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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS VOL. 74, NO. 1

FALL 2006

The School of Graduate and Continuing Studies

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing ofďŹ ces

Education Beyond Degree

WWW.OLIVET.EDU


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The Olivetian

Fall 2006

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

t Students kicked

off the school year with a little friendly class competition during the annual Ollies Follies festivities. Here, the juniors prepare for the classic egg and fish battle.

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02 Design and Editorial Consult George Andrew Wolff ’93 Contributing Writers Caleb Benoit ’06 Dr. Michael Benson Gary Griffin ’81 Seth Hurd ’06 Kate Morgan Marc Shaner ’00/’02 M.A.T. David Caudle ’79

SC OTT SAR GE NT

Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03 Class News Editor Christine (Mazzella) Howell ’05 Editorial Advisers Gary Griffin ’81 Brian Parker ’93 Susan (Hendley) Wolff ’94

q ONU dorm rooms

were buzzing with activity as students returned to camp for the beginning of the Fall 2006 semester. Here, Nicole Chapman ’07 and Rachael Nichols ’07 try to decide where they will store all their belongings in their University Place apartment.

Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A. NIC OLE BAT Y ’06

p Dr. Bud Reedy, senior pastor of Stillmeadow Church of the Nazarene in York, Penn., led the Olivet community during fall revival services. q More than 100,000 sports fans descended on the Bourbonnais campus during Bears Camp July 27 through August 16, making this the second-best attended camp since the inaugural year. Also in attendance were hundreds of Chicago and national media representatives.

Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gary W. Streit Vice President for Student Development Rev. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2006 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to

u The Chicago Bears weren’t the only ones fine-tuning their athletic abili-

ties at Olivet this summer. More than 1,100 local students participated in the 16 camps sponsored by the athletic department. Daniel Voudrie ’96, assistant men’s basketball coach says of the experience, “It has been wonderful to watch this interaction on and off the court, particularly when you observe things like one of the ONU players sharing his faith with a camper.”

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Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345

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Fall 2006

By Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A., University President

The Olivetian

Going to School by Degrees ever before. Our degree programs are constantly being retooled and new programs and geographic service areas are being added.

went to school for a long time, a long time ago. I was fortunate to be able to earn a bachelor’s degree in religion, a master’s degree in theology, a master’s degree in religious education, a doctor of education degree and a doctor of ministry degree and then spend time at Harvard University as a post-doctoral Resident Fellow. One could say I went to school “by degrees.”

The University seeks to provide intellectual, spiritual and personal growth through these quality graduate programs. Our goal is to offer educational oppor tunities to adult students who appreciate the religious and ethical teachings of Olivet and whose occupations, family responsibilities, personal preferences and/or geographical location do not permit them to enroll in a traditional residential degree program on campus.

Years ago in a conversation with my father, at a time when I think he was thinking, “Enough already!” — he said to me, “Think how old you will be when you finish all that schooling.” I had a great relationship with my dad, and I could tell he was teasing me a bit, so I responded by saying, “I’ll be the same age whether I finish this or not — so I might as well finish, right?” “You’re right,” he said. He couldn’t have been more supportive along the way and took great pride in introducing me as “Dr.” Bowling.

Two of the most exciting developments from this area of our work have just become official. 1. A few weeks ago, Olivet received final written approval from the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools for Olivet to offer a Doctor of Education degree in ethical leadership. This is Olivet’s first doctoral program. It will be launched next summer as one of our centennial initiatives. We fully expect this program to gain a national reputation. This doctoral degree will prepare individuals for senior leadership positions in a wide range of fields including education, ministry, business, social services and healthcare. The program will provide an advanced study of the dynamics of leadership coupled with an intentional emphasis on the character and spiritual life of the leader.

These days, there are many individuals who are going to school by degrees. In addition to a vibrant undergraduate program here on our campus in Bourbonnais, Olivet is also reaching out in new ways, geographically and programmatically, to extend our mission of an “Education With a Christian Purpose” to a wider constituency. The Olivet Nazarene School of Graduate and Continuing Studies now offers nearly 20 programs and prepares hundreds of students for graduation each year.

2. Olivet has also received full approval from the Chinese government in Hong Kong to offer our Master of Professional Counseling degree on site beginning this year. Our first group of Chinese students is being assembled right now. We are working with an outstanding Chinese Christian educational leader who is directing this exciting new venture.

This vital and growing par t of our work rests upon a recognition that learning continues throughout life. Each year, more and more individuals are pursuing graduate study. Others are seeking to finish an undergraduate program, which was begun earlier but not completed. Still others are re-tooling their skills and education to pursue previously unintended vocational directions.

Doctoral education and international programs not only extend the influence and ministr y of Olivet, they also enrich the traditional undergraduate program. Together, the graduate school and the undergraduate programs of the University provide a full compliment of educational programs for today’s students.

All of this is not new to the life of Olivet. The University began offering graduate degrees in the mid-1960s. My master’s degree from ONU was conferred more than thirty years ago. The work of our graduate school today, however, is much more sophisticated and diverse than

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The Olivetian

Fall 2006

Campus Improvements

Olivet named one of ‘America’s Best Colleges’

pq Olivet continues to offer the most modern facilities, with Reed Hall of Science updating four labs. The building also added a new entrance canopy.

By Heather (Quimby) Day ’02 Once again, U.S.News & World Repor t has named Olivet Nazarene University as one of “America’s Best Colleges,” one of only 10 Illinois colleges to be named in the “Best Universities – Master’s” category. According to U.S. News, schools within the “Best Universities – Master’s” categor y provide a full range of undergraduate and master’s programs, a category for which 557 U.S. schools were considered. Olivet offers more than 120 areas of study, including the newly approved Doctor of Education degree in ethical leadership. University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A. responded to the honor by saying, “This impor tant recognition by U.S.News & World Report verifies the growing reputation of Olivet. It affirms that not only has the University been increasing in student enrollment, but the quality of the academic programs, campus life and facilities are also improving year by year. I par ticularly commend the faculty and staff of ONU who have made this achievement possible.” Brian Parker ’93, dean of undergraduate enrollment, is delighted by the recognition. “We are certainly celebrating this distinction in the Office of Admissions. Our stature and influence continue to increase as the University grows both numerically and qualitatively. We are now positioned in the top 10 largest Christian universities in the United States.” Parker also notes the greatest benefit of the recognition is for Olivet students and alumni. “As ONU becomes more widely known, their degrees and credentials begin to carry additional weight.”

NICOLE BATY ’06

p The Class of 2006 donated $2,006 to place park benches throughout Decker Quad. The area, first created in 1984 after a generous donation from Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Decker of Saginaw, Mich., also received new landscaping and paving. Older trees and bushes were removed to create a more open feel.

pq Dripping sweat while trying to sleep in a freshman hall is no longer a rite of passage at Olivet as Chapman and Williams halls installed central air conditioning. They also received new carpet, paint and fire sprinklers, with Williams Hall purchasing new lobby furniture. These projects were made possible, in part, by gifts made through the Alumni Phoneathon to the Friends of Olivet annual fund.

p Office entrances on Burke’s main floor received a major facelift. Oak door frames and frosted glass mirror the transformation second floor Burke received last summer. Students looking for a study break in Benner Library can now visit Jazzman’s Café a la Carte, which offers an assortment of specialty coffees and pastries. Common Grounds coffee shop also received a new, cosmopolitan look. As part of the Centennial Celebration, Ol’ Smokey was changed to read ONU instead of ONC. By unanimous vote of the Board of Trustees, “University” officially replaced “College” in Olivet’s name in 1986. Other projects around campus: ó Additional offices were constructed in the Admissions Center. ó Olde Oak and Fortin Villa/intramural fields parking lots were repaved. ó The University’s boiler was replaced with two more efficient boilers.

For more on these and other ONU news stories, go to www.olivet.edu and click on “News & Events.”

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Fall 2006

The Olivetian

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Field trip-based class first of its kind By Kate Morgan

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SUBMITTED PHOTO

n an age in which students demand hands-on learning and real-life applications, Drs. Don Daake and Gary Koch created a first-of-its-kind business class designed to take students out of the textbook and onto the company floor. The summer offering of business policy and strategy, a capstone seminar course for business students, utilizes team teaching and field trips to understand how successful organizations apply classroom concepts and theories. Daake, a business professor, and Koch, associate professor of psychology, worked to integrate traditional strategy topics and larger issues including economic development, community responsibility and social and economic justice. Instead of reading case studies from a text about such issues, field trips act as “living” case studies. Students prepare in advance for what they will see, hold on-site discussions with the hosts and have extensive follow-up dialogue in the classroom. In order to broaden students’ business perspectives, the class visits a variety of for-profit and not-for-profit companies. “We went everywhere,” says Kristina Jasonowicz ’07. “We saw line work at Deere and CAT. We went to family-owned businesses like Whitey’s Ice Cream. We visited the busy Mercantile and Federal Reserve in Chicago, but also got to see the nonprofit organizations like Pacific Garden Mission. “We saw the big to the small, from the money hungr y to the just plain hungry. And through it all, we got to understand how we as individuals can fit into business and society.” Students discuss the underlying themes of ethics and values in business throughout the course. “There’s a lot to say about ethics in the business world today,” says Ciera Hansen ’07. “It was good to hear testimonies from business owners, sharing how they integrate their faith in the workplace.” “It was also incredibly encouraging to me to see the number of very successful business people who were also very successful Christians,” adds Karen Benson ’07. Overall, students are impressed with all aspects of the class. “I’d recommend it to everyone, regardless of major,” says Jennifer Engelland ’08. “It’s an exciting class that requires students to think critically about how classroom information is applied in business.” With its success, Daake and Koch plan to offer the course again next summer.

