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Old L i q u o r s L i f e s t y l e M a g a z i n e | T h e Pa s t & F u t u r e o f L u x u r y Sp i r i t s

Old Liquors M E D IA

KI T

2017

Old Liquors Magazine targets customers via customized magazine covers, tailored to individual Liquor Stores or Brands. Old Liquors Magazine is a quarterly publication that reflects the interests, values, and passions of the Wine, Liqueurs, and Fine and Rare Spirits, Collectors Community.

The Past & Future of Luxury Spirits • OLD LIQUORS & INVESTMENTS • private collections • RARE & LUXURY SPIRITS • FINE WINES • GASTRONOMY • TRAVEL & PLEASURE • ART & PASSION • Collectibles • PEOPLE & BUSINESS • FOOD & BEVERAGE • Watches & Jewelry • ART & CULTURE • TIPS & TRENDS • wannahaves • EXCLUSIVE SHOPPING • MOTORING • GIFT GUIDE • master blenders & distilleries • INTERVIEWS • COLUMNs • Cocktails & Spirits • LuxUry & travel • AUCTIONS & COLLECTING • THE ART OF LIVING • PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE, OLDLIQUORSMAGAZINE.COM.


Reader Profile Old Liquors Magazine

Old Liquors Magazine is a quarterly publication that reflects the interests, values, and passions of the Wine, Liqueurs, and Fine and Rare Spirits, Collectors Community. The magazine intends to be a lifestyle guide to our readers. It offers a global point of view while inspiring them to experience what’s unique, exciting, and extraordinary. Our readers are educated liquor enthusiasts, affluent, and very active online. They are well traveled and are frequent buyers of expensive bottles of fine spirits and wine. They own wine cellars and spirits collections and spend thousands of dollars each month on expanding and maintaining them. They buy direct from their trusted wine and spirits merchants or at auction. They frequently travel for work or leisure and visit producers, getting the story behind the bottle. They are always looking to buy a spectacular bottle or to find more information on an innovative brand. When they encounter an unusual bottle, they buy it. Our readers love to gain knowledge, so when traveling they frequent bars and restaurants that offer extensive wine and spirits lists. They actively engage with sommeliers to learn the latest about the wine trade, cellar masters, winemakers, ingredients, and the art of the craft. Being elite consumers, they can appreciate the heritage, history, and uniqueness of wines and spirits. Our readers have a wide variety of characteristics. They might own private yachts or jets, luxury cars, mansions, horses, art, and jewelry. They share an interest in fashion. They travel the world for business or to go golfing, hunting, sailing, and diving. They have second homes on other continents. They eat in the finest restaurants and sleep in the best hotels. They are very mobile, with personal and executive assistants who are trusted advisors supporting them. Our readers are affluent and are high net-worth individuals. Their income is at least $300,000 annually, and they have a personal net worth of several million U.S. dollars.

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Publication Details & Distribution Published four times a year Available for free. Placed in liquor stores, bars, hotel suites, public areas, and selected restaurant lounges (and advertisers). Old Liquors Magazine | Spring Edition Available from mid-March Old Liquors Magazine | Summer Edition Available from mid-June Old Liquors Magazine | Autumn Edition Available from mid-September Old Liquors Magazine | Winter Edition Available from mid-December

Distribution New York

- 20,000 copies

Chicago

- 15,000 copies

Washington D.C.

- 10,000 copies

Los Angeles

- 15,000 copies

Las Vegas

- 10,000 copies

Other U.S.

- 20,000 copies

Total 90,000 copies

Old Liquors | MEDIA KIT

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In Every Issue BES T D I NI NG I N S PA I N | EL CELLA R D E C A N R OC A

Wine & Dine

BES T D I NI NG I N S PA I N | EL CELLA R D E C A N R OC A

Best dining in Spain: Girona,

El Celler de Can Roca Many people, especially a foodie like myself, can appreciate a unique dining experience. One where not only the food “but also the wine, service, and ambiance” are each as exceptional as the other.

As a chef and graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, I’ve

The three brothers Josep, Joan, and Jordi Roca are the owners.

been educated and trained by the industry’s best. In my years of experience, I’ve learned the details, the techniques, and the

Each has individually earned an impressive reputation in the restaurant business, and they have come together to create

difficulties of creating each dish. But above all, I’ve learned the

what many consider the best dining experience in the world.

flavors! As I was traveling through Spain this past year, I was

Mentioned several times in the Michelin Guide, El Celler de

lucky enough to discover one of the finest restaurants I’ve ever visited. An establishment that delivers all the essential

Can Roca was ranked first in the annual “World’s 50 Best Restaurants” list by Restaurant Magazine in 2013 and 2015 (and

elements for an exceptional dining experience: food, service,

was named fifth best in 2009, fourth best in 2010, and second

decor, wine, and creativity. Welcome to El Celler de Can Roca in

best in both 2011 and 2012). The same magazine in 2014 also

Girona, Catalonia, Spain!

named Jordi Roca the World’s Best Pastry Chef.

They have come together to create what many consider the best dining experience in the world

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From the latest news on rare and collectible spirits, to the craft behind distilling, bartending, and cooking the finest cuisine, the focus is on items that stand out in a global marketplace.

