christmas, the football team gave a love offering to a family who had nothing to eat and who needed to relocate from their neighborhood to a safer place to live. A number of the members of the women’s soccer team have been volunteering at local churches to teach early-morning Sunday school classes. Athletes frequently go on mission trips during their spring break. In recent years, there have been trips to the ravaged Gulf Coast to work in Learning cleanup efforts. While in Florida to work at the national tournament this together in past year, one team helped to competiclean up litter on various beachtion on the es. Another team participated in court or the collection of food boxes for ball field donation. teaches    In essence, we can see these them how student athletes becoming chamto work pions not only in athletic contests, together but also in life. How much do we in other need a generation of students areas too. who both comprehend and know how to demonstrate responsibility, servant leadership and sportsmanship in their everyday life? That’s what real champions are. They know sport. But they also know sacrifice and integrity and servanthood.    We salute both our coaches and players. From public service projects to academics to modeling Christian character, we can see that the Olivet Tigers are making good on their mission: “Winning Championships. Developing Champions.”

Developing Champions.

 o much of the sports scene on the  national level is based on winning.  Alumni and athletic directors across  the country appear to be focused on  one question: “What have you done  for me lately?”    If you don’t believe that, ask the 17-­season former Tennessee Volunteer coach ­P hilip ­Fulmer, who was fired this year even though he held the fifth-highest winning percentage of all active college football coaches who have coached five years or more. Or Jon Gruden, former head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who led them to a Super Bowl win less than 10 years ago. We sometimes hear that “winning isn’t everything,” but there can be little doubt that winning is the ultimate criterion for success or failure at the professional sports level and at many of the Division I schools.    At Olivet Nazarene University, we are fond of winning too. Though the Tigers compete in two of the strongest conferences in the NAIA, the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference (CCAC) and the Mid-States Football Association (MSFA), our teams often advance to national tournaments. However, we assess the quality of an athletic program in other ways. While we are very interested in winning championships, our main focus is on making champions. And others are beginning to take notice.

The Olivetian

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and a final four appearance in 2000. He also has coached 65 CCAC All-Conference Players, four CCAC Freshmen of the Year, six CCAC Players of the Year, 14 NAIA All-America Scholar Athletes and 16 NAIA All-Americans. Coach Brenda Williams has also had her share of recognition lately, having been named by both the American Volleyball Coaches Association and the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference as “Coach of the Year” 2008. While at Olivet, she has been quietly building one of the most respected and talented programs in the NAIA. She picked up her 650th career win back in September, when the Tigers went 2-0 in the Homestead Classic.


14

onu sports

There’s something BY KATE MORGAN

about

Marshall

   There was little fanfare at the last home basketball game before Christmas break. The last finals had been completed hours before. And the few remaining students had to fight their way through a particularly strong mid-December snowstorm to get to McHie Arena.    Just when it seemed that the Tigers were merely going through the motions — when a double-digit lead had slipped away — Antonio Marshall ’12 delivered a clutch 3-pointer, rebuilding the lead to four and shifting the momentum for the rest of the game.    Had this been any other player, maybe there wouldn’t be a story here. But, as it happens, it was Antonio Marshall — and that was unexpected.

The s c hoo lboy ’ s s to ry

H ard times

   Antonio, who is an intense ball of energy on the court, calling out plays above the noise of the crowd, shifts to a humble, soft-spoken young man during our interview, stubbornly refusing to address me as anything but ma’am.   He talks openly, but thoughtfully, about his absolute need to play this year after taking a red shirt last season.    “It was motivating for me to watch the team at nationals last year. That’s something I want to do. I want to be out there, playing at a high level. It was great to be able to learn and study the plays. But it hurt not to be able to play last year.”    Coming into the season, then, Antonio was ready to step up in any role — even when it meant starting on the junior varsity team. And even as he thought he’d be a third-string point guard, there was a sense of urgency he had to fight.    “The coaches want me to be smart, let things come to me. I can’t try to make up for not playing last year — make up for one year — in one play,” he says.    But then, the unexpected happened. Point guard Josh Bronke decided to take a red shirt and the starting spot was up for grabs.    “No one knew who would be a starter on varsity, but we all just worked hard for the position,” Antonio says. “Me and Dustin [Rennewanz ’10] fought for the same spot, but [even after I got the starting spot] he’s still there to help me every day.    “I’m a freshman — I still have a lot to learn — but the team has put me under their wing and helped me out so much. We have a great group of guys and I look up to every one of them.”

M.A.E. putting undue pressure on Antonio, even as he touts his freshman guard.    “Antonio has the potential. He’s a good teammate and a true point guard,” he says. “The true test of a great point guard is: Where does that team end up? We have conference championships, tournament championships; we’ve made an appearance in the [NAIA] Final Four. Where does your ‘quarterback’ lead you?”    Antonio seems more concerned with team goals than with personal accolades, too. He has goals of conference championships and going undefeated at home at the top of his list. And he’s quick to talk up his teammates.    “I really just love our team chemistry. I couldn’t think of a better group of guys, not only on the court, but off of it. They keep me levelheaded and have been a great example to me.”