ONUStudents in the News

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Olivetians part of first Youth in Mission team to Congo: Junior Stefphan Gambill, a crosscultural studies major from Conway, Ark. and senior Susan Shand, a social work major from Nashville, Tenn., were members of the first U.S. Youth in Mission team to visit the Democratic Republic of Congo. The four-person U.S. team, including a student from Southern Nazarene University and Trevecca Nazarene University, partnered with a Congo YIM team to visit schools, orphanages, hospitals and Nazarene churches. The team’s main ministry was door-to-door evangelism. They also ran vacation Bible schools, taught AIDS education and trained youth leaders. “The children were one of the best parts of the summer,” says Gambill. “From sharing Bible stories and playing games — they were such an incredible blessing.” Gambill and Shand worked closely with members of the Nazarene church in Goma, Congo. “We were very honored by their hospitality,” says Gambill. “It was incredible to see how ardently the people worshipped in the face of such extreme pover ty,” says Gambill. “It was humbling to see the way they praised God.”

They Suffer in Faith

When God Takes Too Long

By April Perry ’79 • XULON PRESS

By Joseph Bentz ’83 • BEACON HILL PRESS

April Perry says her medical mission work in Haiti has “allowed God to use service to others to transform [her] into the being He created [her] to be.” Chronicling her work within that country, They Suffer in Faith tells the stories of Haitians who have shown great faith in the midst of turmoil and suffering. Perry’s love for these people shines throughout the book, and her writing will be an inspiration to all who read it. Proceeds help provide funding for training of health care providers in Haiti.

One of the greatest frustrations of the Christian life is having to wait for God to act. We wait, sometimes for years, for our prayers to be answered, for our deepest longings to be fulfilled. In When God Takes Too Long, Joseph Bentz examines the mysteries of God’s timing and shows Christians how to thrive in the midst of one of life’s greatest frustrations — waiting. He offers those who have been discouraged by a life of waiting a chance to alter not only their perspectives on waiting, but also their actions in response to it. Look for this book wherever Christian books are sold, or visit www.josephbentz.com.

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The Olivetian

Fall 2006

It’s better to give than receive. It’s even better to give and receive.

Ñ

Good news for seniors!

Your gift annuity can help Olivet students immediately, plus provide a lifetime of fixed payments for you!

The Pension Protection Act of 2006 created a new charitable planning opportunity. An IRA owner age 70½ or older may now make a direct transfer to charity, allowing him or her to maintain a lower taxable income while supporting an organization of his or her choice.

Gift annuities provide: l Generous payout rates (Up to 11.3% based on age) l Partial tax-free income l Immediate tax deduction

To learn more about this new giving option, contact the Office of Development at 815-939-5171.

Your gift can be cash, property or appreciated securities. Talk with your ONU planned giving staff at 815-9395171 or e-mail us at development@olivet.edu.

úúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúú Your generosity makes “Education With a Christian Purpose” possible! úúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúú Students featured in this issue of The Olivetian are recipients of the following scholarships: úúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúú Kara Burkey: Ciera Hansen: Rachael Nichols: Nicole Chapman: Stefphan Gambill: McCartha McKenzie: Allison Caudle: úúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúú úúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúú úúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúú To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing foundation scholarship, úúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúú úúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúúú Howard and Adda H. Farmer Scholarship

A.K. and Beatrice Harper Scholarship

Russell Lundry Scholarship

Walter “Charlie” Brozek Scholarship; Rex A. and Sarah Anna Roberts Scholarship

Don Gibson Ministerial Scholarship; Art and Bea Hollingsworth Scholarship

Orpheus Memorial Scholarship

Donald and Faith Bell Family Scholarship; Better Day Scholarship

e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

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Fall 2006

The Olivetian

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President names dining room after long-term food services director By Kate Morgan

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Coomer began working in food services at Olivet as a student in 1969. As food service director, she won numerous awards including: Staff Member of the Year, Olivet; Region Six Manager of the Year, Saga Education Food Services; and Employer of the Year, Kankakee County Training Center for the Disabled. “I’m over whelmed,” said Coomer when accepting the unexpected honors. “As I look back over the years, I have to thank all of you. You have been my encouragement and my mentors. “Although I have been employed by an outside contract company, I’ve always considered myself a part of Olivet Nazarene University first.”

isibly shocked and humbled, Judy (King) Coomer ’71 shook her head as he made the announcement to the crowd. As a surprise ending to the annual President’s Dinner, Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A. announced the University dining room would be named after the longtime food ser vices director. The tribute, he said, was only fitting for someone who had served more than 30 million meals. The announcement came on the heels of Dr. Bowling’s explanation of the Centennial Citation of Merit series and a proclamation that Coomer would be the ver y first recipient. This award will be given during Olivet’s Centennial Celebration to select individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to the University. “Judy Coomer has served faithfully and tirelessly for 37 years as the food service director here at Olivet,” Bowling said when presenting the honors.

É Judy Coomer receives the first Centennial Citation of Merit from Dr. John C. Bowling during the annual President’s Dinner

onu Insider Streit leading Olivet initiatives through new provost role: Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A. has appointed Dr. Gary Streit to be Olivet’s first provost. Streit will continue as chief academic officer and vice president for academic affairs, but will also assume responsibilities for current and future major institutional initiatives. Topping his list of immediate responsibilities, Streit will lead the new China Initiative. During the 2006–2007 school year, Olivet will begin offering course instruction in Hong Kong, as well as continue to recruit a select group of Chinese students to study on the Bourbonnais campus. Also resulting from this initiative will be opportunities for both faculty and student internships in Hong Kong and beyond. Streit will also oversee the implementation of the University’s first doctoral degree program, the Doctor of Education degree in ethical leadership, and will work closely with Dr. Carol Maxson to expand the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies’ enrollment to 5,000 students. Bowling says, “[Dr. Streit’s] career performance, experience, education, people skills and extraordinary management abilities make him wellsuited for this new level of leadership.” Streit’s leadership capabilities are also underscored by a recent invitation from Ottawa University. After a rigorous national search for qualified presidential candidates, the Kansas-based institution deemed Streit the right person for the job. Ultimately, Streit declined the prestigious offer so as to continue his work at Olivet. Dr. Gary Streit

Reddick and Bruner named faculty, staff members of the year: Dr. Bowling awarded Dr. Don Reddick ’79, chairman of the department of music, and Mr. Greg Bruner ’88/’94 M.B.A., director of financial aid, as the 2006 Faculty Member of the Year and 2006 Staff Member of the Year, respectively, at the annual President’s Dinner. Dr. Don Reddick and Dr. John C. Bowling Reddick joined Olivet’s faculty 10 years ago. As chairman, he supervises the curriculum planning and instruction of the department’s five majors. He also oversees dozens of departmental events, ranging from student recitals to the annual performance of Handel’s Messiah. A gifted musician himself, Reddick has twice been chosen to provide music leadership for the General Assembly of the Church of the Nazarene. While presenting the award, Bowling noted Reddick’s “service to the Church as well as the University” and “the many ways [he goes] the second mile, time and time again.” Bruner joined the ONU staff in 1988. As director of financial aid, he has created an office known not only for its efficiency, but also for its personal touch. He works tirelessly to meet expectations of students and families, while complying with federal and state policies. In the past academic year alone, Bruner and the financial aid staff processed more than $52 million to help students attend Olivet. “Greg has a winsome way of walking families through that financial maze,” says Bowling. He also cited Bruner’s “Christ-like spirit of service” while presenting the award.

Pastor, social worker to serve as new departmental chairman: Olivet welcomes Houston Thompson as the new chairman of the Department of Social Work and Criminal Justice. Thompson says he looks forward to this new role. “I believe there is a need for social workers who know and live Christ through what they do. My hope is that I can model Christ while teaching the best practices of social work.” Thompson has served as executive director of Interfaith Community Council, an extensive social service agency in New Albany, Ind., for the past six years and as a school social worker for 11 years prior to that. He also served as a minister in several Nazarene churches. He holds degrees from Nazarene Bible College, Mid-America Nazarene University, Olivet and Spalding University. He is enrolled in the Doctorate of Education program at Trevecca Nazarene University.

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Greg Bruner and Dr. John C. Bowling

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The Olivetian

Fall 2006

BY HEATHER (QUIMBY) DAY ’02

The School of Graduate and Continuing Studies

Education Beyond Degree

I

t’s a pitch-black Monday morning when Darlyn Patalinghug ’08 A.A. reaches over to turn off the blaring alarm clock. Without her glasses, she squints to read the large, red numbers: 4:45 a.m. — she’d better get a move on. 5:35 a.m.: After a quick shower, blow dry and breakfast, she slips into the room shared by her 13- and 7-year-old daughters. They barely stir as she kisses them each on the forehead. Darlyn whispers she’ll see them tonight, then grabs her car keys for the 45-minute drive from Bourbonnais to the Metra train station in Midlothian, Ill. 6:25 a.m.: Sliding into one of the train’s front seats, Darlyn takes a book from her bag to pass the time until she arrives in Chicago. 7:01 a.m.: Darlyn begins the 15-minute hike from the Metra station to her insurance office. She’s lucky today — no umbrella needed, as the sun is rising into a clear blue sky. 4 p.m.: “Yes,” Darlyn clicks on the Microsoft prompt. She couldn’t be more sure she’s ready to end her Windows session. The train leaves in less than a half hour, and she simply can’t afford to wait for the next one. 5:35 p.m.: Pizza, sandwich or hot dog? The choices for a nutritional meal are looking bleak at the Bourbonnais Speedway, but there’s no time to stop anywhere else. Darlyn’s group is making a presentation tonight, and she’d really like to run through her notes one last time.