L IF EST YL E & FA SHION | LU X ERY T IM EPIEC ES

Lifestyle & Fashion

Audemars Piguet Watches The Height of Luxury Timepieces Forbes, CNN, ABC, and The Watch Book have all listed Audemars Piguet (AP) as one of the very best luxury watch brands in the world. This is a brand that doesn’t quite have the commercial reach of Rolex or Tag, but it is a brand that is revered in certain circles and practically worshiped by horologists. Classified as an “ultra-luxury” brand, Audemars Piguet is a step above the brands you thought were the most prestigious and sought-after. It is an exclusive, upmarket brand that is relatively unknown to the general public but has a history and a status that many of its competitors can only dream of. What is Audemars Piguet? All Audemars Piguet watches are made in the Le Brassus region, described on the AP website as “a region that beats to the tune of complicated watch mechanisms.” These watches are individual works of art, as Audemars Piguet employs true master craftspeople. This has been the company’s passion for over 140 years, and all of that experience, that skill, and that history can be found in every single AP timepiece.

Audemars Piguet Jules Audemars Equation du Temps

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Men’s and women’s fashion, grooming, and lifestyle news and reviews. Reports on top luxury brands from around the world.

OLD LIQUORS | AUTUMN EDITION 2017

Travel & Pleasure

A S COT LA ND D I S T I LLERY TOUR BY CLA S S I C C A R

A Scotland Distillery Tour by Classic Car For many whiskey tourists, spending a week or more traversing the Scottish countryside and visiting their favorite distilleries is a dream vacation. There’s an endless array of fantastic food and delicious drams to enjoy, picturesque routes to navigate, ancient sites to explore, and a plethora of additional activities and diversions.

Advice for sophisticated travelers craving news and information about the most exciting places in the world. In-depth features on destinations both major and under the radar. 50

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Interiors & Architecture

T HE F LAT I R ON R OOM | F I NE & R A R E

“Knowledge-Based Hospitality” It’s one thing to offer premium spirits to guests. It’s another thing to be able to guide them through a list and offer a recommendation, providing informative, hands-on service. It’s what Tardie refers to as, “knowledge-based hospitality,” and it’s central to his approach at Fine & Rare.

The staff throughout the night will climb up the ladders, slide them back and forth to get access to the bottles, so it’s part of the theater

A World of the Fine & Rare in New York By Jake Emen

Tommy Tardie is no stranger to premium spirits, or to operating world-class bars dedicated to them. As owner of The Flatiron Room in New York City and its 1,200+ bottles of whiskey, he’s also had a front row view of the massive influx in popularity for all things whiskey-related. For his latest venture though, Fine & Rare, he felt it was time for a slight change. “The concept of The Flatiron Room was very whiskey focused,” said Tardie during a recent visit to the new bar, on East 37th Street, which opened in January. “Here, we wanted to depart a little bit. Whiskey is still in my blood but I wanted to go outside that and start tapping into agave spirits, rums, and brandies.”

“Lots of people are getting into the numbers game [in terms of their whiskey lists] but what’s more important to me is not having those numbers, but having a staff that can represent those numbers,” says Tardie. “Having a staff that can confidently walk you through a list and have solid, fact-based opinions. That’s more important, and for this place it’s more about that.” But how many whiskeys does he have on the list? “To be honest I don’t even know,” says Tardie, true to his above-stated credo. He does plan to add more whiskeys in the months ahead but didn’t want to overwhelm his staff as the bar first opened. “It’s more challenging here because it’s not just whiskey, we have the whole agave side and all of the other spirits,” says Tardie. “Staff education is super important, they have to go through a pretty rigorous training program just to get on the floor. We can’t have all this stuff and not represent it well.” Fine & Rare still showcases hundreds of whiskeys representing a broad spectrum of styles and price points in addition to the large assortment of Mezcals, Tequilas, Rums, Cognacs, and other brandies. It’s more of an egalitarian approach to imbibing— there’s a spirit for everyone, and all tastes are welcome. “It’s exciting for me too because I love whiskey but it’s great to learn,” says Tardie. He and his team have taken several trips to Mexico in the name of field research, purchasing a private cask of Tequila Herradura on one occasion, and stopping it at a half dozen tequila distilleries on another.

The best from interior designers, architects, landscape gardeners, and other design pros, featuring groundbreaking projects and innovative new products.

For those looking to partake in their own education, one place to start is with their lineup of flights. Six spirits are brought to the table in a handheld carrying case that resembles a large wooden six-pack holder, along with pre-printed guide sheets. “It’s all theatrics,” says Tardie.

Their bottles stashed and only accessible via ladders

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A R T & PA S S I ON | WA LLACE CHA N

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Art & Passion

A R T & PA S S I ON | WA LLACE CHA N

Wallace Chan

Join artists from around the world for deep explorations of how the arts can spark a passion for beauty, learning, and collecting. Stories about people, places, and cultural events shaping our world.

Hong Kong-based Wallace Chan is one of the most gifted designers of his generation.

His work has featured in exclusive art fairs and exhibitions around the world, selling for tens of millions of dollars. In 1987, Chan created the “Wallace Cut,” a technique that involves carving intricate designs into gemstones. This technique has featured prominently in Chan’s work since then, earning him countless accolades and guaranteeing a place in the annals of art history. In March 2017, Chan will be showing his creations at Maastricht TEFAF for the second time. He will be one of the biggest artists featuring at this prestigious art fair, and we have managed to secure an exclusive interview with him before he prepares his final showcase.

