Issuu on Google+

OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS VOL. 73, NO. 3

SPRING 2006

go

WWW.OLIVET.EDU

and be

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing ofďŹ ces

changed

What Was I Thinking?, p. 3

Tigers end season in Elite Eight, p. 13


2

The Olivetian

Spring 2006

By Kate Morgan

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

Editor George Andrew Wolff ’93

D AV ID M OO RE ’0 6

Assistant Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

D PH OT O

p The world’s

SU BM IT TE

longest-running musical, “The Fantastiks,” took center stage at Olivet Feb. 23–25.

Contributing Writers Caleb Benoit ’06 Dr. Michael Benson Gary Griffin ’81 Seth Hurd ’06 Kate Morgan Marc Shaner ’00/’02 M.A.T. David Caudle ’79 Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03 Class News Editor Christine (Mazzella) Howell ’05

’75, Virgil Mills ’76, Bill Pack and many others enjoyed fun in the Florida sun during February’s Winter Golf Outing. The Watson Memorial Golf Series will raise more than $100,000 for student scholarships.

u During Christmas break, 18 students, two professors, and two community members spent seven days on a work relief trip to Lake Charles, Louisiana. The team helped local residents with home repair, cleaning and debris removal. Joy Garcia ’06 was deeply moved by the experience. “When you would first arrive, you could see the despair and the hurt in their eyes. When we left, we left them in tears of hope.” From: To: Date: Subject:

p Spring revival services were held Feb. 5–8. Newly elected General Superintendent J.K. Warrick preached from John chapters 13–17, examining the pattern for holiness Jesus laid out in the final period of His life.

Editorial Advisers Gary Griffin ’81 Brian Parker ’93 Susan (Hendley) Wolff ’94 SUBMITTED PHOTOS

p Dan Fowler ’75, Denny Williamson

President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A.

Greg Mason John Bowling March 14, 2006 Hurricane Work and Witness Team from Olivet

Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gary W. Streit

Dr. Bowling, Words cannot express my gratitude for the students, faculty and staff who , La. made up the Work and Witness Team that spent the past week in Lake Charles tion devasta the to due effort y recover th They were here to help in the mammo of Hurricane Rita. These folk gave up their spring break, normally a time of rest, relaxation and frolic, to come and assist the people of southwest Louisiana. They paid or raised church. $450 each for this privilege. They slept on the floor or on cots at the local riggedThey ate lunchmeat sandwiches and prewrapped snacks. They showered in g up shower stalls outside. They worked cleaning debris, replacing roofs, paintin needs the served Some ng. carpeti moldy church classrooms, and tearing out of the sick and the dying through nursing home and hospice work. had Having been appointed to this assignment in mid-December, our daughter the in help to and already been planning, along with 32 others, to take this trip of recovery. I had the privilege of witnessing their work, and praying with some ity them on the worksite. One more time I was so proud of Olivet Nazarene Univers and all who make her great. But she is not only great. She is significant. These ce. students epitomized the standards and the motto of Olivet. They made a differen ” I believe I can say that I was “sanctified proud. The students and the staff all said they got more out of it than they gave. If that is possible, then they got a lot out of it, because the people of Lake Charles has had have forever been impacted by these servants of the Lord. Their ministry an incarnational impact on the people of this storm-ravaged area. Thank you for lending them, and the other teams that have come to our area, on to us. We are so grateful and cannot thank you enough. Please pass our thanks . to those who were responsible for making it happen

Vice President for Student Development Rev. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2006 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345

Gregory D. Mason District Superintendent for Mississippi and Louisiana Church of the Nazarene

w

Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited

Olivet Nazarene University

Sincerely,

p Olivet’s spring chapel theme, Great Expectations: God’s Divine Design, has the ONU community taking a closer look at relationships as God intended them.

Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


Spring 2006

By Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A., University President

The Olivetian

3

What Was I Thinking? Rising dramatically from the flat, otherwise featureless, plain of central east Africa is a great mountain. It is the highest point in all of Africa and one of the seven great peaks of the world. It is the tallest free-standing volcano on earth. It was born of fire centuries ago and is now crowned with ice. Though it stands in the heart of the tropics, just south of the equator, it is capped at its peak with huge glaciers. In 1849 German missionaries reported seeing a huge, snow-capped mountain, which they said was called the Mountain of the Caravans by Arab traders from Zanzibar who used the mountain as a landmark while crossing the interior. At first, members of The Royal Geographical Society in Europe refused to believe that snow could exist on the equator, but expeditions sent in 1861 confirmed its existence. During the last few days of January, traveling with a professional African guide, a small group of porters, and a handful of other climbers, I attempted to reach Uhuru Peak, the summit of Kilimanjaro, by foot. What was I thinking? This climb took nine days of hiking, mountaineering and camping in the open air. The ascent began in a dense tropical forest and made its way mile after mile up and out of the wooded area onto the high plains, then past the upper tree line to the elevated alpine regions. Finally came the most difficult part of the climb, the lunarlike expanse of the upper mountain with its thin air and thick glaciers. Here the temperatures are well-below freezing and the wind is harsh. To ascend Mount Kilimanjaro is like walking from the equator to the North Pole in just one week. What was I thinking? I made the climb with six others whom I met for the first time at the base of the mountain. Across the next few days as we labored up the mountain our relationship changed, step by step, from strangers to friends to family. To make a long story short — I made it to the top! On Sunday afternoon, January 29, I stepped onto the peak of the mountain with a great continent stretched out before me in the afternoon sun and shadows. What an exhilarating experience. What was I thinking? I thought first of Pslam 19, The heav-

Dr. Bowling (far left) poses with fellow climbers and guides at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro.

ens declare the glory of God; And the firmament shows His handiwork (NKJV). Then my thoughts turned to Psalm 8: When I consider Your heavens, the work of Your fingers, The moon and the stars, which You have ordained, What is man that You are mindful of him … I also thought of the philosopher Goethe’s observation that Nature is the living, visible garment of God. What was I thinking? I was thinking of God and the wonder of the world He has created for us.

In the days since my trip, I have begun to realize that life is filled with mountains — not like Kilimanjaro, but things like opportunities and obstacles that come to all of us in the daily climb through life. In the coming days, dressed in all of the color and pageantry of Commencement, I will have the chance to look into the eyes of Olivet’s graduating seniors. I will shake everyone’s hand and say a word to each as he or she walks past me into his/her future. What will I be thinking? I will be thinking about the fact that they have climbed a mountain, too — Mount Olivet. What an accomplishment! But I also know that for each graduate there will be other mountains to come as well. However, just as surely as I sensed the presence of God with me on Mount Kilimanjaro, He will also be with them because they have gained an “Education With a Christian Purpose.”

PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY DR. JOHN C. BOWLING

w

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


4

The Olivetian

Spring 2006

Relational Living

A testimony from Michael W. Benson, University Chaplain

I

t is said of Gen. George B. McClellan, the second general-in-chief for Abraham Lincoln, that his largest and greatest fault was that he was stricken with a tendency to exaggerate the size of the enemy. His fear, in turn, rendered him unable or unwilling (often both) to take action; he constantly felt the need for more reinforcements and for increased supplies in order to fight this phantom army that was a product of his own mind. He rarely engaged the enemy because he was always preparing for an enemy that didn’t exist. I have observed a similar trait in myself in that I often read more into situations than is really present. Then, I extrapolate the now ‘mentally-created’ scenario to a great magnitude. This ‘the sky is falling’ mentality effects sharply how I react to people. Learning to put these phantom enemies under the Lordship of Christ has helped me immensely. Everyone lives in relationship to someone. You may have a large circle of friends, family and acquaintances; or, you may attempt to keep it small, choosing instead to know fewer people and know them better. Maybe you keep the circle small so that you are less known. That we were created and designed for relationships flows naturally out of our belief in a Triune God. Trinitarian Christology affirms the belief in one God — in three Persons. “Let Us make man in our image.” This means God is social. God is a social being in His own nature. God needs nobody else for fellowship because there are three of Him — Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It is not simply a friendly relationship, it is a family relationship. This is a crucial declaration about man and

Learning to live in a healthy way in relationships is one of the most important tasks in life. about woman and about our relationship to God and the nature of our relationships to each other. Mankind is a social creature, too. God made mankind that way. “Let Us make man in our image; male and female, created He them.” We live in relationship to God and to others and to self. Sometimes our relationships are disfigured because of painful experiences we have encountered. These days, it is too common that some are listening to negative “tape recordings” that play in their minds — over and over — which

Saveese

daily reinforce the poor understanding of self and of others. Learning to live a healthy way in relationships is one of the most important tasks in life. “How does a person navigate ‘successfully’ through the large and varied sweep of experiences and end up with relationships that are healthy and satisfying?” In the providence of God, the old relationships can be rebuilt and refashioned. This is the point of the Gospel: “All things become new.” Yes, there are new experiences. But there are also new ways of seeing old experiences. The tapes that have clouded our thinking, when made available to God for something new to happen, can be healed by the wounds suffered by Christ too! Someone rightly observed: “The effect of great pain is often claustrophobic; it becomes the whole world to us.” It doesn’t have to be that way. How helpful in our lives and in our relationships if we could learn, as Henri Nouwen was wont to say, “living our wounds through.” You can analyze the wounds in your head, but they need to be lived out in your heart. What God wants to do in our heart will impact us more deeply and significantly. Openness to something new is, potentially, an indeterminable opportunity. And, when the new is orchestrated by the Holy Spirit, the potential is limitless, without boundaries. Rev. Michael Benson writes “Chaplain’s Notebook,” published weekly online at www.olivet.edu, where you will also find downloadable audio of chapel services. Rev. Benson and his wife, Gwen, have three children: Katie ’05, Emily ’07 and Andrew ’09.

l MONDAY, AUGUST 7, 2006

th

Second Annual

Training Camp Golf Outing

dates!

in conjunction with Chicago Bears Training Camp Kankakee Country Club, Kankakee, Ill.

