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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS VOL. 75, NO. 3

WINTER 2008

the

Second Century

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

General Institutional Goals for 2008 to 2020

WWW.OLIVET.EDU


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The Olivetian

Winter 2008

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

Los Angeles area enjoyed food and fellowship during a local alumni gathering November 17. Here Dr. Bowling shares lunch with Lauren, daughter of 1988 ONU grad Paul Riley. Read more about upcoming alumni gatherings around the U.S. on page 11.

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,, Alumni and friends in the

Contributing Writers Dr. Michael Benson Gary Griffin ’81/’07 M.A. Seth Hurd ’06 Casey Manes Kate Morgan Marc Shaner ’00/’02 M.A.T. Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03 Editorial Advisers Susan (Hendley) Wolff ’94/’06 M.B.A. Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited Sports Editor Gary Griffin ’81/’07 M.A.

.. Lindsay Sherman ’08

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(left) and Lauren Hawkins ’08 organized publicity, volunteers, and the collection of shoeboxes for Operation Christmas Child this year. Because of their efforts and the generosity of the student body, nearly 700 boxes filled with toys, hygiene products and children’s Bibles were shipped to kids around the world.

,, David Linn ’71 met up with daughter Michelle ’08 to cheer for Olivet’s men’s basketball team during Hoosier Hysteria 2008. They were two of more than 1200 students, alumni and friends who enjoyed watching the Tigers defeat Trevecca Nazarene University 76-71 at Conseco Field House in Indianapolis. Immediately following was an exciting match-up between the Pacers and the Sacremento Kings.

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div. Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Jim Knight Vice President for Student Development Rev. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2008 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

.. Students had the opportunity to talk with representatives from more than 50 organizations about jobs and internships during Olivet’s first annual career fair January 25, sponsored by the Center for Student Success.

RYAN TIM M ’09

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to

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Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B


Winter 2008

By Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div., University President

The Olivetian

He who has provided guided

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Now faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see. This is what the ancients were commended for. Hebrews 11:1–2

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livet Nazarene University has just completed a yearlong Centennial Celebration. This past year has been truly remarkable as we have paused to reflect on 100 years of God’s faithfulness to this, His, University.

By faith, Orla Nesbitt and the Richards brothers sacrificed earthly possessions to establish the University in 1907. By faith, T.W. Willingham purchased the college out of bankruptcy on the steps of a Danville courthouse in 1926. By faith, A.L. Parrott moved the college to Bourbonnais in 1940 after a devastating fire destroyed the Olivet, Ill., campus in 1939.

And now as we cross into the Second Century, I am convinced — now more than ever — that God’s greatest blessings lie in the days yet to come.

By faith, Walter Larsen established Orpheus Choir, not knowing the thousands of people who would be touched by their music over the years.

I can’t help but be reminded of a letter written to the early Church.

By faith, Butch Ward established intercollegiate athletics, knowing that even athletic competition could be a ministry when dedicated to the Lord.

In Hebrews, chapter 11, the author outlines a virtual Who’s Who of biblical characters: Noah, Moses, Abraham, Joseph, Isaac, Joshua, Rahab — and the list goes on and on.

And the list goes on and on.

The author notes the consistent theme in each one of these familiar stories: When asked to do the impossible, when challenged by God to trust Him, these prominent figures of the Bible proceeded in a leap of faith.

Yet we would be remiss if we simply paid tribute to these spiritual giants without taking the initiative to carry on their legacy. The God who has guided and provided for Olivet since 1907 will continue to pave the way as we begin our Second Century.

UNIV ERS ITY ARC HIVE S

The point was not simply to remind early Christians of their rich, spiritual heritage. Rather, the author meant to inspire, to challenge them as they each faced an uncertain future. The God who had guided the Israelites safely through the Red Sea, provided a sacrifice for Abraham, protected Noah from the storm and brought the walls of Jericho crashing down, would surely be faithful in the days that lie ahead.

In the following pages, you will read of specific University initiatives for the next several years. These plans will strengthen and improve our institution, but they will also stretch us. These plans are made with great anticipation, knowing that God is able to do much more than we could ever possibly ask or imagine. Join me in stepping — leaping — into the next chapter of the Olivet Nazarene University story. With us each following God’s leading, I can only imagine what tales will be told about us 100 years from now.

Similarly, it is necessary and healthy that we take time to reflect on those visionary leaders who took bold, sacrificial leaps of faith in order to make Olivet what it is today:

Pictured above, from top: Orla Nesbitt, Francis Richards, T.W. Willingham, A.L. Parrott, Walter Larsen and Butch Ward

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The Olivetian

Winter 2008

The ‘Circus’ comes to town

PODCASTS Free, downloadable broadcasts of weekly ­ chapel services and other ONU events are now available online. Go to www.olivet.edu and select “Podcasts — Listen Now!” from the drop-down menu.

Creative learning benefits future teachers and local schoolchildren By Kate Morgan

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he lights go down.    The audience waits with baited breath.    Finally the spotlight flashes on … a Styrofoam ball on top of a Popsicle stick?    No, this isn’t the world’s worst circus.    This is “moon on a stick,” the first venture for Olivet’s new Traveling Science Circus. The spotlight — or, rather, a flashlight — acts as the sun; the Styrofoam ball and Popsicle stick, the moon. Members of the Circus use the props to demonstrate the phases of the moon.    And the ring leaders have captivated their audience. “The children respond enthusiastically to the Circus and thoroughly enjoy the activity,” says Priscilla Skalac, teaching instructor and Circus coordinator.    Traveling Science Circus, put together by students of the University’s National Science Teachers Association, brings science lessons and demonstrations to groups throughout the community. They hope to show that science is more than just dry and dusty facts.    “I want students to see that science can be cool and applicable to their lives,” says ­Rebecca Einoris ’09, vice president of the NSTA ­chapter.    And the idea that learning can be exciting and science can “This is what I be fun seems to be catching on. hoped for when    Circus members performed moon on a stick for three third planning this acgrade classes at LaVasseur Elementary School. They hosted an astronomy night for students and parents of Kankakee Trinity tivity. Students, Academy, where participants identified constellations through a especially girls, telescope and went on a nature walk in the dark, among other becoming exactivities. cited about sci   Next on the Circus circuit is a rocks and minerals night with ence and taking a local scouting group.    “I’ve noticed the students come in interested in what I have interest in their to show them,” Rebecca says. “But they leave bursting with surroundings.” excitement with what they have learned.” — REBECCA EINORIS ’09,    The excitement is best represented by a story Rebecca VICE PRESIDENT OF THE shares of a middle school girl. NSTA ­CHAPTER    “She asked for supplies in order to show her youth group how triboluminescence (energy created from something being broken or crushed) works. She started asking really good questions.    “This is what I hoped for when planning this activity. Students, especially girls, becoming excited about science and taking interest in their surroundings.”    Of course, it’s not just the audience members who learn a thing or two from the Circus; it’s a learning time for their instructors as well.    From writing the lesson plans to planning the activities to presenting the lessons in front of budding scientists, the future educators get hands-on teaching experience.    “Traveling Science Circus provides me with the experience I need to be successful in the classrooms,” Rebecca says. “I get the experience of planning an activity and actually following through with it in the classroom. … I come away feeling successful.”    Priscilla agrees. “As future educators, every opportunity they get to teach is just golden for them,” she says.    But the Traveling Science Circus is not just about teaching children. Priscilla sees this as an outreach to all ages. “We’re looking to carry the experience of science to the entire community. Getting children and adults excited about science.” For more information    To that end, Priscilla says, the possibilities are about the Traveling endless. Science Circus, or to    “I think we could respond to any challenge. … request a visit from the A wedding? Wouldn’t that be great? I’m sure we could group, contact Priscilla come up with some fun stuff for that!” she laughs. Skalac at pskalac@olivet. “Really we’re open to anything, from little ones edu or 815-928-5477. to nursing homes.”

