Page 1


Dedicated to the memories of those who gave all while in service to the people of Olathe: Firefighter Alfred “Dub” Philips, Assistant Chief Ernest “Ernie” Prather, and Captain Bill Bingham. Furthermore, may we always remember the vision of Battalion Chief Mike Penner who laid the groundwork for analysis within the Olathe Fire Department.

Pantone 108 Yellow Pantone 660 Blue Pantone 186 Red


Acknowledgments Fire Chief Jeff DeGraffenreid, Ed.D., CFO CRESA-SOC Authors Captain Mike Hall, acred. mgr., EFO, FO, CPM Fire Analyst Kristine Martin, MPH CRESA-SOC Contributors Fire Inspector Jeff Anderson Firefighter Sari Antisdel Engineer Michael Berndt Engineer Brian Bettis Firefighter Jeff Bowers Firefighter Mitch Budke Captain Marvin Butler Engineer Kyle Carlson Permit Technician Marcia Cline Firefighter Robert Collins Firefighter Paul Drinkard Engineer Matt Essex Permit Technician Lily Fletcher Engineer Billy Ford Captain Joey Heideman Captain-Inspector Tom Hoegler Fire Protection Engineer Ben Laxton, PE Captain-Inspector Tim Linot Captain Kiel Mason Emergency Management Planner Todd Maxton Permits Coordinator Sharon Merchant Captain-Inspector Tony Merlo Firefighter John Muller Battalion Chief Charles Ozonoff Public Education Specialist Donnie Pfeiffer Senior Community Enhancement Officer Dennis Pine Captain Jim Rogers Firefighter Wes Simmons Captain Derek Sobelman, MPA Firefighter Waylon Steinman Engineer Daryl Strain Captain Ryan Straley Assistant Chief Mark Wassom, PE Firefighter Jake Young IT Project Manager Teri Boldizsar, City of Olathe Park Project Manager Lisa Donnelly, City of Olathe Field Operations Manager Zach Hardy, City of Olathe Park Services Manager Paul Krueger, City of Olate Senior Planner Amy Kynard, City of Olathe

2

Senior Traffic Engineer Cheryl Lambrecht, City of Olathe Systems Analyst Grady Morrison, City of Olathe Senior Planner Sean Pendley, City of Olathe Police Intelligence Analyst Sabrina Potts, City of Olathe GIS & Development Engineer Scott Rice, City of Olathe Systems Analyst John Schroeter, City of Olathe Communications Specialist Hallie Sheptor, City of Olathe Assistant Director of Communications Erin Vader, City of Olathe Events Coordinator Alexis Woodall, City of Olathe

(Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop and Farm)

Transportation Manager Beth Wright, City of Olathe Project Coordinator Brittney Bush, Emergency Reporting Support Specialist I Heather Davis, Johnson County Emergency Management Planner Megan Lynch, Johnson County GIS Analyst Meg Shoffner, Johnson County GIS Technical Lead Dan Steen, Johnson County Environmental Health Specialist Steve Vogelsang, Johnson County Addressing/GIS Coordinator Mark Whelan, Johnson County Senior Administrative Assistant Michell Prothe, Kansas School for the Deaf Public Relations Manager Carol Best, MidAmerica Nazarene University Customer Success Manager KylIe Greischar, mySidewalk Researcher Jordan Shipley, mySidewalk Meteorologist William Brown,

NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information

Events and Activities Manager Sara Misemer, Olathe Chamber of Commerce Physician and Community Outreach Liaison Lacey Kane, Olathe Medical Center Director of Communications Maggie Kolb, Olathe Public Schools General Forecaster Jenni Laflin, National Weather Service Project Engineer II Kiel Johnson, WaterOne

Graphic Designer Jennifer Mitchell


LETTER FROM THE CHIEF

It is my absolute pleasure to serve as Olathe’s fire chief. As an Olathe native, I have a deep, personal investment in not only our community, but also our department. The Olathe Fire Department is made up of great folks who make a wonderful team. Statements like this are not just my own, but they are also the words of others. Recently, customers described our organization as having “professional people throughout the department” who place “service above self.” I truly appreciate, and whole-heartedly believe those comments accurately reflect our organization. In 2016, we again embarked upon another formal, continuous improvement journey and conducted an introspective self-assessment of the department. The self-assessment was an integral part of the journey, which yielded a road map for success, a new community-driven Strategic Plan, and this innovative Community Risk and Emergency Services Analysis – Standards of Cover. The CRESA-SOC process was both comprehensive and systematic as we worked to identify where we had been, where we were, and where we were going. Ultimately, the process was to ensure excellent and equitable service to those who live, learn, work, and visit Olathe. The CRESA-SOC begins by painting a picture of the community for the reader. This community picture provides a backdrop for the risk assessment and how we work to mitigate that risk. The document continues with an evaluation of risk and then moves on to a discussion about our current resources and how they are deployed. Finally, the CRESASOC provides a comprehensive evaluation of our deployment and subsequent performance. As fire chief and an ambassador of the community, I ask that you connect with us either in person or online (OlatheKS.org/Fire) with any questions or comments. Sincerely, Jeff DeGraffenreid, Ed.D. Fire Chief and Emergency Management Director

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

3


TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: AREA CHARACTERISTICS Introduction Community History Legal and Financial Basis Leadership Timeline Milestones Community Features and Planning Zones

12 12 13 14 16-19 20-23 24

Geography

24-25

Topography

26-27

Climate

28-30

Population

31-33

Demography

34-38

Schools

39-40

Transportation

41-42

Water Distribution

43-44

Area Development

45-47

SECTION 2: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Service Delivery Programs

48

Community Risk Reduction

48

Fire Suppression

49

Emergency Medical Services and Mobile Integrated Health

50

Rescue

50

Hazardous Materials and Explosive Ordnance Disposal

51

Specialized Services, Homeland Security and Emergency Management

52

Point of Service Delivery and Resources Response Area Risk Reduction Efforts and Programming

53-58 59 60-64

SECTION 3: COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT Community Risks