Upcoming ! s g n i t u o f l o g

l FEBRUARY 15–18, 2007 Fourth Annual

Winter Golf Outing

Orlando, Fla.

• Disney World’s Hawk’s Landing • Disney’s Palm and Magnolia • Celebration

The

Larry Watson Memorial Golf Series Honoring the legacy of Coach Larry Watson by raising critical dollars to help underwrite scholarships for Olivet freshmen

Call (815) 928-5455 for more information

w

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


Spring 2006

5

Education possible for family man through scholarships

Freshman ‘road map’ for college and life

By Kate Morgan

W

By Kate Morgan

What does it mean to be a Christian and how can we live out our faith in an increasingly pluralistic world? Christian Formation, the newest general education class offered by the School of Theology and Christian Ministry, is answering these questions for freshman students and providing them with a spiritual “road map” for college and life. “For many students, college is a time to think and grow in their faith,” says Dr. Carl Leth, dean of the School of Theology and Christian Ministry. “Whereas the prior setup had freshmen starting with the Old Testament, Christian Formation allows us to set a road map of sorts,” continues Leth. “From the beginning we teach the importance of the application of Scripture and an evangelistic way of life. We’ll continue to reiterate those ideas in both Scripture classes and Christian Faith.” Twice each week, students meet in large lecture sessions. In these assemblies, professors are challenged to engage students in the material, and PowerPoint and multimedia presentations are now common features. Professors also use themes from popular films like “Hotel Rwanda” to connect students with the text. “A lot of what our students are learning in Christian Formation isn’t new. They’ve heard the Biblical stories before, but sometimes they haven’t thought about how those stories and teachings can connect to their worldviews,” says Leth. “That is what we want them to think about.” Students are expected to know more than just “what Christians believe”; but what those beliefs mean to the way Christians live. “I thought it was a fairly in-depth study of the Nazarene theology,” says Nathan Lacher ’09. “I like that the class explains why we as Nazarenes believe the way we do.” In addition to the large lectures, students participate in small group sessions one hour a week. Small groups include 15 students and one teaching assistant who acts as a discussion facilitator. The hope for these sessions is to encourage students to express their ideas. “I thought the groups were a good addition to the lectures,” says Mary Anne Toliver ’07. “Because there were fewer students, we got to have more personal interaction. We really had the chance to open up and talk about important things.” Overall, Leth is pleased with the outcome of the new Christian Formation course. “This was a creative and experimental step for us,” says Leth. “We’ll do a bit of tweaking, but all in all, this has been a huge step forward in the spiritual growth of our campus.”

The Olivetian

hen Michael Hagnauer ’09 received his call to full-time ministry, he researched several options as to how to get his degree. Eventually, though, he overwhelmingly felt God leading him to Olivet. Even with wife Brandy and young son Ethan to care for, “It wasn’t hard for me to make the decision to come to Olivet and pursue a career in ministry because it was just something I wanted to do,” says Hagnauer. But with a family at home, Hagnauer is not like the typical Olivet student. “Being a student with a family is quite different. Instead of just trying to take care of myself, which is hard enough, I have two other people to take care of,” says Hagnauer. “There’s also the financial factor that comes with a family. There’s always the concern of how I’m going to pay rent so we can have a roof over our heads, let alone pay for tuition at Olivet.” Fortunately, Hagnauer has received some support to attend Olivet. The Rev. Carl H. and Esther Roberts Scholarship, along with other financial contributions, has provided for Hagnauer and his family while he earns his degree. “If it weren’t for the Roberts Scholarship, I probably wouldn’t be taking classes at Olivet this semester.” The Rev. Carl H. and Esther Roberts Scholarship was established by Mrs. Roberts specifically to assist married ministerial students at Olivet. The scholarship honors the memory and recognizes the dedication of her husband. “My father was a Nazarene pastor. My husband was a Nazarene pastor,” says Mrs. Roberts. “I know the importance of ministry work and the importance of family support.” And for Hagnauer, education wouldn’t be possible without Mrs. Roberts’ generosity. “I’m thankful for Mrs. Roberts’ obedience to God in helping my family and me during this time. The money has been a huge blessing to us,” he says. As Hagnauer rushes from class to pick up his son from daycare, arriving home to balance study and family time, he has no regrets. “I consider it an incredible honor to be called to a life of ministry,” Hagnauer says. “And I’m grateful God has continued to provide a way for my family while I attend Olivet.” If you would like more information on how to make a difference in the lives of Olivet students by starting a scholarship, contact the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or (815) 939-5171.

Students host three governor contenders By Kate Morgan

On a Tuesday evening two months before the Illinois Republican Gubernatorial Primary, the Olivet Nazarene University Young Republicans hosted three governor hopefuls for a candidates’ forum. Ron Gidwitz, Jim Oberweis and State Sen. Bill Brady appeared before a crowd of 75 to appeal to voters for March’s gubernatorial primary election. Candidates answered identical questions about issues including education, healthcare, the economy, transportation, and same-sex marriage. The evening ended with questions from audience members. Young Republicans President Trevor Winn ’08 organized the event after a member of the Brady campaign approached him about the idea. “We began contacting all the Republican candidates in November,” says Winn. Three of the five contenders agreed to participate, making the event the first time so many state-wide contenders appeared at the same event in Bourbonnais. From there, Winn arranged for local media to announce the event beforehand and cover the event. “I’m proud that we were able to pull this off and give people the chance to hear directly from candidates,” says Winn.

OLIVET ONLINE Go to www.olivet.edu to experience Olivet’s NEW and IMPROVED Web site!

Features include: • Latest ONU news, sports scores, and press releases • Audio downloads of chapel and other ONU events • RSS news feeds • Printable forms for admissions and athletics • Searchable alumni directories • Class notes • Electronic greeting cards • Downloadable wallpaper • Downloadable PDFs of The Olivetian

w

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


6

The Olivetian

Spring 2006

onu Insider

Bishop named Bourbonnais police and fire commissioner: The Village of Bourbonnais has appointed Craig Bishop, Olivet’s director of the Department of Public Safety, to the Village of Bourbonnais Police and Fire Commission. As a commissioner, Bishop will take part in personnel tasks including disciplinary hearings, termination hearings and interviews to develop employment eligibility lists. He will also use his position to build positive relationships between the police and fire departments, as well as with Olivet. Bishop has been director of the Department of Public Safety since August 2003 and serves as an adjunct professor, instructing the Police and Society course. He previously worked as a police officer and probation officer.

Duffy Robbins, nationally-celebrated speaker and author, is among professors teaching new youth courses.

Leading youth specialists teach new master’s courses By Kate Morgan

Y

outh leaders now have a way to further their education at Olivet Nazarene University. The courses, taught by nationally renowned youth specialists such as Duffy Robbins, Tony Jones and Kelly Schwarz, are part of an ongoing effort to further equip ministers and laypersons to reach out to the church’s next generation. In January, youth leaders from around the region descended upon Olivet for the first course taught by Duffy Robbins, a nationallycelebrated speaker and author. Topics for discussion from Robbins’ textbook This Way to Youth Ministry included understanding adolescents, setting boundaries, building traits of a successful youth minister and assembling a team of volunteers to help. “It’s great to hear from thought leaders [like Robbins],” says Jim Faist, a layman working with youth at Three Rivers Church of the Nazarene, Three Rivers, Mich. “And being able to have discussions with my peers is helpful, too.” Youth leaders were not the only ones interested in learning about the ministry. Senior pastors, especially those from small churches, also were trained how to cultivate the next generation. “I was in youth ministry for years, but now am a senior pastor at a small church,” says Randy Munson from Lewistown, Ill. “So I’m looking to learn how to build a ministry.” Olivet offered the course in partnership with the region’s district superintendents, who provided scholarship money to those taking the course for credit toward a Master of Arts in Theology or Master of Ministry, or for certification in youth ministry. For more information about upcoming classes, contact Pamali Meadows at the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies at pmeadows@olivet.edu or Mark Holcomb ’81 at mholcomb@olivet. edu or (815) 939-5131.

Draine named Air Force Reserve colonel: The United States Air Force Reserve has promoted Susan (Odell) Draine ’76/’90 M.B.A., associate professor of nursing, to colonel. Draine has served in the Air Force Reserve for more than 21 years. Most notably during this time, she has served as a flight nurse in the Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron and worked for the 728th Aeromedical Staging Squadron, the Air Force version of a tent hospital. Currently, Draine is responsible for ensuring proper wartime medical skills training at the 622 Regional Support Group, Headquarters 22nd Air Force in Marietta, Ga. Her tasks include providing assistance to the medical units of the 22nd Air Force and helping members prepare for health services inspections. Rinehart honored by Social Committee at Christmas Banquet: Each year, members of the Social Committee dedicate the Christmas Banquet to someone who has shown great commitment to Olivet. This year the Committee honored Connie Rinehart, currently working for Sodexho food services, for her 15 years of service to the University. “Every day Connie greets students in the cafeteria with a warm and inviting welcome,” says Beth Johnson ’06, vice president of Social Life. “Her ability to listen to students’ concerns and life stories shows what a dedicated, caring member of Olivet’s staff she is.”

Olivetians aid sexual violence victims By Kate Morgan Olivet senior Kiesha Henry had been praying recently for the Lord to lead her to become involved in something that mattered. So when the Kankakee County Center Against Sexual Assault contacted her two years after she asked for more information about becoming a volunteer, she knew the Lord was answering her prayers. She, along with senior Kristina Hanson and junior Brian Murphy, recently completed training to become sexual assault hotline operators for KC-CASA. “I hesitated at first because I’m a senior [and won’t be in the area much longer],” says Henry. But with more than 94,000 sexual assaults reported in 2004, and estimates of unreported incidents as high as 220,000, “I knew this is what I could do to make a difference.” “It is terrible that things like sexual abuse happen,” continues Henry. “But what KC-CASA does is what victims need to begin the healing process.” As hotline operators, the students will be available for individuals, generally sexual abuse victims, to call for referrals, ask questions or to simply talk to someone. They may also accompany victims to the hospital for exams and to report the offenses. “It’s not an easy job. It’s difficult emotionally to deal with some of the situations,” says Henry. “But it’s also rewarding to help victims in their times of need. I really feel like God has led me to KC-CASA to do His work, to help those who might not know how to help themselves.”