  Featured poDCASTS:

“The Christian triathlon”   y  November 29, 2007 Dr. James Diehl, general superintendent,

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Church of the Nazarene

    Dr. Diehl shares a very personal example of how, as Christians, we sometimes run, sometimes walk, and sometimes we simply stand.

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Grace isn’t fair   y November 11, 2007 Dr. John C. Bowling, University president

    Speaking at College Church of the Nazarene in Olathe, Kan., Dr. Bowling delivers a powerful message about God’s greatest gift.

Other podcasts include addresses by: n Chaplain Michael Benson n Keith Davenport ’08, vice president for spiritual development n Frank Turek, award-winning author and speaker n David Leeder, pastor, First Church   of the Nazarene, Kokomo, Ind.

CHAPLAIN’S NOTEBOOK Seeking fresh spiritual inspiration and biblical ­insight? University Chaplain Michael Benson, ­noted author and evangelist, has a regular blog on Olivet’s Web site.   Featured posting:

Our great legacy y January 10, 2008   Do we dare say our burden has become His burden? Or, is it the other way around? Have we begun to hear what has been the heartbeat of God? To view the full story, visit www.olivet.edu and select “Chaplain’s Notebook” from the drop-down menu.

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Winter 2008

Marriage Matters:

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Second semester brings overhaul to chapel rotations

First-ever marriage class at ONU combats cultural trends in matrimony

By Casey Manes

By Casey Manes

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ne glance at our society reveals all-too-common stories of broken relationships, frayed marriages, conflict and heartache.    Olivet Nazarene University’s Center for Student Success actively seeks ways to offset this cultural trend.    The CSS is partnering with the Department of Behavioral Sciences to offer a class exclusively focused on marriage. Director of the Center, Beth Olney, will team teach the course with her husband, chairman of the Department of Human Sciences, Dr. Kent Olney.    “This initiative is a direct result of [a CSS] donor’s desire to invest more into helping [Olivet] students build healthy relationships. With the attacks the institution of marriage has been facing in our culture, this emphasis is certainly needed,” shares Beth.    This will be the first class focused exclusively on marriage offered by Olivet, and the first husband and wife team-taught course of this nature.    Seventy students are enrolled in the spring semester course. It is open to all students, as the course content covers information relevant to everyone, married, single, dating or engaged. Following this year’s inaugural class, it will be offered annually in the spring.    The context of the class will look at marriage through the lens of Scripture, as well as what the Bible says about singleness. The Olneys’ curriculum is built around the foundation of God’s Word, with a biblical worldview study of the messages the culture sends young people regarding the institution of marriage. They will also discuss dating and ways to build healthy relationships that lead to marriage.

The Olivetian

This initiative is a direct result of [a CSS] donor’s desire to invest more into helping [Olivet] students build healthy relationships. — BETH OLNEY, DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR STUDENT SUCCESS

   Beth and Kent have a long-standing tradition of pouring out their lives and passion for strong marriages into the lives of Olivet students. Beth runs the Mentor-a-Couple program for engaged couples and she and Kent provide premarital counseling through this venue. Dr. Olney’s popular class, Marriage and the Family, has been offering guidance to students on godly relationships for all 12 of his years since coming to ONU.    For the Olneys, their desire to teach and encourage young people in the area of relationships and marriage began early on in their own dating days.    “The passion for relationships started back in college when a few influential people were transparent with us,” remembers Beth.    “They were so open and vulnerable about their own marriages and family life, and it made us want to aspire to be that way for other young couples. I guess you could say we saw how much it helped us, so we wanted to pass it along to others.”

    Starting this spring 2008 semester, due to more students than seats, the Olivet chapel program initiated rotation changes.     The alterations are an attempt to ensure chapel is a beneficial experience for all students, with everyone being included in the larger community as much as possible with space constraints.     Freshmen FirstWords chapel, as well as the junior venue in Kresge Auditorium, will be suspended and all services will be held in Chalfant Hall. Three services will be carried out — Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday — and students will be assigned two days of the week to participate.     The chair arrangement in Chalfant was re-plotted in order to accommodate more students at one time and to create more space between aisles and rows.     “In the last few years, we have struggled with seating space in Chalfant Hall. About four years ago, we started FirstWords chapel for freshmen. This Tuesday chapel cycled out half our largest class each year, enabling the rest of us to fit in Chalfant,” explains Michael Benson, University Chaplain.     “This year, however, we continue to have seating problems so that we have had to split out the juniors in Kresge for a video feed. Simply put, the video feed is just not working at a satisfactory level. This new plan is not a cure all. Only the new chapel building will solve this dilemma.”     Groundbreaking for a new chapel took place during Centennial Homecoming festivities, and a capital campaign for the new structure is well underway.

“Education with a Christian Purpose” is made possible  for our students ­because of your generosity. Jamie Durkee Lela M. Davis Memorial Scholarship

Kayla Ballard Walter “Charlie” Brozek Scholarship Middletown, Ind., Church of the Nazarene Scholarship

Abby Hay Larry D. Watson Ambassador Scholarship

Megan Mosher Marjorie L. McCoy and Harold E. Phillips Scholarship

Missy Kalas Laurence H. Howe Scholarship Marjorie L. McCoy and Harold E. Phillips Scholarship

Kellie Mullin Marjorie L. McCoy and Harold E. Phillips Scholarship

Lauren Hawkins Edith V. Hill Scholarship Margaret J. Kariolich Scholarship

Kasey Carr Dr. Richard T. Lind Scholarship

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Joshua McDaniel Donald N. and Irene L. Gustavsen Scholarship Dr. C. Neil Strait Scholarship

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Amber McKean Iris Eileen Zimmerman Scholarship

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Kyle Peacock Indianapolis First Church of the Nazarene Scholarship Richard Pinkowski Felesena Family Scholarship Tara Schmidt Don and Faith Bell Family Scholarship

Lindsey Sherman Better Day Scholarship Katie Sweet Terry L. Kochersperger Scholarship Dan Walker Dr. J. Ottis Sayes Scholarship

To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

RYAN TIMM ’09

Students featured in this issue of The Olivetian are recipients of the following scholarships:


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The Olivetian

Winter 2008

Cultural smorgasbord Mu Kappa Ministry eases the transition for international students By Casey Manes

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   “In addition, a Christmas party [was] held at the Bowlings’. The emphasis [was] on Christmas foods and traditions from our countries.”

mages of a violent car wreck sweep through Dolphy Biswas’ ’10 ­imagination as she rides in a car driving down the “wrong” side of the road. It takes everything in her to not flinch as a car passes by.    In her home country of India, the left side of the road is the norm for navigating a vehicle. The cultural shift to the right side in America is just one of the adjustments she’s had to make as an international student at Olivet Nazarene University.    Thanks to Mu Kappa, the campus ministry for students hailing from 20-plus countries overseas, Dolphy and other international students have found a place to connect, laugh and unload about the quirky new culture in which find themselves. The outreach began more than 20 years ago, with the help of former professor Dr. ­Norman Bloom.

