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Our Lady’s Catholic College Lancaster A Caring Catholic Community


Curriculum Fit for the Future The recent White Paper on Education revealed clear changes in educational priorities for the government. Significant among these was the introduction of the ‘English Baccalaureate’ – recognition of success in specific traditional academic subjects considered suitable and desirable for those students aspiring to professional careers and Higher Education.

At the same time we will not be abandoning the excellent vocational routes we have nurtured over the past few years. Many students will always be happier with more practical learning. As Higher Education itself undergoes significant change, we may also see able students deliberately choosing to enter the world of work earlier, aware that they can study and progress whilst earning.

We welcome the emphasis on a rigorous, broad based education for the majority of students and as Our Lady’s has retained a firm foundation of traditional subjects, we look forward to the ‘Ebacc’ showing how good we are at the more ‘academic’ exams. We expect most of our students will opt to do the new English Baccalaureate as they know it is what Universities and certain employers will look for.

We have also addressed the usual restriction of curricular choice that occurs in times of financial constraint and despite changes in funding, instead of restricting choice of curriculum, we have increased it.Young people joining Our Lady’s at age 11 have always known that they could stay where they were well known and supported right through to 18, but now they don’t have to sacrifice any element of flexibility for that security. We are collaborating post 16 with three other local high schools so that together we can offer a vast range of post 16 subjects that individually no single school could afford.

As Higher Education itself undergoes significant change, we may also see able students deliberately choosing to enter the world of work earlier, aware that they can study and progress whilst earning.


Special Educational Needs Teachers at Our Lady’s are skilled in delivering lessons that are differentiated according to varied academic needs. For certain pupils however, additional help and support is required. Where the need for additional help is identified, the school will discuss those needs with the pupil and an Individual Education Plan (IEP) is devised. This is reviewed twice a year by the school’s Learning Support Department, under the management of Miss Hulme. Copies of the reviewed IEP and the new IEP are provided to parents. This level of assistance is called ‘School Action’. If, despite the additional help the school puts in place, there is still concern that the pupil is not making satisfactory progress, then advice and expertise from professionals not directly employed by the school will be sought. The respective IEPs then become more detailed and this level of assistance is called ‘School Action Plus’. ADMISSIONS ARRANGEMENTS FOR PUPILS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS The school’s admission policy does not discriminate on the grounds of special needs. Pupils are admitted from a number of primary schools, both Catholic and non-Catholic, and are placed in mixed ability registration groups. Pupils are streamed for academic work based initially on information from the primary schools. Pupils who have been described by parents or primary school staff as in need of extra support or monitoring, behaviourally or academically are identified to the Head of Year, the Pastoral Support Officer and the Head of Learning Support as appropriate. Form Tutors are also informed.

FACILITIES AND ACCESS There is a dedicated suite of classrooms for the teaching of Learning Support classes where pupils can access multi-sensory learning and literacy and numeracy development software. A wide range of special needs are specifically catered for in Learning Support and provision includes a Nurture Group for pupils especially vulnerable on transition to Secondary school. The Nurture Room also provides a ‘safe haven’ for pupils who find socialising during flexible times of the school day a challenge. All Learning Support classes involve small groups of pupils and have consistency of staff. All teaching areas of the school are now accessible to pupils with physical disabilities. ACCESS TO THE CURRICULUM The school provides pupils with Special Educational Needs access to a balanced and broadly based curriculum including the National Curriculum as required by the SEN Code of Practice. In Years 7, 8 and 9 there is the opportunity for some pupils to have extra support with basic literacy and numeracy skills. We also offer extraction classes for English as an Additional Language. At Key Stage 4 some departments provide alternative courses for those pupils for whom GCSEs are inappropriate. It is expected that all departments enable access to the curriculum for SEN pupils by the use of differentiated teaching styles, differentiated schemes of work and differentiated assessment. The Learning Support team provide advice and direct support to departments for pupils with learning difficulties. This is in the form of SEN Representatives’ meetings that take place once every half term and which are led by the SENCO or external agencies.


