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OLIVE DY ARCHITECTURAL PORTFOLIO


OLIVE DY 李 唯 維

EDUCATION

c: 714.932.5599 e: olivedy@gmail.com a: 413 Arapaho Place, Placentia, CA 92870 w: www.issuu.com/olivedy

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Bachelor of Architecture June, 2011 + Danish Institute for Study Abroad Fall 2008 - Spring 2009 + North China University of Technology Summer, 2008

WORK EXPERIENCE

HCF Architects Intern Winter 2009 + Autocad drawings, assisted living research and English - Chinese translation

J.C Yang Architect and Associates Intern Winter 2010 + Autocad drawings, photoshop renderings, English - Chinese translation, ecotect analysis, competition layouts

AWARDS

FIABCI Prix d’Excellence Award Fulfillment Amphitheatre - J.C Yang Architect and Associates - 1st Place 2011 + Responsible for English - Chinese translation, layout and cover design

American Planning Association Award China Study Aboard Program: Urban Strategies in Historic Beijing Hutongs 2011 + Team project, responsible for residential area design and powerpoint presentation layout

College Dean’s list

ACTIVITIES

Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society American Institute of Architecture Students member ENV Career Day Committee Taiwanese Student Association

LANGUAGES

Native in English, Mandarin Chinese and Taiwanese, both written and spoken

SOFTWARE EXPERIENCE

BIM + 2D Drafting: Archicad, Revit, Autocad Presentation: Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, MS PowerPoint, MS Word 3D Rendering + Modeling: Artlantis, FormZ Sustainable Building Design: Ecotect General: MS Excel


Index Lincoln Park Intergenerational Care Center Krusemyntegade Kulturhuset Hikaru Resident Eagle Mountain Indoor Skatepark Mozart Pavilion Models, Drawings & Sketches


Lincoln Park Intergenerational Care Center A Combined Child And Adult Day Care Facility Intergenerational programs emerged around the 1960’s as a reaction to bridge the increasing generation gap in America. Even since then, there were many different types of programs that were developed. For example, many schools invited seniors to come and teach their students or have joint programs with surrounding senior centers in the neighborhood. Intergenerational care center is basically another type of intergenerational program that emerged along this process. As if now, it is still relatively new in the United State, especially in the West coast, with only 2 existing centers in California. But they are becoming more popular, not only because of the increasing need for day cares for both senior and children, but also because it is proven over and over again that children and seniors benefit from each other through meaningful interaction. On one end, seniors benefit physically, cognitively and emotionally while on the other end, children who interact with seniors on a regular basis are more socially adept and less fearful of old people in general. There are many components to making what is considered a good intergenerational care center, starting out from the most basic component of providing safety and security. But of all the components, programmatically, what is most important is to provide congregation and separation within the same facility. Even though interaction is good, children and seniors are not mixed throughout the entire day of their stay. However, when they are not interacting physically, their opportunity to interaction visually is maximized. In addition, since the center is located in a public park in East Los Angeles, engaging with the nature and people in the park was also factored in during the design process. The main design strategies used to achieve these goals is by using a system of major and minor bays, grid system, designing in section and playing with “Tetris” finding the best way to fit in a variety of spaces into the center. To engage people in the center with people in the park, programmatically a café is placed on the ground floor but the ground is also carved to draw people in. The orientation and façade system – double skin system with operable louvers in front and glass sliding doors behind - of the building was designed to provide ample natural lighting and ventilation throughout the building while allowing flexibility for the users and offering an ever changing façade for the community.