Finding a home for the holidays

MATTHEW MOORE ’96

   “Mu Kappa is a way of internal understanding of the American culture. It is like a support group I can look to in order to find out what things mean,” explains Dolphy, a sophomore journalism major.    “When it first started snowing, [my first year at Olivet,] I thought, ‘What do I do now?’” she laughs. “Having other people who understand what I’m going through helps in understanding the crazy American culture!” DOLPHY BISWAS

Culture shock

but I still haven’t adapted to the cold. I guess I never will!”    This year marks the first time Mu Kappa has had official student leaders and officers, and the results have been an increase of organized events and involvement.    Mu Kappa partnered with the Center for Student Success to sponsor an orientation for incoming international students at the start of the year. Included were sessions with a professional counselor to discuss some of the cultural adaptation issues to be prepared for.    The orientation also served as a time of fun and fellowship, to provide opportunities for students to create connections and belonging before the flood of American students hit campus.    Now, as the temperatures drop and snow pummels the campus, many of the ONU international students have had their first taste of winter and the    “The biggest change holidays — American style. for me in America, without    “This is the time of year question, is the weather. when the winter depression I come from a part of the and homesickness begin RODRIGUE FONTEM world where average daily to set in,” shares ­Rebecca temperatures are around 25 degrees Schnurr, staff sponsor for Mu Kappa. Celsius (77 degrees Fahrenheit) year    “So we try to show them that Amerround, but that certainly is far from the ica can be fun, despite the weather. case here!” shares Rodrigue Fontem, a [In the fall,] we introduced them to junior biology major from Cameroon. great [American] traditions, like pump   “This is my third winter here kin carving, bonfires and s’mores.

   Each year, roughly 20 individuals hailing from countries all around the globe call Olivet Nazarene University their home. They receive a coveted American education, add a cultural richness to the campus and help make a global tribute to a creative God.    Not all Mu Kappa students are from a native country, however. Many are missionary kids or military kids who are American citizens, but are more familiar with another country and culture. Some come for a year, while the majority stay all four.    And, for a large portion of these students, it isn’t the language barrier that is the most challenging cultural adjustment. Many of them already speak fluent English and are very globally minded. Instead, it’s the different relational style of Americans and the fast pace of life, and the dreaded cold temperatures.

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   No student was left to fend for himself during the Christmas break from classes.    “We have a group of ­local couples who have agreed to serve as mentors and adoptive families to the international students,” relays Rebecca.    In Dolphy’s case, she was lucky enough to have “local” relatives — in Texas — with whom to spend the holidays. Many of the students do have family or friends stateside to stay with during Christmas, while many others are invited home by Olivet roommates and friends. For those still without a home to visit, Mu Kappa connects them with a family eager to host.

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   MacHel Cromwell came to Olivet a year ago from Trinidad and Tobago, and that was the last time he saw his family. He has been a member of the ­Tiger men’s soccer team since arriving. For the first time in a year, he returned to his country over the winter break.    “I am going home. It has been MACHEL CROMWELL a year; I am so excited!” shared the business administration student just prior to the last day of finals.    His journey to get to Olivet wasn’t always an easy one, but he feels his faith has grown along the way.    “No one thought I would make it in college, but I had faith that God would see me through, and He is still working in my life. So many things I had to go through to come here and only God could have made them possible. And I plan to stay. I love it here. I am growing academically and spiritually.”

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Winter 2008

The Olivetian

Talking to Jesus

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he daughter of two messianic Jews,

Samantha ’11 was familiar with the life and teach­ings of Jesus Christ. But it wasn’t until summer fresh­man orientation that she came to understand just how close of a friend He could be to her. Now Samantha is on a road of dis­covery, learning how she can celebrate her rich heritage while basking in the love of her Savior.

Visit www.olivet.edu and click “News & Events” for the latest news about Olivet Nazarene University.

Cheer for children: Urban Children’s Ministries reactivates

Fostering a love for kids: Students give gifts to foster children for Christmas Heart lift: Student devotes his life to Christ in chapel

Buy a jaguar, build a chapel: ONU alumnus offers $145,000 Jaguar for Centennial Chapel

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To read Samantha’s story, visit www.olivet. edu and select “The Olivetian” from the drop down menu.

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Charter National Science Teachers Association celebrated Want to receive ONU news updates right in your inbox? E-mail alumni@olivet.edu to subscribe to the free, monthly Alumni & Friends E-News.

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The Olivetian

Winter 2008

Second Century the

Olivet Nazarene University’s geNeral institutional goals for 2008 to 2020

BRENNAN VIDT ’05

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The Second Century Video Go online to view an inspiring documentary about strategic plans for Olivet Nazarene University’s second century.

ONLINE

Also available online: > Downloadable PDF of Olivet’s strategic plans > Maps featuring new campus architecture and landscaping plans for upcoming years > Fast facts about Olivet Nazarene University

Go to www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the drop-down menu.

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Winter 2008

The Olivetian

GOAL N U M BE R ONE:

GOAL N U M BE R two:

GOAL N U M BE R tH R EE:

Continue to enrich academic quality

Enhance campus living environment for traditional undergraduates

Maintain the undergraduate enrollment at 2,500 students

In the ongoing pursuit of academic

We will create a campus environment

We will remain true to our campus

excellence, we will continue to develop

that inspires personal success and

ethos by welcoming as many traditional

superior programs and resources for

promotes genuine community. Focusing

undergraduate students as possible

students and faculty that we may carry

on the development of the whole person,

without surpassing the size at which we

on the legacy of producing alumni

we will provide personnel, ­resources

can most effectively live out our mission.

equipped to make a significant impact

and activities promoting social, physical

With the mindset of recruiting alumni, we

on the world at large.

and emotional maturity. We will enhance

will focus our admission efforts on those

existing structures and landscaping,

students who are most likely to flourish

and construct additional facilities, to

within the Olivet experience. Once

simultaneously meet the needs of a

students are enrolled, we will provide

vibrant ­University campus and protect

the resources and support they need to

the environmental resources with which

succeed through graduation and beyond.

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God has blessed us.

GOAL N U M BE R four:

GOAL N U M BE R five:

GOAL N U M BE R six:

Grow the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies to 5,000 students

Increase the level of financial support for the University

Continue to improve the financial health and viability of the University

With the world as our classroom, there is

In order that we may continue to make

As careful stewards of God’s resources,

no limit to the reach of Olivet Nazarene

“Education With a Christian Purpose”

we will strengthen the long-term

University. We will continue to develop

a reality for students of all economic

financial health of Olivet by implementing

new continuing studies and graduate

backgrounds, we will seek to increase

procedures, checks and balances to

programs to serve the working adults of

the level of giving from our alumni,

systematically reduce existing — and avoid

the Chicagoland area and beyond. We will

friends and churches, and we will

future — debt, and to steadily augment the

connect with these non-traditional students

explore additional sources of revenue.

University’s financial reserves.

GOAL N U M BE R seve n:

Strong communication is at the core of

Strengthen the constituent relationships of the University

every thriving relationship, and we intend

where they are by providing practical, accredited programs at alternate locations and online.

to further improve interaction with each of the individuals and groups that make up the Olivet community. Through meaningful contact with our students, faculty and staff, alumni, friends and churches, we will ensure that information flows freely to and from the

RYAN TIMM ’09

University, and that our constituents come to understand just how much we value them.