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LUX ERY & T R AV EL | F R AC T I ONA L OW NER S HI P

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Financial & Legal

LUX ERY & T R AV EL | F R AC T I ONA L OW NER S HI P

Fractional Ownership vs

If you have the money and you fly over 250 hours a year, then a private jet is something you need to consider

Buying a Private Jet There is no denying the comfort and the accessibility provided by a private jet. Air travel is something that most of us dread, however, something that is often essential. When you factor in the time at the check-in desk, the time spent waiting around at customs and immigration control, plus waiting for your bags and waiting for delays; it’s a nightmare that can sap hours from your working day or your holiday. Private jets can reduce that wasted time, making everything quicker, easier, and considerably more comfortable. What are the Benefits of a Private Jet? On average, private jets can land at ten times as many airports as commercial airliners. As a result, there’s no need to land at an airport that is miles away from your destination—no one wants to have to worry about taxis, trains, or car rentals after spending hours cramped into a tight, uncomfortable seat. With private jets, you don’t even need to worry about cramped seats because you have the entire plane to yourself. You can sit, lie down, and even go for a walk if you want to. It’s your plane so you can do whatever you want. Furthermore, if you have a private jet, you can reduce the time spent on security and immigration, with the average wait being just 5 minutes. You have more privacy and more safety. Simply put, a private jet turns a situation that none of usare happy with into one that we all enjoy. If you have the money and you fly over

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250 hours a year, then a private jet is something you need to consider. If money is little tight and you’re wondering whether it’s worth stretching your budget that far just for the sake of comfort, speed, and accessibility, then there might be a better way: fractional ownership. It is not for everyone, however, if you travel about 25 hours a year, fractional ownership is feasible, and there are almost as many positives to fractional ownership as there are to owning a private jet outright.

What is Fractional Ownership? As the name suggests, fractional ownership essentially allows you to purchase a share in a private jet. Fractional ownership first came onto the market in 1986 when it was announced by NetJets, who remain the dominant players in this industry. It allows you to pay a smaller fee while still getting many of the benefits. You can change your flight at the last minute, you can request specific catering preferences, and you can even apply for a different plane.

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Reporting on the best financial, legal, and insurance services for high net-worth individuals, their families, and their private and business properties. This section also reports on auction results from around the world.

The Past & Future of Luxury Spirits • OLD LIQUORS & INVESTMENTS • private collections • RARE & LUXURY SPIRITS • FINE WINES • GASTRONOMY • TRAVEL & PLEASURE • ART & PASSION • Collectibles • PEOPLE & BUSINESS • FOOD & BEVERAGE • Watches & Jewelry • ART & CULTURE • TIPS & TRENDS • wannahaves • EXCLUSIVE SHOPPING • MOTORING • GIFT GUIDE • master blenders & distilleries • INTERVIEWS • COLUMNs • Cocktails & Spirits • LuxUry & travel • AUCTIONS & COLLECTING • THE ART OF LIVING.

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Old Liquors | M E D IA KI T


Customized Covers Old Liquors Magazine targets customers via customized magazine covers, tailored to individual liquor stores or brands. Customized covers, a unique six-page cover article, and double-page ad spread are included in each fully custom-made edition.

O L D L I Q U O R S L I F E S T Y L E M A G A Z I N E | T H E PA S T & F U T U R E O F L U X U R Y S P I R I T S

Old Liquors SPECIAL EDITION 2017

C The Nose Knows Dalmore’s Master Distiller Richard Paterson R A R E & LU X U R Y S P I R I T S | F I N E W I N E S | G A S T R O N O M Y | A R T O F L I V I N G | AU C T I O N S & C O L L E C T I N G

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A personalized communications approach boosts reader engagement and enables highly targeted advertising, thus delivering better responses. The over 140-page magazine is customized with a different cover, cover article, and double-page spread for each liquor store or brand making it relevant and attractive to local audiences. Optional AD

• A total print run of 90,000 copies can have up to 900 different magazine covers, cover articles, and double page spreads. • Store owners and brands have the opportunity in each edition, to be featured on the cover and cover article. • Each edition offers the opportunity to use precision marketing to target audiences. • Localized marketing efforts at the lowest cost per reach and cost per person impacted. • A closer engagement increases sales.

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Global Rates NATIONAL PROMOTION

National Print Run

Full Page

$12,000

Full Page Opposite content

$15,000

Outside Back Cover

$18,000

Double-Page Spread

$20,000

Double-Page Spread Front Half

$22,000

Double-Page Spread Pre TOC

$24,000

Double-Page Spread Inside Front Cover

$26,000

Double-Page Spread Inside Back Cover

$24,000

4-Page Advertorial (Inclusive Interview + Photography)

$24,000

LOCAL PROMOTION PACK

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Old Liquors | M E D IA KI T

Local Print Run

Front Cover Local (per 500 copies)

$2,000

6-Page Advertorial (per 500 copies)

$2,000


Commercial Offering LOCAL PROMOTION PACK Old Liquors Magazine offers a local promotion pack to retail store owners ( consisting of a front cover and a five- to six-page feature article ), free of charge. A localized magazine provides a more efficient, relevant circulation. Store owners now have the opportunity to use precision marketing to target audiences, narrowing in on a more precise audience. Localized marketing efforts will ensure the lowest cost per reach and cost per person impacted. T H E NOS E KNOWS | R I C H A R D PAT E R S ON

The Nose Knows Dalmore’s Master Distiller Richard Paterson If you’ve ever had the privilege to talk shop with Dalmore’s Master Distiller Richard Paterson, you’ve likely heard him repeat a quip by Scottish writer Compton Mackenzie that scotch whiskey makes the world “go round twice as fast.”