For more on these and other ONU news stories, go to www.olivet.edu and click on “News & Events.”

w

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


Spring 2006

Turning thrift store TEES into Third World relief

V

Free, downloadable broadcasts of weekly chapel services and other ONU events are now available online. Go to www.olivet.edu and click the graphic for “Listen Now.”

RECENT PODCASTS INCLUDE: Where’s the Virtue in Virtual Sex?

Greg Speck, Youth Ministries Specialist

Speck outlines the destruction of virtual sex, as well as the steps to healing.

Why Does Their Failure Impact My Future?

Jeromy Deibler, lead vocalist of FFH

Deibler shares his painful story of how growing up in a divorced home has carried into his adult life, and explains how to begin the healing process.

Love Won Out (Two-part)

Mike Haley and Melissa Fryrear,

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Focus on the Family

Preaching from John chapters 13–17, Warrick examines the final period of the life of Jesus as He laid out a pattern for holiness.

What am I Saving Myself For?

Dr. Michael Benson, University Chaplain

Benson takes a personal and painful look at the damage of premarital sex.

What’s the Big Deal About Going Too Far?

Jason Perry, Pastor

Perry examines the consequences of intimacy before marriage on the social, mental and spiritual life.

How Does a Waffle Talk to Spaghetti? (Two-part)

Bill and Pam Farrel, Husband and wife author/ministry team

The Farrels outline the unique gender qualities of men and women and show how to communicate through those differences.

What is the divine design for women?

Mary English, Generation Sigma

Mary English, of Generation Sigma, explores the unique calling of women.

What is the divine design for men?

David English,

Director of Generation Sigma

English lays out the four steps to authentic manhood.

Whose idea were relationships anyway?

Dr. Michael Benson

Benson explores the three kinds of relationships and previews chapels to come in the spring semester.

National recognition for art work: Three Olivet Nazarene University art students recently finished in the top five percent of 28,000 entries in the 26th Annual College Photography Contest, sponsored by “Photographer’s Forum” magazine and Nikon. Chris Gibson ’06, of Fort Wayne, Ind., Chad Stadt ’08, from Bourbonnais, and Ryan Timm ’09 from Bradley, Ill., each submitted a photograph after their photography professor, Bill Jurevich, mentioned the competition in class. Their works will now appear in “The Best of College Photography Annual 2006,” a hardbound publication distributed to college libraries and instructors of photography, art and graphic design.

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

ONU Spring Revival Services (Three-part) Superintendent, Church of the Nazarene

Notable Internships: Senior Jessica Allison, from Moro, Ill., has been accepted to become a member of the 2006 Teach for America corps. Beginning in August, Allison will teach social studies at the 7–12 grade level in the District of Columbia public school system. Teach for America is the national corps of outstanding recent college graduates who commit two years to teach in urban and rural public schools and become lifelong leaders in expanding educational opportunity. The organization is highly selective, with approximately 12 percent of 17,000 total applicants gaining admission in 2005. Journalism major Megan (McMahon) Artz ’06 recently landed an internship with television station WLS-TV Chicago. Artz serves as personal intern to reporter Karen Meyer, the station’s feature reporter on disability issues. Her responsibilities include setting up interviews for Meyer, assisting on shoots, and picking out sound bites for reports. While at Olivet, Artz has taken several TV classes, reported for Access ONU, Olivet’s TV news magazine, and written for the GlimmerGlass. The U.S. Department of Energy has selected Jonathon Anderson ’06 to participate in its Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships program at Argonne National Laboratory. During this 10-week program, stretching from late May to midAugust, Anderson will spend more than 40 hours each week conducting research and participating in group seminars, tours, and other activities. Then, at the conclusion of the program, he will draft a full report on his research findings.

w

Haley and Fryrear share the painful journeys that led them into homosexual lifestyles and the freedom they found from it through Jesus Christ.

Dr. J.K. Warrick, General

ONUStudents in the News Who’s Who: Twenty-nine seniors from Olivet Nazarene University have been named to the 2005–06 edition of Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. The students were elected by University faculty and students based on academic achievement, extracurricular involvement, leadership potential and Christian witness. The selected students are Christopher Allison, a social science education major from Bourbonnais; Jessica Allison, a political science major from Moro, Ill.; Sara Batkiewicz, an elementary education major from Bourbonnais; Ryan Beuthin, a corporate communications major from Brownsburg, Ind.; Janie Case, a housing and environmental design major from Swartz Creek, Mich.; Sarah Denault, an elementary education major from Kankakee, Ill.; Nathan Dreisbach, an elementary education major from Fostoria, Ohio; Joy Garcia, a math education major from Stanhope, N.J.; Andrea Guengerich, a political science major from Manito, Ill.; Luke Hays, an elementary education major from Flushing, Mich.; Beth Johnson, a Christian education major from Indianapolis, Ind.; Daryl LaBar, a computer science programming major from Union City, Mich.; Aline Mulieri, a psychology major from São Paulo, Brazil; Simone Mulieri, a sociology major from São Paulo, Brazil; Sarah Pagano, a political science major from Orland Park, Ill.; Kara Pusey, an elementary education major from Leawood, Kan.; Krista Pusey, a nursing major from Leawood, Kan.; Katie Pyle, a psychology major from Danville, Ind.; Nathan Pyle, a biology major from Danville, Ind.; Michael Remole, a children’s ministries major from Potomac, Ill.; Audrey Richardson, a biology major from Byron Center, Mich.; Matthew Smith, a biology major from Spring Arbor, Mich.; Rob Starkey, a business management major from Jasper, Ind.; Stephanie Suprenant, a biology major from Bourbonnais; Suzanne Suprenant, a biology major from Bourbonnais; Molly Taylor, an elementary education major from Fenton, Mich.; Andrew Twibell, a biology major from Muncie, Ind.; Johnny Wakefield, a political science major from O’Fallon, Ill.; and Ryan Walker, a business management major from Fort Collins, Colo.

7

Did you know you can listen to chapel on your computer or iPod?

By Seth Hurd ’06

alentines Day 2005 was perhaps the most unlikely time for a clothing line to be born. Two producers of the independent film “Invisible Children” visited the campus of Olivet to show their documentary portraying the lives of children living in northern Uganda. The film chronicles the struggles of young children who face poverty, war, and forced military service as a part of their daily lives. After the film, the producers asked the audience to use their talents, time, and passions to help generate relief funds for Africa. One small group of students made a decision to take the challenge seriously, and BONES ARMY TEES was born. Senior Jordan Mitchell helped create the idea with former ONU student Kyle Murphy, who currently resides in England. The two took the name of the line from Ezekiel 37, in which God shows His prophet a mountain of bones and promises to breathe life into them, forming an army. Mitchell, who enjoys “thrifting,” or frequenting large thrift stores for bargains, decided to channel his hobby into the budding humanitarian effort. He was able to build up a large, initial stock of used T-shirts. Next, the pair created stencils, and painted the shirts with the phrase “You see bones, I see an army.” The shirts caught on. Mitchell credits it to a sense of social justice throughout the campus, mixed with a love of unique, quality shirts. The group has changed in the year since its founding, with some students graduating and others joining in to help. Currently, BONES ARMY TEES is operated by five ONU students. The additional manpower has become necessary because demand for shirts is high. The group is currently attempting to fill a backorder of more than 40 shirts, hats, scarves and hooded sweatshirts with the signature logo. Each shirt costs roughly two dollars to make and sells for ten. The cost of the operation is covered by the students themselves, so that 100 percent of the proceeds go to the Invisible Children project. The group has moved forward with other efforts as well. On December 7, BONES ARMY TEES sponsored a second showing of “Invisible Children” on the campus of Olivet. The evening raised more than $400 in donations. Plans are currently in the works to show the film again in late spring. Upon receiving his diploma in May, Mitchell plans to enlist in the military, leaving questions about the future of the operation. But according to Mitchell, it’s never been about the shirts anyway. “I want people to watch ‘Invisible Children,’ talk about it, and be active,” Mitchell comments. “I want them to use their own specific talents to raise money for the project. As long as that happens, I don’t care if these shirts keep getting made. All I want to see is that people are giving attention to social injustice.”

The Olivetian

t

.

e

d

God’s Divine Design

Dr. John C. Bowling,

University President Using Genesis chapter 1, Dr. Bowling discusses the greatest truth we learn from the creation story: all relationships begin and find their ultimate fulfillment with God.

u


8

The Olivetian

go

Spring 2006

and be

changed W

ith a dictionary in one hand and tea in the other, Ryan Quanstrom ’07 snickers at his own effort to decipher what Tanya is trying to tell him. She shakes her head and smiles as he flips through the pages of the wellworn translation guide. Finally finding the word in question, he nearly shouts in triumph, and the two laugh at the effort such a simple message demanded. Over the course of his three months in Russia, Quanstrom built a close relationship with Tanya, his Russian “mother.” His Russian was limited, and the total words in her English vocabulary could be quickly tabulated on one’s fingers. Still, Quanstrom explains, “I connected with her on an inexplicable level.” He continues, “This was an experience that changed my entire view of humanity. That if we would only take the time to sit and listen, to daily drink tea and eat biscuits, then we can discover the soul and the heart of another human being.” Quanstrom is one among hundreds of current and former Olivet students who have pushed their educational boundaries to study off-campus. Whether the experience took place in a far-off country or in one of the many U.S. programs, students who study abroad consistently admit to being forever changed. Briana Kassebaum ’07, who participated in the

Kristin Barlow ’07 in Uganda

Latin American Studies Program, says of her time in Costa Rica, “It was probably the most holistic experience I’ll ever have — spiritually, physically, everything.” She explains that’s because when you study in a different culture, you can’t just “hide in a corner” and say you will hold back part of yourself. Everything about you is exposed for the changing. Kristin Barlow ’07, after a semester in Uganda, agrees. “It challenges you in ways you thought you would never be challenged.”