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The Olivetian

Winter 2008

Class Notes

Constance and Irving Kranich

Dennis Ryther ’69 was the referee for marathon swimming (10K) at the Pan American Games in Rio de Janerio, Brazil, July 14, 2007.

JoAnn (Burgess) Collins ’79 has recently published a book on special education titled “Disability Deception.” JoAnn is the mother of three adult children, two of whom have disabilities. Steve Love ’79 of the Fulton County Brain Injury Support Group and Peoria’s Brain Injury Group was recently awarded the Special Friends Award by the Brain Injury Association of Illinois in recognition for outstanding commitment to improving the lives of persons with brain injury. Dan Werner ’79 recently released “Real Men Wear Pink: A Man’s Guide to Surviving a Loved One’s Breast Cancer.” Werner wrote the book using a journal that he kept while his wife, Cheryl, battled the disease. Dan is currently employed as a radio news personality in Mount Vernon, Ohio.

Rod ’84 and Sarah Reed ’84 have returned to Kenya after a three-month furlough in the United States, during which they spoke in 53 services, in 38 locations. Sarah works in children’s ministry and Rod is employed by Africa Nazarene University in Nairobi.

Ruby Altenberg

t Jim Altenberg ’89 and Kimberly (Willis) Altenberg ’89: A girl, Ruby Marie, August 30, 2007. They are currently residing in southern Georgia.

u J. Dave Spriggs ’92 recently accepted a position as staf f psychologist at the Salisbury, N.C., VA Medical Center, providing in-home care to elderly and critically ill veterans. Dave and wife, Julie, have two daughters. J. Dave Spriggs

Cheri (Anthony) Betz ’98 recently received an MA in Leadership from Siena Heights University. Upon completion of her master’s degree, she was promoted to Center Director of Siena Heights University’s Metro Detroit Campus. Prior to her promotion, Cheri worked as the Coordinator of Transfer Student Services for over five years. She and her husband, Steve Betz ’96, reside in Wolverine Lake, Mich.

q Recently three former members of the ONU PR group MasterPeace met for their third reunion since graduation. Pictured left to right a re : Ta m m y (Frame) Bate Past members of MasterPeace ’93, Kandace (Merryman) Brown ’93 and Angela (Kirk) Raske ’94.

u Dana (Ferris) ’98 and Charles Carrigan ’96: A girl, Brianna Grace, April 10, 2007. She joins sister Carly, 3. Dana is the morning show co-host on Olivet’s Shine.FM. Charles teaches geology at Olivet. Brianna Carrigan q Christa (Pilat) ’98 and Nathan Harris ’97: A girl, ­ Katelyn Paige, April 13, 2007. She joins 2year-old sister Morgan ­Christian. Christa is a par t-time HR specialist for Cengage Learning and Nathan is an optometrist for Henr y Ford OptimEyes. They reside in Farmington Hills, Mich. Katelyn Harris

Bill DeWees ’94, M.B.A., former ONU director of broadcasting, has been selected as a featured vocalist on a new “battle of the bands” video game for Nintendo Wii. DeWees is also the voice of the new MegaBrands toy “Brian the Brain.” Other projects that DeWees’ voice can currently be heard on include work for Mitt Romney, Carrot Top, Comcast, the Big Ten Network, the Hyatt, and Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing. u Jason Eaton ’95 is currently serving his fifth consecutive year as the fine ar ts chairman for the Har tland Consolidated School District. Jason has been teaching in the district since 1996. Jason Eaton Jason resides with his wife, Wendy (McClure) ’97, in Swartz Creek, Mich. They have three sons: Grayson (6), Jayden (4), and Brayden (9 months).

u Dana (Benson) ’98 and Stephen Porter have been assigned as intern missionaries with the Church of the Nazarene to Angola, Africa. They previously served at Fair view Village Church of the Nazar ene Dana, Watson and Stephen Porter outside Philadelphia. They have a son, Watson James (2), and currently reside in Kansas City, Mo.

Dennis ’95 and Alana (Byarley) ’97 Crawford: A boy, Asher Dennis, March 29, 2007. Asher joins brothers Caleb, 6, and Andrew, 3. Dennis is a social studies teacher and coach at Bourbonnais Upper Grade Center. Alana is a homeschooling mom. They reside in Bourbonnais, Ill. u Jason and Jennifer ’97 (Hostetler) Hamilton: Adopted two girls, Amber and Kaylin, April 7, 2006.

q Jamie (Clark) ’99 and Jeremy “Bob” Orr ’08: Twins: A girl, Teagan Claire, and a boy, Andrew Neal, December 8, 2007. Jamie is a Benefit Analyst and Jeremy is a Senior Audit Associate, both with CIGNA Healthcare. They reside in Bourbonnais, Teagan and Ill. Andrew Orr

Amber and Kaylin Hamilton

u Marysa (Griffin) ’99 and Steven C. Jankus: A boy, ­ Collin Alexander, August 1, 2007. He joins big brother Landon, 1. Mar ysa works from home as an independent contractor with The Wm. Wrigley Co. Steve is an operating engineer at Vulcan Materials Company in McCook, Ill. They reside in Collin and Landon Jankus Braidwood, Ill.

u Karen (Mooney) ’97 and Jason Courtney ’96: A girl, Nora Dee, November 18, 2006. She joins sisters Ella, 3, and Ava, 1. Karen is a stay-at-home mom and works from home par t-time as an actuarial assistant. ­Jason is an account manager for Golden Rule Insurance Company. They reside Ella, Nora and Ava Courtney in Avon, Ind.

Gear up!

u Rebecca (Lindman) ’99 and Scott Weinberg ’00: A girl, Abigail Ellen, August 10, 2007. ­R ebecca is a branch manager for BB&T Bank. Scott is an analyst for the Department of Justice. They reside Abigail Weinberg in Tampa, Fla.

Sally (Walter) ’00 and Ryan Wenzel: A girl, Krista Brynn, September 13, 2007. She joins big sister Brooke, 21 months. Sally previously taught high school biology, but is currently a stay-athome mom. Ryan is a real estate broker and business owner. They reside in Ladd, Ill. u Suzanne (Vance) ’01 and Marc Herington ’01: A girl, ­Lindsay Joy, December 28, 2006. The family resides in Rock Island, Ill. u Jennifer (Hatchel) ’01 and David Emmert: A girl, Maris Emily, October 13, 2007. David is a farmer, and Jennifer is a nurse practitioner. They reside in Clarks Hill, Ind.

Lindsay Herington

Maris Emmert

q Susan (Weston) ’01 and Jamy VanSyckle ’00: A boy, Jackson Weston, April 22, 2007. ­Susan works as a parttime social worker in an OB clinic at The Salvation Jackson VanSyckle Army and Jamy works as a social worker/adoption specialist at Bethany Christian Services. They reside in Grand Rapids, Mich. u Amanda (Koehn) ’01 and Kenneth Dillman ’98: A boy, Keith Barker III, July 11, 2007. He joins big sister Jenna, 2. Ken in a scientist at SSCI in West Lafayette, Ind. Amanda is the director of the Oxford Public Library in Oxford, Ind., where the family resides.

Keith Dillman

Shari (Scammahorn) ’02 and Troy Hochstetler ’01: A girl, Kyla Elise, January 10, 2007. Shari is a stay-at-home mom and Troy is the next generation pastor at Indianapolis First Church of the Nazarene. They reside in Indianapolis, Ind.