65

Risk Identification and Classification

65

Risk Assessment Methodology and Categorization

66

4


Fire Risks

67

Fire Risk — One- and Two- Family Structures

68-73

Fire Risk — Commercial Structures

74-79

Fire Risk — Mobile Property

79-80

Fire Risk — ­ Wildland Property

81

Fire Risk Conclusions and Categorizations

81

Fire Risk Critical Task Analysis

82-83

EMS Risk

83-85

EMS Risk Conclusions and Categorizations

85-87

EMS Risk — ­ Critical Tasks

87

Rescue Risk

87-93

Rescue Risk Conclusions and Categorizations

93-94

Rescue Risk — ­­ Critical Tasks

94

Hazardous Material (HazMat) Risk

95-97

HazMat Risk Conclusions and Categorizations

97

HazMat Risk — Critical Tasks

98

EOD Risk

98

EOD Risk Conclusions and Categorizations

99

EOD Risk Level Classification — Critical Tasks

100

Disaster Risk

100-101

Non-Fire Risk

101

Correlating Community Risks

101-108

Community Risk Evaluation

109-110

Community Risk Level Categorizations and Conclusions

110-111

SECTION 4: DEPLOYMENT AND PERFORMANCE Current Deployment and Performance

112

Current/Baseline Deployment

112

Community Expectations

112-113

Community Service Demands

114

Incident History

114-116

Incident Type

116-117

Incident Location

117-121

Emergency Service Zones

121-122

Other Considerations of Coverage

123

Equalization

123

Incident Frequency

123-124

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

5


Current Deployment Strategies

125-129

Resiliency

129

Reliability Under Normal Conditions

129-130

Additional Resource Availability

130-131

Planned Special Events

131

Large-Scale or Unplanned Emergencies

131

The Consideration of Time as a Factor

132-133

Fire Behavior

134

Chain of Survival

135

Baseline Performance Tables (2012-2016)

136-141

Response Time Performance by Planning Area

142

Loss and Preservation

143-144

Evaluation of Deployment and Performance

145

Benchmark Performance Objectives and Baseline Performance Measure Statements

145-151

Conclusions

152

SECTION 5: PLAN FOR MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING PERFORMANCE Maintaining and Improving Performance

153

Compliance Methodology

153

Monitor

154-156

Evaluate

156-157

Identify & Modify

157

Approve

157

Share

157

SECTION 6: CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Conclusions and Recommendations

158

Conclusions

158

Recommendations

158-159

APPENDIX A: ESZ OVERVIEW

160

6


TABLE OF FIGURES SECTION 1: AREA CHARACTERISTICS City of Olathe’s General Fund

13

City of Olathe – City Council Members and Wards

14

City of Olathe Map

24

Mid-America Regional Council Map

24

OFD Planning Areas Map

25

OFD Emergency Service Zone Map

25

Community Parks

26

Neighborhood Parks

27

Olathe Topography Map

27

Weather – Monthly Historic Averages

29

Days Temperature >=90° Fahrenheit

29

Monthly Average Precipitation

29

Monthly Average Snowfall

29

Weather — 2016

30

Time Series: Population (Olathe)

31

Time Series: Population (Olathe, Overland Park, Lenexa, and Gardner)

31

Population by Planning Area

31

Emergency Service Zone Population Density

32

Emergency Service Zone Population Density Map

33

Age Totals

34

Generations

34

Race/Ethnicity Totals

35

Language Spoken at Home

35

Household Income

36

Families Under the Poverty Level Map

36

Employment Industry

36

Wage of Workers

37

Commute Type

37

Educational Attainment

38

Disability by Age

38

Hearing and Vision Disabilities

38

Cognitive, Ambulatory, and Self-Care Disabilities

38

Public Schools in Olathe

39

Roadway Infrastructure

41

Rail Line (feet and miles)

41

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

7


Railway At-Grade Crossings

42

Transportation Modes Map

42

Water Distribution System Components

43

City of Olathe Water Production

43

Fire Hydrants in Olathe

44

Commercial Building Permit Data

45

Land Use by Type

45

Comprehensive Plan Existing Land Use

46

Comprehensive Future Land Use

47

SECTION 2: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Points of Service Delivery – Fire Station Locations in Johnson County

53

Station 1

54

Station 2

54

Station 3

54

Station 4

55

Station 5

55

Station 6

56

Station 7

56

Fire Administration Building

56

Minimum Daily Firefighter Staffing

57

Organizational Chart

58

Response Areas for all Fire Departments in Johnson County

59

SECTION 3: COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT Risk Identification and Classification

66

Parabolic Two-Axis Risk Categorization Process

66

US Fire and Fire Loss Rate Trends

67

OFD Fire Responses

67

US Number of Fire Deaths

68

US Fire Death Rates Per Million Population

68

Olathe Fire Deaths and Injuries

68

Olathe Analysis of Single Family Structure Fires

69

Building Age of Housing Units

69

UL Analysis of Changing Residential Fire Dynamics

70

Olathe Permits Issued

70

Residential Building Permits Map

70

Olathe Residential Property Values – Average Appraised Value vs. Average Sales Price

71

Average Property Value Ranges and Number of Subdivisions in Each Range

71

Average Residential Value in Subdivisions

72

8


National and State Registers of Historic Places in Olathe

73

OFD Inspection Activities

74

Olathe Commercial Occupancy Risk Categorization and Statistics

75

OVAP Occupancies in 2012 and 2016

75

OVAP Map

76

Commercial Building Permits Map

77

Olathe’s Top 20 Real Estate Properties

77

Care Facilities

78

Olathe Mobile Property Fires

79

US Loss Measures for Highway Vehicle Fires

80

Aircraft – Dispatched Problem Types

80

Fire Risk Level Classification – Conclusions and Categorization

81

Fire Risk – Categorization by Call Type

81

Fire Risk – Critical Task

82

OFD EMS Responses

83

EMS Hot Spot Map

84

OFD Lift Assists

84

Hospital Quality Measures

85

EMS Risk Level Classification – Conclusions and Categorization

86

EMS Risk – Categorization by Call Type Summary

86

EMS Risk – Critical Task

87

Olathe Public Property Crash Rate

88

Olathe Public Property Injury Crashes

88

Olathe Public Property Non-Injury Crashes

88

Olathe Top Crash Rate Locations — At-Grade Intersections

88

Olathe Top Crash Rate Locations — At-Grade Interchanges

88

Census of All Fatal Occupational Injuries — Kansas

89

OFD Technical Rescue — Dispatched Problem Types

90

Commercial Swimming Pools in Olathe

92

OFD — Ice and Water — Dispatched Problem Types

93

Rescue Risk Level Classification — Conclusions And Categorization

94

Rescue Risk Level Classification — Categorization by Call Type Summary

94

Rescue Risk – Critical Task

94

OFD HazMat Permits Issued

96

HazMat — Dispatched Problem Types

97

HazMat Risk Level Classification — Conclusions and Categorization

97

HazMat Risk – Categorization by Call Type

97

HazMat Risk – Critical Task

98

OFD EOD Responses — Dispatched Problem Types

99

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

9


EOD Risk Level Classification — Conclusions and Categorization

99

EOD Risk — Categorization by Call Type

99

EOD Risk Level Classification — Critical Tasks

100

Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee’s 22 Natural and Man-Made Hazards