In Washington, D.C., Jessica Allison ’06 with Congressman Kenny Marchant of Texas

study abroad programs

There are hundreds of first-class study abroad programs available through U.S. universities for semester or summer terms, and Olivet will work with interested students in finding a program that meets their plans or aspirations. At right is a partial listing of the study abroad programs in which Olivet students have participated:

American Studies Program: Students live in a secure apartment complex near the Capitol. ASP includes eight hours of internship credit tailored to students’ interests and eight hours of course credit emphasizing domestic and foreign policy issues from a Christian perspective.

tion with the Wesley Institute for Ministry and the Arts, the ASC focuses on the integration of theology and the dramatic arts: theatre, dance, music and design.

AuSable Institute in Environmental Studies: A field-based natural sciences program in Michigan.

China Studies Program: Hosted by Xiamen University in Southeastern China, the CSP immerses students in Chinese culture. Students travel throughout China during the semester, and live in an international students’ dorm.

Australia Studies Centre: Based in Sydney, and in coopera-

EduVenture: EduVenture integrates strenuous outdoor activ-

w

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

ity (jungle trekking, mountain climbing, horseback riding) with courses in intercultural communications, field-based anthropology and spiritual formation. Students are involved in community development programs in developing world circumstances in Mexico or Fiji. Focus on the Family Institute: Located in Colorado Springs, the Institute provides an in-depth analysis of family issues and policies in America today, from a clearly Christian viewpoint. Students interact with leading family

e

d

u

researchers and Christian professionals to promote healthy families in church and society. Hungary: Mount Vernon Nazarene University sponsors a semester in Debrecen, Hungary, the hometown of the Hungarian Reformed Church. Courses in history, religion and social sciences are offered under the direction of a Mount Vernon faculty member. International Business Institute: A 10-week study in business in Europe.


Spring 2006

The Olivetian

9

know “ I don’t what will

For some students, off-campus study pushes to show me how challenging this field is and to them to a whole new level of academic excellence. rekindle my passion for covering politics.” Janie Case ’06, who participated in the Oxford HonJessica Allison ’06, who also studied in D.C. ors Program in England, recalls, “I’ve never studied through the American Studies Program, had a that hard in my life — I didn’t know I had it in me.” similar experience. “Studying in D.C. offers stuHowever, the academic rigor is easily surmountdents an opportunity to learn more in one day able for most of these students, since they opt to then they ever could in a week on a traditional participate in programs that are of interest to them. college campus. I saw firsthand how it would be Jen Justice ’07, an elementary education major, possible to be called to full-time Christian ministry found this to be the case for her when studying art in — KARI SHAY ’07 in the government, politics and policy arenas.” Australia. “I found myself working harder than I ever And for both Miller and Allison, the experienchad before, because I was doing things I was passionate about.” es led to even more practical results. For Miller, “I’ve benefited from The level of intensity for off-campus study varies from program to the networking. As my Summer Institute peers have all graduated program, and some students choose to take themselves far beyond the and started out in the media, I’ve continued to learn from their expebeaten path. Take Kari Shay ’07, for example, an art major from Hinsriences as well as my own.” Allison’s experience not only led her into dale, Ill., who spent the fall semester in Fiji through the highly-physical a new career through Teach for America, but she also met her fiancé Eduventure program. She recalls being dropped off with her group on the while studying in D.C. beach, armed with a spear and machete, and being told, “If you want to Asked whether they would recommend off-campus study to other eat, spear a fish. If you want to have a shelter, build one.” Among her students, current and former participants all seem to agree: It’s not a other adventures: sleeping in tribal villages, jumping off 60-foot waterquestion of whether you go, but where you should go. falls, and encountering venomous jungle snakes. “Go, go, go,” Quanstrom emphasizes to anyone who asks. “Go Shay pokes fun at her own lack of preparedness for the program. She and be changed as you change others.” remembers, “I showed up at the airport in my little glasses and I’m like, ‘Is there a Starbucks?’” But because of her openness to adventure, Shay’s life IN THEIR was dramatically altered. She AUDIO OWN explains, “I was stretched so far. Podcasts WORDS: I’ve grown up in Chicago, been a city girl by nature my entire life. Now I want to live in the bush Go to www.olivet.edu and live a simple life: serve God and love Him and not be caught and click on the link for up in materialism. “Podcasts: Listen Now” “I don’t know what will hapto listen to several pen,” she continues, “but it’s just really cool how God works.” students’ accounts about Tricia Miller ’06 didn’t have studying in Australia, to travel nearly as far to have a life-changing experience. The Russia, China, Uganda, summer after her freshman Egypt, Washington, D.C., year, she participated in the Summer Institute for Journalism England, Fiji and many in Washington, D.C., and since other exciting places. that time has participated in two more D.C. programs. “God has worked through that experience

happen … but it’s just really cool how God works.

PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY JESSICA ALLISON ’06, KRISTIN BARLOW ’07, AND BRIANA KASSEBAUM ’07

Briana Kassebaum ’07 in Costa Rica

Latin American Studies Program: Based in Costa Rica, LASP offers tracks in advanced Spanish language and literature, culture and politics, environmental science or international business. Students live with families, but travel to Guatemala, Nicaragua, and perhaps Cuba. Los Angeles Film Studies Program: LAFSP is located minutes from the major Hollywood studios, involves six hours of internship in the film industry and 10 hours of related classes stressing the integration of Christian faith with the visual arts.

Middle East Studies Program: Housed at the American University in Cairo on an island in the Nile River, MESP guides students in exploring the religious, intellectual and political currents in the Middle East. Students travel to Turkey, Syria, Jordan, and when possible, Israel.

all classes and extracurricular activities. Forty-five minutes from London, public transport reaches to the rest of England. Romanian Studies Program: Live with a Romanian family, work in hospitals, orphanages, child welfare or senior adult welfare programs, a Christian Coffeehouse Ministry, public schools, an Internet Café. Internships are available for pre-med, nursing and business students during the summer.

Oxford Scholars Semester: Juniors and seniors from any major with a 3.5 GPA can enroll at the Centre for Scholarship and Christianity at Oxford (SCIO) and be a visiting student through Wycliffe Hall, eligible for

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

government to offer accredited degrees. Students live in self-governing dorms and take Japanese language and culture, directed studies with bi-lingual Japanese professors and English-language courses offered for Japanese students.

Summer Institute of Journalism: In Washington, D.C., taught by Coalition for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU) faculty members

Uganda Studies Program: In cooperation with Uganda Christian University, the USP gives American students the chance to experience Africa up close, living in a dorm and going to class with African students.

Tokyo Christian University: TCU is the only Christian institution in Japan chartered by the

Russian Studies Program: Based in Nizhni Novgorod (the

w

central research center for the Soviet Union), with time in Moscow and St. Petersburg, students live in a college dorm, then with a Russian family. Russian history and culture, Orthodox Christianity and modern Russia are explored.

e

d

u


10

The Olivetian

Spring 2005

Class Notes Ralph Fisher ’59 is in charge of congregational care at the Community Church in Mt. Pleasant, Mich., directing the program for 110 senior citizens, and visitation pastor for new families. It is an Evangelical Presbyterian Church with attendance each Sunday of 1,200 in three services. He is also in charge of the prayer ministry of the church. His wife, Marlene, is a mortgage signer for lending institutions.

Ted Turner ’62 will be inducted into the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association April 2006. In 1967, Turner began his coaching career at Schrum, Ill., and since Ted Turner that time has coached at Illinois high schools TF North, Sullivan, and Clinton — from where he retired as coach and athletic director May 2003. Anita (Pendleton) Reader ’66 and Brian White were married on Oct. 22, 2005. Brian is an associate pastor at Christ United Methodist Church in Westfield, Ind. Anita works for Mortgage Banking in Indianapolis, Ind. They reside in Westfield.

Geneva Silvernail ’75, a global assignment missionary for the Church of the Nazarene, has been assigned as an educational consultant and as the regional literature coordinator on the Geneva Silvernail Asia-Pacific Region and moved to Manila, Philippines, January 2006. Since 1983, she has served the Church in the Philippines, Guam, Dominican Republic, the Virgin Islands, Swaziland, and the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. M. Stephen Davisson ’78 recently earned his Master of Arts in Education, focusing in curriculum and technology from the University of Phoenix Online. He now teaches Biological Science and Chemistry for Cincinnati City School District, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Brad Kenser ’83 recently became superintendent of schools for Community Unit School District No. 3 in Cuba, Ill. He was the principal of Lewistown (Ill.) High School for the past eight years, having completed his Master in Education Administration and Education Specialist degree at Western Illinois University. He and his wife, Debbie (Sawicki) ’83, and daughters Kellie, 17 and Kari, 14, reside in Lewistown. Donna (Rice) ’85 and Michael Cella: A girl, Abigail Joy, 2, adopted Feb. 7, 2006. She joins a sister, Anna, 3. Donna is a nurse in an outpatient infusion center, and Michael manages a nursery for John Deere. They reside in Naples, Fla. Philip ’86 and Sheila (McDonald) Davisson ’86, both captains with The Salvation Army, are being transferred from their current position to the Escuela de Cadetes in Santiago, Chile. They will commence a three-year term in February 2006. They take with them teenage daughters Jaclyn and Julia, while son, James, remains at the University of Chicago. Toni (Oneal) ’86 and Larry Stephens: A girl, Michelle Susannah, March 19, 2005. She joins brothers Isaac 14, Jacob 12, Kyle 3, and sisters Sarah 9, Rachel 8, and Rebecca 5. Toni homeschools the children, and Larry works for Hallmark Office Products, Inc. They reside in Hockley, Texas.