“Scotch whiskey makes the world “go round twice as fast” The quote holds truer than ever for Paterson, now 50 years into his iconic career in the whiskey business. It’s as if the five decades have flown by for the third-generation whiskey blender, from his first sip as a kid to his current world tour spreading the gospel of whiskey and pedaling Dalmore 50. A luxurious, limited-edition single malt whiskey, Dalmore 50 was released in September 2016 to honor Paterson’s anniversary. Aged in American white oak, Matusalem Oloroso Sherry casks from the González Byass Bodega, and Colheita Port pipes from Portugal, and finished in Henri Giraud Champagne casks, each

crystal decanter containing Dalmore 50-year-old will be handfilled to order and sold in a presentation case with a solid silver stag for £50,000 (about $64,000). Paterson is well-known and loved in the whiskey world for his unparalleled passion and unconventional wisdom. (Have you ever seen him toss whiskey on the floor during a presentation?) Then there’s his £1.5 million nose, once insured to protect the value of his legendary nosing skills. His nickname, after all, is The Nose.

Have you ever seen him toss whiskey on the floor during a presentation?

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THE N O SE KN O WS | RIC HARD PATERSO N

Old Liquors Magazine sat down one-on-one with Paterson in early April during the 2017 Universal Whisky Experience at the Wynn Las Vegas and Encore. A charming, gracious, and truly genuine chap, he discussed his illustrious career, his noteworthy nose, and the celebratory Dalmore 50.

You’ve had many accomplishments over the past five decades. Of which are you most proud? The ones that involve the Dalmore single Highlands malt. We produced the Dalmore 62-year-old, the 64-year-old — these are very rare expressions. For instance, the 64-year-old, there’s only three bottles and they go back to 1868, 1878, 1926, 1939. These three bottles, in fact — two are in America, one is in London — they haven’t been actually opened. But they are really rare gems from our portfolio and our portfolio has many aged Dalmores. It really is to show you what can happen to a great whiskey, providing you look at it.

that the 70s and the 80s, especially in the 90s, people really began to see what single malt whiskey was all about. You must never forget that malt whiskey only accounts for about 10 percent of the market. The other 90 percent is still from blended whiskies. Dalmore comes from one distillery, and one distillery only, like a Chateau Bordeaux wine. That’s what makes it unique. But what also makes it unique is making it change over that period. You can have the 12-, the 15-, the 18-yearold, but what we’re now finding, because of all these whiskey festivals, in particular this one, the consumer is becoming more discerning, and what I must do is make sure we excite our consumer.

“But what also makes it unique is making it change over that period”

Are you concerned at all that the global rise of whiskey brands has flattened the sales of Scotch whiskies? I have to say, you know, back in the ‘80s, the ‘90s, cognacs were rising and I think we became a little bit complacent. We must be aware of the Canadian whiskies, the Irish whiskies, and the Japanese whiskies, but we must make sure that we are leaders in that field. Scotch whiskey still represents around about 51 percent of the spirit market, but we must get our products right. We must get the quality right. We must get the packaging right. That’s so important. I’ve always been a great believer that if you’ve got something that’s wonderful to sell, well make sure it’s encased in the finest packaging. That will draw in the consumer and they will buy it.

How did Dalmore come about? The company had purchased Dalmore Distillery way back in 1960 and when we actually started looking at the different expressions, what we wanted to do, we found that after 1960,

“My father more than anything was the one that influenced me” Who were some of your teachers and mentors over the course of your 50-year career? My father more than anything was the one that influenced me. And when I was 8 years old, he did take me to his warehouses in Glasgow. It would be an experience I would never forget. He took my brother and me to the heart of the Glasgow and he took a big bunch of keys out, and he unlocked these huge

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doors of the warehouse, and he pulled them open, and we stepped into his world for the very first time. The first thing we noticed was the smell, the fumes engulfing our nostrils, and we said, “What the heck’s going on here?” We could see the silhouette of the casks in the background, but it wasn’t really of any interest to us. So we started fooling around. That annoyed my father, so much so that he … went into the cask and he poured me a large glass of whiskey and he said, “Richard, ok you think it’s funny, why don’t you tell me something about the whiskey?”

said, “You’re being silly, you’re being stupid, what I want you to do is to hold the whiskey in the back, hold it down at the bottom, swirl it around bring it up and say, hello, and then go back to it and say, how are you? Are you as heavy as your grandfather or are you perhaps as light as your mother? Or perhaps are you as sweet as your chocolate bar. Or are you dry as the dust on the floor?” So from inherent beginnings, I could see it was heavy and grumpy like my grandfather, but it had a certain sweetness, and this was something that captured my imagination. It brought something into me and I thought this is something I want to be part of my life.