100

OFD Non-Fire Responses — Dispatched Problem Types

101

Percent of Housing Units Constructed Prior to 1940 Map

102

Highest Fire Risk Locations – 50+ Units in Structure

103

Overcrowded Housing Map

104

Linguistically Isolated Households Map

105

High Concentration of Vulnerable Populations Map

106

Chronically Impoverished Areas

107

Residents Over Age 25 with Very Low Educational Attainment

108

OFD Planning Area and ESZ Methodology

110

OFD ESZ Risk Level Elements, Conclusions, and Categorizations

110

ESZ Risk Level Conclusions and Categorizations Map

111

SECTION #4: DEPLOYMENT AND PERFORMANCE OFD Calls for Service

114

Incident History by Month

114

Incident History by Day of Week

115

Incidents by Time of Day – All Call Types

115

Incident History by Hour of Day

115

OFD Calls by Time of Day and Major Incident Type

116

Incident Type by Year

116

Incidents by Type, 2016

117

Hot Spot Map of All Incidents, 2012-2016

117

Olathe, KS ­— Structural Fires

118

EMS Calls Map, 2016

119

Fire Calls Map, 2016

120

HazMat and Rescue Calls Map, 2016

120

Incident by Type in Planning Areas — 2012-2016

121

Top 10 Busiest ESZs

121

Incident Types by Station

122

Percentage of Calls by Station/First Arriving

122

First Arriving (Distribution) Coverage

123

Concurrent Incidents by Month, 2012-2016

123

Elapse Scene Time, 2012-2016

124

OFD Travel Time Map – 4-min.

125

Station 1: 4-min. Travel Time Map

125

10


Station 2: 4-min. Travel Time Map

126

Station 3: 4-min. Travel Time Map

126

Station 4: 4-min. Travel Time Map

127

Station 5: 4-min. Travel Time Map

127

Station 6: 4-min. Travel Time Map

128

Station 7: 4-min. Travel Time Map

128

OFD Travel Time Maps – 8 min.

129

First Arriving (Distribution) Response and Reliability

130

Automatic Aid and Mutual Aid

130

Cascade of Events

133

Home Fire Timeline

134

Chain of Survival

135

Baseline Performance – Low Risk Fire

137

Baseline Performance – Moderate Risk Fire

137

Baseline Performance – High Risk Fire

138

Baseline Performance – Special Risk Fire

138

Baseline Performance – Moderate Risk EMS

139

Baseline Performance – High Risk EMS

139

Baseline Performance – Special Risk EMS

140

Baseline Performance – Technical Rescue All Risk

140

Baseline Performance – HazMat All Risk

141

EMS Total Response Time by Planning Area

142

Top 10 ESZs with Most EMS Calls Outside of Total Response Time Benchmark

142

Save Calculation

144

Performance Calculation Ratio

144

Fire Suppression Benchmark Performance Objectives

145

Fire ERF Benchmark Staffing

146

EMS Benchmark Performance Objectives

147

EMS ERF Benchmark Staffing

147

Rescue Benchmark Performance Objectives

148

Rescue ERF Benchmark Staffing

149

HazMat Benchmark Performance Objectives

150

HazMat ERF Benchmark Staffing

150

Citywide Response Analysis

151

SECTION 5: PLAN FOR MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING PERFORMANCE Compliance Methodology

153

SECTION 6: OVERALL CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS CRESA-SOC Annual Updates

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

159

11


SECTION 1 : AREA CHARACTERISTICS INTRODUCTION The department conducted a Community Risk and Emergency Services Analysis (CRESA) of Olathe. The analysis was part of a department driven continuous improvement process. The analysis was divided into parts. The parts were: Area Characteristics; Programs and Services; Community Service Demands; and, Deployment and Performance. Following the analysis, the department established an organizational Standard of Cover (SOC) which included Performance Objectives and Measures; a Plan for Maintaining and Improving Performance; and, Conclusions and Recommendations.

COMMUNITY HISTORY The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 created the Kansas Territory and opened the land to preemption by home seekers of European descent from the more heavily populated states. Counties were formed late in 1855. In the early months of 1857, the survey of the Shawnee lands was followed closely by land speculators, among whom was Dr. John T. Barton, a physician assigned to the Shawnee tribal headquarters. Preemption law provided for town sites that gave town companies the opportunity to gain power, money, political influence, and concessions such as post offices. Barton and his associates chose the geographic center of the county, crossed by Mill Creek and the Santa Fe Trail, to claim for their town. Olathe, a Shawnee word understood to mean “beautiful,” was incorporated in 1857.Olathe is one of the oldest communities in Kansas. According to the Olathe Historical Society, at issue was whether Kansas would be free like the Nebraska territory to the north or a slave state like Missouri to the east. Many residents came to Olathe to make a new home while others, like John Brown of Harpers Ferry fame, came to battle. The fighting started in Kansas four years before the start of the Civil War. Since Olathe was only 10 miles west of the Missouri border, William Quantrill and his raiders invaded Olathe in 1862, destroying much of the town and killing a half-dozen men. At one time more than 15,000 Union solders were camped along Mill Creek in central Olathe. After the war, Olathe became a major stop along the Santa Fe Trail. As many as 600 wagons a week traveled through Olathe on the way toward the gold fields and farming settlements in the far west. Pioneer settler James Beatty Mahaffie built a house in 1863, which he and his family later operated as a stagecoach stop. The Mahaffie farm was the first stop for stagecoaches traveling from Westport, Missouri on the Santa Fe Trail. The two-story native limestone house and several outbuildings have been restored, and the 23 acre farmstead is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.”The historic Mahaffie site and adjoining property was purchased by the City of Olathe in 1979 to help insure its preservation. Today, the site is administered by the City of Olathe’s Parks and Recreation Department. In 2009, the OFD received a Johnson County Heritage Trust Fund Grant which installed an automatic fire sprinkler system in the Mahaffie house. The grant also provided other prevention measures for the house such as a lightning protection system. After 160 years, Olathe is the second largest city among the 21 communities in prosperous Johnson County and the fourth largest city in Kansas.

