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LUCY’S BRIEF GUIDE TO CREATIONISM AND EVOLUTIONISM By JENNIFER TUCKETT


LUCY’S BRIEF GUIDE TO CREATIONISM AND EVOLUTIONISM

CHARACTERS

LUCY, aged 13 and a half SARAH, Lucy’s mother VARIOUS OTHER CHARACTERS

The various other characters can be played either by two actors or by a greater number of actors.

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LUCY’S BRIEF GUIDE TO CREATIONISM AND EVOLUTIONSISM

Lucy, to the audience. Maybe Lucy is writing or reading from a letter at this point.

LUCY: Dear world famous scientists and creative thinkers,

My name is Lucy. I am 13 years old. And I am writing to you because I hope you will be pleased to hear that I have come up with a solution for the next stage of human beings’ evolution, which I understand that you have been trying to find. And, so, basically, in honour of Charles Darwin’s birthday, I have been doing loads of research and, as a would-be scientist and creative thinker when I grow up (or should I say if I grow up), I have discovered that, basically, the next stage in human being’s evolution is that human beings, basically, have to be ruled by me.

Lucy smiles at the audience, pleased at her discovery. Because, I mean, I know what you’re thinking. That maybe this doesn’t seem like the best celebration of Charles Darwin’s birthday, but that is why I need to tell you about how I have come up with this solution to the next stage of evolution, which began with me realising that, seeing as how both Darwin and God are widely reported to have been men and how only very few women have parts in literature about this subject, then, obviously, I should suggest myself as a suitable candidate to decide the next stage of evolution. I really should.

And, so, following on from this revelation, the next thing that I think you should know is that I have discovered an important secret about why I have come up with this solution which is that – Sarah, Lucy’s mother, enters.

SARAH: What are you doing, Lucy?

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LUCY: I’m writing to the world leaders in science and creative thinking to explain that I have come up with the solution to the next stage in evolution, Mum.

SARAH: I see. And do you think that the world leaders in creative thinking and science are really going to want to hear the opinion of a 13 year old girl who seems slightly deranged at the moment, Lucy –

LUCY: Yes. I do. Because, basically, I think you should know that the world leaders in creative thinking and science seem like a really nice group of people to me –

Maybe Lucy looks at the audience at this moment and grins. LUCY: (continuing) – and, so, that is why I am going to tell them -

Maybe Lucy gestures to the audience again.

LUCY: (continuing) - the secret I have discovered about the next stage in human beings’ evolution. SARAH: Lucy –

LUCY: Because I know that you would be just like what the doubting people said when they described Charles Darwin’s book “The Origin of the Species” as “the law of higgledy-piggledy”. SARAH: Lucy, I don’t think I would describe anything that you have done as the law of higgledy-piggledy –

LUCY: And I know that when the leaders in science and creative thinking read my letter then, just like the knowledgeable people said about “The Origin of the Species”, people will say about me “I expect to think that I would rather be the author of your book than of any other.”

Sarah frowns at this. 4


LUCY: And, so, that is why I think you should know that, just like Charles Darwin said, “I therefore write this in case of my sudden death, as my most solemn and last request, which I am sure you will consider the same as if legally entered in my will, that you will devote £400 to its publication and further will yourself take trouble promoting it”.

Sarah hesitates.

LUCY: Because I think you should know that my solution for the next stage of evolutionism is that women should be responsible for this stage, Mum, and particularly me, because I have worked out that it’s just not fair that both Charles Darwin and God were a man. I really have.

Sarah thinks about this.

SARAH: I see. And, well, then, in that case, I think you should know that maybe I have been thinking along the same lines, Lucy. LUCY: But that’s brilliant, Mum –

SARAH: (cutting her off) And, so, I think you should know that these are the things that I have been meaning to tell you.

Maybe the lights rise on another part of the stage.

SARAH: Because when I look back at my life so far, these are the things that I see. Lucy and Sarah look at Sarah’s parents who have appeared in the other part of the stage.

SARAH: I see my parents, who would always tell me:

DAD: You have to work hard, Sarah. 5


MUM: You have to do the best that you can.

SARAH: To which I would reply.

SARAH: OK, Mum. OK, Dad. I promise to work as hard as I can.

Sarah turns back to Lucy.

SARAH: And, later, I saw how proud my parents were when I did work and I got to university: DAD: We’re so proud of you, Sarah.

MUM: We really are.

SARAH: And then when I got a job how happy they were: DAD: You’re climbing up the ladder, Sarah.

SARAH: I know, Dad. MUM: You’re going to be the best in your profession, Sarah.

SARAH: Thanks, Mum. MUM: Don’t thank me, Sarah. Thank yourself. You have only your own hard work to thank.

SARAH: And, when I was older, I also remember looking at the television or in a magazine and seeing:

NEWSCASTER: And coming up next we have a report on how 20 somethings are having to work harder than ever before. 6


ADVERTISEMENT: This is an advertisement for an exciting new series about a group of 20 somethings who move to the city and fight it out in order to get their dream job – SARAH: And thinking that my mum and dad were right –

DAD: We know we were right, Sarah.

MUM: We really do.

SARAH: And being pleased that they had prepared me so well for life.