“I took it in my hand and I said, “I don’t know what you mean dad” and that’s when he hit me in the back of the head”

Your brother didn’t follow the whiskey path? No, he decided to go into the Navy and then he became a social worker. I suppose I create the drinks and he, maybe, socially looks after them.

I took it in my hand and I said, “I don’t know what you mean dad” and that’s when he hit me in the back of the head. He

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He probably needs it as a social worker. Yes (laughing).

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THE N OS E KN OWS | R ICHAR D PATER S ON

How did your nickname, “The Nose,” come about? That came about quite a number of years ago because when

a softness, a finesse, an elegance … and it’s very tender, it’s very, very beautiful, but what’s more important, it’s not woody,

I started blending I used to nose two-three-four-500 casks per day, and everybody used to say “here’s the nose arriving,”

because if you’d been in prison for 50 years, you’d be pretty effected by the prison. Well, this is now refreshed with the port,

and for some reason, it just stuck with me. As you can see, I’ve got quite a big nose because my great, great grandfather was Cyrano de Bergerac himself. But nevertheless, it is important.

with the sherry … the champagne. So it is really unique in that way and that’s why 50 bottles, in my mind, done. Beautiful in every way.

A lot of people never manipulate their nose. What you must do is swirl the whiskey around, put it from one nostril to the other, and stop where you think you can actually achieve what you’re looking for … you must make full use of it, the nose … It will tell you 96 percent of what you need to know about

Did you know it would be a 50-year process? No, no. I just knew really around the ‘80s and ‘90s that we were holding a lot of old stocks and we had to be very careful how we kept them, how we looked after them. But having said that,

the whiskey. Only when you’re not satisfied will you put it in your mouth, hold it, and just see what the rest is going to say to you. It’s not just nosing the whiskey for me, but it’s like, if

it’s only in the last 15 years that the market has said we want these whiskeys.

you don’t mind me saying to you, when I walk in the room, I smell everything, I smell you. I smell what’s going on here.

We know that they’re going to become rare. We’re not going to possibly see some of them ever again. Like the Dalmore

You just become sensitive to these things. Before you open the curtains, can you see is it a dry day? Is it a wet day or what? These are things you just become conscious of, you know? “My

64-year-old, that will never be seen again, and that style. They take years to put together before we finally put them in the bottle. “Time is my master”

great, great grandfather was Cyrano de Bergerac himself” Will someone without your nosing skills be able to detect a relatively light spirit such as the champagne over the sherry, port, and peat in the Dalmore 50? When you really nose the 50-year-old, you will see all these notes, but towards the end you will just detect a little hint,

You must have so much patience... Well, you need patience, and that’s actually a really good way of putting it. Time is my master. Time is what is needed to manipulate the whiskies, and that’s why I do get pretty angry when I see somebody picking up a glass and then just knocking it back. What I want you to do with the 50-year-old or even the 35-year-old, I want you to put it … underneath your tongue, back in the middle, and you must keep it in your mouth for at least 30 seconds before you swallow it, and even when you swallow it, you must wait ‘til it comes up and then see what’s really inside, the actual soul of the single malt. It’s like opening a box of chocolates, seeing all the different centers, the different flavors. That’s how it should be seen on the tongue. But again, we come back to time. You cannot hurry all these whiskies. Over the years, I’ve gone into the warehouse. It’s been very cold. I smell the whiskey and I say, “Eh, she’s not right, she’s asleep. We need to get her a new dress, we need to leave her,” and then you think, “How long will it take? Will it take two-three years?” And then I go back and say “Nah, she’s not quite right.” And then when I go back the next year … I suddenly say, “Oh, hello, she’s just beginning

O L D L I Q U O R S L I F E S T Y L E M A G A Z I N E | T H E PA S T & F U T U R E O F L U X U R Y S P I R I T S

Old Liquors SPECIAL EDITION 2017

to turn,” and it’s so invigorating, so enthralling that you can see the change and that change has taken place because you’ve

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given her that new dress or a new suit or a new tie, what have you. It’s managed to stimulate her, and she can really show her true beauty.

“You know, it’s the same with the whiskey. When everything comes together, it is quite enthralling” Do you typically describe whiskey with female qualities? Yeah, I quite often come back to female. Normally, when I see a whiskey that I love I call it a baby, and I say “This is a real beautiful baby, but she …” and then I refer to it as a woman. I just love to see, you know, somebody dressed and then suddenly really dressed and it comes away and you say “Look, isn’t she gorgeous? She’s got a new dress. That dress really suits you, darling.”You know, it’s the same with the whiskey. When everything comes together, it is quite enthralling.

The Nose Knows Dalmore’s Master Distiller Richard Paterson R A R E & LU X U R Y S P I R I T S | F I N E W I N E S | G A S T R O N O M Y | A R T O F L I V I N G | AU C T I O N S & C O L L E C T I N G

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Optional AD

Old Liquors | MEDIA KIT

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4-Page Advertorial NATIONAL PROMOTION Article + Photography If you are looking at getting your brand featured in Old Liquors Magazine then an advertorial offers a superb opportunity. Place your brand directly into the hands of tens of thousands of consumers each quarter. Old Liquors Magazine offers a national advertorial consisting of a four-page feature article plus optional display advertisement.