12


LEGAL AND FINANCIAL BASIS In 1871, a City of Olathe ordinance established the OFD. The OFD is one of eight City of Olathe departments: 1. Communications & Customer Services 2. Fire 3. Information Technology Services 4. Legal 5. Parks & Recreation 6. Police 7. Public Works 8. Resources Management The City of Olathe’s main operating budget is the general fund, which receives revenue from sales tax (51%), other (20%), property tax (16%), and franchise fees (13%). The general fund is the OFD’s funding mechanism and accounts for 23% of the general fund. The City of Olathe’s budget is a management plan based on a two-year cycle (biennial). The plan details the allocation of resources to meet community priorities and organizational objectives. The Strategic Planning and Research Services Division, which is part of the Department of Resource Management, is responsible for the function of budget. Budget has several key services: Facilitate the Budget Planning process. Prepare Budget Documents. Coordinate the Capital Improvement Plan. Monitor City of Olathe revenue sources generated through taxes and fees. Assist development of department business plans. Prepare documents for budget certification by the state of Kansas. The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Distinguished Budget Presentation Award has been bestowed to the City of Olathe for the past 10 years in a row. Additionally, the City of Olathe has received the GFOA Certification of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting (CAFR) for 36 consecutive years. The CAFR Program was established in 1945 to encourage and assist state and local governments to go beyond the minimum requirements of generally accepted accounting principles to prepare comprehensive annual financial reports that evidence the spirit of transparency and full disclosure and then to recognize individual governments that succeed in achieving that goal, according to GFOA. The OFD routinely works hand-inhand with other City of Olathe staff to track and assess the department’s budget. This constant tracking and assessment helps to ensure reliable, fiscal stewardship. The OFD and its other City of Olathe partners make fiscal adjustments as needed.

City of Olathe General Fund

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

13


LEADERSHIP A “modified mayor-council-manager’ form of government was elected by Olathe voters in 1986. This form of government has three primary components per Charter Ordinance No. 28: 1. A mayor and two council members elected as a whole. 2. Four council members elected by wards. 3. All members elected to four-year staggered terms. The seven member City Council provides leadership to the citizens and City of Olathe staff by ensuring the efficient operation of services and the responsible expenditure of public funds by: 1. Making general policy decisions and instructing the city manager to oversee the implementation and operation of such direction. 2. Passing ordinances, resolutions, and proclamations that have a direct impact on the community. 3. Adopting the City of Olathe’s annual operating budget and the five-year Capital Improvement Plan.

City of Olathe Council Members and wards.

14


OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

15


OFD TIMELINE 1871

A City of Olathe ordinance established Olathe’s first official fire company. The ordinance also allocated $3,000 for the purchase of a chemical fire engine and a hook-and-ladder truck. The vehicles’ design allowed them to be pulled by firefighters for short hauls or they could be horsedrawn when longer distances needed to be traveled. The ordinance included the digging of four strategically located cisterns near the “town square” for fire suppression needs. Additionally, records indicate that the first fire station was located in what is now the 100 block of north Cherry Street. Olathe’s first fire chief was Michael McCarthy.

1883

A department reorganization led to the fire chief earning a salary of $3.50 per day, while the volunteer firefighters earned $1 per fire call. If the fire chief ordered civilians to help fight a fire they were also paid $1. If a person refused to help, they were fined $10.

1895

The department received a Firefighter Relief Act Association Charter from the Kansas Secretary of State.

1897

Station 1 moved to the 100 block of north Chestnut Street. The second floor was the “City Hall Chamber.”

1911

A new, combination City Hall and Station 1 was created at Kansas Avenue and Santa Fe Street. The facility had an apartment where the fire chief and his family lived. The apartment was used until 1963.

1912

Consultants suggested the City of Olathe should undergo a “total modernization of its fire department.”

1914

The department purchased a “Velie,” which was the first motorized fire apparatus in Johnson County.

16

OFD


1954 On January 21, Assistant Chief Ernest “Ernie” Prather collapsed at a house fire after he and other firefighters had removed smoldering debris from the home. Attempts to revive Chief Prather were unsuccessful. He had served Olathe since 1907 and became the department’s second line of duty death.

1944

A fire in the Hyer Boot Company’s “last morgue” destroyed 2,000 “boot lasts” (wooden foot molds). These wooden foot molds were used to make future boots for their customers. Among the molds destroyed were those belonging to Will Rogers, Calvin Coolidge, Theodore Roosevelt, Buffalo Bill Cody, Harry Truman and Gene Autry. The Hyer Boot Company, which was the oldest western boot maker in the world, later became known as the Olathe Boot Company.

1950

The department hired its first full-time firefighters (four), who were supported by volunteers.

1932

On May 1, a heartbreaking accident claimed the life of Firefighter Alfred “Dub” Phillips when the fire engine he was driving—while responding to a flue fire— rolled over after he took action to avoid a collision with an oncoming car at Santa Fe and Woodland. At 29 years old, he was the department’s first line of duty death.

1915

The life-saving “pulmotor” was purchased as an “artificial breath producer” designed to breath for a patient “until enough energy accumulates in the body so that breathing can be carried on naturally.” Fire Chief “Buss” Knox would take the pulmotor to the scene when needed.

HISTORY

17


1969

The City of Olathe contracted ambulance service with Citizens Ambulance of Lawrence, Kansas. In 1969, the department assumed ambulance responsibilities and provided the service until the mid-1970s when Johnson County Medical Action was established. This county-operated service, commonly referred to as Med-Act, is still Olathe’s transporting agency.

1971

A new Station 1 opened at Santa Fe and Kansas Streets. This building was used as Station 1 until 1983 when the Public Safety Center opened at 501 E. Old Hwy 56.

1975

On May 20, Captain Bill Bingham responded with the Dive Team to Lake Olathe in an effort to recover the body of a drowning victim. He drowned during the underwater search. Captain Bingham was the department’s third line-of-dutydeath.

1975

1983

Station 2 opened at 13301 S. Mur-Len Road. This location is now Station 4.

