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A free guide to study and career options for high school students  Years 11-13       May     2018  |  ISSUE    # 1 2 Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. Nelson Mandela CAMERON UALESI HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER

LUPESINA KORO COMMERCE & ENGINEERING STUDENT

Not all of us can do great things. But we can do small things with great love. Mother Teresa CHARLOTTE ROBERTSON ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTIST

DINO MURATBEGOVIC CROWN PROSECUTOR

A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new. Albert Einstein WILMARI BOTHA SALES REPRESENTATIVE

LEAVINGSCHOOLNZ WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

SEAN MAHENDRAN OPTOMETRIST


massey.ac.nz/studyteaching

YOUR FUTURE KNOWS

N O B O UND S CHOOSE TEACHING. CHANGE LIVES If you love working with children and want to make a difference to their lives, apply now for our Teacher Education programmes. There are many career pathways to choose from including early childhood or primary school teaching where you can study for a Bachelor of Arts (Education). If you dream of being a secondary school teacher, study a Bachelor’s degree of your choice (such as Arts, Business, Science) with a major in your intended teaching subject and a minor in a second subject. Once you complete your degree, our one-year Teacher Education programmes will qualify you as a provisionally registered teacher with the Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Contact 0800 MASSEY (0800 627 739) for more information and advice.


CONTENTS

05 FOREWORD | RT HON JACINDA ARDERN, PRIME MINISTER

26 SALES REPRESENTATIVE | WILMARI BOTHA

06 BACHELOR OF COMMERCE | CHARLOTTE MEE

28 FARM ENVIRONMENT CONSULTANT | DR ROSHEAN WOODS

07 WATER RESOURCE ENGINEER | QUINN HORNBLOW

29 SALES AND MARKETING | PAUL NAI

10 PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHER | PAIANA WHAANGA

30 STUDENT LOAN TIPS

11 SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHER | CAMERON UALESI

32 DENTIST | JOHN WON

13 PODIATRIST | MARK ROBINSON

33 GAP YEAR | BRIANA WOODWARD

14 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE | CHARLOTTE ROBERTSON

34 GRAPHIC DESIGN | KEN KHUN

16 OPTOMETRIST | SEAN MAHENDRAN

36 CROWN PROSECUTOR | DINO MURATBEGOVIC

19 FRONT OF HOUSE | NICOLE KAY

37 ENGINEERING AND COMMERCE | LUPESINA KORO

20 SURVEYING | MELISSA HARRINGTON

38 UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS

The Prime Minister reflects on her time at high school and lessons learnt. How a second-year university paper ignited a focus on sustainability.

MANAGING EDITOR

Oliver Lee

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sara Carbery, Diana Clement, Robyn Yousef, Peter White SUB-EDITOR Elise McDowell PAGINATION & LAYOUT HNZL 2014 Limited PRINTER PMP Limited, Auckland PHOTOGRAPHY Mark Brimblecombe, Charley Harvey, Erin Isaacs, Peter McDermott, Kate MacPherson, Steve Selwood, Alan Stevens, Studiostoks (Graphics) PUBLISHER

Looking at the interaction between people and the environment.

Determined, motivated, inspired and setting up a bilingual unit. Factor in passion and ability and a career in mathematics just adds up. Podiatry is in high demand, so explore this area of primary health care. Are you also inspired to follow a career founded in science and research? The perfect mixture of science, interaction with people and health care. Work your way up to a successful career in tourism and hospitality. A Bachelor of Surveying gives you the required skills to work here and overseas.

21 PARAMEDICINE | REBEKAH JUDD Box 331-667,   Takapuna, Auckland 0740 T: +64-9-486 6966 E: oliver@oliverlee.co.nz W: oliverlee.co.nz W: LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ ISSN 2463-3380 (Print) ISSN 2463-3399 (Online) COPYRIGHT: Reproduction in whole or in part by any means is prohibited. DISCLAIMER: The opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher. Although all material is checked for accuracy, no liability is assumed by the publisher for any loss due to use of material in this magazine.

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From apprentice baker to clinical team manager at a St John 111 call-centre.

Test the waters and find out if a career in sales is a good fit for you. Environmental concern meets agriculture – a look at sustainability.

High achiever discovers passion for marketing and pursues it as a career. Consider these eight factors about student loans before signing up. A look at the hands-on, practical work of hospital dentistry. Thinking of taking a gap year or need time to consider your options? Are you drawn to the creative, ever-changing field of graphic design? The hard but rewarding role of prosecuting serious crime.

The recipient of a 2018 Prime Minister’s Pacific Youth Award is on a mission.

With hundreds of scholarships on offer, get ready, get set – apply!

39 SPORTS SCHOLARSHIPS

Around 200 Kiwis are on sports scholarships to study and play in the USA.

40 SCIENCE | LOGAN WILLIAMS

Using science to find innovative and sustainable solutions to problems.

22 PE TEACHER | RICHARD JONES

41 TIPS TO INCREASE YOUR INCOME

24 NOTICEBOARD

43 JOBS IN FOCUS

Have a keen interest in sport? Teaching PE might be the right call. A compilation of key dates, events, websites and services that will be of use during the year

Ten top tips to generate or boost your income as a student. Twenty-four jobs from across a variety of industries are profiled. You may just find your ideal job!

Throughout this magazine, each case study has been colour coded to its Vocational Pathway. In some instances, multiple colours are used to show that the skills you learn can be applied across multiple careers and pathways, throughout your lifetime. Visit www.youthguarantee.net.nz/vocational-pathways to learn more about Vocational Pathways.


AVAILABLE FREE ONLINE www.leavingschool.co.nz

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YOU CAN DO IT TOO

FOREWORD

DON’T BE AFRAID TO TAKE RISKS

written by RT HON JACINDA ARDERN   MANY OF YOU WILL HAVE HEARD THE STORY ABOUT MY HIGH SCHOOL YEAR BOOK. THERE’S THE SPORTIEST KID – DEFINITELY NOT ME – THE HEALTH NUT – AGAIN NOT ME. THERE’S INTELLECT OF THE YEAR – HA! – AND THEN THERE WAS MOST LIKELY TO BECOME PRIME MINISTER. THAT WAS ME.

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Not that I believed it. It was never on my radar. I always thought I would follow in my dad’s footsteps and join the police force. And at one time I remember wanting to be a clown! I have called myself, in the past, an acceptable nerd. I was pretty earnest, but that didn’t mean I was some super-serious swot. I always had friends, even if they weren’t so keen on my love of debating. I used to get a bit of a ribbing about my future career prospects because of that – the Morrinsville College lot were always perceived as the underdogs in the high school debating world.

THERE’S always been a tendency to think that studying a particular subject will lead us down a prOscribed path, medicine equals doctor or nurse, commerce or law gives us accountants and lawyers – but that’s definitely changing. . Still, we became somewhat notorious when we found ourselves in the North Island semi-finals of a national competition one year, up against King’s College. We thought we’d get a small group of supporters tagging along, but instead ended up with a busload, including most of the First XV. We won the debate and I still get people bringing it up with me now, all these years later. It felt like the stuff legends were made of or perhaps just bad TV movies. I took English, Chemistry, History, Maths with Statistics and Economics – because I thought they would be useful – and in my seventh form year I added Classics. I added it in because I had an interest in history, which was also my favourite subject. I really struggled with what I was going to do when I finished school and remember having long discussions with my family about it. I ended up studying communications, not because I was really passionate about it, but basically because I thought it would be good for my career prospects. I really believe people should study what they love. If you do that the passion shines through. There’s always been a tendency to think that studying a

particular subject will lead us down a proscribed path: medicine equals doctor or nurse, commerce or law gives us accountants and lawyers – but that’s definitely changing. Then, of course, there’s the fact that 46 per cent of jobs we do now won’t be around in another 15 or 20 years. I thought if I studied history I wouldn’t get a job because I had a very narrow view of what people who studied history could go on to do. I realise now that was really wrong. We need problem solvers, collaborators, critical thinkers – no matter what they studied. Advice to my 17-year-old self? Just to keep saying yes. Don’t be afraid to take risks. And don’t put too much pressure on yourself. I got so upset, I remember, in my school certificate exams because I didn’t finish one of them. I just couldn’t see past it. But that’s a very distant memory now. And remember it’s not just about an academic record. Yes, your study matters but so does everything else that you do. You can be the kid who was born in Morrinsville and you can be the Prime Minister.

Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern PRIME MINISTER OF NEW ZEALAND LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

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SAY YES TO OPPORTUNITY

UNI SPARKS PASSION FOR SUSTAINABILITY BUSINESS

As a member of the winning team, she got to travel to Niue for three weeks to implement their idea. All of these activities allowed her to put her learning into practice and build up her skills and experience. While she loved university, Charlotte admits that staying at home to study meant the first few months were probably more of a challenge socially than they would have been if she had chosen to study away from home.

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“But about halfway through my first year I thought, I’m here to make friends and enjoy my time at uni, as well as getting a degree.” The subjects she chose in her final year at Riccarton High School – Calculus, Physics, History, Art Design and Painting – aren’t typical of someone lining up to study a Bachelor of Commerce. “I had an aspiration to do architecture,” she explains, “so I did what I thought I needed for that, while enjoying my final year.” writer SARA CARBERY

// photographer ALAN STEVENS

If you’re planning on going to university, CHARLOTTE MEE has this advice: “Just enjoy it. University is about so much more than getting a degree!” “For me it was the friendships, the adventures, the trips and the learning that came from saying yes to opportunities that were available.” A major highlight was “the clubs scene” at the University of Canterbury. “The social aspect of clubs made my time enjoyable – from end-of-term barbecues to balls, and numerous other social events.”

While studying for a Bachelor of Commerce, Charlotte was the promotions manager for Entré, a student-run entrepreneurship company that enables students to put their business skills into practice. She was also one of 30 management students chosen to travel to China to visit New Zealand businesses operating there. Charlotte took part in the 21 Day Challenge, a competition that tasked students to contribute to food sustainability in Niue.

Her decision to major in Marketing was prompted by the environmental content of a second-year PAPER. “That’s when it all just clicked, and I found what I wanted to do.” CHARLOTTE MEE

Charlotte says of all her school subjects, it was English, which she took to Year 12, which had the most transferable skills, particularly in terms of generic writing and public speaking. Her decision to major in Marketing was prompted by the environmental content of a second-year paper. “That’s when it all just clicked, and I found what I wanted to do,” she reflects. “Sustainability, corporate social responsibility, saving the world and all that jazz. From then on I had a large focus on sustainability.” Now 22, Charlotte is taking part in the Countdown Graduate Programme, Dare to Lead. It is a 12-month opportunity to learn how the business works, with graduates rotating through different departments and completing projects along the way. Her goal is to one day own her own business. “I’m unsure what direction I want to go in; all I know is that I want to have a sustainable business and that marketing and the University of Canterbury have set me up to be able to do that.”

KEY FACTS ■ CHARLOTTE MEE HAS A BACHELOR OF COMMERCE MAJORING IN MARKETING FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY. ■ SHE IS NOW TAKING PART IN THE 12-MONTH COUNTDOWN GRADUATE PROGRAMME, DARE TO LEAD. ■ CHARLOTTE HAS A STRONG FOCUS ON BUSINESS SUSTAINABILITY, INSPIRED INITIALLY FROM A SECOND-YEAR UNIVERSITY PAPER.

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For more information on studying Commerce through the University of Canterbury, visit www.canterbury.ac.nz/business


ANALYSING THE IMPACT OF STORMS writer SARA CARBERY photographer KATE MacPHERSON

“Deciding on a career path is a hard thing to do,” admits QUINN HORNBLOW. “And there’s a good chance you won’t get it right the first time.”

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Quinn’s advice is to change courses if your first pick isn’t leading where you want it to. “Don’t feel like you’re committed just because it’s what you started with.” Case in point: He initially thought engineering would be too hard, and have too much focus on maths, so he started a Bachelor of Applied Science in Environmental Management at the University of Otago. Keen on the outdoors and interested in the interaction between people and the environment, he really enjoyed what he was studying – hydrology, geomorphology and ecology – but missed the design and build side of things. So, at the end of his first year, Quinn switched to a Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Natural Resources Engineering at the University of Canterbury, a course which allowed him to continue studying those subjects but in a more applied way. “With Natural Resources Engineering all the designs are tangible, they’re all sites you can get outside and observe – that’s what makes it even more interesting to me.” Quinn also chose to study a Diploma in Global Humanitarian Engineering, alongside his degree. Unique to the University of Canterbury, the diploma teaches the so-called soft skills that contribute to a successful project – things like empathy and an understanding of culture – and allows you to apply your engineering knowledge to humanitarian service. “People are at the centre of everything; the best technical solution won’t work if people don’t like it.” During his diploma, Quinn visited Nepal for four weeks over the summer break (“a life-changing experience”), spending time investigating the state of the water

WATER RESOURCE ENGINEER

BECOME A FUTURE THINKER WITH ENGINEERING

“With Natural  Resources Engineering  all the designs are  tangible, they’re all sites you can get outside and  observe – that’s what makes it even more interesting to mE.” QUINN HORNBLOW

supply in mountain villages. He also attended a design summit hosted by Engineers without Borders, an organisation that works to address the challenges of poverty, sustainability and social inequity, and that he’s continued to be involved with.

In Year 13 at Nelson College, Quinn took Calculus, Physics, Geography, Art History and Graphics. “Obviously, Maths and Physics are the building blocks for engineering, but the other subjects have been just as useful,” he says. “Geography taught me about the physical processes happening in the world, and in Graphics and Art History I learnt how to visualise, construct and communicate ideas effectively.” Now qualified, Quinn is working in his hometown of Nelson as a Water Resource Engineer. A big part of his job is using maps and rainfall data to develop computer models to analyse the impacts of storm events. “The results help local councils or land developers plan and build in ways that lower the chances of negative effects. “There’s a lot of future thinking in engineering,” he explains. “We ask questions like, ‘In 100 or 200 years what will the pressures from population be? From climate change?’ And then design today’s infrastructure to deal with that.”

KEY FACTS ■ QUINN HORNBLOW HAS A BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING WITH HONOURS IN NATURAL RESOURCES ENGINEERING AND A DIPLOMA IN GLOBAL HUMANITARIAN ENGINEERING FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY. ■ HE WORKS AS A WATER RESOURCE ENGINEER, USING MAPS AND DATA TO DEVELOP COMPUTER MODELS TO ANALYSE THE IMPACTS OF STORM EVENTS. ■ QUINN STUDIED CALCULUS, PHYSICS, GEOGRAPHY, ART HISTORY AND GRAPHICS IN YEAR 13.