6 p.m.: “Good evening, everyone,” booms the professor. “Before we get started, would anyone like to offer a short prayer?” 10:05 p.m.: Darlyn turns the key in her car’s ignition and heads toward home. It’s been a long day — a very long day. But this is the choice she’s made, and she smiles as she contemplates the reason. In May 2008, when she stands in her cap and gown before her family, professors and peers, she knows it will be worth it all. She will have earned the right to call herself a graduate of Olivet Nazarene University.

HEATHER (QUIMBY) DAY ’02

DARLYN PATALINGHUG ’08 A.A.

A beautiful tapestry

“It’s all about Christianity”

Who is the Olivet student? With the rapid expansion of the University’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies, Olivet’s student body has developed into a beautiful tapestry representing all walks of life. ONU students are nurses, teachers, salesmen, managers, stay-at-home moms, police officers, preachers, radio personalities, carpenters, and in a plethora of other professional positions. Their ages run the gamut, and they have varied educational backgrounds — some have bachelor’s or master’s degrees, others have just a little college under their belts. A few haven’t been in a classroom since high school more than 10 years prior.

Perhaps more significant is the spiritual impact the University’s graduate and continuing studies programs are making in the lives of students. Central to each course, be it in business, nursing, education or otherwise, is a commitment to lifting up Jesus Christ and His teachings. For Darlyn, this Christian focus has played an integral role in her growing faith. Though the young woman grew up going to church on a weekly basis, her relationship with God faded in early high school. She soon found herself mothering a child at 16 and moving out on her own at 18. “Before coming to Olivet,” Darlyn sheepishly admits, “I didn’t really know what a Nazarene was. But when I took my first course, I realized it’s all about Christianity, and I like that. “Having the Christian background to the college has made my faith stronger, and it’s gotten me closer to the Church and made me want to go to church on a regular basis.”

Skills for life For many adult students, the decision to return to college is made primarily for professional reasons. Dana Washington ’07 M.B.A. says, “My motivation for seeking my master’s degree is self-preservation and to become more marketable for maybe a director or vice president’s position.” Her classmate, Cary Frame ’07 M.B.A., also hopes the business courses will allow him to gain knowledge that will “better assist [me] in obtaining an upper management position.” Darlyn, who is studying for her associate’s degree, admits the possibility of promotion is a motivator for her, but she recognizes the courses have other benefits — both professionally and personally. “Not only will it help me to move up in the company, but it’s also helping me with life skills like leading a group, giving presentations and more.” She also says she hopes her return to school will serve as inspiration for her two young daughters.

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Fall 2006

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE AND CONTINUING STUDIES, CALL TOLL-FREE

The Olivetian

1-877-465-4838 AND VISIT US AT www.olivet.edu

Where is Olivet? Most people know about Olivet Nazarene University’s main campus in Bourbonnais, Ill. But did you know Olivet offers courses in approximately 50 locations scattered throughout Chicagoland? As new groups of students apply, off-campus classrooms continue to be added on a regular basis.

Doctor of Education degree Now, as the University moves into her centennial year, the definition of the Olivet student continues to evolve. In the summer of 2007, the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies will launch its first-ever doctoral degree, allowing a whole new demographic to experience “Education With a Christian Purpose.”

What’s more, Olivet now offers graduate-level courses for students in Hong Kong and will soon offer undergraduate courses and internships in mainland China. Combine that with ONU’s worldwide network of more than 30,000 alumni, and Olivet has a reach that literally circles the globe!

Current Off Campus Class Sites (* indicates new site)

BUSINESS PROGRAMS

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Chicago Regional Center

201 Colorado Avenue Frankfort, Ill.

3601 Algonquin Road Suite 730 Rolling Meadows, Ill.

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3) 2% 3^

“It is only fitting as we celebrate our first 100 years of Olivet Nazarene University that we start a new chapter in Olivet’s academic life,” said President John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A. “Offering a terminal degree is the perfect beginning to the next 100 years, and the Ed.D. in ethical leadership, in particular, is the ideal outgrowth of Olivet’s mission to equip men and women for lives of service to God and humanity.” The three-year interdisciplinary program, including the action research dissertation, is broadly designed to appeal to those who are, or aspire to be, in positions of leadership.

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(see Nursing)

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Schubert Elementary (see Education)

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The Palmer House Hilton 17 E. Monroe Street Chicago, Ill.

1#

EDUCATION PROGRAMS

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Burbank (Luther) School*

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Carl Sandburg High School

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Clark School

1*

Crescent City Grade School*

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Eisenhower High School

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Elmwood Park High School

Dr. Carol Maxson ’88/’90 M.A.E., dean of Olivet’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies, says, “It is our vision that the legacy of this program will be to provide future generations of ethical leaders.”

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Fenton High School

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Professional Development Alliance

NURSING PROGRAMS

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Homewood/Flossmoor High

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Iroquois West High School*

South Holland District Office

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Julian Rogus School

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Kennedy Junior High*

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Kenyon Woods Middle School

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Lemont Townshp High School

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South Suburban College 15800 S. State Street South Holland, Ill.

St. Alphonsus Liguori School 411 N. Wheeling Road Prospect Heights, Ill.

800 Porter Street Lemont, Ill.

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Parkland College*

RML Hospital 5601 County Line Road Hinsdale, Ill.

1515 Raymond Street South Elgin, Ill.

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Mt. Sinai Hospital

2400 W. Bradley Avenue Champaign, Ill.

2929 Green Trails Drive Lisle, Ill.

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Molex Inc. (see Business) California Ave. at 15th Street Chicago, Ill.

320 E. 161st Place South Holland, Ill.

20027 S. 88th Avenue Frankfort, Ill.

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Midwestern Regional Medical 2520 Elisha Avenue Zion, Ill.

Schubert Elementary 2727 N. Long Avenue Chicago, Ill.

St. James Hospital 1423 Chicago Road Chicago Heights, Ill.

River Valley Middle School 15425 127th Street Lemont, Ill.

Infant of Prague School*

Condell 303 Cleveland Avenue Libertyville, Ill.

Reavis High School* 6034 W. 77 Street Burbank, Ill.

529 E. Second Street Gilman, Ill.

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Plainfield Central High School

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1101 Douglas Avenue Flossmoor, Ill.

Olivet is … Who is the Olivet student? Who will the Olivet student be in the next 100 years? Those questions are virtually impossible to answer, as the student body is a diverse reflection of the 4,500 current students who call themselves Olivetians. One thing is for certain. Though the faces may change and the population continues to grow, Olivet will forever continue to be that which she was in her humble beginnings in 1907. Olivet Nazarene University is a place where scholarship is pursued, life is celebrated and Christ is lifted up above all else.

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Hometown Elmentary School

999 Kedzie Avenue Flossmoor, Ill.

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Young School 1434 N. Parkside Avenue Chicago, Ill.

Old Quarry Middle School

2705 McDonough Street Joliet, Ill.

8870 S. Duffy Avenue Hometown, Ill.

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611 W. Fort Beggs Drive Plainfield, Ill.

1000 W. Green Street Bensenville, Ill.

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Timber Ridge Middle School 2101 Bronk Road Plainfield, Ill.

16100 W. 127th Street Lemont, Ill.

8201 Fullerton Avenue Elmwood Park, Ill.

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Oak Ridge Elementary School 8791 W. 103rd Street Palos Hills, Ill.

12700 S. Sacramento Avenue Blue Island, Ill.

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Oak Lawn Community H.S. 9400 Southwest Highway Oak Lawn, Ill.

600 South Street Crescent City, Ill.

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North Palos/District 117 Admin. Center 7825 W. 103rd Street Palos Hills, Ill.

13300 S. LaGrange Road Orland Park, Ill.

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Neuqua Valley High School 2360 95th Street Naperville, Ill.

2035 N. Mobile Chicago, Ill.

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Bourbonnais, Ill.

Morris Community H.S. 1000 Union Street Morris, Ill.

Mt. Sinai Hospital

1045 S. Monitor Avenue Chicago, Ill.

p 3* Weber Center, Olivet Nazarene University,

Minooka Intermediate* 305 Church Street Minooka, Ill.

NW Free Baptist Church 5318 W. Diversey Avenue Chicago, Ill.

p E Chicago Regional Center, Rolling Meadows, Ill.

Madison School* 15700 Orchid Drive South Holland, Ill.

Morrill Math & Science 6011 S. Rockwell Street Chicago, Ill.

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Lockport East Campus 1333 E. 7th Street Lockport, Ill.

Molex Inc. 2222 Wellington Court Lisle, Ill.

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Lincoln Way East High

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Rush Oak Park Hospital* 520 S. Maple Avenue Oak Park, Ill.