Liz (Duff) ’90 and Mark Blachly: A girl, Abigail Xiu-Yu Blachly, born June 2004 and adopted on May 8, 2005, from Chongqing China. She joins brother, Ben, 4. Liz is a family medicine doctor in private practice, and Mark is a physics Abigail Blachly and calculus teacher at Tech High School. They reside in Indianapolis, Ind.

Carrie (Dorsey) ’90 and Larry Sukova: A boy, Nathaniel Jaden, July 11, 2005. He joins brother, Drew, 2. Carrie is a stay-at-home mom, and Larry works in hospital management with Crothall Facilities Management, Inc. They reside in Brownsburg, Ind.

From the Director… Dear Alumni and Friends, Drew and Nathaniel Sukova

Just a few weeks after her father’s passing, Leah Ruth (Woods) Kensey ’50 shared the following in a letter to the University:

Rachael Harpel ’91 recently earned her master’s degree in education from Defiance College in Defiance, Ohio. She is currently employed at Paulding County Hospital in the laboratory. She and her husband, Gregg, reside in Paulding, Ohio, along with their two daughters, Jessica and Allison.

Dear Friends, On Thanksgiving Day, at age 97, my father went to be with his Lord. God’s planning is By David Caudle ’79 so awesome because at Thanksgiving time, Director, Alumni Relations back in the Depression, Daddy won a spiritual battle. God told him to give his last $5 for a missionary offering. He argued with the Lord and told Him that he had cardboard in the soles of his work shoes, and that he desperately needed that $5 to buy the shoes.

Dave ’92 and Jolyne (Strait) ’94 Bartley: A girl, Aubrayanna Saran, Feb. 11, 2005. Dave is the pastor of South Bend First Church of the Nazarene and Jolyne works part-time from home for New Church Specialties. They reside in South Bend, Ind.

Aubrayanna Bartley

His love and obedience won out, and he gave his love offering. He, Mother and I were driving to see my aunt and uncle on their farm when they saw something in the road. Yes, it was NEW work shoes, size 12 — his size!

Kelly (Sumpter) ’92 and Ben Stacy: A girl, Elizabeth Rose, Aug. 30, 2005. She joins brothers Benjamin, 3 and Zachary, 2. Kelly is a part-time consultant for PriceWaterhouseCooper, and Ben is a financial advisor at Fifth Third Bank. They reside in Cincinnati, Ohio.

What a day of blessing that must have been for Leonard Woods — and his wife and daughter.

Hope (Grilliot) ’94 and John L. Spohn ’93: A girl, Mia Grace, Dec. 16, 2005. Hope is operations manager for Hilltop Ministries, Inc., and John is an admissions representative for Mount Vernon Nazarene UniMia Spohn versity at the Cincinnati, Ohio branch. They reside in Cincinnati.

Leah Ruth continued by quoting the paragraph in her “Daddy’s” last will and testament that made provision for a gift to Olivet, and then she closed by asking that it be used to further God’s Kingdom through “Education With a Christian Purpose.” “We can do that!” I remember thinking. One man’s love and obedience will enable multiple young men and women to enjoy the “Olivet experience.”

Brad ’94 and Marissa Jones: A boy, Jackson Richard, Sept. 11, 2005. Brad is a franchise coordinator for Ford Motor Company, and Marissa is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Ashburn, Va.

Connecting,

Jackson Jones

David Caudle ’79 Director of Alumni Relations

Karen (Mooney) ’97 and Jason Courtney ’96: A girl, Ava Rose, April 18, 2005. She joins a sister, Ella, 2. Karen is a stay-at-home mom and works from home part time as an actuarial Ava Courtney assistant. Jason is a brokerage account manager for Golden Rule Insurance Company. They reside in Indianapolis, Ind.

Heather (Perdue) ’97 and Steve Smith: A boy, Spencer Steven, Aug. 21, 2005. Heather is a dietitian/diabetes educator for an insulin pump company, Animas Corporation, in the Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana area. Steve is a Spencer Smith department supervisor for Peddinghaus Corporation. They reside in Saint Anne, Ill.

Jamie Fussner ’96 and Brian Foley were married on Aug. 27, 2005, in Norwalk, Conn. Jamie works for ACNielsen, and Brian works for a Hedge Fund. They reside in Norwalk, Conn. Christina Vancil ’96 and Eric Butler were married on July 2, 2005, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Eric works for ASG Construction and is in the Iowa National Guard 2168 Transportation Company and served in Operation Iraqi Freedom 2003–2004. Christina is working for the state of Iowa. They reside in Marion, Iowa. Wayne Walts II ’96 and Amy Lower were married on Dec. 17, 2005, in Gladwin, Mich. Wayne is an associate broker for RE/MAX River Haven Real Estate, and Amy is a medical receptionist for Cedar Avenue Family Practice. They reside in Gladwin.

Kyler Brown

Amy and Wayne Walts II

Jerome Bragg ’97 recently accepted the senior pastor position at Crosspoint Church of the Nazarene, Madison, Wis. He and his wife, Merea (Grinnell) ’97, reside in Madison.

w

w

.

o

l

Brad Strebeck ’98 and Christine Fox were married on Oct. 1, 2005, in Paxton, Ill. Brad is an engineer for the Illinois Department of Transportation, and Christine is a landscape design artist. They reside in Paxton. Loren ’98 and Shannon (Bult) Martin ’98: A girl, Addison Loren, Oct. 28, 2005. Loren is a professor in the department of psychology at Azusa Pacific University, and Shannon is a stay-at-home mom. Addison Martin They reside in San Dimas, Calif.

Bjorn ’97 and Jodie (Tibbs) Lindgren ’97: A girl, Britta Linda, July 21, 2005. She joins Anders, 6 and Emilie, 2. Jodie is a resident director for Olivet, and Bjorn is a full-time pastor at Open Bible Center in Kankakee, Ill. They reside in Bourbonnais.

w

Scott ’98 and Nichole Brown: A boy, Kyler Scott, Mar. 9, 2005. Scott is employed at the H.O. Claims Department at Auto-Owners Insurance Company, and Nichole is also employed at Auto-Owners Insurance in the Underwriting Department. They reside in Lansing, Mich.

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u

R.J. ’99 and Angela (Harris) Droese ’99: A girl, Catherine Janelle, Jan. 20, 2005. R.J. works in the NYI department at Nazarene Headquarters and is attending NTS. Angela is working as a children’s pastor for Harrisonville (Mo.) Church of the Nazarene. They reside in Harrisonville.

Nolan Heid

Catherine Droese

Katie (Lewis) ’99 and Bryan Heid: A boy, Nolan Bryan, Aug. 2, 2005, and adoption finalized on March 24, 2006. Katie is core faculty for the English department at Baker College, and Bryan is a high school math teacher. They reside in Owosso, Mich.

Greg ’99 and Karalin Lyons: A boy, Nathan Elliott, May 10, 2005. He joins brother, David, 2. Greg is an information security specialist for Kraft Foods, Inc., in Northfield, Ill., and Karalin is currently a home-schooling preschool teacher. They reside in Rockford, Ill.

Nathan Lyons


Spring 2005

Brad ’00 and Heather (Gerbsch) Daugherty ’00: A girl, Ella Naomi, Nov. 15, 2005. Heather is the associate pastor at Wollaston Church of the Nazarene, and Brad is finishing graduate studies at Boston University School of Theology. They reside in Quincy, Mass.

Grahm Hively

Jason ’02 and T ina (Zwirkoski) Hoffer ’02: A girl, Gabriella Constance, Aug. 9, 2005. Jason is the lead pastor of a church plant in Columbus, Ind., and Tina is a stay-at-home mom and part-time substitute teacher. They reside in Columbus.

Ella Daugherty

Ryan ’00 and Cara (McElhinney) Hively ’00: A boy, Grahm Ryan, Nov. 21, 2005. Ryan is a commercial real estate developer with Lauth Property Group in Indianapolis, Ind., and Cara is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Fishers, Ind.

Jason ’00 and Emily Lee: A girl, Abigail Marie, Sept. 26, 2005. They reside in Henderson, N.C.

Jill (Stipp) ’00 and Scot Riggins: A boy, Aden Dean, Feb. 18, 2006. Scot and Jill were married on July 31, 2004, in Fort Wayne, Ind. They are missionaries with the Church of the Nazarene on the Melanesia Field and reside in Papua New Guinea. Sally (Walter) ’00 and Ryan Wenzel: A girl, Brooke Meredith, Dec. 22, 2005. Sally is a biology teacher at Serena High School, and Ryan is a real estate broker in Marseilles, Ill., where they reside. Katie (Sullivan) ’01 and Pete Bretzlaff ’01: A boy, James Kelly, March 17, 2006. He joins a sister, Emma, 3. Katie is an art teacher at BradleyBourbonnais Community High School, and Pete is a social studies teacher and soccer coach at Kankakee (Ill.) Junior High School. They reside in James and Emma Bretzlaff Bourbonnais. Jaime (Bartling) ’01 and Andy Matthews: A girl, Noelle Jordan, Dec. 23, 2005. Jaime is a stay-athome mom, and Andy is a Web programmer at ICG Link. They reside in Nashville, Tenn. Adam ’01 and Kendra (Smith) Estle ’03: A girl, Grace Addison, Dec. 8, 2005. She joins a brother, Silas, 3, and a sister, Hope, 1. Kendra is a stayat-home mom, and Adam is a Spanish teacher and coach at Raymond S. Kellis High School in Glendale, Ariz. They reside in Peoria, Ariz. Caley (Snyder) ’04 and Steve Spangenberg ’01: A girl, Peyton Suzanne, Feb. 9, 2006. Caley and Steve are fulltime pastors at Kankakee (Ill.) First Church of the Nazarene. Caley is the children’s pastor, and Steve oversees the senior high student ministries. They reside in Peyton Spangenberg Bourbonnais. Heather Strous ’01 and Joshua Barkley were married on Aug. 13, 2005, in Huntington, Ind. Heather is the assistant director of public relations for Huntington University, and Josh is an estimator for Barkley builders, Inc. They reside in Ossian, Ind.