GCSE Results 2010

A-Level Results 2010

HOW OLCC COMPARES – In line with the increased emphasis on GCSE, vocational qualifications have been omitted to allow fair comparisons. Main measure of school academic attainment is the number of students gaining 5 A*-C grades including English and Maths GCSE OLCC 5 A*-C grades including English and Maths 58% Avge. other Lancaster, Morecambe and Carnforth non-selective schools 5 A*-C incl. English and Maths 50.2% National 5 A*-C grades including English and Maths 53.4% Lancashire 5 A*-C grades including English and Maths 56.7% Within top 10% of schools nationally as measured in ‘value added’ terms 5 A* - C including English and Maths

GCSE RESULTS

ALPS A-LEVEL – RAW A LEVEL RESULTS Subject

No. of Entries

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

Q

A-E%

A-C%

A-B%

Subject

A*

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

U

X

TOTAL

% A* - C

0

5

22

55

25

5

3

2

0

0

117

70

Art (Fine Art)

6

0

1

2

0

3

0

0

0

100.0

50.0

50.0

Additional Science

Biology

18

2

5

5

1

3

1

1

0

94.4

72.2

66.7

Art

0

3

2

9

8

3

2

2

0

0

29

48

Chemistry

29

6

8

7

3

3

2

0

0

100.0

82.8

72.4

Biology

4

6

8

3

1

0

0

0

0

1

23

91

D&T (3D Design)

3

0

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

100.0

66.7

0.0

Business Studies

0

3

11

7

2

3

1

3

0

0

30

70

Drama

9

0

0

1

2

5

1

0

0

100.0

33.3

11.1

Chemistry

5

8

4

3

0

0

0

0

0

1

21

95

Econ. & Bus. (Nuffield)

9

0

2

2

2

3

0

0

0

100.0

66.7

44.4

Drama

0

1

13

16

5

2

3

1

0

0

41

73

English Lang. & Lit.

28

0

3

10

8

5

2

0

0

100.0

75.0

46.4

Electronics

1

1

1

2

2

2

0

0

0

0

9

56

French

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

100.0

100.0

100.0

English

2

10

37

71

26

13

5

4

0

1

169

71

English Literature

3

14

36

45

11

0

0

0

1

0

110

89

Health & Social Care – D

6

0

0

3

3

0

0

0

0

100.0

100.0

50.0

Food Technology

0

3

6

9

6

2

0

1

0

0

27

67

Health & Social Care – S

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

100.0

0.0

0.0

French

1

1

2

3

3

2

0

0

0

0

12

58

History

13

0

0

2

5

4

1

1

0

92.3

53.8

15.4

Geography

0

0

1

1

1

1

0

1

0

0

5

40

ICT

11

0

1

1

3

3

2

1

0

90.9

45.5

18.2

German

0

3

5

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

10

100

Mathematics

25

2

9

6

4

2

2

0

0

100.0

84.0

68.0

History

0

4

7

17

16

5

4

1

4

0

58

48

Media Studies

10

0

0

1

1

5

3

0

0

100.0

20.0

10.0

Information Technology

2

16

15

18

9

6

1

0

0

0

67

76

Music

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

100.0

0.0

0.0

Mathematics

3

13

31

64

19

17

13

4

0

5

169

66

Physical Education

8

0

1

1

3

1

1

1

0

87.5

62.5

25.0

Music

0

0

0

3

1

4

0

0

1

0

9

33

Physics

9

1

0

2

2

3

1

0

0

100.0

55.6

33.3

Physical Education

4

3

9

15

28

18

5

0

0

0

82

38

Polish

2

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

100.0

100.0

100.0

Physics

2

8

5

5

0

0

0

0

0

1

21

95

0

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

100

Psychology

9

0

0

2

3

3

1

0

0

100.0

55.6

22.2

Polish

Religious Studies

17

1

0

2

7

5

1

1

0

94.1

58.8

17.6

Product Design

0

0

1

4

4

1

0

0

0

0

10

50

TOTALS

215

12

31

49

49

50

19

5

0

97.67

65.58

42.79

Religious Education

7

14

42

38

23

11

3

0

0

0

138

73

Resistant Materials

0

0

0

5

8

2

1

1

2

0

19

26

Single Science

0

5

30

77

18

9

5

1

1

0

146

77

Textiles Technology

0

2

0

5

5

1

0

0

0

0

13

54

TOTAL GRADES

34

125

289

477

221

107

46

21

9

9

69

% EACH GRADE

2.5

9.3

21.6

35.7

16.5

8.0

3.4

1.6

0.7

0.7

A* - E Pass Rate = 98% A* - C Pass Rate = 66% (School Record) A* - B Pass Rate = 43% (School Record)