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The Olivetian

Fall 2006

Former student brings Hollywood to campus By Kate Morgan

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spiring filmmaker and former Olivet student Daric Gates ’05 turned the campus of Olivet Nazarene University into his own movie set when he flew in cast and crew from Los Angeles to film his latest project, Reunited. With the story of Reunited following the lives and struggles of students on a small campus, Gates envisioned Olivet as the perfect place to film. He used locations including Decker Quad-

Gates was in the process of receiving a communications degree from Olivet when Mark Bishop, director of the television and video production and film studies concentrations at the University, told him about the Los Angeles Film Studies Center. Gates applied for the program, designed to integrate a Christian world view with an introductory exploration of the work and workings of mainstream Hollywood entertainment, and was accepted his junior year. Filming since the age of four, Gates used his experience at the L.A. Film Studies Center to launch his career. “Storytelling is my passion,” he says. “And the film school taught how to use that passion to work in film and, with Christian beliefs, to impact the industry.” Experienced in both film and television, Gates has worked on films including Seabiscuit, Mr. and Mrs. Smith and FriGates works to set up a scene in the Ludwig Center’s Red Room. day Night Lights and as an assistant director of rangle, Strickler Planetarium, Weber Center and the television show Las Vegas. He currently works for Edge Creative as an editor for TV show promos. the Red Room within Ludwig Center. He hopes to show the film, which he also de- “In this business, it’s all about who you know,” scribes as a “conservative story of Job or Hosea,” says Gates, reflecting on his career so far. “And God has put me on the right path.” at next year’s Sundance Film Festival.

CHAPLAIN’S NOTEBOOK Seeking fresh spiritual inspiration and biblical insight? University Chaplain Michael Benson, noted author and evangelist, has a regular blog on Olivet’s Web site. Go to www.olivet.edu and select “Chaplain’s Notebook” from the drop-down menu. FEATURED POSTING:

“Quenching your thirst” (September 4, 2006) Today’s college and university students often report high levels of spiritual interest and involvement, yet few pursue the spiritual disciplines needed to maintain an active relationship with God. In this posting, Dr. Benson introduces Olivet’s “Thirst Quenchers” series through which students will be challenged to take their faith to the next level. By joining the Olivet community in reading these postings, you too can learn what it takes to “quench your thirst for God.”

NICOLE BATY ’06

PODCASTS Free, downloadable broadcasts of weekly chapel services and other ONU events are now available online. Go to www.olivet.edu and select “Podcasts — Listen Now!” from the drop down menu. FEATURED PODCASTS:

How is Christ formed in you? (August 30, 2006)

Dr. John C. Bowling, University president Bowling draws on Jesus’ words, “If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink,” as the school year and fall 2006 chapel theme “Journey Inward: Thirsting for God” begin.

When is discipline spiritual? (August 31, 2006) Dr. Michael Benson, University chaplain In his first chapel address of the 2006–2007 school year, Benson offers a challenge: “If your life-as-usual has not been the fertile ground in which God can bring change, then life-as-usual must go.”

SAVE THE

September 25, 2007

Prime Time at ONU

Fall Revival Services: The Community Well

(3-part series: September 18, 19, 20) Dr. Bud Reedy, senior pastor Stillwater Church of the Nazarene, York, Penn.

Additional Podcasts include chapel addresses by n n n n n

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Mark Quanstrom, professor of theology McCartha McKenzie, vice president of spiritual life Talmadge Johnson, general superintendent emeritus Princess Zulu, HIV advocate, World Vision Major Janet Munn, The Salvation Army

Dr. David Graves ❘

Senior Pastor, Olathe College Church of the Nazarene

u Woody Wright ❘ From the Gaither Video Series u The Burchfield Brothers ❘ From the National Quartet Convention

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Upcoming golf outings!

S AV E T H E S E D A T E S ! APRIL 27, 2007 Olivet Open • Bourbonnais, Ill.

FEBRUARY 15–18, 2007

Call 815-928-5455 for more information

Fourth Annual

Winter Golf Outing Orlando, Fla. • Marriott’s Hawk’s Landing • Disney’s Palm and Magnolia • Celebration

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Join us next year for this wonderful Prime Time event on the campus of Olivet!

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Larry Watson Memorial Golf Series


Fall 2006

Class Notes Sharon Monck ’65 was appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to the California Commission on Aging. The 25-member commission advises the governor and members of state government on issues involving seniors in the state of California. She will serve a three-year term. Jasmine McCarty

Jerry Hertenstein ’70 had three pieces of his work — an oil painting, an acrylic painting and a graphite rendering — featured in the annual juried Spring Show of ArtSpace Lima in Lima, Ohio. Only 85 works from 383 entries were accepted. Hertenstein is retired as a journalist after working at daily newspapers throughout the country and now spends his time pursuing his “other love,” art. He resides in Fort Wayne, Ind. Chuck Westhafer ’70 has completed a condo project at Fort Myers Beach, Fla. The condo is situated across the street from the white, sandy beach on the Gulf of Mexico; the first of the two buildings was completed on June 30, 2006. Chuck and his wife Marge reside in Naples, Fla. and attend First Baptist Church of Naples. Brenda (McCorkle) Nixon ’76 is writing a book on child discipline to follow her first book, Parenting Power in the Early Years. Her interview about children’s temperaments on Focus on the Family’s “Weekend Magazine” radio program aired each weekend in September and October. She is on the faculty at Glorieta Christian Writer’s Conference. Brenda and her husband Paul reside in Mount Vernon, Ohio.

Thomas Jacob ’80 is beginning an online ministerial service, www.ChurchWithoutWalls.com. The goal of this Web site is to attract people to the Lord Jesus Christ and to the Church of the Nazarene. Colleen (Patrick) Tew ’82 received the prestigious Laura Bush Foundation grant for her middle school library. Her grant is one of only 206 awarded nationwide. She received her master’s in library and information science from Trevecca Nazarene University in 2002. She is a librarian at Cameron Middle School in downtown Nashville. She is currently working on her doctorate in reading from Tennessee State University. She and her sons reside in Nashville, Tenn. Jim Kelnhofer ’84, who played football for Olivet, recently participated in the 2006 U.S. Transplant Games June 16–20 in Louisville, Ky. Kelnhofer was diagnosed with diabetes at a young age and became progressively ill. In July 2002, he received life-saving pancreas and kidney transplants. Once the transplant took place, there were no complications, and Jim’s life has been completely changed. Frank Johnson ’86 has been appointed vice president for academic affairs at Sterling College in Sterling, Kan. Frank served as a professor of history and led the university in new innovations as associate academic dean for graduate and adult studies. Frank, his wife Terri and their two daughters reside in Olathe. Jay Earles ’89 is an LTC and psychologist in the Army and was recently deployed to Baghdad, Iraq for six months.

Janet (Gross) ’94 and Steve Rohde ’91: A boy, Jackson Theodore, July 26, 2005. He joins brother Maxwell, 7. Janet works in Jackson Rohde the building department for the City of Valparaiso, and Steve is the ministryequipping pastor at Real Life Community Church and a bus driver for Portage Township Schools. They reside in Portage, Ind.

Jonathan Cotton

Kim (Whaley) ’93 and Bruce Cotton: Adopted a boy, Jonathan Raymond, May 25, 2006. Kim is a high school science teacher, and Bruce runs his family farm. They reside in Kalkaska, Mich.

Dear Friends: I am more convinced than ever before that Olivet Nazarene University is blessed with incredibly loyal alumni who love their alma mater and long for ways to support her mission.

Steve Peterson ’95 was recently promoted to vice president for the industrial manufacturer Eaton Corporation. He will be responsible for global staffing, university relations, human resources functional excellence and organizational analysis.

Counted among them are those who serve as members of the alumni board. These men and women model what it means to support the mission of Olivet Nazarene University through the giving of their time, talent and treasure. They are:

Christopher ’95 and Anita (White) Shotts ’97: A boy, Creed Jameson, July 6, 2006. He joins sister, Kadynce Janae, 2. Chris is part owner in the CPA firm Shotts, Merryman, and Co., and Anita is a day-care provider in their home. They reside in Pittsfield, Ill.

Mark Quanstrom (President) Stan Martin (Vice President) Selden Kelley (President Emeritus) Gordon Wickersham (Historian) Charles Sunberg (Ministerial Representative) Keith Peachey (Lay Representative) Joyce Ayers (Northwest Indiana) Angie Beauvais (Senior Class President 2006–2007) James Boardman (Off Zone) Mark Bottles (Off Zone) Tammy Chenoweth (Chicago Central) Craig Dillman (Illinois) Marlys Drebenstedt (Northern Michigan) Linda Dunbar (Chicago Central) Lon Farris (Off Zone)

Melody Corbin ’96 recently earned her Master of Science in education for licensed professional counseling in August 2006. Dawn (Pfleger) ’96 and Benjie McLain ’98: A boy, Landon Taylor, March 22, 2006. Dawn is a stay-at-home mom, and Benjie is the sports medicine coordinator for Marion County. They reside in Ocala, Fla. Bill Mikolajczyk ’96 has accepted a job at Cox’s Country WWKA-FM/Orlando. He resides in Altamonte Springs, Fla.

Matthew ’97 and Sheila Alger: A boy, Winston Edward Paul, Aug. 15, 2006. He joins brothers Austin and Preston, and sister Jayton May. Matthew is associate pastor in Dothan, Ala. Sheila is a Stampin Up! demonstrator. They reside in Dothan.