Norman Moore ’42 was born June 21, 1916, in Darke County, Ohio, the son of Rev. Clarence T. and Jennie Koofer Moore. He went to his heavenly reward Feb. 17, 2006. The memorial service was held at College Church of the Nazarene, Bourbonnais, on Feb. 22, with burial in Kankakee Memorial Gardens. After receiving a degree in business from the University of Cincinnati, he attended Olivet from 1940–1942 and earned a second degree in theology. While a student at Olivet, Moore served as senior class treasurer, student body treasurer and president of the Student Prayer Band. He married the former Mary Schwada, June 15, 1942. She died Oct. 25, 1985. Rev. Moore began his pastoral ministry at the Church of the Nazarene in Union City, Ind., and served as District Nazarene Young People’s president. During his second pastorate at New Hampshire, Ohio, he oversaw the construction of a new church building. In 1947, he was appointed by the Church of the Nazarene as a missionary to China and was sent to language school in Hawaii. Due to world conditions, he was not permitted to go to China. Norman Moore ’42 Instead, he stayed in Hawaii seven years, where he organized the Church of the Nazarene in Wahiawa, Hawaii, which involved building the church and parsonage. In 1954, he moved to Felicity, Ohio, where he pastored for five years. After completing 19 years in pastoral ministry, he moved to Bourbonnais and began his administrative ministry in 1959. He first served as secretary for the Chicago Central District superintendent and was alumni executive director for Olivet. Rev. Moore held several other positions at Olivet including director of admissions and assistant dean of instruction before retiring in 1981. In the 1960s, he created and edited the Alumni Newsletter and The Future Olivetian, a newsletter to prospective students. After retiring as assistant dean, he was the Olivet archivist in Benner Library, retiring a second time in 2000. He married the former Marjorie Mayo ’48, Sept. 24, 1989. She was a missionary to Peru and professor of education at Olivet. Together they taught Sunday school at College Church and began The Wesley Cell Bible Study for senior adults in their home on Sunday evenings. She died April 23, 2005. Rev. Moore demonstrated his heart for missions by sharing his home with many visiting missionaries and participating in six Work and Witness trips. His travels took him to 33 countries and all 50 states. Surviving are three sons and daughters-in-law, Lowell and Betty Moore of Colorado Springs, Colo., Leon ’72 and Marcia Moore of Schaumburg, Ill., Les ’79 and Ava (Rebma) Moore ’78 of Beardstown, Ill., one daughter and son-in-law, Miriam (Moore) ’70 and Mike Luginbill ’70 of St. Anne, Ill., 10 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

Gabriella Hoffer

Angela (Whitehill) ’02 and Kenneth Johnson II ’03: A boy, Nicolas Michael, Dec. 20, 2004. Kernneth is an Army first lieutenant working at Camp Casey, South Korea. Angela is finishing school at Cameron University in Lawton, Okla. They currently reside in Fort Sill, Okla. Andrew Chovanacek ’03 has returned home safely from his one-year deployment in Iraq. His platoon did not have any deaths or injuries and his Company had no fatalities during deployment. Amanda Goodbred ’03 and Aaron Wilderman were married on Dec. 23, 2005, in Decatur, Ill. Amanda works as a teacher for Decatur Christian School, and Aaron is an engineering processor for Caterpillar Inc. They reside in Decatur.

Heather and Joshua Barkley

Chad Hilligus ’03 recently received his master’s degree in vocal performance and opera studies from the University of Utah School of Music. Chad is currently a resident artist with the Tulsa Opera Studio. He resides in Paola, Kan.

Chad Hilligus

Rachel Lewandowski ’03 and Nicholas Cunningham ’04 were married on Sept. 10, 2005, in Kankakee, Ill. Nicholas is the financial accounting manager at BMA management, and Rachel is the worship arts ministries assistant at First Church of the Nazarene in Kankakee. They reside in Nicholas and Rachel Cunningham Bourbonnais. Michon Ledyard ’04 and Joe Dersien were married on July 30, 2005, in Bradley, Ill. Michon works as a FACS teacher at Homewood-Flossmoor High School, and Joe is a signalman for the CN railroad. They reside in Bradley.

Orma Manley ’49 passed away on Sunday, Oct. 23, 2005, at Lincoln Village Convalescent Center. She was a lifelong resident of Racine, born on June 2, 1928, to Dyle and Ethel Manley. She was a CPA for Northwestern Mutual Insurance Company for many years; she also worked at Orth Reality for 10 years. In addition, she owned and operated her own tax preparation business. Orma was a member of Grace Church for more than 20 years. She enjoyed traveling and playing card games. Surviving are her sister, Fay Rattle; brother, David Manley; sister-in-law, Martha Manley; six nieces, seven nephews, and 18 great nieces and great nephews. Miriam J. (Van Zant) Hall ’59 former director of Children’s Ministries for the Church of the Nazarene, died on Monday, Jan. 9, 2006. She was 71. Early in life, God began to prepare Miriam Hall for a special task. Miriam graduated from Olivet Nazarene College (B.S.) and the University of Northern Colorado (M.A.). She did other graduate studies at the University of Colorado. Her teaching experience included kindergarten through sixth grade and specialized instruction as reading coordinator for the Jefferson County Colorado School District. In local churches, she taught Sunday school, directed children’s church, was director of children’s ministries, and conducted teacher training workshops. During a time of restructure in 1976, the denomination created a department focused specifically on the needs of children. Miriam Hall came from Denver, Colo., to Kansas City in June of 1977 to fulfill the newly-created position of director of Children’s Ministries. She served in this position for 21 years until her retirement in February 1998. During her tenure as director of Children’s Ministries, Miriam Hall developed and refined the concept of “total ministry to children.” Under her leadership, several new programs for children were created, and others were expanded and strengthened. In Miriam J. (Van Zant) Hall ’59 June 1986, Miriam premiered the annual week-long emphasis on children, Children’s Week. In addition, two professional organizations came into being: the Nazarene International Education Association (NIEA) and the Nazarene Children’s Pastors’ Association (NCPA). In 1999, the NCPA established the Miriam J. Hall Lectureship in Children’s Ministries at Nazarene Theological Seminary. This lectureship is intended to engage visiting scholars and practitioners to promote significant children’s ministry within congregations, encourage pastoral involvement in children’s ministries, and resource persons with a call to full-time children’s ministry. During a Sunday evening plenary meeting of the 1998 General Board, Hall was honored at her retirement. Dr. W. Talmadge Johnson, the Director of Sunday School Ministries at that time, said of Miriam: “She is a team player and a team builder. She has forged a department that has developed curriculum that is virtually unparalleled.” Dr. Hall authored three books: New Directions for Children’s Ministries; Jesus, the Children’s Friend; and If I Were a Child Today. In 1995, she served with the Billy Graham Institute of Evangelism to develop the interdenominational emphasis on children, Celebrate the Child. From 1977 until 1997, she taught children’s ministries courses at Nazarene Theological Seminary. During her ministry at Headquarters, Miriam received several recognitions. These include the award for “Excellence in Ministry to Children” from the Children’s Pastor’s Conference, and the “O” Award from her alma mater, Olivet Nazarene University. She also received an honorary doctorate from Olivet. In Jesus, the Children’s Friend, Miriam wrote: “Children are of inestimable value, not only to their parents and families, but to God and the church.” Throughout her ministry at Headquarters, Miriam led the church in developing a biblically-based vision for ministry to children that recognizes this worth and has helped children around the world experience the riches of God’s love. Dr. Hall is survived by her husband of 53 years, Herbert E., her daughter and son-in-law, Amy and David Story, and five grandchildren all of Olathe, Kan. She is survived by a brother, Glen Van Zant, of Oklahoma City, Okla., and a sister, Carolyn Ferguson, of Denver, Colo. Memorials may be designated to the Miriam J. Hall Lectureship, Nazarene Theological Seminary, 1700 East Meyer Boulevard, Kansas City, MO 64131.

Michon and Joe Dersien

Mary Long ’04 and Eric Peffley were married on May 21, 2005, in Mansfield, Ohio. They reside in Minneapolis, Minn.

Connor Mahoney

Tyler (Person) ’04 and Patrick Mahoney ’06: A boy, Connor Patrick, Nov. 22, 2005. Tyler is a field accountant for Lincoln Financial Advisors, and Patrick is a home theater installer for Merkal Audio Video. They reside in Fort Wayne, Ind.

WE’D LOVE TO HEAR

from you!

Send us your news and pictures.

Please submit alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all information, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used. Pictures will be accepted only via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet. edu. News should be sent via e-mail or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345. w

w

11

In Memoriam

Andrew Chovanacek

Nadia (Jantz) ’00 and Drew Neal ’01: A boy, Findlay Creighton, Oct. 30, 2005. He joins brother, Chapman, 1. Nadia is a financial planAbigail Lee ner for State Farm Insurance, and Drew is a business analyst at Hertz Rental Car Global Data Center. They reside in Oklahoma City, Okla.

The Olivetian

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


Doing nothing never did so much. Now you can provide “Education With a Christian Purpose” without ever lifting a finger. Using electronic funds transfer (EFT), you can support Olivet Nazarene University by allowing monthly gifts — of your designation — to be automatically withdrawn from your banking account. No checks. No stamps. No envelopes. Just satisfaction knowing you’ve made a profound investment in the lives of Olivet students.