ø ø

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u Constance (Farnsworth) ’63 and Irving Kranich ’54 were married on October 19, 2007, in Shipshewana, Ind. The couple will reside in Lansing, Mich.

u Jennifer (Lebert) Ayres ’93 recently launched www.NoFearBir th. com, a positive-focused online community that empowers and coaches women in childbir th. Jennifer and her family live in Pacific PaliJennifer Ayres sades, ­Calif.

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Winter 2008

He joins sister Kylee Nichol, 1. Rachel is a stay-at-home mom, and Nicholas works in pharmacy customer service at Cigna Healthcare. They reside in Bourbonnais, Ill.

On the road again

u April (Van Kley) ’03 and Kevin Rector ’02: A boy, ­Benjamin Michael, June 23, 2007. April is a third grade teacher at DeMotte Elementary School, and Kevin is a foreman at Walstra Landscaping. They reside in Benjamin Rector DeMotte, Ind.

Olivet Nazarene University is coming to a town near you! Alumni Gatherings

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oin with other alumni and friends in your   area for an informal day of food, fun, fellowship — and special performances   by world renown musician and ONU alumnus, Ovid Young! ­Gatherings have already taken place in Los ­Angeles, Calif., Olathe, Kan., and Columbus, Ohio, and four more events are scheduled for the months of February and March:

Steve DeBoard ’03 recently earned his master’s degree in administration of justice and security from University of ­Phoenix. He is teaching criminal justice at ITT-Technical Institute in Indianapolis, Ind.

≠  February 17 – Jacksonville, Fla. ≠  March 7 – Fort Wayne, Ind. ≠  March 8 – Mason, Mich. ≠  March 9 – Flint, Mich.

Jeremy Dale ’03 recently signed with Hasbro as the illustrator of several G.I. Joe comics, celebrating its 25th anniversary of the “Real American Hero” toy line. Jeremy has been a featured guest at several conventions in 2007 and will be one of several featured guests at Heroes Convention 2008 in Charlotte, N.C. Jeremy is also working on an upcoming series for DC Comics. He and his wife, Kelly (Milcinovic) ’03, reside in ­Columbia, S.C.

For more information about these and other events, visit www.olivet.edu and click on “Alumni & Friends” or call us at 1-815-939-5258. Check back often as additional cities will be announced soon!

Eric ’05 and Shelly (Sheets) ’05 Slonecker are being assigned as Nazarene missionaries in Poznan, Poland. They will be leaving in January 2008. u Rachael (Hill) ’02 and Nick Sefton ’02: A boy, Keegan James, August 25, 2006. Rachael stays at home and Nick is the director of family ministries at Hear tland Church. They reside in Indianapolis, Ind. Keegan Sefton Kelly (Wadsworth) ’02 and Chad Garinger: A girl, Hannah Elaine, August 3, 2006. Chad is the associate pastor at Lombard Church of the Nazarene. Kelly works at Addison Trail High School in the Writing Center. They reside in Lombard, Ill. Barry Wilson ’77/’02 M.A. has just finished a recording project at Gaither Studios in Alexandria, Ind., titled “Lifeblood.” Barry works at Riverside Medical Center in Kankakee, Ill., as a psychotherapist and as an adjunct professor at ONU.

Kurt Hodge ’06 and Jennifer Ballard ’07 were married on July 28, 2007 in Kansas City, Mo. They reside and work in Overland Park, Kan.

Angela (Whitehill) ’02 and Kenneth M. Johnson ’03: A girl, Caitlynn Ruth, August 25, 2007. She joins brother Nicolas ­Michael, 3. Kenneth recently left the Army. He is now a team leader for Yoplait/General Mills. Angela is finishing a degree in hospital administration. They reside in Reed City, Mich.

In Memoriam

u Jason ’03 and ­K atie (Cook) ’03 Brabson: Adopted a boy, Samuel Musse, October 23, 2007. Samuel Brabson Samuel is from Ethiopia, Africa. Jason works for AAA of Chicago. Katie works from home. They reside in Bloomington, Ill. u Rachel (Lewandowski) ’03 and Nicholas Cunningham ’04: A boy, Elijah Roman, October 13, 2007.

u Dennis Roland, Sr. passed away Januar y 1, 2008. Dennis served as Olivet’s football coach from 1986– 1990. During that time, he oversaw upgrades in team facilities and schedules. In 1990, the Tigers finished 7-4, Dennis Roland, Sr. tying the then-school record for wins in a season. His coaching career spanned nearly 30 years and included time as head coach at five universities and two high schools, as well as assistant coaching positions at five more universities. He was a Gideon and a former member of Rotary International.

Elijah Cunningham

save the

HOMECOMING October 23 –26 2008 ctober ’08

date

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Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Pauline Mae (Bearinger) Poole ’42 went to be with her Lord on Thursday, November 15, 2007. She was born in Colling, Mich. on May 23, 1920. She was married to the late Rev. Wesley Poole. After graduation from Olivet, Pauline was a public educator for 30 years in Illinois and Ohio, retiring from the Middletown City Schools. She was also a

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The Olivetian

pastor’s wife in the Church of the Nazarene for 62 years. She enjoyed her fellowship with the Christian Women’s Club of Middletown.

u Frank M. Fitzgerrel ’55 passed away November 16, 2007. He was born April 5, 1924, in Kankakee, Ill. He ser ved in the U.S. Navy from 1942– 1948. He attended Olivet Nazarene University from 1950–1955, majoring in music. He sang solos in the preFrank M. Fitzgerrel sentation of Messiah at Olivet and traveled in a quartet. Mr. Fitzgerrel married Glenna Harmon in 1956. They had two children. He was a security chief at Kankakee Roper for several years.

q Rev. Barry K. Cunningham ’69 was called home November 7, 2007, in San Diego, Calif. He was a former pastor at the historic Los Angeles First Church of the Nazarene. Rev. Cunningham was the son of R.W. Cunningham, who ser ved as president of Nazarene Bible Institute. In addition to L.A. First Church, he pastored churches in Rev. Barry K. Cunningham Kansas City, Detroit, and most recently in El Centro, Calif.

u Anne Lynette Baldridge ’80 passed away Saturday, Dec. 1, 2007. Anne was born on June 6, 1958. She graduated in 1976 from Springfield High School. She attended Olivet, majoring in English and business administration. She played one year of ONU ladies Anne basketball. Anne was emBaldridge ployed by several state agencies for 23 years. She loved her alma mater! She frequently brought prospective students to Olivet, she supported the annual Friends of Olivet campaign and generally promoted Olivet whenever she could.

q Christina (Wehr) Bragg ’90 went to be with the Lord on Saturday, August 4, 2007. She was born August 9, 1968 in Kansas City, Mo. She was a devoted wife to her husband of 16 years, Art ’90, and a loving mother to their children Sam, Jordan, Joshua and Jeremy. She was very active in the CrossRoad United Christina Bragg Methodist Chur ch. Christina fought breast cancer bravely and stared death in the face. She left this world singing praises and glorifying God.

Classes celebrating

reunions:

We’d love to hear FROM

2003, 1998, 1993, 1988, 1983, 1978, 1973, 1968, 1963, 1958, Golden Grads

Send us your news and pictures. Please submit

alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. Pictures will be accepted only via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet. edu. News should be sent via e-mail, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345.