But, then, this year, everything suddenly changed. Because when I became sick and people would tell me: FRIEND: You’re going to get better, Sarah.

COLLEAGUE: You just have to put your mind to it.

FRIEND: We live in an advanced age.

SARAH: And the media would tell me: NEWSCASTER: There’s been a breakthrough in a possible cure which will be available in 20 years time – SARAH: And –

COLUMNIST: We are going to bomb the moon. We really are.

SARAH: Then I suddenly knew that all this was wrong.

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Because, when I look at this, and I look at what my parents taught me, all I can think is Why couldn’t they have given me something to believe in?

And what am I meant to believe in now?

And, so, until that day when science is able to give me that thing to believe in, then I think that you don’t need to worry about being in charge of the next stage of human beings’ evolution, Lucy, whether you’re a man or a woman, you really don’t.

Because I just want to believe.

I just want to believe, Lucy.

And I want you to have something to believe in as well.

I really do.

LUCY: I see.

Lucy thinks about this.

LUCY: But thinking that women should be in charge of the next stage of evolution is something to believe in, Mum –

SARAH: I know but Lucy LUCY: Because think of what humans being have made so far –

SARAH: I know but Lucy LUCY: I mean, they have the ability to think –

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SARAH: I know but Lucy -

LUCY: And they made the wheel.

SARAH: I know but Lucy -

LUCY: And aeroplanes.

SARAH: I know but Lucy -

LUCY: And, and brilliant inventions like the hamburger, which we all know has basically changed the world –

SARAH: I know but Lucy LUCY: And, so, I don’t think it’s fair that women weren’t a part of that right from the beginning, Mum. I really don’t.

Lucy looks at her mum. LUCY: And, also, I know you’re sick. But I think you should know that it’s just like what Charles Darwin said.

Maybe Lucy gestures to Charles Darwin in another area of the stage. CHARLES DARWIN: “When we reflect on this struggle, we may console ourselves with the full belief that the war of nature is not incessant, that no fear is felt, that death is generally prompt, and that the vigorous, the healthy and the happy survive and multiply.”

Lucy turns back to her mum. LUCY: And it’s just like what the Church of England said as well: 9


Maybe Lucy gestures to the Church of England in the other part of the stage. CHURCH OF ENGLAND: “Dear Charles Darwin, 200 years ago from your birth, the Church of England owes you an apology for misunderstanding you and, by getting our first reaction wrong, encouraging others to misunderstand you.”

Lucy turns back to her mother.

LUCY: And, so, that is why I want you to know that I am going to go on, Mum.

And I am going to survive and multiply.

And I am going to become a female Charles Darwin. And, then, when I am in charge, Mum, then I won’t let anything happen to you. I swear.

She looks at Sarah expectantly.

SARAH: Ok.

Sarah hesitates. SARAH: But all I’m saying, Lucy, is that what if I’ve discovered that maybe the next stage of evolution isn’t what you’d like it to be?

Maybe Sarah glances towards the grandparents at this point.

Because what if the next stage is for us to go back to something more simple? Maybe Sarah’s parents smile at her at this point.

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And to something like the time when we cared about being good in the past.

Sarah goes over to the grandparents.

And about doing the right thing.

Maybe the grandparents are affectionate, rather than pushy, to Sarah this time.

And about each other.

Sarah turns back to Lucy.

And not about us all constantly hurrying forward and trying to get the next best car or Ipod or something like that. Because, Lucy, I think you should know that, from this position, I’ve realised that maybe the lives that we have in this world aren’t the lives that we’re meant to be living LUCY: (quickly, cutting her off) But that’s not how it has to be, Mum, because I just want to do this for you so that something can evolve from us since our family has gone Sarah’s parents go.

And in case you have gone too.

Sarah prepares to go. She hesitates.

And I know that you would understand that, if you really were here now.

Sarah goes.

I really do. 11


Lucy is left alone. She picks up her pen and paper again.

LUCY: Dear Scientists and Creative Thinkers,

This is the second letter which I have written to you, as my first letter was interrupted, for which I apologise.

Lucy hesitates.

My name is Lucy. I am 13 years old. And I am writing to you because I am looking for the solution to the next stage of our evolution. Because I need to know that there is a next stage, both for my sake, and for my mum’s sake, and for the sake of my grandparents as well. Because it’s just like what my mum said before she left me and this world earlier this year. Because I need something to believe in. And I am hoping that if you can tell me how I can be in charge of helping to shape the next stage of our evolution then I’m hoping that the something to believe in might turn out to be that.

And, so, that is why I would really like it if you would let me get involved.

Because I want to believe that I can contribute to this.

And I want to believe that I can change things.

Because I need to believe that.

I really do.

Yours sincerely and I am looking forward to hearing your thoughts on who is likely to be in control of the next stage of human beings’ evolution,

Your friend and fellow would-be scientist and creative thinker and ruler of the world, 12


Lucy, aged 13 and a half.

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Lucy's Brief Guide to Creationism and Evolutionism - Jennifer Tuckett  

AND JENNIFER TUCKETT LUCY’S BRIEF GUIDE By VARIOUS OTHER CHARACTERS SARAH, Lucy’s mother LUCY, aged 13 and a half The various other characte...

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