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per cent of the urban population are provided with on‐site or community facilities for sanitation; (b) By the year 2000, to have established and applied quantitative and qualitative discharge standards for municipal and industrial effluents; (18.58; Section 2, Chapter 18)

percentage point, from 79% to 80%. About 770 million and 700 million urban people gained access to improved drinking water and sanitation, respectively, during 1990–2004. (WHO, 2006)

Johannesburg Plan of Implementation Access to safe drinking water

The provision of clean drinking water and adequate sanitation is necessary to protect human health and the environment. In this respect, we agree to halve, by the year 2015, the proportion of people who are unable to reach or to afford safe drinking water (as outlined in the Millennium Declaration) and the proportion of people who do not have access to basic sanitation; (Chapter II, 8)

2015

Between 1990 and 2006, the amount of people without improved sanitation decreased by 8 percent. At the current rate, the world will not achieve even half of the sanitation goal. The total population without improved sanitation in 2015 will have decreased 2.4 billion since 1990. The MDG will be missed by over 700 million people. (WHO, 2008)

IWRM

Develop integrated water resources management and water efficiency plans by 2005, with support to developing countries; (Chapter IV, 26)

2005

Countries having IWRM plans have risen from 21% to 38%. The Americas have improved most – from 7% to 43%; the comparable changes for Africa were from 25% to 38% and for Asia from 27% to 33%. 59 % of OECD/European countries have IWRM plans. (UNWATER, 2008)

Halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation (MDGs, 7C)

2015

Unmet Goal for Central Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Oceania. (UN, 2011)

Millennium Declaration Access to safe drinking water

Emerging water challenges at Rio+20 Rio+20 will also address emerging challenges such as the nexus of water-food-security nexus and the human right to water. • The Water-Energy Food Security Nexus: The need to improve water, energy and food security for a growing population augments existing pressures on natural resources. Agricultural production is expected to increase 70 percent and energy production is expected to increase 50

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Rio+20: A Water Guide for Young Water Experts  

Water will be a central component of the Rio discussions due to its role in the green economy. Furthermore, water management structures will...

Rio+20: A Water Guide for Young Water Experts  

Water will be a central component of the Rio discussions due to its role in the green economy. Furthermore, water management structures will...

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