YOUR GIFT, NO MATTER THE SIZE, MAKES A DIFFERENCE. www.olivet.edu • 1-800-648-1463

To learn more about EFT, contact the Office of Development at (815) 939-5171 or development@olivet.edu or visit www.olivet.edu.


Spring 2006

The Olivetian

13

NA I A DI VI SION I N AT ION A L TOU RN A MEN T

Tigers end season in Elite Eight By Marc Shaner ’00/’02 M.A.T. and Caleb Benoit ’06

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

The Olivet Nazarene University women’s basketball team also had a chance

to make the NAIA National Tournament with a CCAC Tournament Championship, but the Tigers dropped a 100-91 decision in the tournament final on the road, falling to regular season conference champion St. Xavier for the third time this season. A jumper by Robertine Frederick ’06 with just over five minutes remaining cut the St. Xavier advantage to four points, but that’s as close as Olivet would get. A slow start put the Tigers in a hole immediately. The first Olivet field goal — a Hilary Disch ’08 3pointer — came six minutes into the game. Olivet, who won nine of its final 10 games before the CCAC Tournament Championship, finishes with a final record of 19-14.

CREATIVE IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY

F

Stan Chismark ’07

CREATIVE IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY

or the third time in five years the Olivet Nazarene University men’s basketball saw its season come to an end in the NAIA Division I Elite Eight. For the second time in those five years, the Tigers’ season came to an end at the hands of Oklahoma Baptist, who also defeated the Tigers in 2002. On Saturday, the Bison knocked off Olivet 91-75, advancing to their eighth NAIA Fab Four. Oklahoma Baptist jumped out to an early lead before the Tigers were able to tie the game at six on Stan Chismark’s second straight three. However, Oklahoma Baptist scored on their next possession, taking the lead for good. Oklahoma Baptist’s lead would expand to 21, 45-24, with 5:54 to play. The Bison shot better than 80 percent from the field during the first half. After a hot start, Oklahoma Baptist finished by shooting 63 percent in the first half. After falling behind by 21, the Tigers were able to go on 17-3 run to end the half, cutting the Oklahoma Baptist lead to seven on a Zach Birkey ’06 three right before halftime. In the second half, the Tigers scored the first two buckets, cutting the lead to three (48-45) on Travis Meeks’ ’07 jumper with 18:26 to play. However, the Tigers would not get any closer. Seeing its lead cut to three, Oklahoma Baptist used a 12-4 run to push the lead back into double digits, 60-49, with 14:57 to play. The lead hung around 11, until the Tigers were able to cut the lead to 10, 72-62, on a basket from Zach Johnson ’06 with 8:41 to play.

Hilary Disch ’08

Phil French ’08 The Bison responded by going on a 13-1 run, putting the game away. The Tigers used some late field goals to get the lead under 20. After shooting 63 percent in the first half, Oklahoma Baptist was even warmer in the second half, connecting on 75 percent of their field goal attempts. They finished the game 35-of-51 (68.6 percent). The Bison were also hot from the three-point line, hitting 53.8 percent (7-13). The Tigers were led by Phil French ’08 , who came

Sports Shorts

FOOTBALL

|

off the pines to score 16 points and grab six rebounds. Chismark added 14 points, nine coming on three three-pointers. Micah Lavender ’08 chipped in 10 on 4-of-5 shooting. Seniors Birkey and Johnson scored eight points apiece, with Birkey dishing out a game-high seven assists. The Tigers graduate Birkey and Johnson, along with Rob Rinard, but return a good portion of this team which finishes 23-11 overall and went 11-1 in the CCAC. The Tigers finished the year by going 20-6 after starting the year 3-5.

VOLLEYBALL

|

BASKETBALL

tween tight end and fullback. He carried the ball 11 times for 67 yards and caught 15 passes for 187 yards and scored a touchdown. Brewer, LaBar and Walker were named for the second time, while Ruzich was named for the third time, as he is a fifth-year senior. Kizzee’s selection was his first. Three Tiger volleyball players named NAIA Scholar Athletes: Three Olivet Nazarene University volleyball players were recently tabbed NAIA All-American Scholar Athletes. Middle blocker Emily Lindquist ’06 appeared in all 161 Lindquist Rountree Dykstra games for the Tigers this season. She recorded a team-high 269 blocks. She also recorded 472 kills to rank second on the team. Middle blocker Chelsie Rountree ’06 appeared in 149 games for the Tigers, recording 344 kills and 159 blocks. Setter/defensive specialist Andrea Dykstra ’07 appeared in 160 games for the Tigers, recording 117 assists and a team-leading 77 aces. She also recorded 405 digs. Lindquist and Rountree are twotime NAIA All-America Scholar-Athletes.

Ruzich named NAIA All-American: Olivet Nazarene University senior football player, offensive lineman Chad Ruzich ’06, was named a NAIA Honorable Mention All-American by the NAIA’s coaches. Ruzich started 34 straight games at right tackle for the Tigers. He came to Olivet originally as a linebacker, but was moved to tight end as a freshman, then switched to tackle as Chad Ruzich ’06 a sophomore. He was also a 2004 NAIA Honorable Mention All-American selection. Ruzich became the eighth Olivet player to be named to two NAIA All-America squads, but the first since Ben Richardson ’04, who was named an NAIA Honorable Mention All-American in 2000 and an NAIA First Team All-American in 2003.

Four Tigers earn All-CCAC accolades: Birkey Chismark French Four Olivet Nazarene University men’s basketball players have been named to All-Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference (CCAC) Team. Zach Birkey ’06, Stan Chismark ’07 and Phil French ’08 were named to the first team, while Nick Livas ’09 was named to the honorable mention squad. In addition, French was also named Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Sixth Man of the Year. In addition, head coach Ralph Hodge ’75 was named CCAC Coach of the Year. For Hodge, it was the ninth time that he’d received the award.

Five Tiger football players named NAIA All-America Scholar-Athletes: Five Olivet Nazarene University football players were tabbed NAIA All-America Scholar Athletes. Wide receiver Joey Brewer ’06 appeared in all 12 games for the Tigers this season, leading the receivers with 63 receptions for 700 yards. Brewer also scored two touchdowns. Defensive lineman Andy Kizzee ’07 appeared in all 12 games for the Tigers, recording 61 tackles (24 unassisted), 11.5 tackles for loss, 19 quarterback hurries, six sacks, two blocked kicks, one pass defended, and one forced fumble. Defensive lineman Daryl LaBar ’06 Brewer Kizzee appeared in 11 games for the Tigers this past season, recording 23 tackles (four unassisted). He also had two quarterback hurries, one tackle for loss and one sack. Offensive lineman Chad Ruzich ’06 made 12 starts at right tackle for the Tigers. It was Ruzich’s third year at tackle after making the switch from tight end. Tight end/fullback Ryan Walker ’06 appeared in 12 games for the Tigers, splitting time beLaBar Ruzich Walker

w

w

w

.

o

l

Mullin

Disch

Vanden Bosch

Livas

Hodge

Three Tigers tabbed all-conference: Olivet Nazarene University Kellie Mullin ’07 and Hilary Disch ’08 capped the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference season by being named to the all-conference first team. Alynn Vanden Bosch ’06 was a CCAC Honorable Mention All-Conference selection.

—Compiled by Marc Shaner ’00/’02 M.A.T., Sports Information Director

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


14

The Olivetian

Spring 2006

Olivet soccer helps community win in Indianapolis By Caleb Benoit ’06

I

t doesn’t take but a few moments into a conversation with Olivet Nazarene University men’s soccer coach Mark Howard ’85 to see the passion he has for the game he’s coached at the collegiate level for 16 seasons. And when the game of soccer creates an opportunity for ministry — the very core of the indoor soccer league at the Indianapolis First Church of the Nazarene — it’s hard to believe he could be more excited. Howard led a group representing Olivet to help direct a winter clinic sponsored by the highly successful Indy Naz Soccer League. The 9-year-old league, which is completely self-funded, has grown from a humble beginning into a significant ministry in the community. From an idea of former Nazarene youth pastor Dale Hardy, the league was formed, with the help of some parents, to provide children with an activity during the winter months. It has expanded from just four teams, made up entirely of youth from the church, to approximately 500 4- to 18-year-olds, 75 percent of whom do not even attend the church. “It’s an amazing thing,” said Howard. “We talk about reaching people in the community for Christ, but this is that put into action in a very practical way. It’s such a non-traditional, unique ministry.” The league’s motto is rather simple: “Sharing the love of Jesus with our community through the beautiful game of soccer.” However, the league is anything but ordinary. Howard added he has run a countless number of clinics over the years, but he has never seen the turnout he witnessed in Indianapolis. Most clinics bring out between 10 and 15 percent of its leagues’ players, but about 80 percent of Indy Naz’s youth attended January’s clinic, which is actually held in the church in two multipurpose rooms. Howard, along with men’s assistant coach Tom Knowles and a number of players from both the men’s and women’s teams, worked with over 500 players and 100 coaches, working on soccer skills and coaching strategies. The Olivet coach and players, including Indianapolis native Bryce Nelson 08, weren’t the only instructors at the clinic. But they certainly made an sizable impact. “It was incredible,” said Indianapolis resident Monty Fox in an e-mail to Olivet President John Bowling. Fox, who played on Olivet’s very first intercollegiate soccer team in 1978–79, has had three children play in the league, and his youngest son is still involved in coaching and referring. “Not only was the team excellent in teaching our kids the basic soccer skills, but they also gave of themselves personally by their interaction with the kids.” Recently, the league has added a special-needs division, which is open to kids of all ages. Also a sign of growth has been the attendance for the league’s annual awards ceremony. About 1,100 attended last year, but the league has expanded to the point where the awards night has been split up into two different times. With over 2,000 anticipated this March, Paul Johnson ’00, another ONU soccer alum and current young-adult pastor at College Church, will be the guest speaker. Howard stayed the next day to worship and encouraged the 2,000-plus member get involved in the athletic outreach. The results have been nothing but positive, according to Fox. “We have been overwhelmed since then with offers of help in all areas of our ministry.”