1986

Olathe voters selected a modified mayor-councilmanager form of government, which remains today. This form of government has a mayor and two council members who are elected by residents as a whole and four council members who are elected by wards. All City Council members serve four-year staggered terms. As the policy makers, the City Council passes resolutions and ordinances, approves the budget, appoints citizens to advisory boards and hires the city manager who serves at the pleasure of the Station 2, at 13301 S. Mur-Len Road, City Council. closed when it opened at its new location

CAPTAIN BILL BINGHAM

1988

Olathe’s population of 40,000 was served by two fire stations.

}

1989

at 1725 N. Renner Road. Station 3 opened at 1490 W. 143rd Street.

1990 18

The 13301 S. Mur-Len Road facility opened as Station 4.

OFD


1999

Station 6 was built at 24200 W. College Boulevard and opened.

1992

Station 5 opened at 1128 W. Spruce Street.

}

2007

2001

Olathe’s population reached 100,000

Station 7 opened at 16110 S. Mur-Len Road.

HISTORY

19


SERVICE MILESTONES

October, 2008 The “raising of the rail” was completed

Over the last decade the OFD continued to grow and

“raising” eradicated four at-grade crossings.

morph with the community. This exciting transformation led to many noteworthy changes and developments. Here are just some of those significant OFD milestones

for the Fort Scott Subdivision (east railroad track line). The

October, 2008 The OFD received an Assistance to Firefighters Grant — Fire Prevention and Safety for

(2007-2016):

Blitz’s Brigade, Safer College Campaign (College Fire

May, 2007 The OFD responded to a mutual aid request

Extinguisher Trainer Program

following the historic tornado in Greensburg, Kansas.

Staff were sent to assist with search and rescue; safety; and, public information.

July, 2007 Special Operations Group members worked

in flooded areas of Anderson County.

October, 2007 Firefighters participated in a voluntary

HDL/LDL, lipid profile, and carotid study by the University of Kansas Medical Center.

November, 2007 Station 7 opened near 159th and

Mur-Len Road.

November, 2007 The first 12 months of Olathe’s

Clean Air Ordinance noted 447 sign installations by fire inspectors, 16 complaints, 15 educational visits, and 3 citations.

February, 2008

The OFD had nine members selected to the City of Olathe’s Service Excellence Team.

February, 2008

Every firefighter completed “Fire Inspector I” coursework, which was made possible by a 2004 Assistance to Firefighters Grant — Fire Prevention and Safety.

June, 2008 The OFD began a working relationship

with the 73rd Civil Support Team (CST), Kansas

Army National Guard. The CST is a highly trained organization that supports local, state, and federal agencies responding to attacks that could involve weapons of mass destruction.

20

& Life Safety 101), College Dorm Burn Room, and Fire

January, 2009 After 209 fire scenes, Canine Doogie

retired with nine years of service. Doogie was the OFD’s first accelerant detection canine.

March, 2009 The OFD hosted Dave Dodson and “The

Art of Reading Smoke.”

May, 2009 The City of Olathe passed Resolution No.

09-1043, which adopted the Johnson County Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan.

August, 2009 An advanced life support Clinical

Standards and Practice Committee was established to help coordinate equipment and procedures used by paramedic agencies within the county.

October, 2009 The annual Helmet Head Bike Rodeo moved from the Fire Administration Building to Olathe

Medical Center so as to accommodate the event’s growth.


October, 2009 The Orr Memorial was dedicated

January, 2011 Annual wreath presentation ceremonies

at Haven Park and included a smoke alarm message

began on the anniversary of each of the OFD’s three line

campaign in partnership with Kami Orr, who was one of

of duty deaths.

only two survivors of Olathe’s most tragic fire. The Orr fire claimed the lives of Matthew, Rebecca, Jeremiah, Benjamin and Kyle on October 16, 2004.

December, 2009 Care Kits were placed on the

March, 2011 The OFD began the accreditation process. April, 2011 The OFD published its first, community-

driven strategic plan.

battalion chief rigs and Inspector 50 unit. The kits

May, 2011 The OFD sent a public information officer

are for displaced fire victims and contain basic items

to the State of Alabama in response to an Emergency

like toothbrushes, toothpaste, razor, shaving cream,

Management Assistance Compact request.

deodorant, soap, After the Fire book, and more. The kit was created after talking with fire victims and learning more about their immediate needs following a fire.

May, 2011 The OFD sent a canine rescue team to help following the Joplin tornado.

April, 2010 The OFD received an Assistance to

Firefighters Grant — Operations and Safety Program. The award was a regional effort to narrow band countywide radio equipment.

September, 2010 Station 8 became home to the Emergency Communications Center’s COM1.

December, 2010 The Johnson County fire chiefs

updated the mutual and automatic aid agreement of 1993.

December, 2010 The OFD received 19 hazardous

materials (HazMat) suits (A, B, and coverall) from Homeland Security Grant Program.

December, 2010 Fire Chief Jeff DeGraffenreid released

the OFD’s first, annual Plan of Action. The Plan of Action

helps guide the implementation of the vision and goals of both the OFD’s Strategic Plan and Business Plan.

May, 2012 The OFD ordered or received two trucks;

one tender; one engine; one specialty pumper; and, one rescue.

June, 2012 The OFD published its first Community Risk Assessment and Emergency Services Analysis – Standards of Cover.

August, 2012 The OFD received accredited agency status from the Commission on Fire Accreditation International.

October, 2012 The Bike Team debuted at the Jared Coones Memorial Pumpkin Run.

October, 2012 The first Daily Information Report (DIR)

was sent out to the Fire Duty Officer email distribution list. The DIR contains a daily safety message and information about dangerous structures, hydrants out of service, street closings, and a Community Risk Reduction report.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

21


October, 2012 The City Council adopted the 2012 International Code Council package.

Month, 2012 The City of Olathe allocated $500,000 to the “Phase 1: Fire Training Center” capital improvement project.

March, 2014 The OFD helped create the Johnson

County Response to Hostile Events model procedure. Staff also assisted with the countywide training.

October, 2014 The OFD hosted its first BLUE CARD® training program in the Command Training Center.

October, 2012 All uniformed staff were issued a

Month, 2014 The construction of numerous, modular

December, 2012 The OFD received an Outstanding

December, 2014 The OFD celebrated 100 years of

personal, portable radio.

Partnership in Child Safety Award from Safe Kids Kansas.

January, 2013 The OFD began quarterly, Command Team meetings.

January, 2013 Hydrogen cyanide monitors were

placed in service on Rescue 51, Truck 52 and Battalion

training props at Fire Administration began.

“motorization” as Olathe’s first fire truck was purchased in December of 1914.