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The Olivetian

Winter 2008

Ladies Day {

JOIN US ON OLIVET’S CAMPUS FOR

MARCH 1

  9 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

F E AT U R I N G

Danae Dobson     Author and speaker

Jenni Till Ovid Young Paul Aldrich    Orpheus Choir Jazz Band Soprano concert vocalist

World-renown concert pianist Comedian

The ONU

Cost is $25 per person and includes continental breakfast, lunch and an ONU Presents CD.

Register online

at www.olivet.edu or call 800-648-1463 for additional information.

Travel with us to

Lancaster, Pennsylvania¬

ONU

Join Prime Time friends from all over the U.S. for an exciting trip to one of the most scenic and unique destinations in the country.

e m i T e Prim Tours For more information or to register, call 800-648-1463 or

MAY 5–10, 2008

visit www.olivet.edu.

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$575 per person based on double occupancy


Winter 2008

The Olivetian

13

VOLLEYBALL

Brawny brains:

Sports Shorts

ONU athletes excel on and off the court By Casey Manes

AMBER M C KEAN

A

cademic and athletic prowess is nothing new to Tiger sports, particu  larly when it comes to volleyball. The team has been given the Team   Academic Award for five consecutive years by the American Volleyball    Coaches Association.    In 2007, three of Olivet’s own were chosen as NAIA All-American ScholarAthletes, a testimony to their dedication to leadership and stewardship in athletics as well as in the classroom.    In order to receive All-American Scholar-Athlete status, a player must be a junior or senior and maintain at least a MICHELLE M C FADDEN cumulative 3.50 GPA on a 4.00 scale. In the past three years, ONU athletic teams have produced 114 NAIA AllAmerica Scholar-Athletes.    Amber McKean ’08, Michelle McFadden ’09 and Stephanie Smith ’09 were selected for volleyball and each of these women demonstrate all that it means to be an ONU Tiger — excel— Coach Brenda Williams lence on and off STEPHANIE SMITH the court.    Amber is a senior English education major from Cissna Park, Ill. She had a team-leading 418 kills and finished the season with 43 aces. She also registered 296 digs and 67 blocks.    Michelle McFadden, a junior middle hitter from Lincoln, Ill., is majoring in art. Michelle accomplished 391 kills, 644 digs 108 blocks. She also registered 21 aces.    Stephanie Smith, a sophomore with junior standing, is an outside hitter from Bourbonnais, Ill., majoring in religion. She had 219 kills and 44 aces, while also carrying out 252 digs and 24 blocks.    “These three young women represent what it means to be a true student athlete,” begins Tiger volleyball coach, Brenda Williams.    “Academics are a huge priority for the ONU volleyball program and these three have led by example on and off the court. We are very proud of them.” NO. 10 MICHELLE MCFADDEN AND NO. 13 AMBER MCKEAN

Men’s Basketball After opening the year 1-4, the Tigers went 6-6 in their next 12 games, as they posted a 7-10 mark heading into their final two nonconference games. During the Christmas break, the Tigers won three of their four games, including victories over two NCAA Division II programs and a 98-91 overtime victory over St. Thomas University (Fla.). Through their first 17 games, the Tigers were led by Phil French ’08, who was averaging 16 points and 8.2 rebounds. Ryan Paxson ’10 averaged 13.4 points and had hit a team-leading 45 three-point shots. Tyler Wallenfang ’10 and Josh Bronke ’09 were averaging 10.2 and 10.1 points, respectively. French entered the final semester of his collegiate career ranked in several all-time lists. He had scored 1,310 points, the 23rd most points in school history. He’d also grabbed the 19th most rebounds (590) and made the 20th most field goals (506). French had also attempted 453 free throws, the ninth most attempts and made 298 free throws, the 12th most makes. Paxson also ranked in a career list, hitting 99 three-pointers, the 14th most in school history.

   These three young women represent what it means to be a true student athlete.”

Women’s Basketball Leading the nation in scoring is nothing new for the Tigers, as they have led the NAIA Division I in scoring each of the past three seasons. This season is no different, as the Tigers averaged 103.2 points during their first 18 games of the season. During that stretch, the Tigers went 14-4, including a 10-game winning streak. During their streak, the Tigers entered the NAIA Top 25 Poll, rising to as high as No. 20. Hilary Disch ’08 led three players in double figures, averaging 18.3 points. She had also dished out 67 assists and ranked second on the team with 65 three-point baskets. Courtney Hehn ’09 was averaging 14.6 points and drained a team-leading 76 three-point attempts. Maggie Sillar ’08 also averaged double figures, scoring 14.1 points and was grabbing a team-leading 7.3 rebounds. Disch is continuing to add to her impressive career numbers. Through 18 games, she had scored 1,616 points, the fifth highest total in school history and was 118 points shy of passing Karren (Zellers) Tingley ’93 for the all-time leading scorer. She had also registered 348 steals, the most ever by a Tiger, and dished out 340 assists, the seventh most all-time. Codi Jaeger ’08 had recorded 266 steals, the fifth most, and dished out 370 assists, the sixth most. Jade Stanlick ’09 had recorded the 12th most assists in school history, as she dished out 256 assists.

Men’s Indoor Track On Jan. 12, the Tigers participated in the first of seven indoor meets, running at the Illinois Wesleyan University Relays. The ­Tigers left the meet with five champions, including four in running events. Alvin Smith ’08 cruised to victory in the 200-meter dash, finishing the event in 23.05 seconds. Jerad Koch ’10 picked up a victory in the 800-meter run, running a 1:56.81, edging the runnerup, who ran a 1:57.08. The 4x400-meter relay and distance medley relay also took first place. The 4x400 teamed to run a 3:27.42, while the distance medley ran a 10:59.95. Kendall Thomas ’09 won the weight throw with a toss of 51'7 ¼". He beat the field by nearly five feet. The Tigers’ indoor season culminates at the NAIA National Meet on March 6–8.

O l i v e t ’s s c h o l a r- a t h l e t e s This excellence in the classroom and in the sports arena extends to all areas of athletics at Olivet. In 2007 alone, there have been a total of 29 scholarathletes total, with 15 already named in the 2007–2008 academic year.     Bethany Carr ’08, a Spanish and communications student from Metamora, Ill.; Alison ­Gremar ’08, majoring in social science education from Bourbonnais; Cheri Hoffman ’08, a biology major from Noshotah, Wis.; Katie Huffman ’08, an English major from Springfield, Ill.; and Megan Mosher ’08, an exercise science major from Pleasant Plains, Ill., all ran to a scholar-athlete finish in cross country.     In women’s tennis, Jennifer Ramsay ’09, an elementary education major from Casey, Ill.; Kayla Ballard ’09, a psychology major from Middletown, Ind.; and Jamie Durkee ’09, a mass communication major from Huntertown, Ind., were honored. Women’s soccer recognized Abby Hay ’08, a biology student from Indianapolis, Ind. and Katie Sweet ’08, an engineering major from Seattle, Wash.     Basketball players Missy Kalas ’08, from McHenry, Ill., majoring in elementary education; Codi Jaeger ’09, an athletic training major from Cincinnati, Ohio; Kellie Mullin ’08, majoring in health and physical education, from Momence, Ill.; Jessica Mateer ’09, an athletic training major from

Portage, Mich.; and Maggie Sillar ’09, a communication studies major from Marseilles, Ill., all received NAIA scholar-athlete recognition.     For Tiger men, Kacey Carr ’08, biology major from St. Charles, Ill., and Alex Gerber ’08, a biology major from Eureka, Ill., were selected as scholar-athletes for the men’s cross country team.     Football season churned out six players honored for classroom achievement: Andy Kizee ’08, an engineering major from Worthington, Ohio; Jerod Lucas ’09, an accounting major from West Terre Haute, Ind.; Joshua McDaniel ’09, an elementary education major from Potterville, Mich.; Richard Pinkowski ’09, an accounting major from Ft. Meyers, Fla.; Marcus Stuart ’09, an accounting major from Eagle, Idaho; and Dan Walker ’09, a mechanical engineering major from Fort Collins, Colo.     Men’s soccer recipients included: Chad Houseman ’08, a Spanish and social work major from Burlington, Iowa; Chris Walker ’08, a biology major from Grand Blanc, Mich.; and Rodrigue Fontem ’09, a biology major from Kumba, Cameroon.