The 2005 Olivet All-Stars were announced in a special ceremony during Homecoming. Olivet All-Stars competed in intramural athletics before intercollegiate sports began at the University. This year’s honorees were (pictured above, back row) Donald Bell ’53 (basketball, football); Lee McMurrin ’52 (basketball, track and field); Charles McCullough ’54 (basketball); (pictured above, front row) Marilyn Starr ’54 (basketball, softball, track and field); Jacqueline (Spencer) Watson ’54 (basketball); and Shirley (Strickler) Crabtree ’55 (basketball, softball). Not pictured: Donald Durick ’53 (softball).

TIGER TRACKS BASKETBALL Men’s Basketball: After finishing their pre-conference at 8-8, the Tigers’ men’s basketball team won 13 of 15 games after returning from Hawaii. They had winning streaks of five and eight games, as they are 21-10 overall, and finished 111 in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference. During the conference season the Tigers knocked off second-ranked Robert Morris College twice and nationally-ranked Saint Xavier University, on the way to the CCAC Regular Season Championship. They were also ranked No. 15 in the final NAIA Top 25 Poll. The CCAC Championship was the Tigers’ first since 2002–03 and first outright title since 2001–02. Despite a loss in the CCAC Tournament Semifinal, the Tigers were awarded an at-large bid to the NAIA National Tournament. Stan Chismark ’07 averaged a team-leading 14.7 points, while Phil French ’08 averaged 11.0 points and Nick Livas ’09 averaged 10.1 points and a team-leading 6.5 rebounds. Zach Birkey ’06 led the team with 135 assists. Women’s Basketball: The Olivet Nazarene University women’s basketball team ended the first semester at 6-9, losing two games while on a trip to Hawaii. Since then the Tigers have gone 13-4 and are currently 19-13. They finished 9-3 in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference, good for second place. During one stretch of the conference season the Tigers rattled off six straight victories. They advanced to the CCAC Tournament Championship, where they faced nationallyranked Saint Xavier University. In their final 17 games, the Tigers reached the century mark eight times and hit at least 90 points in seven other games. Kellie Mullin ’07 averaged a team-leading 13.5 points, while Hilary Disch ’08 averaged 13.2. Courtney Hehn ’09, who missed seven games, has hit a team-leading 72 three-point shots, while Codi Jaeger ’08 has dished out 116 assists.

|

INDOOR

TRACK

Men’s Indoor Track: Traveling to Upland, Ind., for the NCCAA National Meet, the men’s indoor track team finished in seventh place, scoring 45 points. Alvin Smith ’08 led the scoring for the Tigers, finishing runner-up in the 400-Meter Dash, running in a time of 50.66. Kacey Carr ’07 ran a 15:49.17 in the 5,000-Meter Run to finish fourth. Kendal Thomas ’09 finished fourth in the Weight Throw with a heave of 45'9.5", while Mark Hollis ’06 added fifth-place finish in the Pole Vault, jumping 14'8". Four relay teams placed, led by the 4x200 and 4x400-Meter Relays, which both finished third. Smith qualified for the NAIA National Indoor Meet in the 400-Meter Dash, while Carr qualified in the 3,000-Meter Run. Women’s Indoor Track: A fourth-place finish at the NCCAA National Indoor Meet was one of many highlights for the Olivet Nazarene University women’s indoor track team. The Tigers won four events, led by double winner Bethany McCoy ’08. McCoy won the Mile Run in a time of 5:00.30 and the 800-Meter Run, crossing the finish line in 2:16.74. Abby Heinold ’07 won the 400-Meter Dash in a time of 59.03. McCoy and Heinold teamed with Cheri Hoffmann ’08 and Carmin Green ’07 to win the 4x400-Meter Relay, winning in a time of 4:01.60. Green also finished third in the 800-Meter Run, finishing in 2:17.50. Jenny Ellis ’07 ran a 17:38.87 to finish second in the 5,000-Meter Run. Green, McCoy, Ellis, Hoffmann and Heinold all qualified for the NAIA National Indoor Meet in individual events, while Green, McCoy, Hoffmann and Heinold will combine to run in the Distance Medley Relay. Simone Mulieri ’06 also qualified and will run in the 5,000Meter Run. —Compiled by Marc Shaner ’00/’02 M.A.T., Sports Information Director

FIND THE LATEST NEWS, STATS AND SCORES AT

www.olivet.edu

w

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


Spring 2006

The Olivetian

15

QUESTIONS With The Reedys R I C H ’6 7 A N D D E B B I E ( D AV I S ) ’ 70 1 What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

– For me, hands down, it’s reading. The books that have affected me the most have been Frank Peretti’s books. Especially his earlier works like This Present Darkness and Piercing the Darkness. D

R

– For me, golf. I’ve got a friend that 25 years ago,

who started going out to Phoenix with me once a year. We started out with the two of us, then four, and now there are eight of us that make this annual golfing trip.

2 What is your first memory of Olivet?

– Actually I have a rather unusual situation in that I went to Olivet when I was six years old, because they actually had a grade school at Olivet for two or three years. It was over on the right side of the gym and a woman taught grades one through five in the one-room downstairs while her husband taught grades five through eight upstairs. R

3 You’ve seen a lot of changes at Olivet over the

years. What do you think have been the most positive?

– I grew up here when Dr. Reed was first president, and then Dr. Parrott was president, and when Dr. John Bowling was elected, I was on the board at College Church. It’s interesting to me the way God uses different people with different skills at different times to accomplish different things. I deeply admire Dr. Bowling because he has an unbelievable ability to work with people, set long-range goals, and then know what to do to accomplish those goals. That’s been a great asset to Olivet. But also, both Dr. Reed and Dr. Parrott laid the foundations for a lot of things that would happen later. R

4 What is it about Olivet that inspires you to continue lending your support?

R

7 So you two have been together for a long time.

What do you think is key to having a long and healthy marriage?

Living in Williams was so incredibly fun! I went from having three brothers and one sister to having friends around all the time – and activities all the time. It was just great fun to have all those friends. D

– There were 24 inches of snow, so you couldn’t do anything. No traffic was moving, so the only way you could get anywhere was walk. I was in Hills Hall, and there were some big snow drifts outside. So some of the guys got in the windows and would dive into the snow drifts from the fourth floor. Looking back, they were lucky there was nothing in those snow drifts, but as college kids we never thought about those sorts of things. R

– Probably the most important thing, really for both

R

8

home where you grow up is a huge factor for the rest of your life. Growing up in Christian home, I just assumed everyone else’s home was just like ours. But another factor, and probably one of the biggest factors in our life, has been the time we’ve spent praying together. I think God builds a bond, binds the two of you together, when you share your concerns and prayers with each other.

– Another thing is just that you really need to have fun together. You need to do a lot together and try to enjoy the same activities. You’re not always going to enjoy the same activities, but I think you just need to have fun together, make friends together. D

– I agree. My parents told me that when I was small, probably four or five, I wouldn’t eat ice cream because I said I didn’t like it. I think the same thing can be true with a relationship. There can be things in relationships you think you don’t like, but after you try it a few times, you grow to love R

What are some of the lessons your parents taught you about business and success?

– Probably the most important lesson my father gave me was that success comes by providing something that is worthwhile to other people. If you provide a needed service, you won’t have a problem making a living. R

9 Among other things, the two of you are responsible for establishing two important businesses in this community: Cornerstone Christian Bookstore and Hidden Cove Family Fun Park. What led you into these ventures?

– I think there are several. The atmosphere of the

– I always say that I kind of came by Cornerstone accidentally, but I guess it was largely due to my love of reading and my love of literature. I was always going shopping at all kinds of bookstores, and there weren’t as many then as there are now. Rich was instrumental in helping me start the business. I never would have been able to do it alone. D

R

– It’s interesting, you always feel like a person in

full-time ministry has a lot more ways of using their talents than an individual doing something else. When I got the concept of Hidden Cove, I felt like it was a commitment to God to provide something that would be entertainment for families, a place where parents could feel comfortable sending their children. I didn’t go into the business to make money; I went into the business to provide a service. It goes back to the thing that my dad said: If you provide a worthwhile service, you will be able to make a living out of it.

0 What do you want to be your legacy?

– For me it would be that all of my children, my grandchildren and future generations will all love God. D

of us, is that when you look at Harvard or Yale, all those schools started out as Christian schools and now they have no moral values. This is not so with Olivet. D

those things. (Laughs.) Now, I probably enjoy ice cream too much.

– It’s interesting as you get older, there are so many things that you thought were important before that have very little value. There are a couple things that motivate me. I am motivated to try and do God’s will, and I’m motivated to do those things that will help my children and my grandchildren.

– And the impact of that in our com-

R

munity is huge. It’s just amazing to me how many teachers our children have had over the years who graduated from Olivet. When your children are impacted by a Christian teacher or a Christian coach who has stayed in the area, it shows the impact the University is having on the community. Also, there’s always something going on — always a concert, a play, sports — and these have a great impact on the community.

5 How did the two of you meet?

– She arranged to meet me. (Both laugh.) – That’s not true at all. R – Actually we were both in an International EconomR D

ics class with Vernon Carmichael as the professor.

– We didn’t meet right away, but somewhere around the big snow of ’67, we started dating. D

6 The snowstorm of ’67 — what was that like?

– That big snow had to be one of the highlights of my life. It was just so much fun. Classes were dismissed, and I knew some people over in Trailerville, so we tromped over there in our boots. It was just so fun playing out there in the snow. D

w

w

w

.

o

l

i

v

e

t

.

e

d

u


olivet nazareneuniversity

we believe. you belong here. ap p l y o n l i n e | w w w. o l i v e t . e d u 1- 8 0 0 - 6 4 8 -14 6 3


73.3 OLTNSPRG06