F

G

E

D

C

B

A

1

12 13 14 9 15 8 16 7 17 6 18 5 19 4 20 3 21 2 22

1

11

10

1

1

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

87 9 1 10 0

2

G

F

E

D

C

2

2

1

1

B

2

A

1st Floor Plan G

F

E

D

C

B

A

1

1

13 3 2

2

2nd Floor Plan G

F

E

D

C

B

A

G

F

E

D

C

B

A

1

1

2

2

23 23 G

3rd Floor Plan F

E

D

C

B

Site Plan

1st Floor

2nd Floor

3rd Floor

1. Reception

11. Children Activity Room

20. Children Activity Room

2. Intergenerational

12. 3-Year-Old Room

21. 4-Year-Old Classroom

13. 3-Year-Old Outdoor

22. 4-Year-Old Outdoor

3. Adult Activity Room

14. Toodler Room

23. Of多 ce, Conference Room

4. Quiet Room

15. Toodler Outdoor

24. 5-Year-Old Classroom

5. Adult Outdoors

16. Intergenrational Outdoor

25. 5-Year-Old Outdoor

6. Infant Room

17. Rehabilitation Outdoor

26. Children Cafeteria

7. Staff Cafeteria

18. Adult Cafeteria

27. Children Outdoor Cafeteria

8. Staff Outdoors

19. Adult Outdoor Cafeteria

Multipurpose Room

9. Kitchen 10. Public Cafe

Adult Area

Children Area

A

Intergenerational Area

N


4

1-5 80+ Cafe

4-5 Reception

Section D

Section A

IG t Staff

4-5

IG

IG G

0-1 0 1

Section B

IG G Staff f

Cafe

1-5

Section E

Staff

4-5

IG

1-5

0-1

Section F

Section C

4 80+

S Staff

4

IG G

0-1

5

IG G

5 3 80+ Section 1

1-5 1-2 80+ +

IG

IG

1-5 + 80+ Cafe Section 2


Night Rendering of South Facade


Indoor IG Area

Outdoor IG Area


Entire Model 1/8”=1’-0”

Street View


Lake View

View Into Courtyard


Krusemyntegade Kulturhuset Krusemyntegade Community Center Krusemyntegade Community Center is located in an old residential area in Copenhagen, Denmark. Similar to other old cities, many structures built within the city of Copenhagen are built as infill buildings. As an infill building, the design of this center needs to acknowledge the two adjacent buildings, especially in terms of faรงade design. The drastic height difference of the two adjacent building was made less obvious by stepping the height down gradually, also, heights of each floor and different set backs were designed to match the adjacent building as well. As a community center, programmatically the center is designed with the goal to maximize interaction between people within the center and also neighbors. The spaces are designed to allow people from the outside to see activities inside and people within the building can also see various activities going on within the building. A variety of spaces are provided for families, allowing a wide age group to enjoy the facilities.


A

A

Open to Below

Rock Climbing

A

A

2FL

1FL Site Plan A

A

Open to Below

Rock Climbing

A

Open to Below

Open to Below

A

3FL

A

4FL

A

5FL

North-South Section South Elevation View


Circulation

Roof Terrace

Multipurpose

Sports Cafe

Interior View

Diagrams

South Elevation


Hikaru Resident Getaway House in Mount Baldy The Hikaru Resident is located amidst Mount Baldy in the San Bernardino County of Southern California. Hikaru is a successful Japanese film producer who visits California only occasionally, therefore this house is purposely designed to be as open as possible, allowing Hikaru to enjoy and experience California without filter. The structure was inspired by wine cases. However, rather than sitting each space right on top of the metal structure, each space is suspended by connectors, giving a lighter feel to the overall design. The entire structure is lifted high above ground to allow better view of the stream running right under the house.


1 A9

T.O BEAM +33’-8” 1/2” STEEL ROOF PLANEL 1/2” POLYCARBONATE CEILING PLANE

L

B.O 2ND LEVEL CEILING +32’-2” 1/2” EXTERIOR POLYCARBONATE PLANEL FINISH

3 A9

4” LIGHT GAUGE STEEL CHANNEL STUD

1/2” INTERIOR POLYCARBONATE PLANEL FINISH

POLYCARBONATE TO STEEL CONNECTOR

4” LIGHT GAUGE STEEL RUNNER CHANNEL

T.O 2ND LEVEL FLOOR +23’-8 1/4”

T.O COLUMN +22’-0”

2 A9

8”X8” STEEL COLUMN

BALCONY GLASS PANEL

T.O BACOLNY GLASS PANEL +15’-8 3/8” 1/4” HARDWOOD FLOOR FINISH 3/4” PLYWOOD ALUMINUM MULLION FOAM INSULATION 6” LIGHT GAUGE STEEL CEE JOISTS 2x2 NAILER 3” STEEL CONNECTOR