For more information on studying Engineering through the University of Canterbury, visit www.canterbury.ac.nz/engineering

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ENGINEERING

PRODUCT DESIGN

FORESTRY

UC Engineering offers a four-year engineering degree, spanning nine disciplines, leading to a professional career that can take you around the world.

Limitless possibilities come from combining creative design, science, engineering and business. A degree that promotes interdisciplinary innovation.

UC offers NZ’s only Forestry Science degree, which combines science, management, commerce and technology courses.

• New state-of-the-art facilities

• Industrial Product Design

• Real-world projects sponsored by industry

• Applied Immersive Game Design

• Theoretical and hands-on practical work, including field trips

• Unique global humanitarian engineering programme

• Chemical, Natural & Healthcare Product Formulation

www.canterbury.ac.nz/engineering

www.canterbury.ac.nz/engineering/ product-design

• Four-year professional degree

• Global exchange programmes www.canterbury.ac.nz/engineering/ schools/forestry

BE PREPARED TO CHANGE THE WORLD.


BUSINESS

LAW

SCIENCE

With world-class lecturers and industry connections, a UC BCom prepares you to be enterprising, innovative and international in outlook so you’ll succeed in a dynamic business environment.

UC Law arms you with knowledge and skills to make a real difference in society. Criminal Justice and Law graduates are globally aware and geared up for success in their profession.

Science and technology are integral to New Zealand's future economic prospects and a UC science degree allows you to explore your options and find your passion, leading to many exciting careers.

• Gain work-ready skills through internships and group projects

• Gain practical skills through internships, law clinics and the clinical legal studies programme

• Brand new state-of-the-art science facilities

• Acquire critical thinking and analytical skills

• Knowledge to solve global challenges leading to loads of career opportunities

• Start up your own venture through UC Centre for Entrepreneurship • Add an OE with a business and culture study tour or exchange www.canterbury.ac.nz/business

• Challenge yourself through student competitions and be part of an active student community

• Amazing research opportunities (in the lab and the field)

www.canterbury.ac.nz/science

www.canterbury.ac.nz/law

Get a professional degree to get ahead! Fees-free study at UC. First year scholarships available. 0800 VARSITY (827 748) www.canterbury.ac.nz


PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHER

A JOURNEY INTO TE ĀO MĀORI

THE POWER OF LISTENING WHEN TEACHING

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writer ROBYN YOUSEF

// photographer PETER McDERMOTT

PAIANA WHAANGA is an inspirational role model to young New Zealanders (especially Māori) who are going to study teaching. Last year Paiana completed her Graduate Diploma in Teaching (Primary) at Massey University, and was the recipient of the Kupe Scholarship. Now she is establishing a new bilingual unit at Ross Intermediate School in Palmerston North. Paiana (26) grew up in Wellington immersed in the Māori community, attending Kohanga Reo at her whānau’s Koraunui marae. She is of Scottish/English descent on her mother’s side and Māori descent on her late father’s side. Her father was a teacher for 23 years and inspired her to follow this career path. Receiving the Kupe Scholarship last year (awarded by TeachNZ to Māori and Pasifika high achievers) was a great honour to Paiana. “This taonga (treasure) is a huge motivation and reminder to me of why I am pursuing this career path. I feel humbled to have this taonga that is named after the great chief, Kupe.”

She attended Stokes Valley School then went on to the full immersion classes at Maraenui Bilingual School in Napier. It was here she was taught to live and learn by the values of her ancestral history. Her secondary schooling was at St Joseph’s Māori Girls’ College in Napier. The subjects she took in her last year included English, Māori, Art, Maths and Science. For school leavers planning a teaching career, Paiana says there are many subjects that would be beneficial but believes Maths and Science, particularly, are very important options. She finished a Bachelor of Visual Imaging after three years’ study with the Universal College of Learning (UCOL). Paiana then spent three years at Te Awhina Kohanga Reo as a kaiāwhina (assistant). “It was here that I re-established my journey in Te Āo Māori. It became the spark and encouragement I needed to find my calling and purpose.” She is working with another Massey University graduate Jalessa Wilson (Whaea Jay) to establish

“Listen – the  power of listening is huge. Listen with honesty,  integrity and genuinely, BEING a kaiako/ teacher is  about being honest, open and  loyal to your tamariki.” PAIANA WHAANGA a whare wānanga at Ross Intermediate School. “The bilingual whānau we have established reflects the aroha Whaea Jay has for her tamariki, when I came along a few months ago fresh from student life she shared to me her vision for our bilingual unit.” Paiana has a passion for teaching and believes that patience is a critical quality in teaching so that children feel listened to and encouraged. “Listen – the power of listening is huge. Listen with honesty, integrity and genuinely. Being a kaiako/teacher is about being honest, open and loyal to your tamariki.”

KEY FACTS ■ PAIANA WHAANGA HAS A BACHELOR OF VISUAL IMAGING FROM UNIVERSAL COLLEGE OF LEARNING AND A GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN TEACHING (PRIMARY) FROM MASSEY UNIVERSITY. ■ SHE WAS THE RECIPIENT OF TEACHNZ’s KUPE SCHOLARSHIP. ■ PAIANA IS CURRENTLY WORKING TO ESTABLISH A WHARE WĀNANGA AT ROSS INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL IN PALMERSTON NORTH.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

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For more information on studying Teaching through Massey University,  visit www.massey.ac.nz /g-dip-teaching-primary


IT ALL ADDS UP TO A GREAT CAREER

SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHER

FOSTERING A PASSION FOR MATHEMATICS

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writer PETER WHITE

// photographer ALAN STEVENS

CAMERON UALESI has a passion for mathematics and loves nothing more than sharing that with a classroom of secondary school students. The 23-year-old is in his first year teaching mathematics at Pakuranga College in Auckland. Moving from the Manawatu where he grew up to live and work in Auckland has been a big change but he has enjoyed the new challenges and, most of all, the interaction with students. So what does he love most about being a teacher? “The feeling you get when the students succeed and sometimes the lightbulb comes on and they make connections between certain things. In mathematics a lot of people have that perception of mathematics being hard and they don’t like it. So changing their perception and getting them to like it is an on-going goal,” Cameron says. “I know you can’t do that for every kid but those one or two that you do change now and then keep you going. It is just a passion I have that I want to give others.” Cameron went to Feilding High School where Mathematics and Statistics were his favourite

“a lot of people have that  perception OF mathematics being hard and they don’t  like it. So changing their  perception AND GETTING THEM to like it is an on-going goal.” CAMERON UALESI subjects. In Year 13 he took Calculus, Statistics, Physics, Chemistry and Sports Science. “I really enjoyed mathematics and decided I would like to become a mathematics teacher in Year 12. But it was sort of a question I asked myself whether or not I would go teaching straight away after leaving school or whether it would be later after I had experienced something else.

“So I talked to one of the mathematics teachers who inspired me and he told me to start with engineering as you can always come back to be a teacher. So that’s what I started out doing at uni but I didn’t really like it so I changed midway through my first year to go towards mathematics and statistics.” Mentoring a fellow student at Feilding High School convinced him he would love to have a career helping others to achieve their learning goals. “I got that enjoyment in watching her succeed at that young age. At university I worked at a tuition site as a part-time job and fell in love with it really.” Cameron studied at Massey University where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree, double majoring in Mathematics and Statistics. He then completed a one-year Graduate Diploma of Teaching (Secondary). He says secondary school students should consider teaching as an alternative option to what they may be planning to do, and that teaching opens doors to working overseas. “It is good to have it as not your only option. Now becoming a teacher and finding out how easy it is to go travelling overseas as a teacher, kind of having that experience with kids is a big opportunity opener.”

KEY FACTS ■ CAMERON UALESI HAS A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJORING IN MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS FROM MASSEY UNIVERSITY, AND A GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF TEACHING (SECONDARY). ■ HE WORKS AS A MATHEMATICS TEACHER AT PAKURANGA COLLEGE IN AUCKLAND. ■ CAMERON LOVES SHARING HIS PASSION FOR MATHEMATICS AND HELPING HIS STUDENTS SUCCEED.

For more information on career on studying Teaching opportunities with Plumbing World through Massey University,  visit www.plumbingworld.ac.nz/careers visit withwww.massey.ac.nz for further details on plumbing /g-dip-teaching-secondary apprenticeships with ATT,  visit www.att.org.nz

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writer PETER WHITE

// photographer STEVE SELWOOD

EXPLORE A NEW AVENUE OF HEALTH

in Year 13. He encourages students wanting a career in the primary health care sector to consider becoming podiatrists. “It is a rewarding career with excellent prospects for the future. There are lots of job opportunities with the fact there is currently only one university that teaches podiatry in New Zealand producing around 30 new graduates a year. “It is a really satisfying job and an opportunity to explore a new avenue of health for students. Podiatry has a high demand for its services and can take you almost anywhere in the world.”

Most school leavers wanting a career in primary health care usually have training to be a doctor, nurse or physiotherapist in mind. MARK ROBINSON is proud to be a podiatrist, a job that is all about prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of the lower limb and foot. The 23-year-old began working for Feet N Motion in Russley, Christchurch, earlier this year after graduating from Auckland University of Technology (AUT) with a Bachelor of Health Science (Podiatry). AUT is the only university in New Zealand that offers a podiatry degree. When considering his study and career options, Mark was focused on helping people, learning more about the human body and he was particularly interested in the sports side of health. A nursing degree was Mark’s first choice but he soon realised he was more interested in a degree in podiatry. “It has such a broad range of scope – going from the sports injury prevention and rehab side, palliative nail care and diabetes aspects – that all interested me, all the links it has with physiotherapy as well,” Mark says. “So transitioning to podiatry was an excellent option in year two. My flatmate was studying podiatry. What he was doing on the course I found interesting and thought it

would be time for me to make the change to podiatry. And so, I did.” Mark first became aware of podiatrists while playing First XV rugby in his final year at Whangamata Area School on the Coromandel Peninsula. “I would constantly have sore arches and feet during and after playing. I ended up seeing a specialist who recommended I moved on from the electrical tape-covered boots I was wearing to some good quality, more supportive ones. “My feet felt better instantly, and I was back to playing footy pain-free. Previously I didn’t really have any

knowledge of footwear or anything like that. I basically used to just look at the aesthetics of the shoe and think if it looks good, it must feel good.”

THE PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION OF THE LOWER LIMB AND FOOT.

Mark is in training to run his first marathon so is acutely aware of how important it is to look after your feet and have the right running shoes.

1. ORTHOTIC THERAPY FOR SPORTS AND LIFESTYLE.

“I am a big fan of the sports aspect and find it really interesting because I can link it with my running as well. Getting the right footwear has helped me a lot to get the best times and best injury prevention.” Mark took Geography, Biology, English, Health and Marine Studies

■ MARK ROBINSON HAS A BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE (PODIATRY) FROM AUT.

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PODIATRY  — WHAT IS IT?

KEY PARTS OF A PODIATRIST’S ROLE:

2. DIABETIC CARE TO PREVENT COMPLICATIONS. 3. FOOTWEAR ADVICE AND FITTING. 4. STRAPPING AND BRACING FOR PRE-SPORTS TRAINING AND GAMES. 5. NAIL CUTTING AND GENERAL CARE (INCLUDING NAIL SURGERY). 6. BIO MECHANICAL AND GAIT ANALYSIS.

KEY FACTS

■ HE WORKS AS A PODIATRIST AT FEET N MOTION IN CHRISTCHURCH.

PODIATRIST

PODIATRISTS IN HIGH DEMAND

For more information on studying Podiatry through AUT, visit www.aut.ac.nz

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 14

RESEARCH WITH A PURPOSE

DRAWN IN TO SCIENCE

writer SARA CARBERY photographer ALAN STEVENS

Some of CHARLOTTE ROBERTSON’s happiest memories are nature walks with her family, swimming in the local rivers and hanging out at her mum’s work. These visits with her mother, a food safety microbiologist, inspired a love of science at a young age. “It was so exciting,” Charlotte recalls. “Like being in a whole new world.” Charlotte knew she wanted to study science as soon as it became an option as a subject at school. “Science was one of the biggest things I looked forward to at Intermediate. Science Fair was the coolest competition, aside from triathlon, volleyball and swimming sports.” In Year 13 at Palmerston North Girls’ High School, Charlotte took Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geography and Calculus. All these subjects were useful for the Bachelor of Natural Sciences she went on to study at Massey University (at the Albany campus) and for the Master of Science (Research) she will complete in early 2020 via the University of Waikato. “I chose subjects I enjoyed and knew would be useful for the field I wanted to work in,” Charlotte says, admitting she found Physics and Calculus hard. “I definitely wouldn’t pass the tests to become a helicopter pilot for the Navy as was my dream in Years 10 and 11.” Charlotte describes Massey’s Bachelor of Natural Sciences as a broad science degree designed to teach through inquiry-based learning. “Rather than learning purely from textbooks, there was a lot of focus on teaching us how to develop communication, analytical, and other research skills – things we need to be able to do as scientists.” Her areas of focus were environmental science and agriculture. Now 24, Charlotte is a Master’s Scholar at DairyNZ, where she has worked previously as a science intern and on research farms. Her project’s aim is to identify key lessons relating to financial sustainability and reducing nitrogen loss

through integration of plantain, fodder beet and catch crops in Canterbury dairy farm systems. “It relates to my values and it feels like I’m working in the area I belong,” she says of her job. “It’s an important field of research and so I feel useful and like I have a strong purpose.” Ultimately, Charlotte would like to complete a PhD, become a researcher in environmentally sustainable dairy farming practices and be “communicating this research to make the differences we need”. Her advice is: “Don’t avoid ‘scary’ opportunities. Apply for scholarships and subjects you are interested in. Don’t feel like you have to go straight for your end goal. “I’m glad I stopped to check out the grass on the other side of the fence – and got jobs and experience in related areas – rather than shooting

KEY FACTS ■ CHARLOTTE ROBERTSON HAS A BACHELOR OF NATURAL SCIENCES FROM MASSEY UNIVERSITY, AND IS CURRENTLY STUDYING TOWARD A MASTER OF SCIENCE (RESEARCH) FROM WAIKATO UNIVERSITY. ■ SHE IS A DAIRYNZ MASTER’S SCHOLAR. ■ CHARLOTTE AIMS TO GET HER PHD AND BECOME A RESEARCHER IN ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE DAIRY FARMING PRACTICES.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

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“Rather than learning purely from textbooks,  there was a lot of focus on teaching us how to develop communication,  analytical, and other research skills – things we need to be able to  do as scientists.” CHARLOTTE ROBERTSON straight for a PhD. A PhD is still my goal and I am really glad (and proud) that I have taken time to build up my skill and knowledge base first.” For more information on studying Science through Massey University,  visit www.massey.ac.nz For more information on career options within the dairy industry, visit www.dairynz.co.nz/people/ dairy-careers or www.growingnz.org.nz


OPTOMETRIST

A NEAT BALANCE

16

BLENDING SCIENCE WITH PEOPLE AND HEALTH writer PETER WHITE

// photographer MARK BRIMBLECOMBE

When it comes to job satisfaction, optometrist SEAN MAHENDRAN enjoys plenty every working day. “I love the smile on a child’s face and the excitement in their eyes when with glasses they see the rustling leaves on the tree out the clinic’s window or for the first time in a long time, they see their mother or father’s faces clearly across my exam room,” Sean says. The 25-year-old began working for Specsavers Whanganui this year after joining the Specsavers Graduate Programme. He says there are many opportunities for work as a new graduate and a wide range of career pathways. “The majority of my classmates entered private practice. You can also choose to pursue a career in hospitals, clinics, industry and research.” Sean studied towards a Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Optometry (Honours) at the University of Auckland. It is the only university in New Zealand

A career in optometry to transform eye health Optometry is about more than just glasses and contact lenses. Through the treatment and management of eye conditions and disease, Optometrists help to improve their patients’ way of life. An optometrist’s work is meticulous and precise. As health care professionals, optometrists aim to provide the best possible health outcomes for patients by using their knowledge of how the eye functions to treat and manage vision problems. At Specsavers we are focussed on providing the highest level of optometry care in all our stores. As a group of passionate professionals, our optometrists are committed to reducing the rate of avoidable blindness in New Zealand. We're on a clear mission to transform eye health in New Zealand — and we need more people like you to join us on that mission. For more information contact:

anzprofessionaldevelopment@specsavers.com


“i loved that every  day at university  I was taught something which fascinated me.” SEAN MAHENDRAN

patient interaction and health care. Optometry meets all these and is intellectually challenging, and financially and emotionally rewarding. It offers favourable working conditions and does not involve health-related emergencies on a regular basis.” But there is much more to his role than fitting glasses and contact lenses.