THE NO SE KNOWS | R I C H A R D PAT E R S ON

The Nose Knows Dalmore’s Master Distiller Richard Paterson

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If you’ve ever had the privilege to talk shop with Dalmore’s Master Distiller Richard Paterson, you’ve likely heard him repeat a quip by Scottish writer Compton Mackenzie that scotch whiskey makes the world “go round twice as fast.”

“Scotch whiskey makes the world “go round twice as fast” The quote holds truer than ever for Paterson, now 50 years into his iconic career in the whiskey business. It’s as if the five decades have flown by for the third-generation whiskey blender, from his first sip as a kid to his current world tour spreading the gospel of whiskey and pedaling Dalmore 50. A luxurious, limited-edition single malt whiskey, Dalmore 50 was released in September 2016 to honor Paterson’s anniversary. Aged in American white oak, Matusalem Oloroso Sherry casks from the González Byass Bodega, and Colheita Port pipes from Portugal, and finished in Henri Giraud Champagne casks, each

crystal decanter containing Dalmore 50-year-old will be handfilled to order and sold in a presentation case with a solid silver stag for £50,000 (about $64,000). Paterson is well-known and loved in the whiskey world for his unparalleled passion and unconventional wisdom. (Have you ever seen him toss whiskey on the floor during a presentation?) Then there’s his £1.5 million nose, once insured to protect the value of his legendary nosing skills. His nickname, after all, is The Nose.

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Have you ever seen him toss whiskey on the floor during a presentation?

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T HE NOSE KN O WS | RIC HARD PATERSO N

Old Liquors Magazine sat down one-on-one with Paterson in early April during the 2017 Universal Whisky Experience at the Wynn Las Vegas and Encore. A charming, gracious, and truly genuine chap, he discussed his illustrious career, his noteworthy nose, and the celebratory Dalmore 50.

You’ve had many accomplishments over the past five decades. Of which are you most proud? The ones that involve the Dalmore single Highlands malt. We produced the Dalmore 62-year-old, the 64-year-old — these are very rare expressions. For instance, the 64-year-old, there’s only three bottles and they go back to 1868, 1878, 1926, 1939. These three bottles, in fact — two are in America, one is in London — they haven’t been actually opened. But they are really rare gems from our portfolio and our portfolio has many aged Dalmores. It really is to show you what can happen to a great whiskey, providing you look at it.

that the 70s and the 80s, especially in the 90s, people really began to see what single malt whiskey was all about. You must never forget that malt whiskey only accounts for about 10 percent of the market. The other 90 percent is still from blended whiskies. Dalmore comes from one distillery, and one distillery only, like a Chateau Bordeaux wine. That’s what makes it unique. But what also makes it unique is making it change over that period. You can have the 12-, the 15-, the 18-yearold, but what we’re now finding, because of all these whiskey festivals, in particular this one, the consumer is becoming more discerning, and what I must do is make sure we excite our consumer.

“But what also makes it unique is making it change over that period”

Are you concerned at all that the global rise of whiskey brands has flattened the sales of Scotch whiskies? I have to say, you know, back in the ‘80s, the ‘90s, cognacs were rising and I think we became a little bit complacent. We must be aware of the Canadian whiskies, the Irish whiskies, and the Japanese whiskies, but we must make sure that we are leaders in that field. Scotch whiskey still represents around about 51 percent of the spirit market, but we must get our products right. We must get the quality right. We must get the packaging right. That’s so important. I’ve always been a great believer that if you’ve got something that’s wonderful to sell, well make sure it’s encased in the finest packaging. That will draw in the consumer and they will buy it.

How did Dalmore come about? The company had purchased Dalmore Distillery way back in 1960 and when we actually started looking at the different expressions, what we wanted to do, we found that after 1960,

“My father more than anything was the one that influenced me” Who were some of your teachers and mentors over the course of your 50-year career? My father more than anything was the one that influenced me. And when I was 8 years old, he did take me to his warehouses in Glasgow. It would be an experience I would never forget. He took my brother and me to the heart of the Glasgow and he took a big bunch of keys out, and he unlocked these huge

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doors of the warehouse, and he pulled them open, and we stepped into his world for the very first time. The first thing we noticed was the smell, the fumes engulfing our nostrils, and we said, “What the heck’s going on here?” We could see the silhouette of the casks in the background, but it wasn’t really of any interest to us. So we started fooling around. That annoyed my father, so much so that he … went into the cask and he poured me a large glass of whiskey and he said, “Richard, ok you think it’s funny, why don’t you tell me something about the whiskey?”

said, “You’re being silly, you’re being stupid, what I want you to do is to hold the whiskey in the back, hold it down at the bottom, swirl it around bring it up and say, hello, and then go back to it and say, how are you? Are you as heavy as your grandfather or are you perhaps as light as your mother? Or perhaps are you as sweet as your chocolate bar. Or are you dry as the dust on the floor?” So from inherent beginnings, I could see it was heavy and grumpy like my grandfather, but it had a certain sweetness, and this was something that captured my imagination. It brought something into me and I thought this is something I want to be part of my life.

“I took it in my hand and I said, “I don’t know what you mean dad” and that’s when he hit me in the back of the head”

Your brother didn’t follow the whiskey path? No, he decided to go into the Navy and then he became a social worker. I suppose I create the drinks and he, maybe, socially looks after them.