8”x8” STEEL TUBE BEAM

B.O COLUMN +11’-8”

Key Wall Section

4 A9


ALUMINUM SHEET ROOFING STEEL SQUARE TUBE COLUMN POLYCARBONATE PANEL

WOOD PANEL POLYCARBONATE RAILING

12'-4"

10'-6"

28'-7 1/4"

24'-0"

18'-6 1/4"

11'-8"

STEEL CONNECTOR

STEEL SQUARE TUBE BEAM

10'-6"

WODDEN STAIRS

12'-4"

11'-0"

6'-3 1/4"

POLYCARBONATE PANEL CLEAR

CAISSON

Longitudinal Section

8”

3-1/4” X 3/8” WOOD STRIP FLOORING

BUILDING FELT 3/4” PLYWOOD

7-3/8”

RIGID INSULATION

3”

1/4” STEEL PLATE

1/8” X 6”X 6” STEEL PLATE

2” X 4” STEEL TUBE

1/4” BOLTS WITH WASHER

8”

8” SQUARE TUBE BEAM WITH 3/4” THICKNESS

WELDED MOMENT FRAME

8” SQUARE TUBE COLUMN WITH 3/4” THICKNESS

3 Inch Connector to Floor

Final Presentation Model


Eagle Mountain Indoor Skatepark A Family Oriented Skateboarding Facility Unlike other skateboarding facilities, Eagle Mountain Skatepark is fortunate to have more than enough space to have both an indoor and outdoor skateboarding area. As a family oriented facility, the main goal of this project is to allow a wide range and variety of interaction between the skateboarders and the spectators. This is achieved by designing with the concept of solid versus void. Solid being the programs and void being the skateboarding ramps. Parents that take children to the skatepark who most of the time do not skateboard themselves, can be in the cafĂŠ or mall area and watch their children play while they eat or shop at different areas in the building.


4FL: Mall + Offices

3FL: Ramp Access

2FL: Cafe Area

1FL: Public Services

View From Exterior

3rd Floor Access to Skate Ramp


From Skateboarders’ Point of View

Floor Plans WC

WC

Food Service

Ramp Access

Gift Shop

Kitchen

Ramp Access

Information Booth

Ramp Access

Skateboarders Access Only

Seating

Repair Shop

First Aid

Snack Bar

Skateboarders Access Only Ramp Access

Seating

Ramp Access Kitchen

WC

WC

Snack Bar

Food Service

1FL

First Aid

Ramp Access

3FL WC

WC

Mall

Cafe Bridge

Bridge

Mall

Cafe Cafe

Cafe

Bridge

Offices

2FL

Mall

Bridge

4FL

Mall

WC

WC


Mozart Pavilion A Music Inspired Pavilion A music piece chosen from a given list is translate it into a 2D drawing then 3D model in terms of melody, rhythm, timbre, loudness, pattern and etc. The Ninth Piece – Domine Jesu Christe – in the Requiem by Mozart was chosen for this project. As a choir piece, the different bar widths and density of the 2D drawing indicates each separate parts – soprano, alto, tenor and bass – in the music. Spaces in between indicate silence during the piece, while the overall grey tone in the back represents the orchestra. The 3D model extrudes the essence of the 2D drawing. The design is basically two folding planes interlocking with each other, creating a variety of solid of void spaces as seating area and exhibition spaces.


3D Interpretation of Domine Jesu Christe in The Requiem by Mozart

2D Interpretation of Domine Jesu Christe in The Requiem by Mozart


FInal Presentation Model in Basswood


Models, Drawings & Sketches Models and drawings were created throughout the first three years in the program. All are conceptual models except for one detailed section model. Sketches were drawn during study abroad trips in China (2008) and Denmark (2009), during third and fourth years of the program.


OLIVE DY Bachelor of Architecture, 2011 California State Polytechnic University, Pomona c: 714.932.5599 e: olivedy@gmail.com w: www.issuu.com/olivedy


Olive Dy Architectural Portfolio