KEY FACTS ■ SEAN MAHENDRAN HAS A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE AND BACHELOR OF OPTOMETRY (HONOURS) FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND. ■ HE BEGAN WORKING AT SPECSAVERS WHANGANUI THIS YEAR AFTER JOINING THE SPECSAVERS GRADUATE PROGRAMME. ■ IN YEAR 13 HE TOOK STATISTICS, CALCULUS, BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS, GEOGRAPHY, ENGLISH AND ACCOUNTING.

Study a Bachelor of Laws at New Zealand’s only law school ranked in the world’s top 30*. Find out more at law.auckland.ac.nz/llb

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Optometrists can spot systemic diseases such as diabetes and are trained to prescribe medicines for certain ocular diseases. “At the back of the eye, we can see changes caused by strokes, brain tumours and other systemic conditions. Abnormalities in eye movements can also reveal other serious health issues. “We can then work with other health professionals, such as GPs and ophthalmologists to ensure the best eye-health and health outcomes for our patients.” Sean went to Long Bay College on Auckland’s North Shore. In Year 13 he took Statistics, Calculus, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geography, English and Accounting.

OPTOMETRIST

that offers a degree that qualifies graduates to work as an optometrist in New Zealand and Australia. “I loved that every day at university I was taught something which fascinated me and rustled my curiosity to find out more. I liked that some of our lecturers are world leaders in their field and that we had access to the latest equipment and technology, as well as access to external sites such as hospitals and clinics.” Sean’s patients rely on his clinical judgment and management skills to ensure they receive the best possible eye-health care. “As new optometrist or clinicians, it can be challenging to formulate management strategies for vision problems or eye diseases that we are not yet familiar with or [have] encountered. This is a natural part of any career development and having a reliable mentor is invaluable,” he says. So what attracted Sean to be an optometrist? “I wanted a career that provided a balance of science,

17

He says anyone with a genuine interest in helping others would enjoy optometry. “It would suit a person who wants a fantastic blend of the sciences and people-interaction in everyday work.” For more information on studying Optometry through the University of Auckland,  visit www.optometry.auckland.ac.nz For more information on Specsavers’ Graduate Programme, visit https:// opportunities.specsavers.com.au/ explore-careers/graduate-optometrist/


Your real-life adventure

STARTS HERE

Discover exciting career opportunities in one of our vibrant sectors: travel; tourism; aviation; accommodation; quick-service restaurants; museums; retail and retail supply chain; cafés, bars & restaurants; clubs; catering.

EARN AS YOU LEARN, QUALIFY, TRAVEL, DOING WHAT YOU LOVE The great news for you is that many businesses offer ServiceIQ on-job training programmes, so you can earn as you learn, get a nationally recognised qualification, and a solid career to set you up for more adventure.

TOURISM & TRAVEL

RETAIL

SERVICEIQ is the Industry Training Organisation (ITO) for the service industry. We develop on-job training programmes for businesses keen to provide their staff with relevant skills, training and qualifications, knowing that it’s great people who make a great business.

HOSPITALITY

AVIATION

CHECK US OUT AT:

www.ServiceIQ.org.nz

MUSEUMS


// photographer CHARLEY HARVEY

ON-THE-JOB TRAINING IN TOURISM

LEARN AND EARN

There have already been many highlights in 19-year-old NICOLE KAY’s ServiceIQ – New Zealand Certificate in Travel – Level 3 and Level 4. hospitality career. She’s met Sir Graham Henry, along with many Nicole was offered a fulltime job at Ascot Park’s Emberz Restaurant to train of the country’s top sporting personalities, and last year was a on-the-job as Restaurant Supervisor in 2016, and she formalised this with winner in Hospitality New Zealand’s Rising Stars Awards, securing a qualification training programme, gaining a ServiceIQ Certificate in the Up & Coming Front of House award. Food & Beverage – Level 3. Nicole was drawn to a career in Nicole’s bubbly and outgoing tourism because of the endless personality serves her well in her job opportunities it provides new role at The Batch, which she both locally and worldwide. is enjoying. Tourism was also one of her “No day is ever the same and you favourite subjects at secondary get to meet new people from all school. Nicole enjoys her role over the world.” as Front of House at The Batch Her advice to school leavers who are – Invercargill’s popular viewing the tourism and hospitality new café. sector as a career option is to get Born in Riversdale, Southland, out there. Nicole attended Northern “Start from the bottom and Southland College and take every learning opportunity Invercargill’s James Hargest and every chance you get to College for her secondary move up. Those who want to be education. The subjects she chefs should take every cooking studied included English, Tourism, class your school provides to make History, Business Studies, it easier to get an apprenticeship. Classical Studies and Maths. Her passion for tourism really “For those who are interested in kicked in at James Hargest front of house work, I believe it’s a College, where she completed job best learnt while working. With ServiceIQ’s New Zealand ServiceIQ, you can learn on-the-job Certificate in Tourism by starting at the bottom and work (Introductory Skills) – your way up learning as you go. Level 2. That’s what I’ve done by starting as a function food server as an In 2014, Nicole started a job after-school job and working my in food services at Invercargill’s “With ServiceIQ, you can learn  way up while studying on-the-job leading hotel, Ascot Park. with ServiceIQ.” She continued this part-time on-the-job by starting at the bottom  Nicole plans to travel overseas but work while attending the and work your way up learning as  doesn’t have any immediate plans. Southern Institute of “I’m still learning all hospitality has Technology for a year where ’ ’ ” you go, That s what I ve done. to give in New Zealand before I go she completed two further NICOLE KAY anywhere else.” qualifications through KEY FACTS ■ NICOLE KAY WORKS FRONT OF HOUSE AT THE BATCH, A POPULAR NEW CAFÉ IN INVERCARGILL. ■ SHE HAS A NEW ZEALAND CERTIFICATE IN TOURISM (INTRODUCTORY SKILLS) – LEVEL 2; NEW ZEALAND CERTIFICATE IN TRAVEL – LEVEL 3 AND LEVEL 4; AND A SERVICEIQ CERTIFICATE IN FOOD & BEVERAGE – LEVEL 3.

For more information on on-the-job training offered by ServiceIQ , visit www.serviceiq.org.nz/training

LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

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FRONT OF HOUSE

writer ROBYN YOUSEF

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BACHELOR OF SURVEYING SURVEYING

LOCAL AND GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND

20

writer SARA CARBERY

The two-year programme has seen the 28-year-old testing leading edge technology, defining future products and working at Trimble SketchUp (formerly Google SketchUp).

During her final year at Timaru Girls’ High School, when she was tossing up between degrees in geography or civil engineering, MELISSA HARRINGTON’s geography teacher suggested she throw a degree in surveying into the mix.

Now, based in Boulder, Colorado, she is travelling around North America and further afield, selling technology solutions to Trimble’s customers.

Put simply, surveying involves mapping the Earth’s surface to determine boundaries, locations, topographic features and man-made structures; hence the fit with geography. Intrigued, Melissa headed to an open day at the University of Otago to find out more.

“What I love about my job the most at the moment is the people, the travel opportunities, and playing a key role in defining the future technology to be used by surveyors.”

“We heard about the career opportunities internationally, the technology that was being used, as well as the role surveyors play in shaping communities, locally and globally,” recalls Melissa, who was immediately sold on the University of Otago’s Bachelor of Surveying.

“The skills and knowledge that you obtain through a Bachelor of Surveying are very transferable within New Zealand and internationally,” she says.

As Melissa’s career is proving, the opportunities for surveying graduates are many and varied.

“You can be a land development engineer, cadastral surveyor, a construction surveyor, a hydrographic surveyor, a project manager, a planner, a teacher, a software developer … the list goes on.

“Surveying was a great fit with my interests in travel, spending time outside exploring and learning new skills.”

“I love surveying, the surveying profession and the people within it. Our skills and knowledge can contribute greatly to the betterment of the world.”

Surveying was a good mix of the subjects she enjoyed – Chemistry, Physics, Statistics, Calculus and English, in particular, alongside Geography. The other subject that would have been useful is Graphics. Melissa loved her four years at the University of Otago. “The School of Surveying has a nice community feel, and the classes are small, meaning you get to know everyone in your class. The staff are also amazing and always willing to impart their knowledge.” While at university, Melissa worked as a summer intern for Trimble Inc., a world-leading technology company, testing survey equipment and software.

gaining full professional recognition as a Licensed Cadastral Surveyor along the way.

“SURVEYING WAS A GREAT  FIT WITH MY INTEREST, SPENDING  TIME OUTSIDE EXPLORING AND  AND LEARNING NEW SKILLS.”

“It was a great way to spend the summer, outside playing with the latest technology!”

“I loved the variety. You were somewhere different every day, and there was a good balance between office and field work.”

After graduating, Melissa went to work for Eliot Sinclair and Partners for four years, a surveying and engineering consultancy in Christchurch,

Melissa’s current job is back at Trimble Inc., where she is part of their Rotational Development Program for high-performing young professionals.

MELISSA HARRINGTON

KEY FACTS ■ MELISSA HARRINGTON HAS A BACHELOR OF SURVEYING FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF OTAGO. ■ SHE BELIEVES THAT CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS, STATISTICS, CALCULUS, ENGLISH, GEOGRAPHY AND GRAPHICS ARE USEFUL SUBJECTS TO HAVE STUDIED FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN UNDERTAKING A DEGREE IN SURVEYING. ■ MELISSA WORKS FOR TRIMBLE INC., WHERE SHE IS PART OF THEIR ROTATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM FOR HIGH-PERFORMING YOUNG PROFESSIONALS. LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

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For more information on studying Surveying through the University of Otago, visit www.otago.ac.nz/surveying For more information about Cadastral Surveying,  visit www.surveyors.org.nz


BE ONTHE FRONT LINE writer SARA CARBERY

// photographer ALAN STEVENS

REBEKAH JUDD has been interested in paramedicine most of her life, she was a St John Cadet when she was at school, but it was in assisting at a car accident part-way through an apprenticeship in baking that made her realise she wanted to make it her career. “I came across an accident, where some young men had flipped into a ditch, and I stopped to help,” Rebekah recalls. Although this was the catalyst for a career change, from baker to paramedic, Rebekah finished her apprenticeship before enrolling in a Bachelor of Health Science majoring in Paramedicine at the Auckland University of Technology (AUT). Rebekah also holds a Postgraduate Certificate in Emergency Management, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Business – Health Management. “The journey has been incredible,” says the 37-year-old. “It is an honour to be able to help someone in their own home, and a privilege to connect with people and make a difference.” Rebekah currently works as a Clinical Team Manager for St John, leading a team in the 111 call-centre. The team takes calls from ambulance crews who need clinical advice, and assign rescue helicopters throughout New Zealand. While incredibly rewarding, paramedicine is also challenging, admits Rebekah. “In this job you see the very best of humanity and the very worst. You see things normal people don’t see. “Being affected by it is normal, it changes you; it helps you grow, if you let it.” In the future, she would like to see paramedics diversify how they help patients who live away from major hospitals, monitoring them via new technology and referring them to specialist teams when required. “In my opinion, paramedicine is still a profession in its infancy. In the near-future, I believe it will

CLINICAL TEAM MANAGER

PARAMEDICINE: CHALLENGING AND REWARDING

“IN MY OPINION, PARAMEDICINE IS STILL  21 A PROFESSION IN ITS INFANCY. IN THE NEAR-FUTURE,  I BELIEVE IT WILL DIVERSIFY SUBSTANTIALLY. THERE WILL BE MORE OPPORTUNITIES, AND I AM REALLY EXCITED TO SEE THESE.” REBEKAH JUDD

diversify substantially. There will be many more opportunities, and I am really excited to see these.” In her final year at Onehunga High School, Rebekah took English, Classical Studies, Art History, Art and Graphics (“Art was my thing”) but in hindsight, she says Biology and Maths would have been useful subjects. “Everybody’s journey is different,” she reflects. “Though I never had a clear pathway in mind as a high school student, I found what I was meant to be doing as I moved forward and learned new things. “That’s what it’s all about; learning, adapting, sharing and connecting.” If you’re considering a career in paramedicine, her advice is, “Dream big, have big ideas. Technology is changing at such a pace that we can’t keep up, so think ahead and be prepared.

“And remember to be kind,” she says. “The ability to manage people with the respect and care they deserve will be a very important skill to have in this ever-changing environment.” Paramedics are the backbone of emergency ambulance services run by St John and Wellington Free Ambulance, as well as helicopter rescue services.