Winston Alger

Yours for connecting and reconnecting,

David Caudle ’79 Director of Alumni Relations

Drake Luginbill

Jason ’00 and Shannon (Wheeler) Garrett ’00: A boy, Josiah Clark, May 11, 2006. They reside in Mt. Zion, Ill.

Joel ’99 and Karolyn Emilee Thompson Parsons: A boy, Andrew Jaren, Aug. 10, 2006. Joel and Karolyn serve together as co-pastors at the Church of the Nazarene in Coal Valley, Ill., where they reside.

Josiah Garrett

Travis ’00 and Jesi (Dierickx) Myers ’02: A boy, Clayton Allen, Dec. 17, 2005. He joins sister Sage, 3. Travis is a deputy Sage and Clayton Myers for a county sheriff’s department, and Jesi is a stay-at-home mom and an independent jeweler for Premier Designs Jewelry. They reside in Rockford, Mich.

Dana (Benson) ’98 and Stephen Porter: A boy, Watson James, Sept. 7, 2005. Stephen is the family ministries director at Fairview Village Church of the Nazarene, and Dana works part-time in the church office and with Pharmacy Connections. They reside in Royersford, Pa. Watson Porter

Wesley New ’00 is the youth and college/career minister at Menifee Valley Church of the Nazarene. He resides in Menifee, Calif.

Beth (Jensen) ’00 and Bob Aussem: A girl, Aislinn Jensen, August 5, 2006. Beth is a mental health therapist at Ottawa Community Hospital, and Bob is a painter at the same hospital. They reside in Ottawa, Ill.

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Sarah (Blanchette) ’00 and Matthew DeYoung: A girl, Claire Hope, June 1, 2006. Sarah is a stay-at-home mom, and Matt is an operations manager for an Internet retailer in Chicago. They reside in Kankakee, Ill.

Claire DeYoung

Aaron ’97 and Dawn Thompson: A girl, Emilee Marie, Dec. 1, 2005. Aaron teaches at Elmwood Grade School, and Dawn teaches at Maternity BVM School. They reside in Bradley, Ill.

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Jeff Forgrave (Indianapolis) Bart Garvin (Chicago Central) Beth Kring (Eastern Michigan) Dan Lee (Indianapolis) Leora Legacy (Off Zone) Carolyn Lunn (Off Zone) Trisha Parks (Illinois) Wendy Parsons (Northwestern Illinois) Don Pierce (Michigan) Dena Reams (Wisconsin) JoAnne Rexroth (Off Zone) Chris Stevens (Southwest Indiana) Johnny Wakefield (Senior Class President 2005–2006) Denny Williamson (Northeastern Indiana)

Their involvement in the work to reconstitute and repurpose the alumni board and the alumni association to better position both to support the mission of Olivet Nazarene University received significant impetus when 89 percent of alumni participating in the recent ballot expressed support for amending the constitution of the alumni association. This process will continue in the coming months.

Hannah Thomas

Kevin Whisman ’96 and Adele McMunn were married June 26, 2004. Kevin and Adele are both teachers for Asheville City Schools in Ashville, N.C. Kevin is a middle school teacher working with autistic children, and Adele is a fourth grade teacher. They currently reside in Sylva, N.C.

Chad ’97 and Teri (Perkinson) Luginbill ’00: A boy, Drake Foster, May 18, 2006. He joins Brice, 7, Brie, 5, and Eli, 2. Chad is a loan officer, and Teri is a nurse at a local hospital. They reside in Oklahoma City, Okla.

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From the Director…

Christopher ’94 and Brandy (Carey) McCarty ’95: A girl, Jasmine Meiying, born Jan. 3, 2005 in Hunan, China and joined her forever family on Sept. 19, 2005. Chris is the director of business development for an electrical subcontractor and Brandy is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Indianapolis, Ind.

Karen (Haessig) ’96 and Sunu Thomas: A girl, Hannah Grace, May 11, 2006. Karen and Sunu are on staff with Campus Crusade for Christ in Colorado Springs, Colo. They reside in Colorado Springs.

The Olivetian

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Chris ’99 and Holly (Watson) Pollock ’00: A girl, Annabelle Joy, April 6, 2006. She joins a brother, Watson, 4. Chris is the senior high pastor at Bethany First Church, and Holly is a kindergarten teacher for Putnam Cit y Watson and Schools. They reside Annabelle Pollock in Bethany, Okla. Josh ’01 and Jennifer (Alderson) Broughton ’01: A boy, Noah Michael, April 27, 2006. Josh is the youth pastor at Woodland Lakes Community Church, and Jennifer is a stay-athome mom and social worker. They reside in Wichita, Kansas.

Noah Broughton

Brent ’01 and Carla (Edwards) Duncan ’03: A girl, Aubry Nicol, Jan. 30, 2006. Brent is a geologist working for RT Environmental, and Carla is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Holland, Pa. Marcus Lackey ’02 was selected as Trevecca Nazarene University’s 2006 staff member of the year at the university’s annual President’s Dinner on Aug. 19, 2006. For the past six years, Marcus has been an employee of Trevecca, serving as the receptionist and admissions counselor in the Division of Adult Studies. Marcus was raised in Highland, Ind., and relocated to Nashville in 1999. He graduated from Olivet with a degree in speech communications.


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The Olivetian

Chris ’02 and Mindy (Shotts) Scott ’03: A boy, Luke David, June 8, 2006. Chris is an Army Signal Corps captain at Fort Riley, Kan., who served in Ramadi, Iraq from 2003– 2004, and Mindy is a stayat-home mom. They reside in Manhattan, Kan.

Fall 2006

In Memoriam Beloved former president’s wife passes away

Luke Scott

Todd Maberry ’03 graduated in May 2006 with a Master of Divinity degree from Duke Divinity School, Durham, N.C. He was also ordained as an elder in the Church of the Nazarene in August 2006 by Dr. Nina Gunter at the Northwest Illinois Campgrounds, Manville, Ill. He and his wife Laura currently reside in Todd Maberry Cary, N.C. Erin (Erwin) ’03 and Phil Rexroth: A girl, Haley Elisabeth, March 27, 2006. Phil is working for the federal government, and Erin is working part-time. They reside in Alexandria, Va. Dawn (Blair) ’03 and Adam Tudor ’03: A girl, Kate Lynae, July 30, 2006. Haley Rexroth Dawn is the head of loan operations at Ossian State Bank, and Adam is an eighth grade history teacher at Norwell Middle School. They reside in Ossian, Ind. Molly (Roberston) Cable ’04 has been accepted to the doctoral program at the School of Veterinary Medicine at Purdue University. She has been employed as a veterinary assistant in alternative medicine at Noblesville, Ind. Molly and her husband Brian reside in Kokomo, Ind. Courtney Bergman ’05 and Brian Baker ’06 were married on July 29, 2006 in Bourbonnais. Brian works for Olivet in the information technology department, and Courtney is a science teacher at Bradley-Bourbonnais Community High School. They reside in Bourbonnais. Luke Wadsworth ’05 was one of 183 soldiers to graduate from the U.S. Army Ranger School in Fort Benning, Ga. As a chemical officer, he has now been assigned to the Army’s 3rd Brigade and 2nd Infantry Division. The unit is based at Fort Lewis, Wash., and currently deployed to Mosul, Iraq. Luke Wadsworth

Jessica and Nathanael Swanson

Jessica Allison ’06 and Nathanael Swanson were married on May 26, 2006, in Alton, Ill. Jessica is in the Teach for America program and is teaching fifth grade social studies and science at DC Preparatory Academy public charter school, and Nate works for the Millennium Challenge Corporation. They reside in Washington, D.C.

Emily Franks ’06 and Brett Wampler ’06 were married on June 24, 2006 in Indianapolis, Ind. They reside in Indianapolis. Benjamin Jerome ’0 6 was r e centl y Emily and Brett Wampler honored by Capital University Law School as one of the first Adoption Law Fellows. Adoption Law Fellowships are available to outstanding first-year students who are interested in pursuing a career in child welfare and/or adoption law upon graduation. An adoptee from Seoul, Korea, Jerome founded a chapter of the International Justice Mission — a human rights organization that rescues victims, often children, of violence, sexual exploitation, slavery and oppression — while at Olivet. He currently attends the Christian Assembly Church and enjoys participating in triathlons across Ohio. Tricia Miller ’06 recently accepted a job as a research associate at the Almanac of American Politics. The almanac is owned by National Journal Group, which also owns Congress Daily.

Maybelle E. Reed, 94, died Thursday, Aug. 31, 2006 at Bickford House in Bourbonnais. Her late husband, Dr. Harold W. Reed, was president of Olivet Nazarene College from 1949 to 1975. Mrs. Reed was involved in the lives of students as hostess and mentor. She took an active role in developing and promoting the social and cultural life of the college. She was known as a gracious first lady of the Olivet campus in Bourbonnais and hosted many events for Olivet faculty, staff, trustees and friends at their home on South Chicago Avenue in Kankakee. She also shared in her husband’s ministry in Huntington, Ind.; Newton and Junction City, Kansas; and as president of Bresee College, Hutchinson, Kansas; and vice president of Bethany Nazarene College, OklaMaybelle E. Reed homa. Together, in 1966, the Reeds formed and led the Reed Institute for the Advanced Study of Leadership, which continues now as a program at Olivet Nazarene University. She was born Oct. 6, 1911, in Armel, Colo. Her husband was born in nearby Haigler, Neb. They were married June 19, 1933. She is survived by her son, Hal, and his wife, Mary, of Palmdale, Calif.; their daughter, Kate McAllister, her husband, Bruce, and their sons, Cameron and Eric of Quartz Hill, Calif.; and daughter, Ann Reed, of Los Angeles, Calif. Mrs. Reed was preceded in death by her parents, Karl and Jessie (Baxter) Ripper; two brothers, Dr. C. Harold Ripper of Bethany, Okla., and Marlow Ripper of Wray, Colo.; and a sister, Loraine Sharp of Bethany, Okla.