I took it in my hand and I said, “I don’t know what you mean dad” and that’s when he hit me in the back of the head. He

He probably needs it as a social worker. Yes (laughing).

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CChhap apter te r MaGaZIN MaGaZINee || D Des esCCrI r Ipt p tIoN IoN

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L I FE S T YL E & FAS HI ON | LUXE RY T I M E P I E C E S

T H E N O S E K N O W S | R I C H A R D PAT E R S O N

Audemars Piguet Watches

The Nose Knows Dalmore’s Master Distiller Richard Paterson

The Height of Luxury Timepieces

If you’ve ever had the privilege to talk shop with Dalmore’s Master Distiller Richard Paterson, you’ve likely heard him repeat a quip by Scottish writer Compton Mackenzie that scotch whiskey makes the world “go round twice as fast.”

Forbes, CNN, ABC, and The Watch Book have all listed Audemars Piguet (AP) as one of the very best luxury watch brands in the world. This is a brand that doesn’t quite have the commercial reach of Rolex or Tag, but it is a brand that is revered in certain circles and practically worshiped by horologists. Classified as an “ultra-luxury” brand, Audemars Piguet is a step above the brands you thought were the most prestigious and sought-after. It is an exclusive, upmarket brand that is relatively unknown to the general public but has a history and a status that many of its competitors can only dream of.

“Scotch whiskey makes the world “go round twice as fast”

What is Audemars Piguet? All Audemars Piguet watches are made in the Le Brassus region, described on the AP website as “a region that beats to the tune of complicated watch mechanisms.” These watches are individual works of art, as Audemars Piguet employs true master craftspeople. This has been the company’s passion for over 140 years, and all

The quote holds truer than ever for Paterson, now 50 years

crystal decanter containing Dalmore 50-year-old will be hand-

into his iconic career in the whiskey business. It’s as if the five decades have flown by for the third-generation whiskey

filled to order and sold in a presentation case with a solid silver stag for £50,000 (about $64,000).

of that experience, that skill, and that history can be found in every single AP timepiece.

blender, from his first sip as a kid to his current world tour spreading the gospel of whiskey and pedaling Dalmore 50. A luxurious, limited-edition single malt whiskey, Dalmore 50 was

Paterson is well-known and loved in the whiskey world for his unparalleled passion and unconventional wisdom. (Have you

released in September 2016 to honor Paterson’s anniversary.

ever seen him toss whiskey on the floor during a presentation?)

Aged in American white oak, Matusalem Oloroso Sherry casks from the González Byass Bodega, and Colheita Port pipes from

Then there’s his £1.5 million nose, once insured to protect the value of his legendary nosing skills. His nickname, after all, is

Portugal, and finished in Henri Giraud Champagne casks, each

The Nose. Audemars Piguet Jules Audemars Equation du Temps

Have you ever seen him toss whiskey on the floor during a presentation?

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OLD LIQUORS | AUTUMN EDITION 2017

BEST DINING IN SPAIN | EL CELLAR DE C AN R OC A

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A R T & PA S S I O N | WA LLAC E C H A N

B E S T D I NI NG I N S PA I N | E L C E LLA R D E C A N R O C A

Best dining in Spain: Girona,

A R T & PA SSI ON | WA L L AC E C H A N

Wallace Chan

El Celler de Can Roca

Hong Kong-based Wallace Chan is one of the most gifted designers of his generation.

Many people, especially a foodie like myself, can appreciate a unique dining experience. One where not only the food “but also the wine, service, and ambiance” are each as exceptional as the other.

As a chef and graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, I’ve been educated and trained by the industry’s best. In my years of experience, I’ve learned the details, the techniques, and the difficulties of creating each dish. But above all, I’ve learned the flavors! As I was traveling through Spain this past year, I was lucky enough to discover one of the finest restaurants I’ve ever visited. An establishment that delivers all the essential elements for an exceptional dining experience: food, service, decor, wine, and creativity. Welcome to El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, Catalonia, Spain!

The three brothers Josep, Joan, and Jordi Roca are the owners. Each has individually earned an impressive reputation in the restaurant business, and they have come together to create what many consider the best dining experience in the world. Mentioned several times in the Michelin Guide, El Celler de Can Roca was ranked first in the annual “World’s 50 Best Restaurants” list by Restaurant Magazine in 2013 and 2015 (and was named fifth best in 2009, fourth best in 2010, and second best in both 2011 and 2012). The same magazine in 2014 also named Jordi Roca the World’s Best Pastry Chef.

His work has featured in exclusive art fairs and exhibitions around the world, selling for tens of millions of dollars. In 1987, Chan created the “Wallace Cut,” a technique that involves carving intricate designs into gemstones. This technique has featured prominently in Chan’s work since then, earning him countless accolades and guaranteeing a place in the annals of art history. In March 2017, Chan will be showing his creations at Maastricht TEFAF for the second time. He will be one of the biggest artists featuring at this prestigious art fair, and we have managed to secure an exclusive interview with him before he prepares his final showcase.