KEY FACTS ■ REBEKAH JUDD HAS A BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE MAJORING IN PARAMEDICINE FROM AUT. ■ SHE ALSO HOLDS A POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT, AND A POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN BUSINESS – HEALTH MANAGEMENT. ■ REBEKAH RECOMMENDS BIOLOGY AND MATHS AS USEFUL SUBJECTS TO TAKE AT SECONDARY SCHOOL FOR THOSE CONSIDERING A CAREER IN PARAMEDICINE.

For more information on studying Paramedicine through AUT, visit www.aut.ac.nz For more information on careers with St John,  visit https://join.stjohn.org.nz

LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

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SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHER 22

writer PETER WHITE // photographer CHARLEY HARVEY

A JOB TO GROW AND DEVELOP IN

LOVE OF SPORT LEADS TO TEACHING PE When RICHARD JONES was 13 he thought being a physical education teacher looked like good fun. As Richard got towards the end of his secondary school years at Southland Boys’ High School, his love of sport meant that was the career he chose. “When I was younger I thought teaching was a cool career path. In my last year at school I knew I was into sport and physical education. That was something I was passionate about and I wanted to get into the industry. Teaching was something that fitted into the study well,”  Richard says.

Richard says the thing he loves most about teaching is the variety of the work and how each day is different from the next.

In his final year at Southland Boys’ High School, Richard took Physical Education, English, Geography, Digital Computing and Woodwork.

“IN MY LAST YEAR AT SCHOOL I KNEW  I WAS INTO SPORT AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION.  THAT WAS SOMETHING I WAS  PASSIONATE ABOUT AND I WANTED  TO GET INTO THE INDUSTRY.”

Now 35, Richard has been at Aparima College in Riverton, Southland for nearly all his teaching career. In 2005, he started as a physical education (PE) teacher and has since worked his way up to Head of Department. Currently, he is stand-in Deputy Principal.

RICHARD JONES “You can be teaching a health class or a PE class, or be on school camps or sporting trips. There are lots of different contexts that you come into contact with students. Ultimately what I enjoy about teaching is how you develop relationships with students and engage them in their learning. That is what it is all about.”

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He then went to Southern Institute of  Technology (SIT) and graduated with a Bachelor of Sport and Exercise. “One of the things I enjoyed was the reasonably small class-sizes or lecture groups, with good availability to communicate with your lecturers and plenty of one-on-one assistance if you needed it.

“There were a lot of practical hands-on learning experiences whether they were in the lab or outdoor sport and recreational activities. “Being down in Southland there are lots of good outdoor facilities and Stadium Southland is a great facility.”


KEY FACTS ■ RICHARD JONES HAS A BACHELOR OF SPORT AND EXERCISE THROUGH THE SOUTHERN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, AND A POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN TEACHING IN SECONDARY EDUCATION FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF OTAGO. ■ HE IS CURRENTLY STAND-IN DEPUTY PRINCIPAL AND HEAD OF DEPARTMENT AT APARIMA COLLEGE IN RIVERTON, SOUTHLAND.

For more information on studying Sport and Exercise through the Southern Institute of Technology,  visit www.sit.ac.nz

0800 4 0 FEES www.sit.ac.nz

SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHER

After he graduated he went to the University of  Otago’s College of Education and completed a one-year Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching in Secondary Education. In 2009, Richard went overseas for the year and taught English in South Korea, which he says was a great experience. Being able to travel overseas and use his teaching qualification and experience was a major bonus. He highly recommends teaching as a career path with lots of room to grow and develop. “I would recommend getting involved in coaching, peer support or tutoring while at school, which may give someone an indication if they might be interested in teaching. “For someone who is interested in sport I would say to jump at the opportunity.”

23


IMPORTANT NOTICES 24

NOTICEBOARD

JOB HUNTING

I never dreamed about success. I worked for it. Estée Lauder

KEEPING TRACK OF WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

These websites will help you find a job! Allied Work Force – www.awf.co.nz Trade Me Jobs – www.trademe.co.nz/jobs MyJobSpace – www.myjobspace.co.nz Student Job Search – www.sjs.co.nz Do Good Jobs – www.dogoodjobs.co.nz Work and Income – www.job-bank.workandincome.govt.nz Seek – www.seek.co.nz

SECONDARY SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OPEN DAYS open days are a fantastic way of getting to know more about your HOLIDAYS 2018 /2019 University proposed courses of study, the university itself, meet fellow students and become Term 2 holiday: 6 July–22 July 2018 Term 3 holiday: 28 Sept–15 Oct 2018 Term 4 holiday: No later 18 Dec 2018– No earlier 28 Jan 2019 Term 1 holiday: 12 Apr–29 Apr 2019 Information sourced from Ministry of Education, visit www.education.govt.nz

It’s f ine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lesson of failure. Bill Gates

familiar with the campus. If you’re choosing between several tertiary providers, you may find open days help you make your choice. The following tertiary providers have open days: Tertiary provider

Date

Website

UNIVERSITY OF OTAGO

Mon 7 May

www.otago.ac.nz

UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO

Fri 18 May

www.waikato.ac.nz

UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY

Thu 12 July

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY

Fri 20 July

www.canterbury.ac.nz www.lincoln.ac.nz

MASSEY UNIVERSITY Manawatu Campus Wed 1 August

www.massey.ac.nz

MASSEY UNIVERSITY Auckland Campus

Sat 11 August

www.massey.ac.nz

UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND

Sat 25 August

www.auckland.ac.nz

AUCKLAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Sat 25 August

www.aut.ac.nz

MASSEY UNIVERSITY Wellington Campus Fri 31 August

www.massey.ac.nz

VICTORIA UNIVERSITY OF WELLINGTON

www.victoria.ac.nz

Fri 31 August

* Accurate at time of print. Please check provider’s websites for any changes.

CAREERS NEW ZEALAND

A fantastic resource providing expert advice and confidential, free information on all things education and employment – including choosing school subjects, enrolling in study or training and applying for jobs. Call their free advice line on 0800 222 733, free text CAREER to 434 or chat online by visiting their website at www.careers.govt.nz LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

SCHOLARSHIPS There is a free-to-use comprehensive list of  Year 13 scholarships available to 2018 school leavers at MoneyHub. Tens of millions of dollars are available and applications close throughout the year. Talk to your careers advisor or visit www.moneyhub.co.nz/ scholarships-nz

| LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

We do not need magic to change the world, we carry all the power we need inside ourselves already: we have the power to imagine better. J.K. Rowling


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NCEA Examinations Wednesday 7 November to to Friday 30 November Cambridge Examinations June session held 1 May to 13 June November session held 2 October to 16 November

FEELING DOWN?

Leaving school is one of the most major transitions we undertake in our lives, and it’s a time when anxiety, worry and depression can surface. www.thelowdown.co.nz is full of ideas and people who can help you get unstuck and get to a better place. Need to talk? Free text to 5626

MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT

It’s always important to make sure that you are on the electoral roll and ready to take pa rt in national and local elections. How else can you be sure that you are ready to have your say on the big issues affecting you and your family? www.elections.org.nz/voters

First, think. Second, believe. Third, dream. And f inally dare. Walt Disney

STUDENT LOANS

IF YOU ARE STRUGGLING

If you are about to leave school and you’re looking at tertiary study, there’s going to be a lot to think about. If it’s anything to do with financial support while you’re studying, StudyLink can help and you need to apply by 16 December 2018. www.studylink.govt.nz

LIFELINE available 24/7 0800 543 354 www.lifeline.org.nz YOUTHLINE available 24/7 0800 376 633 or free text 234 www.youthline.co.nz WHAT’S UP Mon-Fri noon-11pm & Sat/Sun 3pm-11pm ipis0800 as dolorest quatiam illent elia 942 8787 www.whatsup.co.nz quidi to conseque as exces et alis HELPLINE dolorest, vidALCOHOL veles autDRUG volupta 0800 787 797 available 24/7 esecupt aecupidenis. www.alcoholdrughelp.org.nz

GET SET FOR NZ CAREERS EXPO 2018 CHRISTCHURCH Horncastle Arena AUCKLAND ASB Showgrounds, Greenlane HAMILTON Claudelands Event Centre WELLINGTON TSB Arena, Queens Wharf

10 to 12 MAY 24 to 26 MAY 10 to 11 JUNE 22 to 23 JUNE

Admission to the Expo is free for all visitors. Visit their website www.careersexpo.org.nz

There are two kinds of people, those who do the work and those who take the credit. Try to be in the fif irst group; there is less competition there.

Indira Gandhi

VOLUNTEERING Volunteering can provide you with opportunities to develop your skills in new and interesting ways as well as providing valuable real-world experiences – all important attributes to your CV when applying for your first job! For more information, visit: www.volunteeringnz.org.nz/ volunteers/finding-volunteer-roles/

Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Helen Keller

VOCATIONAL PATHWAYS

Throughout this magazine, each case study has been colour coded to its Vocational Pathway. In some instances, multiple colours are used to show that the skills you learn can be applied across multiple careers and pathways, throughout your lifetime. Visit www.youthguarantee.net.nz/ vocational-pathways to learn more.

LEAVINGSCHOOLNZ

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

| LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

IMPORTANT NOTICES

EXAM DATES 2018

25


SALES REPRESENTATIVE

ARE YOUR SKILLS SET-UP FOR SALES?

ALWAYS AIM HIGH writer SARA CARBERY

// photographer ALAN STEVENS

26

If you’re competitive, honest, able to think quickly on your feet, have a good attitude and pay attention to detail then a career in sales might be ideal for you, says WILMARI BOTHA, a Sales Representative with Plumbing World. “My job in a nutshell is to maintain existing relationships with customers, while growing sales and hunting for new business to bring in,” Wilmari explains. Now 26, Wilmari grew up in South Africa and finished high school at Sentraal High, one of the top schools in Bloemfontein. In her final year, which in South Africa is called Matric, she took Afrikaans, English, Maths, Life Orientation, Computer Studies, Biology and Art. Wilmari loved studying Art and although she got into an art school, for family reasons she didn’t end up going. Instead, she took on a few jobs “to test out the waters and see what I liked and disliked”.

“I even had three going all at once at one stage. I wouldn’t do that again! However, through doing all these different jobs I figured out what I was truly good at – sales.” Wilmari’s sales skills were quickly recognised and, before she left South Africa, she was the youngest sales representative employed by Japan Tobacco International. Emigrating to New Zealand with her husband when she was 21, Wilmari “jumped into” a sales role in Christchurch before moving to Auckland to start a career with Plumbing World. “Knowing literally nothing about the plumbing industry, I started out on the trade counter; five months later I was promoted to Sales Coordinator and exactly two years after that I got promoted to Sales Representative,” she says. “Plumbing World offers a variety of different roles for me to advance and step into.” Wilmari enjoys the challenge of her role and the people she works with, and says Maths, Computer

Studies and English have proven to be the most useful of her school subjects. Her dream is to one day own and run her own business. And she has this advice to offer school leavers: “Don’t go and study something just to study something. Sit down and really think about what you’re good at and what you love doing. If you’re not sure, then do what I did and do a few odd jobs to see what you’re good at and what you like. “Eventually you’ll find your thing. Go study it afterwards, if you need to; if not, then keep doing what you’re doing and always aim high!” Plumbing World has an appraisal system in place for employees, which incorporates personal development plans as well as a clear development and succession planning process. “We are focused on improving leadership skills to support and drive our future growth to help our people realise their full potential.”

KEY FACTS ■ WILMARI BOTHA IS A SALES REPRESENTATIVE WITH PLUMBING WORLD. ■ SHE LEARNT ABOUT THE PLUMBING INDUSTRY ON-THE-JOB AND HAS BEEN PROMOTED TWICE SINCE STARTING WITH PLUMBING WORLD. ■ WILMARI SAYS THAT MATHS, COMPUTER STUDIES AND ENGLISH ARE USEFUL SCHOOL SUBJECTS FOR A CAREER IN A SALES ROLE.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #1 2

For more information on career opportunities with Plumbing World, visit www.plumbingworldcareers.co.nz


#loveplumbing

WE KNOW CHOOSING A CAREER PATH CAN BE A LITTLE DAUNTING... YOU PROBABLY HAVE SOME BIG QUESTIONS? AND NOT MANY ANSWERS. Well our advice is to look at what really interests you first and take it from there. So, have you thought about a career in the plumbing trades?

There’s going to be a lot of tradesmen retiring soon and the reality is New Zealand will need more tradespeople on the ground to get the work done. Did you know that plumbing is one of the most lucrative trades out there – once you’re qualified there’s nothing stopping you from starting your own business and really going for it. Sound interesting? Well Plumbing World have the industry contacts to get the ball rolling on an apprenticeship right away! So if the Plumbing, Gasfitting, Drainlaying or associated trades floats your boat come and see ‘your team in black’ and who knows… you could have the career of your dreams kick off before you know it! Keep in the know by joining our Club go to... Facebook.com/YPCNZ

Branches Nationwide. Freephone 0800 800 686. plumbingworld.co.nz


FARM ENVIRONMENT CONSULTANT 28

THE GROWTH OF SUSTAINABILITY

ENVIRONMENT MEETS AGRICULTURE writer SARA CARBERY photographer STEVE SELWOOD DR ROSHEAN WOODS has a passion for research that supports farmers to be more sustainable and reduces the impact farming has on the environment. During her PhD study (hence the ‘Dr’ in front of her name), Roshean conducted experiments to determine how the plants eaten by cows can help reduce the amount of nitrogen that is leached through the soil by the cow’s urine. “My research topic was a perfect fit,” she says. “I am passionate about the environment, and this project was tackling an environmental issue by looking at the soil–plant system.”

DairyNZ. Between her Honours degree and her PhD Roshean gained valuable experience working on a dairy farm before securing a DairyNZ/AgResearch Science Internship for a year. “This was a great opportunity for me and confirmed which areas of science I was most interested in,” she says. Now 27, Roshean is a Farm Environment Consultant with AgriMagic, a job that involves working with farmers to help them meet environmental regulations set by regional councils, and ensure their businesses remain sustainable into the future. “The thing I enjoy the most is working with farmers and seeing how quickly they adapt to become more sustainable once they understand

“Farmers need so many people working with them to  run successful farm businesses – consultants, scientists, researchers, fertiliser reps, plant breeders and  agronomists – the list goes on.” DR ROSHEAN WOODS

the key things which are impacting the environment on their property.” Roshean says hers is just one of the many interesting jobs you’ll find in the agricultural sector. “Farmers need so many people working with them to run successful farm businesses – consultants, scientists, researchers, fertiliser reps, plant breeders and agronomists – the list goes on.” Her advice is to study something you enjoy, and go with your gut. “In making some of the biggest decisions – like which university to attend or which job to choose – I followed my heart, not just my head. Sometimes it just feels right.” Roshean also recommends getting in touch with someone who is working in the type of role you’re interested in. “See if you can find out more about it, or even better, see if you can spend some time with them.”