Gr e at e x p e ctat ion s

   With his natural talent and the progress he’s made in the past few months — plus the opportunity to be a four-year starter — many say Antonio has the potential to become an all-time great Tiger point guard.    “I always had high expectations for myself … But as far as me being one of the best point guards ever, I just want to be a better point guard for this team in the next game, the next practice, the next minute,” he says, shrugging off the expectations. “I feel that I just have to take it one game at a time, and we’ll see what happens from there.”   Having coached quite a few valuable point guards in his day — from Keith Peachy ’82 to Kent Chezem ’92 to Tyler Field ’00 — you won’t find coach Ralph Hodge ’75/’96

SPORTS SHORTS

   If it seems Antonio is averse to stepping into the limelight, perhaps it’s because he’s not exactly used to it. The diminutive baller didn’t make the varsity squad in high school until his senior year and wasn’t recruited by many schools.    “I’m short, you know? I wasn’t the best player on my team,” he says. “I’ve always had to work hard to be good at basketball.”    The third of four boys, the hard work started early. By the age of 4, Antonio was already shooting on a 10-foot hoop.    “My dad got me started. One day I made a shot and I never really looked back!” he says, a smile breaking onto his face.    Though a work horse on the court, off the court, that’s not always been the case. “I was always the kid who didn’t care about school. I was the class clown, loved having fun,” he laughs.    But when Antonio’s fourth grade teacher challenged him to behave in class — and rewarded him with games of one-on-one basketball — something clicked.    “He showed me there was more to life than just basketball. He made such a big difference in my life. I’m studying elementary education and want to be a teacher because of him.”    Of course, on the court, he could easily teach a few lessons as well.    “I really don’t think he goes out there and thinks he’s a freshman,” coach Hodge notes. “The way he carries himself, the way he holds himself says, ‘I’m where I belong. I need to be a good leader for this team and need to get this job done.’’    That’s certainly what it looked like as the clock ran down on that cold, snowy game night before Christmas break.    “Be smart,” he called out to his teammates as they looked to hold the lead. “Be smart.”

18 games. Hoping to secure a couple of victories during a Christmas-break tournament, the team instead remained at home because of inclement weather.    They may have hit their stride at the right moment, though, as the Tigers started Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference play with two consecutive wins.    Through their first 18 games, the Tigers were led by Tyler Wallenfang ’10, who averaged 14.7 points and 7.3 rebounds per game. Rashad Mitchell ’10 averaged 12.2 points and had a team-leading 30 steals. Cory Hainlen ’11 and Antonio Marshall ’12 were averaging 11.0 and 9.5 rebounds per game, respectively.    Wallenfang has a career 981 points and will look to become the 36th member of Olivet’s 1000 point club.

Women’s Basketball

   It’s been a season of streaks for the Tigers. After starting the season 4-0, the Tigers dropped their next three games at the Trevecca Nazarene Invitational. Rebounding nicely, the team won their next six games, only to lose their next four. Through their first 18 games, the Tigers are 11-7, 1-0 in Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference play.    Courtney Hehn ’09 led the Tigers in points through the first 18 games, averaging 19.1 points per game. Jealyn Foston ’10 averaged 12.6 points and 4.3 rebounds per game, while Poppy Miller ’10 chipped in 10.9 points and 6.7 rebounds per game. Before a knee injury shortened her season, Danielle Pipal ’12 had a team-leading 46 steals while averaging 7.3 points per game.

Men’s Indoor Track

   With the indoor track and field season just under way, the men’s team participated in the Phoenix Invitational at the University of Chicago on January 17. The team finished third with 85 points, with four champions.

Men’s Basketball

   With the young Tigers still finding their identity, the team has hovered around the .500 mark through their first

   Randy Terrell ’09 beat out the field in the 800 with a time of 1:58.67. The team of Caleb Erway ’09, Nathan ­T icknor ’08, Jerad Koch ’09 and ­Terrell cruised to a nearly three-second victory in the distance medley    Over in the field events, Mike Eller ’12 took the long jump with a distance of 6.5 meters, while Kendall Thomas ’09 won the men’s weight throw with a distance of 17.78 meters.    The Tigers’ indoor season culminates at the NAIA National Meet at East Tennessee State, March 6–8.

Women’s Indoor Track

   The Tigers also started their sevenmeet indoor season at the Phoenix ­Invitational at the University of Chicago. The team secured a third-place finish with the help of two individual ­champions.    Kiersten Ellis ’11 took the 400meter dash with a time of 1:02.27, while Ashley Fozkos ’11 won the pole vault with a leap of 3.6 meters.    The Tigers’ indoor season culminates at the NAIA National Meet at East Tennessee State, March 6–8.

VISIT WWW.OLIVET.EDU FOR THE LATEST SCORES, SCHEDULES AND SUMMARIES. w

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ten questions

Winter 2009

The Olivetian

15

He said, she said.