He was married in 1933 to Margaret Bradford, now deceased. In 1991 he married Fayra Quinn. He is survived by his wife and three daughters: Carolyn Lunn and Jeanne Millhuff of Olathe and Kathleen MacLaren of Marblehead, Mass.; and his stepchildren: Julie Gilmore of Olathe and Chuck Quinn of Lenexa. He had 17 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.

Lyle E. Eckley ’33 a highly regarded minister whose work spanned 75 years of service as pastor and district superintendent of the Church of the Nazarene died August 15 from complicaLyle E. Eckley tions due to a stroke. After attending Flint Junior College and Asbury College, Eckley transferred to Olivet College on the original Olivet, Ill. campus. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1933. In 1958, he received an Honorary Doctor of Divinity degree for his outstanding leadership both to the Church and to the University. His early efforts as a minister began with a student pastorate in Sidell, Ill. in l932. This was followed by pastorates in Freeport, Ill. and Milwaukee, Wis. In l942, Eckley was appointed the district superintendent of the New York District of the Church of the Nazarene. He served the New York metro region for six years before being appointed to the newly formed Northwestern Illinois District. He moved his family to Peoria, Ill. in l948 where he served for 20 years. This was followed by an appointment to the West Texas District with headquarters in Lubbock in l968, where he finished out his career serving nine years and retiring in l977. Upon official retirement he continued to serve the church as an evangelist and later as a nursing home chaplain. His distinguished leadership was marked by a clear initiative to plant new churches most often through tent revivals and storefront churches that he himself worked to establish. His constant connection to the “man on the street” led to the organization of new Nazarene churches that are still functioning today. In addition he sought to revitalize established churches and develop his pastors personally and professionally.

June (Mongerson) Dippel ’36 passed away June 1, 2006, at age 92. Called to preach at age 15, her life was spent as pastor, evangelist, and ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene. Along with her Th.B. from Olivet in 1936, she earned Olivet’s M.A. in Religion in 1989. In addition to several other pastorates, she served the Creve Coeur Church of the Nazarene from 1941 to 1963. She was Dean of Women at Frankfort Pilgrim College and secretary to the Division of Religion at Olivet. She was a member of First Church of the Nazarene in Kankakee, Ill. Her daughter, Doris Dippel, survives.

Russell Dickinson ’42 passed away Aug. 7, 2006 at Mercy Hospital in Cadillac, Mich. He was born Feb. 8, 1908 in Marine City, Mich., the son of Samuel and Laura Riffenburg Dickinson. After graduating from Olivet, he became an ordained minister in 1958 and pastored Nazarene churches in Michigan, Illinois, and Indiana until his retirement in 1973. He pastored at the Clifton Congregational Church from 1969 to 1973. He was a church planter, starting churches in Gaylord, Mich.; Washington, Ind.; and Sandusky, Mich. He enjoyed refinishing furniture, decorating and painting. Urey Arnold ’49 was born Dec. 31, 1919 and passed away Aug. 17, 2006. Prior to attending Olivet Urey graduated from Davis Business College in Toledo, Ohio. He received a master’s degree in school administration from the University of

WE’D LOVE TO HEAR

Illinois and a Doctor of Education degree from Wayne State University, where he was honored with the Anthony Wayne Award fro Educational Leadership. He worked as a public accountant until he enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1943 and served in WWII. He taught school in Ill. and Mich., serving as a vocational teacher from 1954–1963. He was a member of the committee which established Wayne County Community college and wrote policy for the Plymouth School Board. He served as superintendent of schools in Richmond, Mich. and deputy superintendent of the Macomb County Intermediate School District. For two years he served as president of the American Regional Education Association, which gave him the prestigious Judd Prentis Award for Leadership. Urey retired in 1982 after serving 32 years in public education. Upon retirement, the Macomb ISD honored him by naming the conference center after him.

Jacqueline “Jackie” (Spencer) Watson ’54, age 74, of Maple Park, Ill., passed away peacefully in her home Aug. 11, 2006. As a student at Olivet, Jackie was a member of Orpheus Choir, sang in several prominent trios, as well as the Olivetians, served on the student council, was a residence president and served as president of the women’s “O” Club. She was honored with a “Who’s Who” designation and was inducted into Olivet’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2005. She used her musical gift and degree to teach elementary and junior high students the beauty of music. During her 35-year tenure, she obtained her master’s degree in education at Northern Illinois University, and upon retirement in 1997, she became an enthusiastic member of the “Red Hat Society.” Wilma (Davis) Collins ’59, age 66, went to be with the Lord June 25, 2006 in Red Wing, Minn. She was a 1958 graduate of Pontiac High School in Pontiac, Mich., then attended Olivet, where she met her husband Jerry. She served the victims of domestic violence as a victim’s advocate at Quanada for 16 years until she retired, and then volunteered there, receiving the Quanada Volunteer Award of the Year. She also served Calvary Baptist Church, of which she was a member for more than 30 years, as librarian, Mission Committee member, Outreach Committee member and AWANA leader, and she was chairman of the Christian Women’s Club. Vernon Thomas Groves ’82, retired ONU faculty member, passed away peacefully in his sleep on July 30, 2006 at Atria Collwood Knolls in San Diego, Calif. He would have celebrated his 95th birthday August 15. He earned an undergraduate degree in English and graduate degrees including a Ph.D. in education and psychology from the University of Wisconsin. He devoted the rest of his life to education, teaching high school for three years and then teaching as a professor of education and psychology for 36 years at Eastern Nazarene College and Olivet Nazarene College. During these years, he held many positions of academic leadership and continued his own education by attending Boston University, the Art Institute of Chicago and the American Academy of Art. In 1957, he was married to Miriam Grace Schwada, a public school teacher, who was a professional help to him as well as a loving and faithful wife. He retired in 1976, and 10 years later they moved to San Diego. Throughout his life, he was a devout Christian and a devoted husband and father. He was known for his calmness, patience, intelligence, honesty and wry sense of humor. He loved words, memorized poetry, read voraciously, planned beautiful landscaping, played the cornet, sang bass, published articles, traveled widely, painted portraits and walked on his hands.

from you!

Send us your news and pictures. Please submit alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all information, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used. Pictures will be accepted only via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu. News should be sent via e-mail or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345.

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Fall 2006

MEN’S

The Olivetian

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SOCCER

‘There was still so much damage’

Men’s soccer team aids New Orleans year after Katrina

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trailers; houses in the middle of streets; and a house sitting on an upside-down truck. “It was devastating and ver y sad to me,” recalls JP Troglio ’09. “It hit me that we had all forgotten about New Orleans because a year had passed. But there was still so much damage.” Luke Smith ’07 and Chad Houseman ’08 had worked in the region during spring break. “Having visited in March, I was shocked by the amount of work still left to do,” Smith says. After seeing the destruction, they got to work. The goal was to gut as many houses as they could. They cleared years of accumulated possessions, now ruined from the storm and floods, from each home. They took out sinks, bathtubs, refrigerators with food still in them, toilets with waste still in them. They removed walls and ceilings caked with mold, leaving only the foundation. In all, they gutted three homes during the trip. “I cannot brag enough on my players and their efforts,” Howard says with a proud smile. “We gutted three houses in only four and a half days. That’s amazing!” The work they did also helped solidify them as a team. “Working, pushing, lifting each other up

By Kate Morgan or many college athletic programs, summer is a time of intense workouts and training. For 24 members of the Olivet men’s soccer team and three athletic coaches, summer meant hitting the road to serve others. They traveled to New Orleans at the beginning of August, nearly a year after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Gulf Coast, working with Operation Blessing International. No one could believe how much work still needed to be done. “The views didn’t change. It didn’t matter where you drove,” says Mark Howard, head men’s soccer coach. “You could drive eight, ten miles, and it was all the same. It was amazing the amount of devastation that remained.” The team toured the city, including the Lower Ninth Ward and St. Bernard’s Parish. They saw logs resting on the roofs of homes; walls and ceilings covered in mold; rows and rows of FEMA

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while gutting the homes — it made us grow as a team,” Troglio says. “It was important to go, serve and give back with servants’ hearts,” adds Matt Ryba ’10. “And what we accomplished … we now have a bond unlike any other team.” That bond was put to the test when ONU scrimmaged two Louisiana teams. They had scheduled one game in advance and picked up another game when they saw a team practicing on a local field. “With all the destruction, all the anger and feelings of hopelessness, there are still moments of normalcy,” Howard says. “We were privileged to be a part of that, to just spend time playing soccer with them.” Howard hopes to make missions a regular part of Olivet’s soccer program. This year’s mission trip received support from Olivet’s administrative team, men’s soccer alumni, The Firehouse Chapel in Orland Park, Ill., and the First Church of the Nazarene of Indianapolis. They also held a one-day soccer camp at First Church to raise additional funds. The plan is to organize a trip every three to four years, allowing each player who participates in the program to go at least once. But with the reaction they received from the people of New Orleans, Howard and his team might find themselves heading south again soon. “People would stop to thank us for coming — people who we weren’t even personally helping,” Howard remembers. “They feel really forgotten and isolated. All the promises that have been made … the amount of work is just overwhelming.” “People would walk down the street and say, ‘God bless you,’” adds Chris Walker ’08. “It meant so much to them to see people doing something.”