Prior to her PhD, Roshean undertook a Bachelor of Science with Honours at Lincoln University, majoring in Soil Science and Plant Science. She chose to do a BSc because she enjoyed science subjects at school, and during her first year at university she discovered an interest in soils and plants. “I found it fascinating that there was so much more to soil than I’d ever dreamed of,” she says. “After all, soils grow our food; life would be completely different without them.” In her final year at Timaru Girls’ High School, Roshean studied Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Calculus and English, all subjects that have helped in her studies and career. In the university holidays she made the most of research placements at Lincoln University and KEY FACTS ■ DR ROSHEAN WOODS HAS A PHD AND A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH HONOURS FROM LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. ■ SHE WORKS AS A FARM ENVIRONMENT CONSULTANT FOR AGRIMAGIC, HELPING FARMERS TO HAVE SUSTAINABLE BUSINESSES AND MEET THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS. ■ ROSHEAN BELIEVES THERE ARE MANY VARIED AND INTERESTING ROLES AVAILABLE IN THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR. LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

For more information on studying a Bachelor of Science through Lincoln University, visit www.lincoln.ac.nz For more information on career options within the dairy industry, visit www.dairynz.co.nz/people/ dairy-careers or www.growingnz.org.nz


writer SARA CARBERY photographer ALAN STEVENS

WAKE UP TO MARKETING “You really need to be doing something that you are passionate about,” says marketing graduate PAUL NAI. “It needs to be one of the reasons why you wake up in the morning; you need a purpose.”

Paul’s passion has become marketing, even though he didn’t know what marketing was when he left Aorere College seven years ago, wanting to become a professional businessman. “Most of all, I just wanted to provide for my family, especially my parents, and thankfully I am doing that now,” says Paul. “Marketing was just something that I enjoyed at uni, which resonated with me and my goals.” At the University of Auckland, Paul studied for a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) and a Master of Commerce (First-Class Honours) specialising in Marketing. By his own admission, at school and university he worked hard to achieve his goals.

“MY HIGHLIGHT WOULD BE GRADUATING WITH,  FIRST-CLASS HONOURS FOR MY MASTER’S DEGREE AND  WALKING ACROSS THE STAGE  IN FRONT OF MY FAMILY.  THE TAKEAWAY FROM MY  EXPERIENCE IS THAT IT DOESN’T  MATTER wHeRE YOU’RE from  OR IF YOU ARE A minoritY, GREATNESS IS there FOR THE TAKING.” PAUL NAI

“My advice would be to master the balance between social life and studies. “While my friends were out partying, I chose to stay in and finish my assignments. While my friends were enjoying themselves during the weekends, I was at uni studying.” Paul’s best years at university were the ones he spent in postgraduate study. “Joining the honours programme was a very big deal for me and my family because it was rare to see Pacific Islanders make it into honours level at the business school, let alone masters,” the 24-year-old says. Paul was granted a 2016–2017 Summer Research Scholarship at the Business School and conducted research on the consumer behaviour of Pacific Islanders around sugar-sweetened drinks, co-writing a research paper with his supervisor, Dr Bodo Lang. Paul says all the subjects he took in Year 13 – Calculus, Statistics, English, Economics and Health – proved useful in his studies. “Complex mathematics from Calculus helped my study regarding numerical calculations; Statistics introduced me to some useful analytical skills; English was very helpful with critical reading and essay writing; Economics was the subject that helped develop my interest in business; and lastly, Health taught me about my wellbeing. This would become critical since life at university was all about wellbeing.” Paul is currently working as a sales and marketing graduate at Goodman Fielder. His short-term goal is to absorb as many skills as he can from Goodman Fielder’s Dream Big graduate programme. In the long-term, he would like to progress to a leadership role in the company. Of his time at university, Paul says,  “Among many, my highlight would be graduating with first-class honours for my master’s degree and walking across the stage in front of my family. The takeaway from my experience is that it doesn’t matter where you’re from, or if you are a minority, greatness is there for the taking.”

SALES AND MARKETING

HIGH-ACHIEVER IN COMMERCE

29

KEY FACTS ■ PAUL NAI HAS A BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (HONOURS) AND MASTER OF COMMERCE (FIRST-CLASS HONOURS) FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND. ■ HE IS CURRENTLY WORKING AS A SALES AND MARKETING GRADUATE AT GOODMAN FIELDER’S DREAM BIG GRADUATE PROGRAMME. ■ PAUL WAS GRANTED A 2016–2017 SUMMER RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND’S BUSINESS SCHOOL.

For more information on studying Commerce through the University of Auckland, visit www.business.auckland.ac.nz

LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

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STUDENT LOAN FACTS 30

INS AND OUTS OF A STUDENT LOAN CONSIDER THESE FACTORS BEFORE TAKING ONE ON writer DIANA CLEMENT

// graphic STUDIOSTOKS

So, you’re about to get a big grown-up student loan? You might be looking forward to it, or nervous. There’s quite a bit you need to know before you tie yourself down with borrowing what could build to tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars.  IT’S A LOAN. The student loan needs to be paid back eventually. Because it’s interest free (when you’re living in New Zealand) it won’t grow when you’re not making repayments. Only student allowances to those from low income families don’t need to be paid back.

1

FACT 

FACT

REPAYMENTS ARE

2 AUTOMATIC. Once your pay

hits the $19,448 threshold your employer will deduct student loan repayments at 12 per cent on income over that threshold. You may feel compulsory repayments are mean. It’s actually a great way to get it paid off.


YOU MAY BE WASTING IT

3 ON BEER. Sure, university is

expensive. But a good proportion of student loans are spent on alcohol, entertainment and general consumer spending. A study of Waikato University students who consumed alcohol found that 38 per cent reported drinking six or more drinks in succession at least weekly. That’s an expensive way to build up debt. FACT

IF YOU GO OVERSEAS YOU’LL

4 PAY INTEREST. As soon as you

move overseas for more than six months you’ll be charged interest, which is currently 4.3 per cent. Be aware that you could be chased by debt collectors or even arrested when you come back to New Zealand if you don’t pay. So, clear the debt as quick as you can if you want to work overseas.

FACT

IT DOESN’T AFFECT YOUR

5 CREDIT SCORE. Student debt is

treated somewhat separately to consumer debt, and your student loan won’t show up on your credit report nor will it affect your credit score, says Hazel Phillips of Credit Simple.

However, if you have a student banking package that includes a credit card or overdraft, it’s a different story.

That might seem a long way away, but you’ll be 30 and then 40 before you know it. Mortgage lenders will reduce your income available to consider your 12 per cent loan repayments to the Inland Revenue Department. That means you won’t be allowed to borrow as much for a home as you may want or need to. FACT

STUDENT LOANS ARE

7 INDIVIDUAL PROPERTY.

“Use student debt wisely and look at your student loan as an opportunity to learn how to be responsible with debt and repayments, and to manage your money impeccably,” says Phillips.

Ouch. If you and your partner decide to pay his or her loan off before yours and then you split, you’ll be stuck with your loan. It’s what’s called “individual property”.

“That will set you up for life, in terms of your personal finance habits.”

Y OUR LOAN DIES WITH YOU. FACT If you die early your partner, children or relatives won’t have to pay your loan off. But you really don’t want to do that too fast.

FACT

IT CAN STAND IN YOUR WAY.

6 If you haven’t paid your student

loan back it can stop you getting a mortgage in the future.

STUDENT LOAN FACTS

FACT

8

31

Finally, this is the start of your adult finances. Use your loan wisely.

KEY FACTS ■ STUDENT LOANS MUST BE PAID BACK. REPAYMENTS ARE DEDUCTED AUTOMATICALLY FROM YOUR PAY ONCE YOUR INCOME IS ABOVE A CERTAIN THRESHOLD. ■ YOU’LL BE CHARGED INTEREST ON YOUR STUDENT LOAN IF YOU MOVE OVERSEAS FOR MORE THAN SIX MONTHS. INTEREST IS CURRENTLY 4.3 PER CENT.

Career options that are a cut above

Come

Farming and Animals

Transport

Manufacturing

Trades and Services

Food Science and Technology

Carve it up @AFFCO

WAVE23645

Administration and Office Support

Sales/Consumer Products

For more information on financial support through StudyLink, visit www.studylink.govt.nz

employment@affco.co.nz

I www.affco.co.nz


writer PETER WHITE

// photographer ERIN ISAACS

BACHELOR OF DENTAL SURGERY

DENTIST

PRACTICAL, HANDS-ON WORK 32

“There is more to dentistry than most people think,” says JOHN WON.

When John was in Year 13 at Wellington College he studied English, German, Calculus, Statistics and History. Not the subjects normally taken by someone wanting to become a dentist but then John, 23, is not your everyday dentist. He graduated from the University of Otago with a Bachelor of Dental Surgery. Rather than move into private practice and help patients with conventional dentistry, such as fillings, crowns, dentures and root canals, he chose to work in the hospital service.

“HOSPITAL DENTISTRY FOCUSES MORE ON  MEDICALLY COMPROMISED PATIENTS WHO NEED DENTAL EXAMINATIONS BEFORE SURGERY  AND PROVIDING URGENT DENTAL CARE, AS WELL  AS DOING ON-CALL WORK – THAT IS MAINLY  TRAUMA WORK FROM MOTOR VEHICLE  ACCIDENTS, FALLS AND ASSAULTS.” JOHN WON

“It is on the other spectrum of the dentistry field. Hospital dentistry focuses more on medically compromised patients who need dental examinations before surgery and providing urgent dental care, as well as doing on-call work – that is mainly trauma work from motor vehicle accidents, falls and assaults,” John says.

The biggest challenges he has faced in his role are being rostered on-call for 24 hours of the week, and all the necessary on-the-job learning.

John moved to Dunedin to study first-year Health Sciences at the University of Otago on the advice of family friends who were doctors and dentists. He chose dentistry after his first year because he loved the practical aspects of dentistry. “You get hands-on experience quite quickly as compared to medicine say, which is quite theoretical. Dentistry is focused on the head region, particularly the mouth, and I wanted to do something with my hands straight away.

Earlier this year he began work at the Faculty of Dentistry as a Dental House Surgeon working with the team of oral (mouth) and maxillofacial (jaws and face) surgeons. This includes on-call work at Dunedin Hospital.

He wanted to experience the hospital side of the profession and loves the environment he works in and the colleagues he works alongside.

“You also realise you have to keep being updated on things, studying new materials, new methods, reading scientific literature and asking your colleagues who are much more experienced.”

“I also think it is very rewarding and a privilege to be working around the head and mouth region, and really see the patients’ lives transform because of it.” If you would like to be a health professional and like working with your hands then John’s advice is that dentistry is a good option.

“As a new graduate, whether you are in private practice or at a dental school or hospital, you realise you don’t know everything after graduating. Learning never stops.

“You realise that in the first month, so you figure out what works best for you and it is very important to keep reminding yourself of that, so that you can improve.

“On the course you start doing practical sessions early on and obviously theoretical and medical knowledge. If you are really interested in dentistry – and I wish I had done this at high school – then shadow a dentist and find out what they really do.”

KEY FACTS ■ JOHN WON HAS A BACHELOR OF DENTAL SURGERY FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF OTAGO. ■ HE WORKS AS A DENTAL HOUSE SURGEON AT THE FACULTY OF DENTISTRY AND DUNEDIN HOSPITAL. ■ JOHN RECOMMENDS THOSE INTERESTED IN PURSUING A CAREER IN DENTISTRY SPEND SOME TIME SHADOWING A DENTIST.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

For more information on studying Dental Surgery through the University of Otago,  visit www.otago.ac.nz/dentistry


CONSIDERING A GAP YEAR? writer SARA CARBERY

If you’re not sure what you want to do when you leave school, a GAP YEAR – taking time out to explore possibilities and try new things – might be a good option. “My gap year will give me enough time to fully think about what I want to do at university, and enough time to change my plans if I want to,” says 18-year-old Briana Woodward. “This means I’m not rushing into something that I don’t want to do.”

“I think this gap year will help as it has made me more independent, which will be good when I move to Auckland by myself. It has also improved my confidence, which will help with meeting new people and fitting in with a new routine.” If you are thinking about doing something similar, Briana’s advice is: “Definitely do it! It is a great opportunity to broaden your horizons and really get out and experience the world. “It’s also really good if you don’t know what you want to study, so you can take some time to think about it.”

The staff at Lattitude “go above and beyond for the volunteers” and are willing to help “with anything”. So don’t worry about being alone, Briana says. “The other volunteers from New Zealand will be only a message or a phone call away, and they can share your frustrations, worries and good experiences.”

GAP YEAR

WAKE UP IN GORGEOUS SPAIN

33

A former student of Samuel Marsden Collegiate School in Wellington, Briana is a volunteer with Lattitude Global Volunteering. She works as an English teaching assistant at a primary school in Spain. “I loved the idea of fully immersing myself in a new culture, especially in a beautiful and historical country that I had always dreamed of visiting,” Briana says. “It gives me the opportunity to do things that I love – travelling, experiencing new things and helping people.” While she misses her family and friends, Briana is finding teaching rewarding and loves living with her host family. “They offer me an insight into Spanish culture and help me to get the most out of my time in Spain. They are half Portuguese, so I have also got to experience a bit of Portuguese culture as well!” While she studied French (alongside Geography, Economics, Chemistry and Classical Studies) in Year 13, and German in Year 12, Briana spoke “next to no Spanish” when she arrived in Spain. But this hasn’t been a problem, she says, because everyone has been willing to teach her. So much so, Briana is thinking about studying tourism and Spanish at the Auckland University of Technology next year. “Since I have already learnt a bit of Spanish here, it will be easy to continue learning at university.

“I LOVED THE IDEA OF FULLY IMMERSING MYSELF IN A  NEW CULTURE, ESPECIALLY IN A BEAUTIFUL AND HISTORICAL  COUNTRY THAT I HAD ALWAYS DREAMED OF VISITING.” BRIANA WOODWARD

KEY FACTS ■ BRIANA WOODWARD WORKS AS AN ENGLISH TEACHING ASSISTANT AT A PRIMARY SCHOOL IN SPAIN. ■ LATTITUDE GLOBAL VOLUNTEERING OPERATES IN 14 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES, IN FOUR DIFFERENT ROLES, AND NO EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. ■ THEY HAVE SUPPORTED 46,000 “GAPPERS” ABROAD SINCE 1972. ALL TRAINING, 24/7 SUPPORT, FOOD AND ACCOMMODATION IS INCLUDED.