They have come together to create what many consider the best dining experience in the world

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LU XE RY & T R AV E L | F R AC T I O NA L O W NE R S H I P

A S COT LA ND D I S T I LLE RY TO U R BY C LA S S I C C A R

A Scotland Distillery Tour

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Fractional Ownership vs

If you have the money and you fly over 250 hours a year, then a private jet is something you need to consider

Buying a Private Jet

by Classic Car For many whiskey tourists, spending a week or more traversing the Scottish countryside and visiting their favorite distilleries is a dream vacation. There’s an endless array of fantastic food and delicious drams to enjoy, picturesque routes to navigate, ancient sites to explore, and a plethora of additional activities and diversions.

There is no denying the comfort and the accessibility provided by a private jet. Air travel is something that most of us dread, however, something that is often essential. When you factor in the time at the check-in desk, the time spent waiting around at customs and immigration control, plus waiting for your bags and waiting for delays; it’s a nightmare that can sap hours from your working day or your holiday. Private jets can reduce that wasted time, making everything quicker, easier, and considerably more comfortable. What are the Benefits of a Private Jet? On average, private jets can land at ten times as many airports as commercial airliners. As a result, there’s no need to land at an airport that is miles away from your destination—no one wants to have to worry about taxis, trains, or car rentals after spending hours cramped into a tight, uncomfortable seat. With private jets, you don’t even

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need to worry about cramped seats because you have the entire plane to yourself. You can sit, lie down, and even go for a walk if

250 hours a year, then a private jet is something you need to consider. If money is little tight and you’re wondering whether

you want to. It’s your plane so you can do whatever you want. Furthermore, if you have a private jet, you can reduce the time

it’s worth stretching your budget that far just for the sake of comfort, speed, and accessibility, then there might be a better

spent on security and immigration, with the average wait being just 5 minutes. You have more privacy and more safety. Simply

way: fractional ownership. It is not for everyone, however, if you travel about 25 hours a year, fractional ownership is feasible, and

put, a private jet turns a situation that none of usare happy with into one that we all enjoy. If you have the money and you fly over

there are almost as many positives to fractional ownership as there are to owning a private jet outright.

What is Fractional Ownership? As the name suggests, fractional ownership essentially allows you to purchase a share in a private jet. Fractional ownership first came onto the market in 1986 when it was announced by NetJets, who remain the dominant players in this industry. It allows you to pay a smaller fee while still getting many of the benefits. You can change your flight at the last minute, you can request specific catering preferences, and you can even apply for a different plane.

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T H E F LAT I R O N R O O M | F I NE & R A R E

“Knowledge-Based Hospitality” It’s one thing to offer premium spirits to guests. It’s another thing to be able to guide them through a list and offer a recommendation, providing informative, hands-on service. It’s what Tardie refers to as, “knowledge-based hospitality,” and it’s central to his approach at Fine & Rare.

The staff throughout the night will climb up the ladders, slide them back and forth to get access to the bottles, so it’s part of the theater

A World of the Fine & Rare in New York By Jake Emen

Tommy Tardie is no stranger to premium spirits, or to operating world-class bars dedicated to them. As owner of The Flatiron Room in New York City and its 1,200+ bottles of whiskey, he’s also had a front row view of the massive influx in popularity for all things whiskey-related. For his latest venture though, Fine & Rare, he felt it was time for a slight change. “The concept of The Flatiron Room was very whiskey focused,” said Tardie during a recent visit to the new bar, on East 37th Street, which opened in January. “Here, we wanted to depart a little bit. Whiskey is still in my blood but I wanted to go outside that and start tapping into agave spirits, rums, and brandies.”

“Lots of people are getting into the numbers game [in terms of their whiskey lists] but what’s more important to me is not having those numbers, but having a staff that can represent those numbers,” says Tardie. “Having a staff that can confidently walk you through a list and have solid, fact-based opinions. That’s more important, and for this place it’s more about that.” But how many whiskeys does he have on the list? “To be honest I don’t even know,” says Tardie, true to his above-stated credo. He does plan to add more whiskeys in the months ahead but didn’t want to overwhelm his staff as the bar first opened. “It’s more challenging here because it’s not just whiskey, we have the whole agave side and all of the other spirits,” says Tardie. “Staff education is super important, they have to go through a pretty rigorous training program just to get on the floor. We can’t have all this stuff and not represent it well.” Fine & Rare still showcases hundreds of whiskeys representing a broad spectrum of styles and price points in addition to the large assortment of Mezcals, Tequilas, Rums, Cognacs, and other brandies. It’s more of an egalitarian approach to imbibing— there’s a spirit for everyone, and all tastes are welcome. “It’s exciting for me too because I love whiskey but it’s great to learn,” says Tardie. He and his team have taken several trips to Mexico in the name of field research, purchasing a private cask of Tequila Herradura on one occasion, and stopping it at a half dozen tequila distilleries on another. For those looking to partake in their own education, one place to start is with their lineup of flights. Six spirits are brought to the table in a handheld carrying case that resembles a large wooden six-pack holder, along with pre-printed guide sheets. “It’s all theatrics,” says Tardie.

Their bottles stashed and only accessible via ladders

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Notes...

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Old Liquors Magazine is published four times a year. Available for free. Placed in liquor stores, bars, hotel suites, public areas, and selected restaurant lounges (and advertisers). Printed in U.S.A. No portion of the website or of the magazine may be reproduced without written consent of the publisher.

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