December, 2014 The OFD answered 10,167 calls for service in 2014.

July, 2015 Countywide lecture-based training began on

Chief 52.

the Johnson County model procedure for hostile events.

March, 2013 The OFD had its first four staff complete

August, 2015 The OFD in conjunction with the FBI

the Blue Card Command Certification Program.

August, 2013 The Third Graders Discover Fire and

Life Safety Program educated its 30,000th student. The program started in 1994.

October, 2013 The Mobile Integrated Health program began.

October, 2013 96% of the 5,614 City of Olathe-owned hydrant locations were GPS-verified and updated within

OFD mapping. The average hydrant location accuracy was about six inches.

October, 2013 In partnership with Olathe Medical

Center, 178 flu vaccinations were administered at the annual Open House.

January, 2014 Implemented a formal safety check

– called the “gear check” – on all personal protective equipment.

February, 2014 The OFD published the risk-based Fire Station Location & Optimization Report.

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Kansas City Field Office validated new techniques for

rescuing a downed bomb technician (patient) from the hot zone. This Bomb Tech Rescue Program was also added to the curriculum at hazardous devices school.

December, 2015 Graduated a firefighter recruit academy class of nine.

January, 2016 A new chief building official started,

who is also a fire protection engineer.

March, 2016 The OFD held the first Hero Day,

which was designed to introduce young women to the fire service.


April, 2016 The Insurance Services Office rating, for

Olathe, improved from class three to class one.

September 14, 2016 - The OFD teamed up with

April, 2016 The OFD began work on a new, community-

installed a goLibrary at Station 6. Using the goLibrary,

the Olathe Public Library a literacy partner and

driven strategic plan.

visitors may pick up books on hold, return materials, browse the catalog, and place holds. The goLibary is

April, 2016 Dynamic deployment of a two-person,

located just inside the fire station’s public entrance.

40-hour squad - staffed with one firefighter emergency medical technician (EMT) and one firefighter paramedic - began operation at Station 2. The unit is called Squad 52. The purpose of the squad concept is to aid in OFD resiliency and to get the right resources to the right call at the right time.

April, 2016 For the 17th year, the OFD and the

University of Bordeaux (France) continued a student intern partnership. The student interns are part of a two-year program about fire safety and occupational management.

April, 2016 The Mobile Integrated Health program

was selected as the recipient for the 2016 Thomas H. Muehlenbeck Award for Excellence in Local Government by the Alliance for Innovation.

May, 2016 The rehabilitation project at Station 2 was completed.

May, 2016 The OFD received an Excellence in Fire

Service-Based EMS Award, from the Congressional Fire Services Institute and Masimo, for the Mobile Integrated Health Program.

July, 2016 Countywide practical training began on the

hostile events model procedure.

October, 2016 Dynamic deployment of a second twoperson, 40-hour squad started operation at Station 5. The unit is named Squad 55.

November, 2016 The OFD created a Peer Support

program to assist staff with challenges related to physical, emotional, and behavioral health.

December, 2016 Firefighter interviews were conducted for a Recruit Academy to start in February of 2017.

August, 2016 Graduated a firefighter recruit academy

class of 10.

August, 2016 The OFD received a regional Assistance

to Firefighters Grant for self-contained breathing

apparatus replacement. The regional grant was a collaboration between the OFD and Fire District #1 of Johnson County, Lenexa Fire Department, Northwest Consolidated Fire District, and Shawnee Fire Department.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

23


COMMUNITY FEATURES AND PLANNING ZONES Geography

Olathe is located on the historic Santa Fe, Oregon and California Trails and is the geographical center of Johnson County – the most populated of the 105 counties in Kansas. Olathe is in the bi-state Kansas City metropolitan area and is about a twenty-minute drive from downtown Kansas City, Missouri. Within Johnson County, Olathe is the county seat and the second most populated city. Approximately 59 percent of Johnson County has been incorporated into 20 cities, while the remaining 41 percent is unincorporated. The county has a total of 477 square miles with Olathe in the center with a total land mass of almost 62 square miles. Less than 1 square mile of Olathe is water. Kansas City Region In addition to its role in Johnson County, Olathe is also part of a nine-county planning area that includes 120 separate municipalities and nine county governments in both Kansas and Missouri. The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) is the non-profit association of city and county governments that helps advance issues that

City of Olathe at the center of Johnson County.

reach across boundaries of individual communities such as transportation, emergency services, environmental concerns, economic forecasting, and more. Olathe is active in many of the planning initiatives that make the region as a whole a better place to live.

Map credit: Mid-America Regional Council

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Planning Areas Throughout this document and for planning purposes, Olathe is divided into smaller areas to increase understanding of the community as a whole. Smaller sections allow the department to study unique features about parts of the city that may differ from others. This is especially helpful in the risk assessment in Section 3. Olathe has been divided into three broad planning areas – North, Central and South. These areas divide the city into three similarly sized sections. • North Planning Area is all parts of Olathe north of 127th Street. • Central Planning Area is the mid-section of the city between 127th and 151st Streets. • South Planning Area area is all parts of Olathe south of 151st Street. Emergency Service Zones Finally, analysis in this document also will examine Olathe in smaller 1-square mile grids called emergency services zones (ESZs). These zones are part of a countywide dispatch grid system created in 1985. The countywide system has 475 ESZs. Population density, incident history and several demographic variables were considered in each ESZ. Appendix A includes detailed analysis of each of Olathe’s ESZs.

OFD's Planning Areas

OFD's Emergency Service Zones

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

25


Topography

Positioned in the geographic center of Johnson County, Olathe has an elevation of 1,100 feet and a land mass of 61.7 square miles. The Kansas Geological Survey describes the area as consisting of “gently rolling uplands with hilly areas along the streams.” Olathe has a robust parks and trail system, which takes advantage of the community’s topography. The City of Olathe has 13 community parks and 24 neighborhood parks. According to the City of Olathe’s Parks and Recreation Department, there are approximately 1,700 acres of developed parkland in the community. The park land includes things such as community and neighborhood parks, swimming pools, historic/memorial sites, trail areas, community gardens, and a cemetery. Additionally, there are 32.85 miles of public trails; 45.2 miles of bike lanes/wide sidewalks along roads; 6.94 miles of trails in the planning stages; 415.33 acres of “other” park land (e.g., undeveloped park land, vacant lots); 330.6 acres of right-of-way medians; and 67.17 acres of greenway and stream ways. Olathe’s topography is also conducive to waterways such as creeks and lakes. The community has five creeks (Cedar Creek, Indian Creek, Little Cedar Creek, Mill Creek, and Tomahawk Creek) and five lakes of which are made up of both public and private ownership: • Lake Olathe, public, 170 acres of water • Cedar Lake, public, 75 acres of water • Shadow Lake, private, 65 acres of water • Frisco Lake, public, 24 acres of water • Water Works Park, public, 10 acres