For more information on volunteering abroad through Lattitude Global Volunteering,  visit www.lattitude.org.nz

LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

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A FREE app to help you make informed study & career choices. Income, fees and job prospects for over 100 jobs and occupations. Discover the roles that match your skills using the app’s skill matching tool. Look up the “Occupation Outlook” app on:

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

OCCUPATION OUTLOOK

34

DRAWN TO CREATIVITY THE FIELD OF GRAPHIC DESIGN writer SARA CARBERY photographer ALAN STEVENS

Design, Photography, Graphics, Visual Arts and Textiles … KEN KHUN clearly knew he wanted to study and work in the creative fields when he was choosing his subjects for Year 13 at Mount Albert Grammar School.

occupationoutlook.mbie.govt.nz

YOU CAN READ (AND DOWNLOAD) THE LEAVING SCHOOL MAGAZINE ONLINE BY CLICKING THE LINK BELOW

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

Now 22 and recently qualified as a graphic designer, Ken says all these subjects set him up well for a Bachelor of Fine Arts, majoring in Graphic Design, at Auckland’s Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design. “Design, Photography and Graphics were the key subjects I focused on in high school. They have taught me the fundamental skills and knowledge I could bring progressing into university,” he says. “Visual Arts and Textiles were also helpful as I was able to explore my concepts through different creative outlets.” At  Whitecliffe, Bachelor of Fine Arts students have the opportunity to experience all four areas of specialisation in their first semester – Fine Arts, Photo Media, Fashion Design and Graphic Design – before moving into their chosen major. “I knew that Graphic Design could lead me to different avenues and opportunities,” Ken says of his choice of major, adding that his interest in publication design was a contributing factor in choosing this pathway. LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2


WHITECLIFFE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND DESIGN

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

“YOUR FAVOURITE MAGAZINE, BEAUTIFUL  BOOKS, FUNCTIONAL MAPS AND SIGNAGE  SYSTEMS, MOVIE CREDITS, THE LATEST  COMPANY BRANDS AND PACKAGING  – EVERYWHERE YOU TURN, YOU SEE THE WORK OF A  GRAPHIC DESIGNER.”

35

Graphic design is an industry that offers a broad range of creative and commercial possibilities and employment opportunities because of the ever-increasing scope of the graphic design industry.

Get The Whitecliffe Edge

As Whitecliffe says on its website, “Your favourite magazine, beautiful books, functional maps and signage systems, movie credits, the latest company brands and packaging – everywhere you turn, you see the work of a graphic designer.” Graduates find work with local and international firms across a range of work environments, including boutique design firms employing two to 10 people, and large design studios with over 30 employees. Many businesses employ graphic designers for in-house design roles. There are also a growing number of freelance opportunities for entrepreneurial designers who prefer the flexibility of self-employment. Whitecliffe says, “Our curriculum gives students a well-rounded understanding of the ever-changing field of graphic design. Students graduate with technical skills, creative ability, commercial awareness and historical perspective. “They learn to explore with all technologies, software and content development needed to produce projects across print and digital media.” Having professional designers visit and guest lecturers was a valuable part of Whitecliffe’s Fine Arts programme, says Ken, who enjoyed the industry internships, and having one-on-one critiques with the lecturers. “They have really helped me overcome the tough challenges and pushed my projects visually and conceptually.” Ken’s goal is to work in the design industry here or overseas, but he has no solid plans as yet. “Right now, I'm seizing any opportunities that come my way.”

Whitecliffe is an award-winning arts and design tertiary education specialist. Whitecliffe graduates are articulate, innovative creative thinkers with broad skills and a high level of industry standard technical proficiency. They create powerful and compelling visual expressions of their ideas, are leaders in the creative industries, and shape contemporary culture.

KEY FACTS

REGISTER 2018 Open Days OUT-OF-TOWNERS CERTIFICATES FINE ARTS PHOTO MEDIA

For more information on studying Graphic Design through Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design, visit www.whitecliffe.ac.nz

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Wednesday 30 May Tuesday 26 June Wednesday 8 August Friday 10 August

FASHION DESIGN

Wednesday 15 August

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Friday 17 August

Whitecliffe.ac.nz

Emily Bray

■ KEN KHUN HAS RECENTLY GRADUATED WITH A BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJORING IN GRAPHIC DESIGN FROM WHITECLIFFE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND DESIGN. ■ HE STUDIED DESIGN, PHOTOGRAPHY, GRAPHICS, VISUAL ARTS AND TEXTILES IN YEAR 13.


CROWN PROSECUTOR

writer SARA CARBERY

36

// photographer OLIVER LEE

INTERESTING AND REWARDING CAREER

PROSECUTING CRIME “Law is what happens when politics meets real life,” says DINO MURATBEGOVIC, a Massey High School old boy who chose the profession because he wanted to help change things he didn’t like.

Twenty-six-year-old Dino is working as a Crown Prosecutor with the Office of the Manukau Crown Solicitor; he is part of the team responsible for prosecuting serious crime in South Auckland. “I couldn’t think of a more interesting thing to get up and do every day, or better people to do it with,” he says. “But it’s hard and involves a lot of responsibility. You have to really want to do it in order to do it properly.”

“I couldn’t think of  a more interesting thing  to get up and do every  day, or better people  to do it with, But it’s  hard and involves a  lot of responsibility.” DINO MURATBEGOVIC

Dino’s path to becoming a trial lawyer was via a conjoint Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws (Honours) degree at the University of Auckland.

“Having a real grasp on social sciences ensures you never forget that.” If you’re thinking of studying law, Dino’s advice is to make sure you really want to do it. “It’s as interesting and rewarding a career as I could imagine – but that’s by no means a guaranteed outcome. Jobs are hard to come by, and it’s an insular and self-sustaining world. I had never met a lawyer before going to law school, and it was a world totally foreign to my family and me.” He says the best thing you can do is find good mentors. “It’s here I’ve had the greatest luck. You end up as good as the people you learn from, and you pick up their values. It pays to make sure they’re good ones.”

“I loved uni,” he says. “Everything in your life just gets bigger – the work, the subject matter, the opportunities to have fun” – which included a year-long exchange to Amsterdam. “It takes a bit of time to strike a balance, but studying is just one of the reasons you’re there.” In Year 13, Dino focussed on the social sciences – “History, Classics, English and other subjects like that. I stayed as far away from Maths and Physics as I could.” He says even though he hasn’t used the topics he studied specifically since leaving school, subjects like History and Classics have been “massive” for him. “Doing them lets you develop a measure of control over how you form opinions,” he explains. “It allows you to think in a disciplined way and to understand that nothing is ever as simple as it looks at first glance. “Every situation is reached because of a lot of different factors, and every change or action has a lot of different effects, most of which you might struggle to predict, if you don’t really stop and think about it. KEY FACTS ■ DINO MURATBEGOVIC HAS A BACHELOR OF ARTS AND A BACHELOR OF LAWS (HONOURS) FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND. ■ HE WORKS AS A CROWN PROSECUTOR WITH THE OFFICE OF THE MANUKAU CROWN SOLICITOR. ■ DINO SUGGESTS THOSE INTERESTED IN PURSUING A CAREER IN LAW HAVE A GOOD GRASP OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES.

LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

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For more information on studying Law through the University of Auckland,  visit www.law.auckland.ac.nz


LOOKING TO THE FUTURE writer SARA CARBERY

// photographer ALAN STEVENS

STUDENT: ENGINEERING AND COMMERCE

AWARD RECIPIENT PASSIONATE ABOUT STEM

37

Nineteen-year-old LUPESINA KORO is one of nine recipients of the 2018 Prime Minister’s Pacific Youth Awards, recently presented by Jacinda Ardern. The West Aucklander, of Samoan and Tokelauan ethnicity, is a former head girl of St Mary’s College in Auckland and is currently studying a Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Commerce conjoint at the University of Auckland. As the Ako Aotearoa Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Award recipient, Lupesina was awarded a $10,000 university internship, but she says the award comes with a responsibility. “I now have to boost up Pasifika in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths); so essentially, this is what the award means to me. It has enabled a platform, through countless opportunities, to spread the STEM message that these subjects are accessible to everyone.” Alongside her studies, Lupesina is a Unibound mentor, helping to prepare Māori and Pacific school leavers for life at the University of Auckland, and she also goes into secondary schools to support Year 13 students and work through strategies to help them succeed. “Often people’s perception of maths and science is that they are areas only reserved for  ‘the smartest in the class’ or ‘only the nerds are good at it.’ We, as a society, need to tautoko that maths and science is for everyone, because as we grow in this technological world, they become more and more a part of our daily lives.” Lupesina’s advice is to become aware of the opportunities available and educate yourself in how to make the most of these opportunities. KEY FACTS ■ LUPESINA KORO IS THE RECIPIENT OF THE SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS AWARD AT THIS YEAR’S PRIME MINISTER’S PACIFIC YOUTH AWARDS. ■ SHE IS STUDYING TOWARD A CONJOINT BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING AND BACHELOR OF COMMERCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND.

“We, as a society, need to tautoko that maths  and science is for everyone, because as we grow in  this technological world, they become more and  more a part of our daily lives.” LUPESINA KORO “Even if what you want to pursue has nothing to do with maths or science right now, I guarantee that in the future you will encounter STEM-related problems – simply because that’s where this digital world is headed. So, it is crucial that you start reading now and become more aware of how our world may change.” Lupesina’s earliest memory of enjoying – and being good at – maths and science is having to recite the times tables in Samoan before entering her classroom at Richmond Road Primary. “While most students dreaded this part of the day, I was that weird kid who looked forward to it. “People often say, ‘Oh, your brain must just be wired that way,’  but I never understood what that actually meant. I just know that numbers have always been an interest of mine because the answers were always clear cut.” Lupesina would like to become a Chartered Accountant “because of the myriad opportunities available for someone who has this qualification in their kete”. She would also love to pursue a doctorate in engineering science because she believes research in this field would be invaluable to the betterment of Pasifika communities. For more information on studying Engineering through the University of Auckland,  visit www.engineering.auckland.ac.nz and to find out more on what a career in engineering, technology or science can offer you, visit www.futureintech.org.nz For more information about the Prime Minister’s Pacific Youth Awards, visit www.mpp.govt.nz/young-people/ prime-ministers-pacific-youth-awards/about-the-awards LEAVING SCHOOL ISSUE #1 2

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SCHOLARSHIPS

READY, GET SET, APPLY 38

HUNDREDS OF SCHOLARSHIPS ON OFFER writer DIANA CLEMENT

// photographer ALAN STEVENS

ETHAN FASI-MOHENOA knew he wanted to go to university but that it would be tough financially. The careers advisers at Massey High School encouraged the 18-year-old to apply for scholarships. The aspiring social enterprise businessman secured one of the New Horizons Scholarships offered by Auckland University of Technology (AUT), which is for students from schools with a decile rating between one and four. The scholarship will pay out $6500 per year for his three-year degree, which is a blessing for the Bachelor of Business student. “We are not a wealthy family and it was a huge burden lifted off my shoulders,” says Ethan. Despite gaining an excellence endorsement in Year 13 Ethan wasn’t sure he stood a chance. “I wasn’t very sure I would get it, but it was relatively easy once I was pointed in the right direction by my careers adviser at school.” Universities, polytechnics and other tertiary institutions love scholarship winners because they are loyal and will help create a strong alumni body. Many providers offer hundreds of scholarships. They can be for everything from academic excellence to quite obscure requirements, such as for students whose ancestors hail from specific countries. At AUT alone, at any one time there are 900 students who are on a scholarship. That includes the Vice Chancellor’s

Teagan Hansen, have merit endorsements in NCEA but have other qualities. Teagan was a prefect at Tuakau College and volunteer at the Sunset Beach Surf Life Saving Club in Port Waikato. If the scholarship criteria doesn’t quite sound like you, don’t be put off from applying. There is often some leeway. AUT scholarship staff accept that a First in Family Scholarship, for example, benefits only children more than those from large families. They know that students from some communities may not be able to prove their financial situation. The online application process requires that you write a student statement, which tells the university all about you. Getting good referee statements really adds to an application. Ethan’s referees were a teacher and his youth pastor at the Church of the Good Shepherd in Massey.

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS: Teagan Hansen and Ethan Fasi-Mohenoa are recipients of 2018 New Horizons Scholarships from AUT.

Significant Student Scholarships, the Woolf Fisher First in Family AUT Scholarship, and many others. Competition can be fierce, and the university receives over 1000 applicants every year for the 150 New Horizons Scholarships it offers.

Landing a scholarship doesn’t always require you having been Dux at school; being well-rounded and giving back to the community counts for as much as your results. Some scholarship winners, such as first-year bio medicine student

Once awarded a scholarship, students are assigned a mentor and get to join the Scholarship Society at AUT. There is a lower attrition rate for scholars at AUT than is usual for the student body as a whole. Other institutes also offer scholarships. Māori and Pasifika Trades Training (MPTT), for example, offers full fee scholarships for students whose financial situation might prevent them taking pre-trades courses at polytechnics, such as UNITEC and Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. There are many others.

KEY FACTS ■ THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF SCHOLARSHIPS ON OFFER FOR A WIDE RANGE OF STUDENTS. ■ COMPETITION CAN BE FIERCE BUT DON’T BE PUT OFF FROM APPLYING. ■ BEING WELL-ROUNDED AND GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY COUNTS FOR AS MUCH AS YOUR RESULTS.

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For more information on scholarships talk to your careers adviser and for an in-depth guide to university scholarships,  visit www.moneyhub.co.nz/ scholarships-nz.html


STUDY AND PLAY IN THE USA writer PETER WHITE

There are around 200 young New Zealanders enjoying the benefits of sports scholarships to colleges (universities) in the United States. For today’s school leavers considering going down the same path, it is vitally important to get the right advice and information. Stuart McEwen played basketball in the United States (USA) for five years before starting a company to assist young Kiwis looking to study there. “I came back to New Zealand looking to help athletes in a variety of sports do the same thing, so I started a sports management group called Striv3 along with Thomas Spragg, a former college soccer player at the University of Washington,” Stuart says. “We are looking to help as many athletes as we can get over there on the pathway that is becoming a more prominent one for New Zealand athletes. Obviously, you must be suited academically, you must be good enough at your sport but there are individual differences as to where in the USA system you fit. “We want to take time to get to know the athletes and support them as much as we can right through their time in the USA.” One thing Stuart wants to make very clear is that gaining and keeping a sports scholarship requires discipline and hard work. Academic performance is fundamental to every sports scholarship. “There is so much information to share on the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) pathway. When choosing which subjects to continue with in high school it is best to choose those which will qualify you for division I NCAA, as this will allow you to compete at the division II, III and Junior College-level automatically. “To be eligible to compete in NCAA sports during your first year at a division I school, you must graduate high school and meet all these requirements. You need to complete 16 core courses over your time at

school, made up mostly of core subjects – English, Maths and the sciences – and earn at least a 2.3 Grade Point Average (GPA) in your core courses. “The GPA is calculated on a 4.0 scale. NCEA grades will be translated around these GPA score. Excellent = A = 4.0, Merit = B = 3.0, Achieved = C = 2.0, Not Achieved = F = 0.” It may sound complicated but Stuart’s company Striv3 is there to simplify matters for students.