 FIND THE LATEST NEWS, STATS AND SCORES AT www.olivet.edu 

TIGER TRACKS FOOTBALL

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FOOTBALL: The Tigers opened the season 1-6 for the first time since 1994. The offense was led by quarterback Derek Diehl ’08. Diehl passed for 1,237 yards in the team’s first seven games. He had also passed for four touchdowns. 323 of Diehl’s passing yards came on 18 completions against Geneva College (Pa.). Diehl’s favorite target has been Dan Herrman ’09, who caught 26 passes for 310 yards. Austin Kizzee ’09 added 19 catches for 308 yards and three touchdowns, while Matt Ostrom ’09 hauled in 16 passes for 228 yards and one touchdown. Billy Lawrence ’07 etched his name in the Tiger record book, recording his 186th career point, with a six-yard score against McKendree, which gave him the fourth spot on the list. He also entered the career rushing list with 2,805 career yards, which is the fifth most yards ever by a Tiger player. This season, Lawrence has gained 351 yards on 109 carries and scored two touchdowns. Chris Bjorkland ’07 led the defense, recording 72 tackles through the first seven games. He also registered four tackles for loss and intercepted two passes. Jeremy Robinson ’08 recorded 46 tackles, three tackles for loss and one sack, while Aaron Palmer ’07 posted 44 tackles, four tackles for loss, two fumble recoveries and one interception. MEN’S SOCCER: After suffering a seasonopening loss, the Tiger men’s soccer team won in double overtime, defeating Elmhurst College (Ill.) 1-0. However, the Tigers dropped their next two games to slip to 1-3 to start the year. But over their next 10 games, the Tigers went 7-3 to improve to 8-6 in their first 14 games. Leading the offense was Mouhamadou Diop ’07 who had scored eight goals and dished out three assists. Paul Dawson ’07 missed the Tigers’ first three games of the year, but came on to score six goals and dish out three assists. Josh Ayers ’10 also scored

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six goals for the Tigers. John Crabtree ’08 has been solid in the net, posting a 1.34 goals against average, allowing 16 goals in 1,075 minutes. Crabtree made 58 saves, while posting four shutouts. WOMEN’S SOCCER: After starting 2-11, the Tigers have gone 5-4-1 over their next 10 games. One of those wins was a 1-0 win over nationally ranked Saint Xavier University, while another was the team’s first ever win over Trinity International University at Trinity International University, winning 10. Leading the offense has been Rachel Page ’09, who had scored seven goals and dished out one assist in the team’s first 14 games. Danielle Hickey added two goals and three assists, while Lindsay Atkins ’07 registered three goals. Danielle Johnston ’10 has been steady in net, posting a 1.23 goals against average, allowing 17 goals in 1,248 minutes. She has made 76 saves, while recording five shutouts. MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY: For the first time since head coach Mike McDowell took over the cross country program, the men’s cross country team was mentioned in the national poll, as they picked up 13 votes in the Sept. 14 poll. The Tigers placed fourth and third in their first two meets, respectively. In their own invitational on Oct. 14, they scored 21 points to win the meet. Kacey Carr ’07 won the Tiger Invitational, running a 26:51.00. Alex Gerber ’09 finished second, running a 26:57.10. Caleb Erway ’10 and David May ’10 finished fourth and fifth, respectively. Erway ran a 27:04.82, while May finished in 27:22.41 WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY: The return of five runners from a team that was ranked second in the final NAIA Top 25 Poll, the Tiger women’s cross country team was ranked

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fourth in the NAIA Top 25 Preseason Poll. In four of their first five meets, the Tigers won the meet. The only meet that they failed to win, was the Augustana (Ill.) Invitational, which was won by the University of Illinois. At the Tiger Invitational on Oct. 14, the Tigers took five of the top seven places. Leading the way was Bethany McCoy ’08, who won the meet, running a 17:42.37. Carmin Green ’07 and Jenny Ellis ’07 finished third and fourth, respectively. Green ran an 18:44.70, while Ellis finished in 19:02.41. Cheri Hoffmann ’08 finished sixth in 19:35.35, while Kaeley Matuz ’10 ran a 19:36.58 to finish seventh. GOLF: With a roster featuring nine freshmen, the future looks bright for the Tiger golf squad. The linksters finished second at the Olivet Nazarene University Invitational to open the season. By the end of the year, the Tigers finished second at the Northern Illinois Intercollegiate Golf Conference Championship. Seth Doran ’10 led the way for the Tigers, firing a 77, tying for the NIIGC Player of the Year. Jordan Dillard ’10 shot a 78 and was named to the NIIGC First Team AllConference squad, along with Jason Hopkins ’09, who fired a 79. MEN’S TENNIS: Coming off their fourth straight NAIA National Tournament appearance, the Tiger men’s tennis team finished the fall season with an unblemished 5-0 record. Arka Mondal ’08 and Christian Sanchez ’07 were the only singles players to start the season undefeated, as they both went 5-0. Mark Bell ’10 and Chris Tudor ’09 went 4-1 in singles action. Mondal and Bell, and Leandro Viltard ’09 and Tudor, started the year 4-1 in doubles action. VOLLEYBALL: After starting the year 1-7, the Tiger volleyball team was able to rebound and win 16 of their next 19 matches, includ-

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ing a 3-1 win over eighth-ranked Savannah College of Art and Design (Ga.). Of their first 26 matches, 10 came against schools that were either ranked in the NAIA Top 25 Poll or receiving votes. The Tigers were without the services of NAIA Honorable Mention AllAmerican Michelle McFadden ’09 for the first 14 matches. McFadden was sidelined with an injury. However, several players filled in admirably in her absence. Three players had recorded at least 225 kills, led by Amber McKean ’08 with 267. Laura Wilkens recorded 254, while Katarina Stanojevic ’08 posted 249. NAIA Honorable Mention All-American Megan Gullickson ’07 had dished out a teamleading 1,032 assists and had recorded 47 service aces. Michelle Kapteyn ’10 recorded a team-high 444 digs. Stanojevic had recorded 92 blocks to lead the team. The Tigers opened the year ranked 18th in the NAIA Top 25 Preseason Poll. WOMEN’S TENNIS: The Tiger women’s tennis team is attempting to return to the NAIA National Tournament, where they made three appearances from 2001–2004. If the fall season is any indication of the rest of the season, the Tigers could qualify for their fourth tournament appearance, as they went 10-1. Their only loss was a 5-4 setback to nationally-ranked Indiana Wesleyan. Jade Stanlick ’09, Lily Gonzalez ’09 and Jennifer Ramsey ’09 all went undefeated in singles action, compiling a combined 33-0 record. Stanlick and Jill Haas ’08 combined to go 11-0 in doubles action.


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The Olivetian

Fall 2006

FIND THE LATEST NEWS, STATS AND SCORES AT www.olivet.edu

GOLF

Senior golfer looks at his final season

By Seth Hurd ’06

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We really focus on working together to help each other out.” And the restructuring has already produced measurable improvements, most notably the team’s stroke count of only 289 at Indiana University’s Gleason Tournament, the lowest ONU score in the past several years. According to Coach Schimmelpfennig, the top players are continually driving the team toward excellence. “So far this season we have seen a great deal of consistency out of our top players. We’ve won one tournament and finished in the top three in several others. The next few years should be some of the best years in Tiger Golf history.” One player in par ticular making the team better is freshman standout Seth Doran, whose influence Josh says has “driven us all to work harder. He’s a really good teammate. If one of us plays bad, he’ll sit and encourage us.” It’s true of all athletics that hotshot newcomers are often a negative influence on team momentum, but JOSH KOCH ’07 this isn’t true about Doran. “Even though he can beat me, he gives me respect because I’m a senior,” Josh explains. “This year, there’s a lot of respect between the coaches and players, and between the players and players. That’s nice to see.” Now that Josh can count the meets he has left on his fingers, he’s come to an understanding that the relationships are the most important aspect of his athletic career. “I look forward this year to having the guys grow closer together and become more of a family. They’ll get to know each other as the years progress, and they’ll just keep getting better. They’re so talented as it is. If they keep practicing, I really don’t see how anything can stop them.”

osh Koch ’07 has played golf since he was four. And now he enters the most bittersweet season for any athlete — his senior year of college. The Michigan native hopes to end his collegiate career with a bang. “This year, we have a lot more athletes,” he says. “Our team this year is a lot closer. We hang out aside from the golf course. We play basketball together a lot, go bowling, eat together in the cafeteria.” Although this sounds like the behavior of a group who’s played together all the way through college, Koch is one of only two seniors on a squad made up primarily of freshmen. “It’s been cool to know these new guys coming in. I’m excited for the program for I look forward this year the next three years after I’m to having the guys grow gone. We have an abundance closer together and of ver y talented players that become more of a famare young.” ily. They’ll get to know The strong bond the team each other as the years has already cemented is vital progress, and they’ll for any group that spends so just keep getting better. much time together. Meets and tournaments are often all—JOSH KOCH ’07 day events. “We get up early, eat together, and talk about how cool it is to miss classes,” he comments lightly. “We’ll make our way to the course, drive some balls and then play our hearts out. After that, we’ll eat dinner together and come back home.” It’s not just the mentality of the team that’s changed. Coaches Jeff Schimmelpfennig and Adam Reynolds have revamped the entire golf program for the ’06 season. Josh says the changes are easy to see. “Practices are a lot more structured this year. The attitude is a lot more serious — but the players are better, and that makes it fun.