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Women’s Indoor Track The Tigers opened their indoor season on Jan. 12, where they participated at the Illinois Wesleyan University Relays; the first of seven indoor meets. The Tigers left the meet with six champions, including four in running events. Bethany Carr ’08 and Danielle Dill ’11 were multiple winners for the Tigers. Carr won the 800-meter run and the mile run. She finished the 800 in 2:18.16, .29 seconds better than the individual who finished runner-up. In the mile, Carr ran a 5:12.31, seven seconds better than second place. Dill sprinted to victory in the 55-meter dash, running a 7.44, which was three tenths faster than the second-place finisher. Dill also won the long jump, leaping 16'11 ½" to post the victory. Kiersten Ellis ’11 and Ashley Fozkos ’11 each won one event. Ellis won the 200-meter dash in 27.25, while Fozkos won the pole vault with a height of 11'5 ¼". The Tigers’ indoor season culminates at the NAIA National Meet on March 6–8.

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The Olivetian

MEN’S

Winter 2008

BASKETBALL

Role Play

two of his dreams: playing basketball at the collegiate level and studying at a Christian university.

  

Growing pains

By Kate Morgan

T

   As Travis headed to Olivet, he anticipated a life of fun and freedom. “I learned it’s not all hanging out and having fun,” he laughs. “I didn’t get in trouble, but I definitely didn’t go to classes as much as I should.” TRAVIS PROEHL    Combining his lack of class attendance with poor eating habits and a less-disciplined workout schedule, Travis had a rocky start at Olivet. Halfway through his freshman year, Travis had trouble keeping up in practice. Worse still, he learned he was academically ineligible to play.    “I really dug myself a hole. It was tough for me to fight through that, get my grades up and then rejoin the team,” Travis says. “But I didn’t want to take the easy way out and quit. I wanted to stick with it.”    Adds coach Hodge, “He has a great work ethic and coachability. And once he matured, he was really able to be part of the team.”

ravis Proehl ’08 is the quintessential team player: pushing teammates to perform in practice; willing them to win in games. While relishing the moments he gets to play, on the sidelines, he’s the team’s top supporter.    It’s probably not the role Travis envisioned for himself, but if the 5'9" guard is unhappy with his position, he’s not letting on about it.    “I’m sure it would be great to play, but I’d rather our team win,” he says matter-of-factly. “If we’re successful with me sitting on the bench, I’m OK with that.”    There are no hints of indignation with Travis. His positive attitude is genuine; his energy, contagious.    “He has something that many players simply do not have,” says coach Ralph Hodge ’75/’96 MAE, “and that’s the willingness and desire to be a part of a team. He’s the ultimate team player.”

Dreams fulfilled

Perseverance pays off    Travis didn’t plan a four-year career at Olivet. After helping lead his    While his main role this year has been to serve as a leader of the high school team, Peoria Christian, to a fourth-place state finish, he’d J.V. team and guard Olivet’s top players during practices, he’s still an decided to attend a local community college. He figured he had a betintegral part of the team. ter chance of playing basketball there — not to mention the fact that    “Travis challenges our starters every day in practice. He never lets he’d save a substantial amount of money on tuition. up. That’s an important ingredient of making up a team,” coach Hodge    But after disappointing outings during the team’s open gyms, Travis says. “If he continues to grow, continues to push himself, he could see figured his dream of playing college ball had ended. On a whim, he more playing time as we go through the season.” traveled to an Olivet basketball camp. “Not really to try to play here,”    In fact, Travis saw his first substantial action he explains, “but just for a last hurrah of playduring a January 8 contest against University ing basketball.” of Illinois-Springfield, gaining confidence and    Coaches Hodge and Dan Voudrie ’96 MAT showing what he can do. already knew of Travis’ defensive prowess    But whether he plays every game from now — they’d seen his aptitude for shutting down until the end of the season or merely contintop players as they recruited two others from ues to challenge players during practices while his high school. playing on the J.V. squad, Travis stands by the    But at camp, Travis’ offensive skills seemed decisions he’s made to stick with the team, to develop on the spot. “I definitely played realizing the lessons he’s learning on and off out of my mind, offensively,” he recalls. “The the court right now serve a bigger purpose. coaches knew I could play D, but at camp I    “This will help me in the long run, disciplinshowed them I could play offense too. ing me for the future,” he concludes. “It’s a    “I felt God saying, ‘Hey, you need to be at struggle to do both school and basketball. But Olivet,’” he remembers. Added confirmation — Coach Ralph Hodge ’75/’96 MAE if I persevere all four years, I’m going to learn quickly followed with a scholarship offer. a lot of life lessons out of it.”    And with that, Travis says, God fulfilled

   Travis challenges our starters every day in practice. He never lets up. That’s an important ingredient of making up a team.”

TIGER TRACKS

ROBINSON

inson totaled a team-leading 121 tackles, including 52 solo tackles. Robinson also recorded 15 tackles for loss, six quarterback hurries, five sacks, four pass break-ups, three forced fumbles, one fumble recovery and one interception. Robinson had at least 12 tackles in all nine games that he appeared in, recording a career-high 17 tackles against McKendree University (Ill.) on Nov. 3. He had 15 PHIL FRENCH tackles against the University of St. Francis (Ill.) on Nov. 10, including 10 solo tackles. Robinson is the first Olivet player to receive All-American status since Chad Ruzich ’06 was named an NAIA Honorable Mention All-American in 2005. Robinson is the first, first team all-American selection since Ben Richardson ’04 in 2003.