“GAINING AND  KEEPING A SPORTS  SCHOLARSHIP REQUIRES  DISCIPLINE AND HARD WORK.  ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE  IS FUNDAMENTAL TO  EVERY SPORTS  SCHOLARSHIP.”

One athlete who loves the USA college system is world-class runner Julian Oakley, 24. The former Tauranga Boys’ College student, who is studying for a Master of Business Administration in Finance at Providence College, Rhode Island, has run the eighth-fastest mile time and second-fastest 3000-metre time run indoors by a New Zealander. “There are many benefits to getting an education in the USA. Perhaps one of the biggest selling points is getting a free education at a top-class university and leaving without a student loan,” Julian says.

SPORTS SCHOLARSHIPS

SECURING A SPORTS SCHOLARSHIP

39

“Choosing to go to university in the USA was the best decision I have made, and it has made me a better athlete. I would recommend the USA experience to anyone who wants to compete in their chosen sport at a high level, as well as having a great time along the way.” WORLD CLASS: Julian Oakley from Tauranga has succeeded on and off the track at Providence College, Rhode Island.

STUART McEWEN, STRIV3

KEY FACTS ■ APPROXIMATELY 200 NEW ZEALAND STUDENTS ARE STUDYING AND PLAYING SPORT IN THE UNITED STATES THROUGH SPORT SCHOLARSHIPS. ■ GAINING AND KEEPING A SPORTS SCHOLARSHIP REQUIRES DISCIPLINE AND HARD WORK. ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IS FUNDAMENTAL TO EVERY SPORTS SCHOLARSHIP. ■ IF YOU’RE CONSIDERING APPLYING FOR A SPORTS SCHOLARSHIP, GETTING THE RIGHT ADVICE AND INFORMATION IS ESSENTIAL.

For more information on studying and playing sport in the United States after high school,  visit www.striv3.com or email stuart@striv3.com For more information on NCAA Student-Athlete Eligibility, visit www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/future

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BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS WITH SCIENCE

SCIENCE

writer SARA CARBERY

40

LOGAN WILLIAMS grew up in Timaru and spent a lot of his childhood in the Mackenzie country, camping, tramping and fishing with his family. So when the science graduate saw first-hand the rivers he loves being destroyed by a “disgusting brown sludge” called Didymo (an invasive algae), he dedicated hours applying his scientific knowledge to find a solution.

business, across multiple disciplines,” he says. A master’s degree enabled him to further investigate the culture of business and organisational

management, which has aided his company’s success. “A postgraduate degree allows you to fine-tune your academic prowess,” explains Logan, “to

Out of this dedication grew the award-winning company Biome Innovation, which looks to manufacture biodegradable products, such as plastic and fabrics, from Didymo. “My passion in life is to create innovative solutions to some of the world’s biggest problems,” Logan says. “I want to sustain the world for generations to come.” Now 22, Logan has a Bachelor of Science majoring in Psychology and Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology with First-Class Honours, and is now working on developing his start-up business Biome Innovation. When Logan first enrolled in the university, he wanted to become a clinical psychologist to help people. He was motivated by a desire to learn how we think and why we react in certain ways. “My goal was to better understand people, and how to apply it [this understanding] in

INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS: Logan Williams is holding a sample of the new biodegradable material he has developed from invasive water algae.

specialise in a specific topic of your choosing and innovate to create a revolutionary insight.” In his final year at Timaru Boys’ High School, Logan took Physics, History, Biology, English, Statistics and Drama. “Science is incredibly important in viewing the world,” he says of his studies of Physics and Biology. “By applying deductive reasoning – using evidence to decide the best solution – you can solve all problems faced in life.” Logan also found Statistics helpful for understanding data in business, and Drama was “immensely important” for networking and presenting ideas to large groups. As for why he chose to study at the University of Canterbury, Logan says he has always loved Christchurch. “The earthquakes made the people of Canterbury supportive and resilient, as they continually searched for innovative solutions to ongoing problems in the city.” If you’re interested in studying psychology at university, Logan has this advice: “Make sure you take a diverse range of papers across multiple subjects – broaden your horizons. “The times of going and getting a degree which provides you a job for life are over,” he says.

“MY PASSION IN LIFE IS TO CREATE INNOVATIVE  SOLUTIONS TO SOME OF THE WORLD’S BIGGEST PROBLEMS.  I WANT TO SUSTAIN THE WORLD FOR GENERATIONS TO COME.” LOGAN WILLIAMS

“Employers are looking looking for multiple skills across many disciplines, so you can adapt, change and grow with the company.”

KEY FACTS ■ LOGAN WILLIAMS HAS A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJORING IN PSYCHOLOGY AND BACHELOR OF ARTS (HONOURS) IN PSYCHOLOGY WITH FIRST-CLASS HONOURS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY. HE IS CURRENTLY MANAGING HIS START-UP BUSINESS BIOME INNOVATION. ■ HE TOOK PHYSICS, HISTORY, BIOLOGY, ENGLISH, STATISTICS AND DRAMA IN YEAR 13. ■ LOGAN STARTED THE AWARD-WINNING COMPANY BIOME INNOVATION. LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

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For more information on studying Science through the University of Canterbury,  visit www.canterbury.ac.nz/science


MAKE MONEY FAST writer DIANA CLEMENT

// photographer STUDIOSTOKS

Going to uni can be a huge financial shock. Suddenly you’re let loose on the world and need to manage your own money. If your student allowance/loan isn’t enough to live on, then it’s time to start making some money fast. The average student works 14 hours a week. There are opportunities to work for yourself or for others in every community – someone has to get the jobs.

04 START YOUR OWN ONLINE SHOP

Check out Alibaba.com and Aliexpress.com and see if you can find items to import and sell on Trade Me, Facebook buy/sell pages or even door-to-door. It’s a matter of finding something that people want. If you’re especially clever, you could set up your own Shopify store.

05  DRIVE AN UBER

If you’re old enough to have a licence and a half-decent car you could make some money driving in your spare time. It’s not well paid, but sometimes money is money.

06  BE A SPORTS COACH

Rugby, football, netball, basketball and many other sports clubs need junior coaches and referees. If you’re good at sport, this is a great way to make some extra money.

07  CLEAN WINDOWS OR HOUSES

Double income families often employ house cleaners. Drop leaflets in local letterboxes offering your services.

08  BABYSIT Here are 10 ideas to get you going.

01

GET A JOB

Students can and do get jobs. There is a constant demand for staff in cafés and restaurants. Students can get all sorts of part-time jobs in industries such as retail, transport, fitness and many more. Consider getting an in-demand qualification, such as training as a barista. Ask other students what they do.

02 SELL YOUR SECOND-HAND STUFF ON TRADE ME

There’s money to be made on Trade Me. Start with everything you own that you don’t use or isn’t beautiful. Then ask friends and family for stuff they can’t be bothered selling. Finally, consider checking out local recycle centres for items you can re-sell at a profit, but note that this is taxable.

03 BE A TUTOR

Parents of secondary school-age children, and sometimes even younger, often want tutoring for their children. If you’re good at Maths, Science or even subjects such as Art, there could be work for you. Tutorly.co is a local peer-to-peer tutoring site where you might find work.

Parents everywhere need babysitters. Write a sales pamphlet outlining how great you are with children. Collect references. Post your pamphlet in letterboxes, on noticeboards and in local social media groups.

09  TAKE A WEEK OFF GOING OUT

This might sound odd but making money and spending less have the same ultimate effect on your pocket. Treat saving money as a contact sport and game yourself to find new ways to spend less with the same enjoyment in life. It’s possible.

10  JOIN THE GIG ECONOMY

Check out apps such as Kwota where people post small jobs. It could be anything from editing Te Reo, playing music at weddings, to digging someone’s garden. Whatever you earn, take firm control of your budget to make every cent last much longer.

For more information on sorting your financial health, visit www.sorted.org.nz

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FINANCIAL TIPS

10 WAYS TO CREATE INCOME

41


A CLOSER LOOK AT SOME FASCINATING VOCATIONS THERE ARE MANY THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN DECIDING WHICH PATH TO TAKE AFTER SCHOOL. HAVE A LOOK AT THE FOLLOWING JOBS AND LEARN ABOUT THE RELEVANT FACTORS FOR EACH POSITION. Here you’ll find profiles of varied and interesting jobs from four categories: social and community; manufacturing and technology; service industries; and a section with a special focus on the dental industry. The jobs range from cheesemaker to librarian to firefighter. Each job profile includes detailed descriptors, job prospects and some insightful statistics.

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Also known as: Audiometrist. Audiologists diagnose and treat patients with hearing loss. They advise on hearing problems and select and fit hearing aids, as well as repair hearing aids. Audiologists use specialised equipment to identify and measure hearing problems. To become an audiologist, it is necessary to have a Master of Audiology. The entry requirement for this master’s degree is a bachelor’s degree; most candidates have a bachelor’s degree in the health sciences. In total, across the bachelor and master degree, five years of study is required. Useful NCEA subjects include English, Maths, Biology, Physics and Te Reo Māori. Opportunities are reasonably good, with the occupation small in size but growing. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 5 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $76,100.

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Roles in this area include: Horse trainer, dog trainer, zookeeper, veterinarian assistant, pet groomer, shepherd. An animal handler’s career path depends on what specific role they do. For example, horse and dog trainers are often self-employed and rely on them creating a customer base and business reputation. Others, such as zookeepers, often have a salaried, fixed role within a zoo. Generally, animal handlers train and take care of animals. Tasks include feeding, washing and training animals, and cleaning their cages or enclosures. There are no strict entry requirements for animal handlers. Some tertiary providers offer qualifications in animal care. Employers often prefer to hire people with experience. Employment is projected to grow in the next few years. Statistics: Job prospects: Average. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale:Estimated average income is $32,800.

D GOO

AUDIOLOGIST

Listed alphabetically, here are a variety of jobs that fit within the category social and community services; an area that often provides a lifelong and rewarding career.

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ANIMAL HANDLERS

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Also known as: Immigration officer, biosecurity officer. Customs officers control, monitor and administer the entry of goods and people to New Zealand. They ensure everything coming into the country is legal, properly declared and taxed. There are no specific entry requirements, except for being a New Zealand permanent resident or citizen, and having a driver’s licence. Successful applicants are formally interviewed and must pass a medical assessment. Training for customs officers takes nine weeks. Useful NCEA subjects include English and Maths. Job prospects are slightly below average. There are few vacancies and competition for roles is high. Statistics: Job prospects: Poor–Average. Length of study: Less than 1 year. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $59,500.

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CUSTOMS OFFICER

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LENGTH OF STUDY

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Please note: The occupations listed have been colour coded to their predominant industry sector colours using the Vocational Pathway colour chart.

MEDIUM H HIG

Also known as: Forestry firefighter, rural firefighter. Firefighters control and put out fires, they also educate the public on fire safety and the prevention of fires. They may also respond to vehicle crashes and hazardous substance spills, and urban search and rescue callouts. For entry into the New Zealand Fire Service, applicants need to pass pre-entry testing, which includes literacy, numeracy and abstract reasoning assessments, fitness tests, a medical exam and a practical skills test. Next, there is an interview, and reference and Police background check. Successful applicants then complete a 12-week training programme. The Royal New Zealand Air Force also trains firefighters but you must enter basic military training before being accepted onto their firefighting-training programme. Useful NCEA subjects include English and Maths. Chances of getting a job are poor due to strong competition for limited roles. The New Zealand Fire Service recruits twice a year; they fill 48 positions each time and receive up to 600 applications. Statistics: Job prospects: Poor. Length of study: Less than 1 year. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $77,600.

POO R

42

JOBS IN FOCUS

FIREFIGHTER

JOBS IN FOCUS

Job data has been sourced from OCCUPATION OUTLOOK and CAREERS NEW ZEALAND, visit www.occupationoutlook.mbie.govt.nz and www.careers.govt.nz

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Continued…

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Also known as: Chiropodist, foot specialist, footwear technician, foot doctor. Podiatrists diagnose, treat and prevent foot and lower limb problems. This can involve offering advice on foot care and health, performing biomechanical assessments, prescribing and arranging soles for footwear, performing toe realignment surgery and referring patients on to a doctor. Podiatrists also treat gait abnormalities in children. Entry requirements for a podiatrist include a Bachelor of Health Sciences (Podiatry), being registered with the Podiatrists Board of New Zealand and having a current annual practising certificate. Useful NCEA subjects include English, PE, Biology, Health and Chemistry. Employment for podiatrists is projected to keep growing at a fast rate, which should mean there will be demand for new podiatrists. Statistics: J ob prospects: Good. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $57,000.

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PODIATRIST

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SOCIAL WORKER

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Also known as: Youth worker, case manager, whanau support worker. Social workers provide advice and support to individuals and families with personal or social problems. They also help with community and social issues. Social workers can specialise in working with certain groups (such as the elderly) or certain problems (such as drug addiction). To become a registered social worker, you must hold a qualification recognised by the Social Workers Registration Board, such as a Bachelor of Social Work or Applied Social Work, Bachelor of Bicultural Social Work, Poutuārongo Toiora Whānau, or an approved master’s degree. Further, you must demonstrate you are a “fit and proper person”. Although it may be difficult to secure a first job in social work, demand for this role is growing. Overall job prospects are good. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 4–6 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $52,000.

MEDIUM H HIG

REGISTERED NURSE

LENGTH OF STUDY

Also known as: Community health nurse, nurse practitioner, Plunket nurse, practice nurse, enrolled nurse. Nurses use their knowledge and judgement to assess health needs, provide care for people in a range of settings, and advise and support people on maintaining their health. To work as a registered nurse, it is necessary to have a Nursing Council-approved Bachelor in Nursing or Bachelor of Health Sciences, hold an annual practising certificate and have registration with the Nursing Council of New Zealand. Registered nurses are also required to take part in continuing professional development to maintain their competence. Useful NCEA subjects include English, Maths, Biology, Physics and Chemistry. The demand for registered nurses is likely to continue to grow. Most nursing graduates get a nursing job within one year of graduating. Statistics: J ob prospects: Good. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: N ew graduate registered nurses in a DHB, $47,000. With five years’ experience, $67,000.