Community Parks Black Bob Park

14500 W. 151st St.

Cedar Lake

15500 S. Lone Elm Rd.

Civic Center Park

250 Santa Fe St.

Frisco Lake Park

1100 E. Dennis Ave.

Frontier Park

15501 W. Indian Creek Pkwy.

Lake Olathe Park

625 S. Lakeshore Dr.

Lone Elm Park

21151 W. 167th St

Olathe Girls Softball Complex 13901 W. 151st St. Oregon Trail Park

1100 S. Robinson St.

Prairie Center Park

555 N. Olathe View Rd.

Stagecoach Park

1205 E. Kansas City Rd.

Two Trails Park

1000 N. Ridgeview Rd.

Veteran Memorial Park

1025 S. Harrison St.

Source: City of Olathe — ­ Department of Parks and Recreation

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Neighborhood Parks Arapaho Park

12301 S. Arapaho Dr.

Manor Park

15355 S. Alcan St.

Arbor Landing Park

16305 S. Lindenwood Dr.

Mill Creek Park

320 E. Poplar St.

Arrowhead Park

1701 S. Lindenwood Dr.

North Walnut Park

801 N. Walnut St.

Brougham Park

15501 S. Brougham Dr.

Pellett Park

520 W. Elm St.

Calamity Line Park

901 S. Santa Fe St.

Quailwood Park

14092 S. Greenwood St.

Eastbrooke Park

13000 S. Greenwood St.

Ravenridge Park

675 W. Harold St.

Fairview Park

400 N. Walnut St.

Santa Marta Park

116th & Greenwood St.

Frontier Pool Park

15909 W. 127th St

Scarborough Park

1825 E. 153rd St.

Hampton Park

16360 S. Warwick St.

Southdowns Park

2101 S. Lindenwood Dr.

Haven Park

15475 W. 147th Terr.

Southglen Park

11300 S. Clare Rd.

Heatherstone Park

12310 S. Pflumm Rd.

Water Works Park

610 S. Curtis St.

Mahaffie Pond Park

1031 E. Cothrell St.

Woodbrook Park

14821 W. 123rd Terr.

Source: City of Olathe — ­ Department of Parks and Recreation

Olathe's topography. OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

27


Climate

Olathe’s seasons are diverse and the community experiences the gamut of spring, summer, fall, and winter conditions. Climate normals, from National Weather Service (NWS) data, are based on the most recent 30-year period (1981-2010) and not a running period (e.g., 2007 – present). The next NWS 30-year period begins in 2020. According to the NWS, Olathe’s temperatures range from an average high of approximately 90 degrees Fahrenheit in July to an average low of about 20 degrees Fahrenheit in January. Both, the summer and winter temperature variances –the difference between day and night – are around 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Olathe’s average temperature is roughly 56 degrees Fahrenheit and the prevailing wind is from the southwest. The century’s record high occurred when the mercury reached 107 degrees Fahrenheit in August of 2000. In September of the same year, thermometers climbed yet again and rose to 106 degrees Fahrenheit. These extreme temperature experiences helped forge a partnership between the department’s Emergency Management Division and the Olathe Public Library when the two library locations began to serve as cooling centers in “excessive heat warnings.” Today, the centers still offer people temporary relief from the heat during the libraries hours of operation. Library facilities are open every day of the week, excluding holidays. Since 2007, there were 24 excessive heat warnings issued for the area. May is usually Olathe’s wettest month while the annual rainfall average is about 40 inches. Every year the average snowfall accounts for about 19 inches of accumulation; and, December through February sees the most snowfall. In a given year, snowfall is observed on an average of 34 days, and produces measurable snowfall on approximately 15 days per year. Freezing rain is reported on average five to six times during the winter season and despite the fact that the annual occurrence of sleet is not specifically tracked by the NWS, it is a common winter occurrence especially in a mix with snow. Using the issuance of winter weather advisories and winter storm warnings as a proxy for the number of times winter weather impacts the region in a given year, impactful winter weather generally occurs in this area 12-15 times per year. As this statistic demonstrates, Olathe sees the entire array of wintry precipitation, which at times includes a simultaneous mix of all winter precipitation types. In 2002, an ice storm crippled the central plains and caused an estimated 650,000 power outages. The mammoth storm greatly affected the state of Kansas; the Kansas City metropolitan area; Johnson County; and, Olathe. The incredible event, known as Kansas Ice Storm DR-1402, received a major disaster declaration on February 06, 2002. The storm’s incident period was from January 29, 2002 to February 15, 2002. Several substantial snow events have occurred over recent years, including two 12+ inch snowfalls in February of 2013 and a 10+ inch snowfall in February of 2011. Although significant snow events are the exception and not the rule, OFD will staff a snow plow when the wintry condition is projected to have an impact on the service delivery of emergency operations. The snow plow helps lessen the impact of weather by assisting in the mitigation of accessibility and egress at critical incidents such as cardiac arrests, extrications, or building fires. Snow events also reinforce the importance of the department’s relationships with other City of Olathe departments and divisions. These relationships are critical to ensuring year-round equitable service delivery. During winter months, the department closely communicates with the Streets Division who manages snow plow operations. In 2008, the department and Streets Division collaborated as the City of Olathe readied for a significant winter weather event. The collaboration led to the Streets Division’s use of incident action planning, based upon the

28


National Incident Management System, to prepare for plowing operations. This enterprising practice remains in place even now. Additionally, during snow events, the City of Olathe maintains a Snow Plow Information Map, which shows for the real time status monitoring of snow plow operations and roadway conditions across the community. Somewhat uncommon in emergency services is the mention of heating degree days (HDD). The term is commonly used for weather futures contract calculation. For example, a weather futures contract settlement price is determined by summing the HDD values for a month and multiplying that sum by a dollar amount. However, the HDD is relevant to emergency responders as the numbers may be taken into consideration during a risk assessment. An HDD is the number of degrees that a day’s average temperature is below 65° Fahrenheit. This temperature is considered to be when structures need to be heated. By way of illustration, a higher number of HDDs potentially indicates a higher use of commercial and residential heating equipment. In 2016, Olathe experienced 66 HDDs.