Sports Shorts T i ger vol leyball team recognized for academics: The 2005 Olivet Nazarene University volleyball team was one of 21 NAIA schools to be recognized for its academic achievements by the American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA). Trinity Christian College (Ill.) was the only other Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference team to receive the award. The AVCA named 287 volleyball programs the recipients of the 2005–06 AVCA Team Academic Award. The 287 programs are the second most, only to the 305 programs named following the 2003–04 season. Recipients of the award range from NCAA Division I to high school girls’ and boys’ teams. The award, initiated in the 1992–93 academic year, honors college and high school teams that displayed excellence in the classroom by maintaining at least a 3.30 cumulative team grade-point average on a 4.0 scale. Nominating head coaches must be AVCA members. Last season, coach Brenda Williams had three players named NAIA All-America Scholar-Athletes.

VOLLEYBALL

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—Compiled by Marc Shaner ’00/’02 M.A.T., Sports Information Director

Haas becomes first ITA Regional Champion: Women’s tennis player Jill Haas ’08 defeated University of IllinoisSpringfield’s Kathleen Brancato 6-4, 6-4 in the ITA Central Jill Haas Regional Championship. With her win, Haas became Olivet Nazarene’s first-ever ITA Regional Champion. She won the event out of a 64-player field and advanced to the ITA NAIA National Championship, where she finished sixth out of eight players. Four football players land on Don Hansen’s National Weekly Football Gazette Preseason NAIA All-American list: Running back Billy Lawrence ’07, defensive end Andy Kizzee ’07 and defensive back Chris Bjorkland ’07 were named to the Don Hansen Football Gazette Preseason Third Team All-American squad. Place kicker Matt Soulia ’08 was an honorable mention selection by the same publication. All four were NCCAA First Team All-Americans by the publication. Don Hansen’s National Weekly Football Gazette was the first publication to exclusively cover small college football. Gullickson records career-high: In the Tiger volleyball team’s 3-2 win over 24th-ranked and previously unbeaten Cornerstone University (Mich.), setter Megan Gullickson ’07 recorded a career-high with 71 assists. Her previous career-high was 67 assists, which she set in an upset win over sixth-ranked College of Saint Mary (Neb.) last season. Gullickson has dished out 4,125 career assists through 13 games this season.

FOOTBALL

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SPECIAL

GA ME ONE

Kizzee

ONU Men’s Basketball vs. Illinois Tech 2 p.m. EST G A M E T WO

Indiana Pacers vs. New York Knicks 7 p.m. EST

Bjorkland

Special appearance by

Allison Durham Speer

Gospel music recording artist, singing the National Anthem and providing a patriotic concert at halftime of both games.

Soulia

Gullickson

TENNIS

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TICK ET PACK AGE includes

n One ticket to both games n Voucher for 1 FREE hot dog, chips and Pepsi n FREE T-shirt n One FREE ticket to a WNBA Fever game in June 2007

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$12, $25, $35 and $55 tickets are also available but do NOT include the items mentioned in the package above.


Fall 2006

The Olivetian

QUESTIONS

With

Kara Joy Burkey ’08 Social Work major • Lima, Ohio

1 Tell us a little bit about your family.

tions with them. I still have a passion for mission work and feel that God is calling me to serve Him as a missionary. I have no idea what that looks like. I guess I will just continue to take things a day at a time and pray that God will put me in situations where I can reach out to hurting people and their families.

I am the oldest of four children. Jonathan is a freshman here at Olivet, Caleb is an eighth grader, and Anna is in sixth grade. My parents, Jon and Twyla, are awesome. They are both very involved in our church, Lima Community Church of the Nazarene, and my dad is a plumber and electrician.

less of the dirty and ugly things in my life. If we understand that He made us and loves us just as we are, then we can be even more passionate about honoring Him and loving and serving Him in every area of our lives.

0 What has God been teaching you lately?

Lately, God has been teaching me a lot about fear and relying on Him. As a leader for Sister 2 Sister, a lead worshipper in Before Tomorrow and at College Church and as a student, I get very overwhelmed by my incompetence and inabilities to do the work that I need to do. A few weeks before school started, I was just lying on my bed, terrified of what was to come. I opened my Bible and the words in Isaiah jumped out of the pages at me. God is speaking to His chosen people Israel in this passage, and I felt like at the same time He was speaking to me. He says in chapter 41 verses 9–10, and 13– 14: I took you from the ends of the earth, from its farthest corners I called you. I said, ‘You are my ser vant’; I have chosen you and have not rejected you. So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand. “For I am the Lord, your God, who takes hold of your right hand and says to you, Do not fear; I will help you. Do not be afraid … for I myself will help you,” declares the Lord, your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel.” God is teaching me to trust Him. There is nothing too big that I cannot handle with Him, and so I am resting in His hand.

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at Olivet with you this year? I love having Jonathan at Olivet! It is so fun to be walking on campus when all of a sudden he comes out of nowhere and tackles me. Jonathan is my best friend in the world, and it has been hard to be away from him and the rest of my family these past several years.

With all your classes and campus involvement, you must have a pretty crazy schedule. What do you do to “de-stress?” I do have a pretty crazy schedule! To “de-stress” I love to get coffee with my roommates, read the Chronicles of Narnia, sing, talk to my Momma on the phone, go on walks with friends, hang out with my brother or sleep … sleeping is probably the best of all of them!

3 What’s the best part about being in a min-

8 What’s something about you that very few

4 As you travel, you have lots of students

9 What’s something you’re really passion-

2 What’s it like having your “little” brother

istry team (Before Tomorrow) for Olivet? For me, the best part about being in a ministry team for Olivet has definitely been sharing life with the other guys on my team. It is so encouraging to be a part of a team that loves each other, prays for each other and shares a passion with me to spread the love of Jesus to those we meet wherever we are.

people know? I love to smell crayons!! Crayola crayons smell amazing. Whenever I go to the store and walk past the crayon section, I must stop and smell them. I also keep a box on my desk and dream about the day that I will journey to Kansas City with my roommate, Allison Caudle, and go to the crayon factory store!!

ask you what it’s like to go to Olivet. What do you tell them? It’s a lot of fun! Olivet is like a home away from home. I talk to students about what they are interested in studying and whether or not Olivet offers that for them. I tell them about the ministries and activities I’ve been able to be a part of and about my favorite part of Olivet: the spiritual life. I love how Jesus is allowed into classrooms, invited into classes through prayer, and people are encouraged to love Him and grow deeper in their relationship with Him.

ate about? I am extremely passionate about people. I love to be with them, hear their stories, be an encourager and help them to dig deeper into who they are in Christ. A verse I loved to share with girls this summer is Psalm 45:11: “The King is enthralled by your beauty. Honor Him, for He is the Lord.” I am awestruck that the Lord, my King, is enthralled by me and thinks that I am beautiful, regard-

5 Tell us a little bit about Sister 2 Sister and

your involvement with that organization. Sister 2 Sister is a campus mentorship program through Women’s Residential Life. Freshmen and transfer students, or as we lovingly call them “little sisters,” each fill out a personality survey and then are matched with a female upperclassman. The girls become “sisters” and hang out about once a week throughout the semester. The “big sisters” have times of accountability with other big sisters and sponsors, women faculty and staff members — or wives of faculty and staff — who lift our girls up in prayer and hang out with them once a month. Sister 2 Sister is probably the biggest passion of my heart right now. Beth Harvey ’08 and I, co-leaders for this year, have a desire to see these girls build amazing relationships and as a result become closer to God. Several weeks ago we hosted our annual Sister 2 Sister kick-off party. It was amazing … there were more than 400 people present.

I love how Jesus is allowed into classrooms, invited into classes through prayer, and people are encouraged to love Him and grow deeper in their relationship with Him.

— K AR A JOY BURKEY ’08

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Why did you choose social work as a major and what do you hope to do with it after school? I came to Olivet intending to be a missionar y nurse. As I began the nursing program, I realize I have a heart for people in their full situation — not just the little girl sick in the hospital, but her whole family. I changed my major to social work in hopes that I can work to bring people hope and the love of Jesus through my interac-

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DAR ALEN

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th p re uring a id re ls, Tiger ath n c ia l a de: to t e a n lu m c e in f d s in u s nd a st mpu tunitie lo r s a use, ca es, and . o c h n a n Oppor n s c o u n s e e m r y s io perfo he cit mic op a d m is g an acade nt of Music er in t ogeth e t in m d e t n h a r e im a t ep at dt all wit ents, D izza an ence h ilable for id s letic ev hicago for p e r pus C re ava a cam ates a trip to ight in d lodging r n r e v ay o duce nts st student. Re Stude t e s v li . O ls t ission curren at area hote Adm f s . t o P n . e par ff i c e R.S.V

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