1

Kent, you recently returned from a trip to Washington D.C. Tell us about that. Kent: In January, I traveled to Washington D.C., along with Dr. Steve Lowe ’88, Dr. Glen Rewerts, and 27 students. We attended the Christian Student Leadership Conference, a program sponsored by the National Association of Evangelicals, which provides students a closeup look into our political system and how Christians can make a positive contribution to our government.

10 Questions with

Kent and Beth Olney

2

Of all the courses you’ve taught, do you have  a favorite? Kent: Probably my two favorite courses are Introduction to Sociology and Sociology of the Family.    The first one may surprise some people, but I thoroughly enjoy teaching freshmen. I particularly like introducing them to the fact that the Word of God is highly relevant and applicable to sociology. Over the past several years, I have used either Daniel or Esther to demonstrate how God’s Word is timeless when it comes to understanding and influencing society. Students not only learn sociological principles, but also see how God speaks directly to the social needs of every generation. My fascination with Sociology of the Family grows from the fact that society is witnessing dramatic changes in this institution and desperately needs a clear biblical perspective when wrestling with these issues.

3

In addition to your teaching role, you’ve also  been actively involved in ministry among the       deaf. What inspired that? Kent: Prior to coming to Olivet in 1995, my family and I lived in Oregon, where I was pastor of the Salem Deaf Fellowship for ten years. My interest in the deaf community results from having grown up between two deaf siblings. I went on to become a nationally certified sign language interpreter, which has led me to interpret for such events as courtroom proceedings, political rallies, various presentations by state governors, a White House Press Conference, Promise Keeper events, Billy Graham Crusades, weddings, etc.

4

Beth, since its founding in 2007, the Center  for Student Success has sponsored numer      ous events and programs. What are some of       your highlights? BETH: My favorite event is the “Jump Start” New Student Conference each fall. Many new students come scared to death, wondering if they will ever make a friend. Usually within a few hours, I see walls broken down and fears relieved. I have also enjoyed initiating activities for our young married students, staff and faculty. As a university, we have not done much with this particular group up until this time, and I see it meeting a definite need.

5

What’s on the horizon for the CSS?  BETH: One of the new initiatives that has great potential and excites me personally is in the area of leadership and character development. There’s never been a greater time in our world to produce and send out young men and women equipped with a moral compass, and at Olivet we are well positioned for such an emphasis. We are currently laying the groundwork and hope to have initial strategies in place by the fall of 2009.

6

What is Marriage Inc., and  how did it come about?

BETH: Marriage Inc. formed when three passions converged: (1) A passion to do a better job addressing marriage issues among Olivet’s unmarried college students, (2) a passion to build stronger existing marriages across our local community and region, and (3) a passion to defend marriage against attacks leveled by radical activists intent on redefining this institution. When a donor with a burden and vision for healthy marriages stepped forward to fund the initiative, the wheels were set in motion. So this fall, 2008, Marriage Inc. was birthed out of the new Center for Student Success.    Marriage Inc., while housed at and supported by Olivet, is a service to the citizens of Kankakee County and beyond. Our goal is to join hands with businesses, churches and other community organizations whose collective aim is to build and defend strong marriages.

7

For the past two years, you have team-taught  Olivet’s first-ever course on marriage. What’s      that like? BETH: Team teaching the course on marriage has been fun, but has not been without its challenges. Since my communication style is much more random and flexible, I think I’ve driven Kent crazy a time or two because he tends to be much more logical, linear and sequential. Kent: The challenge for me is that I have to make sure my stories and illustrations concerning my wife are accurate. Once in a while she interrupts me in order to tell her side of the story. This usually gives our students a good laugh.

8

As you talk to college students about mar riage, what’s the biggest misconception you        hear? Kent: The major misconception we hear is simply that marriage has lost its value. Therefore, growing numbers

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are putting off marriage until later in life, or rejecting it altogether. However, sociological research on marriage overwhelmingly indicates marriage is an enormous social benefit to the couple, to children and to society as a whole. Furthermore, marriage was God’s first created social institution, created prior to sin, and designed to reflect the image of God. Sadly, some of our students have told us that they have never heard a sermon from their pastor on the topic of marriage. Our churches need to do a better job addressing this issue and promoting marriage.

9

What was your most memorable date?  BETH: Back when we were in college, while returning from a date, Kent spontaneously suggested we turn around and prolong our date by going bowling. Being a spontaneous person myself, I absolutely loved this; and we had a great time bowling and laughing together. Little did I know that his suggestion was totally out of character to the predictable, disciplined, structured man I was about to marry.

10

In what ways do you make each other   better people? Kent: Beth is a happy person and keeps us both laughing. She is also a very caring person, and has a great deal of empathy for others. These qualities enrich my life, since on my own I can be rather sober. BETH: Kent has helped make me a more organized and structured person, which has helped me accomplish more than I could have ever imagined.

Kent Olney serves as chairman of the Department of Behavioral Sciences, and Beth is director of the Center for Student Success.


800.648.1463 www.olivet.edu

Upcoming Admissions    Events

Purple and Gold Days for high school seniors and their parents

www.olivet.edu

▶ March 20–21, 2009

call 800-648-1463 for more information


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