Disch, French and Sillar take conference weekly award: Phil French ’08 was a two-time winner of the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Player of the Week honors, while Hilary Disch ’08 and Maggie Sillar ’08 each won the award once. French earned his first award on Nov. 26, following his 21point, 12-rebound performance against Illinois Wesleyan University. He also won the award on Dec. 10, after averaging 18 points and MAGGIE SILLAR 9.5 rebounds in two games during the week. Disch won the award on Dec. 3, averaging 19.3 points, 4.7 rebounds and 5.7 assists during the team’s three games. Sillar took home the award on Dec. 17 after scoring 23 points and grabbing six rebounds and shooting 68.8 percent from the field against Huntington HILARY DISCH University (Ind.). Robinson named an AFCA-NAIA FirstTeam All-American: Linebacker Jeremy Robinson ’08 became the first Tiger to be named an American Football Coaches

STEMBRIDGE

Three men’s soccer players earn NAIA All-American status: Three Tigers were selected as NAIA Honorable Mention All-Americans, the first Tiger players to be selected since Juan Bay ’06 in 2003. Goalkeeper Andy Stembridge ’10 and defender Rodrigue Fontem ’09 anchored a Tiger defense that finished with a 1.47 goals against average. Stembridge posted

Association (AFCA)-NAIA First-Team All-American. The AFCA began selecting NAIA All-Americans in 2006. Despite missing the first game of the season, Rob-

FONTEM

MKHWANAZI

SCHMIDT

a 1.28 goals against average in 2,035 minutes in 23 contests. He recorded 88 saves and posted eight shutouts. Fontem was the team’s sweeper and saw action in 24 games, making 23 starts. In the only game that he missed, the Tigers allowed five goals. Vincent Mkhwanazi ’10 finished third on the team with 11 points. He scored three goals and dished out five assists. One of his three goals was a game-winning effort. Schmidt named NAIA Honorable Mention All-American: Tara Schmidt ’11 was named an NAIA Honorable Mention All-American, becoming the third Olivet Nazarene freshman to be named an NAIA All-American. Schmidt, a right side player, was near the top in several of the team’s statistical categories. She led the team with 68 aces, 24 more than the next highest total. She also finished second on the team in kills and blocks, registering 417 and 138, respectively. Schmidt also recorded 268 digs. Schmidt finished the season with 22 double-figure kill matches, including a career-high 21 kills in the Tigers’ 3-2 victory over Mt. Vernon Nazarene University (Ohio) at the NAIA National Tournament. She also tied a school record with 10 aces in a match, which she did against Concordia University (Neb.).

Find the latest news, stats and scores at www.olivet.edu

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Winter 2008

The Olivetian

15

›››

QUESTIONS

With

Tristan Riddell ’08 Mass Communications/Film Studies Major (Urbana, Ill.)

1

Why did you choose Olivet Nazarene University?

  It was a choice between Columbia College and Olivet. As a wannabe film major, many people thought that was a no brainer because Columbia is now the largest film school in the nation. But two things happened. I met professor Mark Bishop who showed me the program, facilities, and all the equipment I would have at my fingertips almost anytime I needed it. If I went to Columbia, I would have had to be on an extremely long waiting list to even look at a camera.   The second thing that happened was two very loving and Christian people who watched me grow up came to me and said that they prayed for me and felt like God was telling them to help send me to Olivet. And so they helped me out financially to come here. I know the hand of God was in that ­decision.

2

How did you come to choose film studies as your major?

  When I was a junior in high school, I was trying to figure out what I wanted to “be.” For a very long time, I planned on going to Quantico to join the FBI and specialize in violent crimes toward children. Before that it was a computer animator, then a pilot for the navy, and before that a Jedi. But once I got older, I realized what influenced all of those decisions, and it can be summed up in one word: movies. So, my senior year of high school, I made one with my best friend and future business partner, Daniel Clarke, and I’ve been doing it ever since.

3

after awhile, with the tenacity and determination Derek had, we became a full-fledged club, the first film club Olivet had ever seen. I was fortunate enough to host the initial student film festival, and when Derek graduated, he passed on the presidency to me. We grew and grew, and when I left for LA, I left it in the very capable hands of Hahnah Jackson ’08, who is running it now.

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You’ve also been an actor and a director for some of Olivet’s plays. Which gives you the greatest thrill — acting, ­directing, or working behind the camera?

  I love the theatre, and under the tutelage of professor Jerry Cohagan, I have only developed a

Over the past four years, you’ve been involved with ONU’s improv troupe, Spoons for Forks. What’s been one of your favorite improv moments?

better love, skill and appreciation for it. But working behind the camera is my passion. When you’re looking at the monitor and you get that perfect shot and scream, “That’s it! That’s the one!” There’s very little that’s better than that feeling. The only thing that tops it is when you’ve been at work in the editing room for literally two and a half days, the only human contact you have is your girlfriend who periodically brings you food, and you get to a finished product you’re proud of. I’ll never trade that feeling. I want it to happen again as much as God allows it.

6

Can you tell us a little bit about the Los Angeles Film Studies Program in which you participated this fall?

  LAFSC was a great experience with a top notch staff who knew what they were doing. Jeremy Casper and John Bucher, my two main professors, helped me grow as a filmmaker so much that my films will never be the same as a result. I learned a lot in the areas in which I’m weakest, as well as a few things to add to what I already knew. People should absolutely know that this program is not film school and should not be seen as a substitute. LAFSC is a way to figure out if you want to go into film and also to enhance what you already know and a lot that you just have interest in.

  Sadly, my favorite moments are the ones nobody ever sees because they happen in practice. I love working with these people who are hilarious, smart and dedicated. And with Scott Karalis ’08 running the show now, I know it can only grow funnier. But my favorite moments have been the times I’ve had the privilege of standing in front of a packed auditorium with over 300 people sitting in chairs, on the floor, in the aisles, and peaking in through doors and hearing them all laugh at the same time because of a joke that me or the team just made.

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You had the incredible experience of working for Ridley Scott and RSA while you were there. What was that like?

  Ever since I was a little kid and saw Top Gun and Alien I knew I wanted to work with Tony and Ridley Scott. I just never thought it would actually come true! It was an experience that I will never forget and will always look back upon fondly. The people Ridley has hired at RSA are a very talented and friendly group. I couldn’t have asked for a better crew to teach me and work alongside me. It was mind blowing walking into their offices for the first time knowing that some of the greatest actors and producers in America had been there as well. And that many great movies originated there such as Gladiator, Man on Fire, Kingdom of Heaven, and American Gangster.

Tell us a little bit about the Seventh Reel and your involvement with it.

  I was there in the beginning with Derek Bowshier ’06 when it was just a bunch of guys in a basement making their top five lists. Then

8

What are your plans after ­graduation?

  I was offered the position of writer/producer for the promotions department at central Illinois’ TV news leader back home (WCIA), but that is all up in the air right now. One thing that is definite is me moving to Chicago sooner rather than later and setting up my own production company with my best friend, Daniel Clarke, who is finishing film school there as we speak. We hope to have that as a side business until we can make it our primary source of income.

9

  I am more marketable than most of my friends back home because of Olivet’s communications department. The reason WCIA offered me a job is because I was told I have the résumé of someone almost twice my age. And it’s all because of this department. I have been trained for film, radio, television (behind the camera, as well as in front), the stage (behind the curtain, as well as in front), and I can give a 15 minute speech with impeccable structure with 30 seconds preparation time because of this department. I have no fears whatsoever of finding employment after ­graduation.

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How are you better prepared for the working world because of your time at Olivet?

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How do you feel Olivet has contributed to your spiritual development?

  Olivet has surrounded me with Christian people who have been there for me when I’ve needed a support system and who have also challenged me in the things I’d become complacent in.

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Common Grounds Some of th e greatest memo r i e s are made wh e n we least exp e c t it.

rs: a d n e l a c r Mark you y @ O li v e t

G o ld D a y s d n a le p r Pu niors):

Saturda

and (for 7th, 8th ): rs e 9th grad March 1

hool se (for high sc –23 February 22 arch 1 M – February 29 9 ation, March 28 –2 s and registr il ta e d r fo livet.edu 48-1463. Click www.o or call 800-6

The Olivet Nazarene University 100

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highlights some of those attributes that make Olivet one of the nation’s premier Christian universities. The complete list may be found   at www.olivet.edu.

Olivet Nazarene University

100

The Second Century  

Olivet Nazarene University's general institution goals for 2008 to 2020.

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