Partnership with Parents

Teaching Assistants have very positive relationships with pupils and parents and aim to contact parents once every half term to discuss progress and development. This is further enhanced by termly monitoring reports and IEPs twice a year. The SENCO often has daily contact with parents via phone or email depending upon the nature and need of the child. Complaints about the special educational needs provision made by the school should be discussed with the Headteacher, Mr Conboy. In the unlikely event that the Headteacher is unable to resolve the problem, then the parent can write to the Special Educational Needs governor care of the school. Parents can obtain copies of the Special Educational Needs Policy on request or from the website. The website also has details of other important school policies including the Admissions Policy, the Accessibility Plan and the Child Protection Policy. We would also invite parents to participate in the termly ‘Parents Forum’ meetings to share their views with members of the School Leadership Team.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE GOVERNING BODY’S POLICY ON PUPILS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS AND ANY CHANGES TO THE POLICY. The quality of the implementation of the school’s Special Educational Needs Policy is perhaps most objectively assessed by the Ofsted Inspection. Comments included:-

“The school fosters a welcoming learning environment where all feel valued and treated with respect. There is close attention to the needs of vulnerable students and those who, for whatever reason, may be going through a hard time.” “The Catholic ethos of the school is one in which students are cherished and very well cared for. Students, especially those that may be vulnerable, are very well supported.”

Our Lady’s always strives to work in close partnership with parents and values any help that parents can give. If a parent has concerns of any sort regarding SEN and their child then they should discuss them directly with the SENCO, Miss Hulme. Many pupils with SEN prefer to communicate with their allocated class Teaching Assistant, who will then inform the SENCO and parents will be contacted if necessary.

“Pupils are served well in this school and care is given to them as individuals; they feel themselves to be respected and supported. Different learning needs are recognised and catered for with flair and creativity.”

In May 2009 The Learning Support Department’s SEN audit (School Selfevaluation toolkit for inclusion) was inspected by the LEA adviser. On a balance of strengths and weaknesses it was concluded that ‘SEN provision is good’.


Uniform Our Lady’s Catholic College places great importance upon the correct wearing of uniform. Experience has shown that in a college where everyone wears uniform, it is easier to foster a pride in personal appearance and neatness. The College uniform is based on colour rather than style and most items can be obtained from several major department stores. However, ties, sweatshirts and PE items can be ordered from Mike’s Sportsworld/Trutex in Lancaster. Mike’s Sports also visits the school on a number of occasions during the year and always just before the beginning of the academic year when many parents need to obtain new items. If you have any questions after studying the list below – please contact the school and we will be pleased to help.

PE UNIFORM • White T-Shirt with school logo. • Royal blue shorts with school logo. • Royal blue and white rugby/hockey shirt with school logo. • Royal blue socks with school logo. Please ensure that all pupils bring a towel to their P.E lessons as pupils are encouraged to have a shower afterwards. It is also advisable in wet weather to bring a change of dry clothes. PLEASE NOTE THAT PUPILS MAY NOT WEAR THE FOLLOWING; • Jewellery, other than a watch or small ear stud. • Make up or nail varnish. • Denim or corduroy. • Boots or trainers.

KEY STAGE 3 (YEARS 7, 8 AND 9) GIRLS UNIFORM • Plain mid-grey skirt in any style - modest length suitable for college, or trousers. • Plain mid-blue regulation college-type of blouse with button-up neck, collar and sleeves. A similar short-sleeved blouse may be worn in the summer term. • Plain black, brown, dark grey or dark blue shoes. • A dark coloured, preferably blue or grey, topcoat or anorak. • Navy blue sweatshirt. • College tie. BOYS UNIFORM • Plain mid-grey trousers • Plain mid-blue regulation college-type shirt with button-up neck, collar and sleeves. A similar short-sleeved shirt may be worn in the summer term. • Plain black, brown, grey or white socks. • Plain black, dark brown, dark grey or dark blue shoes. • A dark coloured, preferably blue or grey, topcoat or anorak. • Navy blue sweatshirt. • College tie.

Details of Key Stage 4 Uniform (Years 10 and 11) can be obtained direct from the College.



OLCC Prospectus 2012