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STATISTICIAN

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Also known as: Information analyst, data analyst, modeller, risk analyst. Statisticians use statistical methods to collect, analyse and report numerical information for a range of purposes, often to do with identifying trends and changes that can help improve decision-making for the future. To become a statistician, it is necessary to have a bachelor’s degree as a minimum qualification. Preferred subjects include statistics, mathematical sciences, economics/econometrics, and business and management. Some employers prefer candidates to have a postgraduate qualification. Useful NCEA subjects include Maths, Calculus and Statistics. Employment numbers are projected to rise. Experienced statisticians are in high demand, but there are few entry-level openings for new graduates. Statistics: Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $88,200.

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JOBS IN FOCUS

INCOME

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Also known as:Librarian assistant, knowledge analyst. Librarians maintain and develop library services. This includes organising the stock of books, buying new books, organising events to promote reading and library services, and offering information to library users. Librarians in specialist libraries may also help users do research. The nature of the role is changing, increasingly becoming less paper-based and more digitally oriented. Librarians usually need a New Zealand Certificate in Library and Information Studies (Level 5), or a degree in Information Studies. Useful NCEA subjects include English and other subjects that include research. Employment for librarians is expected to increase in the coming years. Growth is projected at two per cent per year until 2025. Statistics: J ob prospects: Good. Length of study: 2–4 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $45,500

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LIBRARIAN

SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY

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AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN

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Also known as: Dairy products maker, food factory worker, process worker. Cheesemakers produce cheese in cheese processing plants. They mix ingredients, monitor the maturing process of the cheese, and test that the cheese is of the required quality standards. There are no specific entry requirements. One way to gain a cheesemaking qualification is by doing an apprenticeship and gaining a New Zealand Certificate in Dairy Processing (Levels 3, 4 or 5). The Primary ITO is the Industry Training Organisation that looks after training for the cheesemaking industry. Otherwise, there are several specialised certificates in cheesemaking and processed cheese. While it can be difficult for inexperienced workers to get into the industry, employment is set to grow over the next few years and job prospects are good. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 0–4 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $67,200.

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Also known as:Car mechanic, diesel mechanic, heavy vehicle technician, light vehicle technician, motor mechanic, motorcycle technician, mechanic. Automotive technicians work with light or heavy vehicles and agricultural machinery, including servicing, dismantling, rebuilding, replacing and repairing their parts and systems. They check vehicles for faults, carry out Warrant of Fitness checks, and modify and upgrade vehicles. To become a qualified automotive technician, it is necessary to complete an apprenticeship in light or heavy vehicle automotive engineering, and gain a New Zealand Certificate in Automotive Engineering – Level 4 or the Heavy Automotive Engineering equivalent. MITO oversees the apprenticeships in this area. For Year 11–13 students interested in pursuing this role, the Ignition and Accelerate StartUp programmes run by MITO are a good way to gain industry experience. Job prospects are quite good, with opportunities particularly good for heavy-vehicle technicians. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 3–4 years. Pay scale: E stimated average income is $49,200.

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Also known as: Reel-fed printer, sheet-fed printer, digital printer. Printers set up and operate printing machines, and prepare, print and bind books, newspapers, magazines and other printed material, such as card, carton, plastics or metal. There are no specific entry requirements. Competenz is the Industry Training Organisation that manages apprenticeships in printing. They offer a New Zealand Certificate in Print (Levels 3 and 4), New Zealand Certificate in Binding and Finishing (Levels 3 and 4) and a National Diploma in Print Industry Management (Level 5). Employment numbers for printers and print finishers has significantly dropped in the last 12 years, and this fall is expected to continue. This trend may make it difficult for new workers to enter the industry. Statistics: Job prospects: Poor. Length of study: 0–4 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $51,400.

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PRINTER AND BOAT BUILDER PRINT FINISHER

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POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

Also known as: Chemistry technician, earth science technician, life science technician, agricultural technician, medical laboratory technician. Science technicians help scientists carry out research, testing and experiments in areas of science. Science technicians usually specialise in a particular area, such as chemistry, earth sciences or life sciences. In terms of qualification requirements when hiring new science technicians, most employers generally require a bachelor’s degree in science or technology, while some require a National Diploma in Science (Level 5 or 6) or a master’s degree. Prospects for science technicians are increasing, as research funding levels increase, particularly in the applied sciences, biological industries, health, environment and high-value manufacturing and services. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 2–5 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $53,200.

H HIG

SCIENCE TECHNICIAN

LENGTH OF STUDY

JOB PROSPECTS

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LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME AVERAGE D GOO

Also known as: Telecommunication technician, communications technician, radio transmission technician. Telecommunications trades workers install, maintain, test and repair electronic communications equipment and systems in telecommunication networks and internet supply systems, and connect equipment to networks. They assist with selecting sites for equipment. To become a telecommunications trades worker you need to complete a telecommunications apprenticeship and gain a National Certificate in Telecommunications (Level 3 or 4). Apprenticeships can be done through the Infrastructure Industry Training Organisation (Connexis) and The Skills Organisation. Job prospects are currently quite good, in part due to the government’s investment in ultra-fast broadband, and growing demand for the services of telecommunications trades workers. Employment in this role has grown over the last 12 years and is projected to continue to grow. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 4 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $58,500. Income is highly variable, and depends on qualifications and specialisation.

H HIG

TELECOMMUNICATIONS TRADES WORKER

LENGTH OF STUDY

POO R

JOBS IN FOCUS

alphabetically, here are a variety of jobs from the manufacturing and technology sector, a knowledge-intensive and high-value area. MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY Listed

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY


LOW

MEDIUM

POO R

AVERAGE

JOB PROSPECTS

45

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

Also known as: Meat retailer, smallgoods manufacturer. Butchers select, cut, prepare and sell meat. They cure and smoke meat, break down and bone carcasses, package meat for display, and sharpen and maintain knives and other butchery equipment. To become a butcher, it is necessary to have a National Certificate in Meat Retail Butchery (available at Levels 2, 3 and 4). This can be achieved by completing an apprenticeship in butchery, which is managed by Competenz. For Year 11 to 13 students, the Gateway programme is a good way to gain industry experience in butchery. NCEA subjects English and Mathematics are recommended. Other useful subjects include Science or Biology and Home Economics. Job prospects are good. There is high demand for butchers and it is relatively easy to find work. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 3–4 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $41,300.

H HIG

BUTCHER

LENGTH OF STUDY

JOB PROSPECTS

LOW

MEDIUM H HIG

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

CHEF

LENGTH OF STUDY

Also known as: Sous chef, head chef, commis chef, chef de partie. Chefs prepare and cook food in a variety of establishments, such as hotels, restaurants, cafés, catering operations/institutions and bars. Most chefs work across all food areas, though some choose to specialise, such as pastry chefs. To become a fully qualified chef, it is necessary to pass a commercial competence assessment and have both the Level 3 and 4 New Zealand Certificate in Cookery. This can be done either with a training provider or as an apprentice in a workplace. Some employers do not take on apprentices but still offer training in the Level 3 or 4 certificates. Job prospects for qualified chefs are quite good, due to a shortage of qualified chefs in New Zealand and increasing tourism. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 2–3 years. Pay scale: Chefs’ incomes vary greatly. Incomes generally range between $32,000 and $65,000.

JOB PROSPECTS

LOW

MEDIUM H HIG

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

CONFERENCE AND EVENT ORGANISER

LENGTH OF STUDY

Also known as: Event manager, conference manager, event co-ordinator, wedding planner. Conference and event organisers plan, coordinate, promote and run events, conferences and functions for a variety of organisations, communities, groups and individuals. To become a conference and event organiser, there are a variety of study and training options, such as a certificate or diploma in event and/or conference management, a degree in management, marketing, tourism and hospitality, communications or media studies, or on-the-job training and study towards a tertiary qualification. Employers also highly value prior experience in running events. Registration with the NZ Association of Event Professionals is useful. Job prospects are good, and opportunities are expected to continue increasing. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $51,250.

JOB PROSPECTS

VARIES

LOW

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

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MEDIUM H HIG

FLIGHT ATTENDANT

LENGTH OF STUDY

Also known as: Cabin crew member, travel attendant. Flight attendants work on passenger aircraft, looking after passengers. Their many duties include operating emergency equipment, assisting people with special needs on board and serving food and drinks. Each airline has its own training programme. Flight attendants usually need to have NCEA Level 3, including English. Fluency in a second language is highly valued. Individual airlines may have differing entry requirements. In New Zealand, it is necessary to have New Zealand residency, be at least 18 years old, have a minimum 18-months of experience in a customer service role, current first aid certificate, current passport without restrictions and pass aviation security clearance checks. There is strong demand for entry-level and experienced flight attendants in Auckland and Christchurch. Statistics: Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 1 year. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $52,500.

JOBS IN FOCUS

INCOME

D GOO

Also known as:Financial planner, financial risk manager, authorised financial adviser, registered financial adviser, qualifying financial entity adviser. Financial advisers provide advice about financial planning, insurance, investing and other financial services and products. Authorised financial advisers are allowed to provide more complex and personalised investment advice. To become an authorised financial adviser, you need to gain the National Certificate in Financial Services – Financial Advice (Level 5) or equivalent qualification, get authorisation to practise from the Financial Markets Authority, join and register with an approved dispute resolution scheme and be registered on the Financial Service Providers Register. Useful NCEA subjects include English, Statistics, Economics and/or Accounting. Job prospects are generally good due to the high demand for financial advice. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 1–3 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income is $95,400.

H HIG

AUTHORISED FINANCIAL ADVISER

SERVICE INDUSTRIES Listed alphabetically, here are a variety of jobs from the service industries sector, a sector that makes up a large proportion of the economy.

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

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LOW

INCOME AVERAGE

POO R

DENTIST

MEDIUM

D GOO

Also known as:Oral medicine specialist, paediatric dentist. Dentists study, diagnose, treat and prevent problems (including diseases and injuries) with the teeth, mouth, gums and jaw. Educating patients on how to avoid oral health problems is also a necessary part of the role. To become a dentist you need to have a Bachelor of Dental Surgery (or recognised overseas equivalent) and be registered with the Dental Council of New Zealand. The University of Otago is the only university in New Zealand that offers a Bachelor of Dental Surgery, entry requirements to this degree are stringent and there are a limited number of places available. The job market for dentists is becoming more competitive, as recently there has been a relative increase in the number of dentists. However, only a limited number of students are accepted to dental school every year. Statistics: Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 5 years. Pay scale: Estimated average income: $71,800.

H HIG

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

Also known as: Chairside dental assistant, dental surgery assistant, orthodontic auxiliary. Dental assistants help dental practitioners and therapists by preparing patients and assisting them in the care of patients. They play an important role in the successful day-to-day running of a dental practice. There are no formal entry requirements to work as a dental assistant. Once employed, dental assistants can complete the Certificate in Dental Assisting offered by the New Zealand Dental Association. At the time of enrolment (and for the duration of the course), you must be employed as a dental assistant by an NZDA Member for a minimum of 20 hours per week. Useful NCEA subjects include Health, Biology, Chemistry, Physics and English. Chances of getting a job as a dental assistant are good due to high turnover. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 0–1 year. Pay scale: Rates of pay range from minimum wage for new workers to $26 per hour for those with five years’ plus experience.

H HIG

DENTAL ASSISTANT

46

JOB PROSPECTS

LOW POO R

AVERAGE

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

ORAL HEALTH THERAPIST

INCOME

H HIG

Also known as: Crown and bridge/prosthodontic hygienist, orthodontic hygienist, periodontal hygienist, community dental therapist, school dental therapist, school dental nurse. Oral health therapists work with clinical guidance from a dentist or periodontist and examine a patient’s mouth, teeth, gums and jaw, take and develop x-rays, whiten teeth and maintain orthodontic appliances. They may also refer patients to dentists, extract first teeth and recognise and treat gum disease. To become an oral health therapist, it is necessary to have either a Bachelor of Oral Health from Otago University or a Bachelor of Health Science in Oral Health from Auckland University of Technology. You also need to be registered with the Dental Council of New Zealand and hold an annual practising certificate. Useful NCEA subjects include Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths and Health Education. Job prospects are good due to growing demand for their services. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: R ates of pay range from $35 per hour for new workers to $60 per hour for those with five years’ plus experience.

MEDIUM

D GOO

Also known as: Clinical dental technician. Dental technicians create and repair devices for the treatment, replacement and protection of damaged, badly positioned or missing teeth. Working from a mould of a patient’s mouth made by a dentist or a clinical dental technician, they custom-make a range of appliances for the mouth, such as dentures, crowns and mouthguards. To become a dental technician, it is necessary to have a Bachelor of Dental Technology from the University of Otago, be registered with the Dental Council of New Zealand and hold an annual practising certificate. Useful NCEA subjects include Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths and Health Education. Chances of getting a job as a dental technician are good due to a shortage of workers. Statistics: Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: New dental technicians earn around $38,000 a year. With two years’ plus experience, $38,000–$48,000. With four or more years’ experience, $48,000–$70,000.

H HIG

DENTAL TECHNICIAN

LENGTH OF STUDY

JOB PROSPECTS

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME AVERAGE D GOO

Also known as: Specialist orthodontist, surgical orthodontist, dental specialist. Orthodontists work in a specialised area of dentistry, where they prevent, diagnose and treat dental and facial irregularities, such as poorly aligned jaws, crooked teeth and malocclusions. To become an orthodontist, it is first necessary to become a dentist. This entails having a Bachelor of Dental Technology from the University of Otago, being registered with the Dental Council of New Zealand and holding an annual practising certificate. It is then required to have two years’ experience as a dentist and demonstrate a high level of continuing education, before applying for entrance to the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry degree, which takes three years to complete. Useful NCEA subjects include Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths and Health Education. Statistics: Job prospects: High. Length of study: 10 years. Pay scale: Estimated annual income is in the range of $110,000–$240,000.

H HIG

ORTHODONTIST

LENGTH OF STUDY

POO R

JOBS IN FOCUS

Listed alphabetically, here are a selection of jobs from within the dental industry; a branch of medicine that SPECIAL FOCUS: DENTAL INDUSTRY focuses on the mouth, teeth, gums and jaw.

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

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Leaving School issue 12  

A free guide to study and career options for high school students Years 11-13.

Leaving School issue 12  

A free guide to study and career options for high school students Years 11-13.