Weather — Monthly Historic Average Month

Average Low

Average High

Record Low

Record High

January

20.0°

38.0°

-18° (1943)

74° (2003)

February

25.0°

45.0°

-12° (1982)

81° (1972)

March

35.0°

56.0°

-8° (1978)

85° (1995)

April

45.0°

67.0°

13° (1975)

91° (2006)

May

55.0°

76.0°

30° (1976)

95° (1956)

June

64.0°

84.0°

43° (1982)

105° (1980

July

69.0°

89.0°

48° (1972)

114° (1954)

August

67.0°

88.0°

46° (1986)

107° (2000)

September

58.0°

80.0°

30° (1942)

106° (2000)

October

47.0°

69.0°

18° (1993)

98° (1939)

November

35.0°

54.0°

1° (1959)

84° (1978)

December

24.0°

42.0°

-22° (1989)

76° (1939)

Source: The Weather Company — Intellicast Days Temperature >=90° Fahrenheit — 1981-2010* 2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

32°

17°

17°

45°

54°

62°

29°

22°

25°

28°

Monthly Average Precipitation — 1981-2010* JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

1.07

1.46

2.37

3.7

5.23

5.23

4.45

3.89

4.62

3.16

2.15

1.53

Month Average Snowfall — 1981-2010* JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

4.6"

5.4"

2.0"

0.6"

0.0"

0.0"

0.0"

0.0"

0.0"

0.2"

1.2"

4.8"

Source: NWS OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

29


Weather — 2016 Element

Max

Average

Min

Temperature Max

98°

67°

5° F

Temperature Mean

87°

58°

-2° F

Temperature Min

77°

48°

-8° F

Heating Degree Days (base 65)

66

11

0

Cooling Degree Days (base 65)

22

4

0

Precipitation

2.53 inches

0.11 inches

0.00 inches

Wind

44 mph

8 mph

0 mph

Gust Wind

57 mph

23 mph

16 mph

Source: The Weather Company — Weather Underground *NWS climate normals are based on the most recent 30-year period (1981-2010) and not a running period (e.g., 2007-present). The next 30-year period begins in 2020.

30


Population

Olathe is the second largest among the 21 communities in prosperous Johnson County, and the fourth largest city in the state. Olathe’s population has continued to grow steadily over the past decades. The city’s population estimate for the end of 2016 is 136,699 residents. The graph below shows the growth of the city since 1990. Olathe’s population has more than doubled since that time. Olathe has experienced an 8.4% increase since the last census in 2010. Most cities in Johnson County have seen similar population growth. Olathe’s growth, however, has outpaced neighboring cities as shown in the graph below. Olathe’s population has increased 53% since 2000, while Olathe’s largest neighboring cities, Overland Park and Lenexa, have increased 26% and 28% respectively. Johnson County has an estimated 566,814 people who call it home based on US Census bureau estimates released in late 2016. The county has seen a 32% growth since 2000. The Kansas City metropolitan area has more than 2 million residents currently. For planning and risk assessment purposes, population has also been evaluated at the MySidewalk.com -- Data are derived from Census counts and

planning area and ESZ level.

ACS 5-year Estimates

MySidewalk.com -- Data are derived from Census counts and ACS 5-year Estimates Planning Area

Total Population (US Census Estimates)

North

37,652

Central

68,079

South

24,128

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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Population has been identified for each emergency service zone (ESZ). The table below indicates if the zone is designated “Rural” or “Urban” based on its population. • Rural = an ESZ with 2,500 people or less. • Urban = an ESZ with more than 2,500 people.

Emergency Service Zone Population Density Type and Total

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ESZ

Area

Type

ESZ

Area

Type

ESZ

Area

Type

123

North

Rural

202

North

Urban

275

Central

Urban

124

North

Rural

203

North

Urban

276

Central

Urban

125

North

Rural

204

North

Urban

277

Central

Rural

147

North

Rural

222

Central

Urban

278

Central

Urban

148

North

Rural

223

Central

Rural

293

South

Rural

149

North

Rural

224

Central

Urban

294

South

Rural

150

North

Rural

225

Central

Urban

295

South

Rural

151

North

Rural

226

Central

Rural

296

South

Rural

152

North

Rural

227

Central

Urban

297

South

Rural

153

North

Rural

228

Central

Rural

298

South

Urban

154

North

Rural

245

Central

Rural

299

South

Urban

172

North

Rural

246

Central

Rural

300

South

Urban

173

North

Rural

247

Central

Urban

301

South

Rural

174

North

Rural

248

Central

Urban

318

South

Rural

175

North

Rural

249

Central

Urban

319

South

Rural

176

North

Rural

250

Central

Urban

320

South

Rural

177

North

Rural

251

Central

Urban

321

South

Urban

178

North

Rural

252

Central

Urban

322

South

Urban

179

North

Rural

268

Central

Rural

323

South

Rural

180

North

Urban

269

Central

Rural

342

South

Rural

197

North

Rural

270

Central

Rural

343

South

Rural

198

North

Rural

271

Central

Rural

344

South

Rural

199

North

Rural

272

Central

Rural

345

South

Rural

200

North

Urban

273

Central

Rural

346

South

Rural

201

North

Urban

274

Central

Urban

347

South

Rural

367

South

Rural


Olathe's population densities by Emergency Service Zone.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

33


Demographics Olathe is home to more than 136,000 people. Understanding the demographic characteristics of the people who live here helps the fire department better anticipate service demand to ensure the community’s expectations are met. Demographic information presented in this section considers Olathe as a whole. Specific information regarding characteristics of people in each Emergency Service Zone can be found in Appendix A. Age In recent years, Olathe’s population has continued to grow and change. Currently, the median age in Olathe is 34.2 years. This has trended older in recent years from an average of 30.8 years in 2000, an 11% increase. More than 19% of the population is over the age of 55. Olathe still remains younger than the United States as a whole with a median age of 37.3 years and Kansas at 36.0 in 2010. Olathe’s aging population, however, brings with it an increased service demand with more medical calls and a greater fire risk. In 2016, more than 43% of all medical calls in Olathe were for patients over the age of 60. Even with an increasingly aging population, more than 32% of the people in Olathe are under 20 years old (2011-2015 ACS estimates). Live births in Johnson County have averaged at 7,534 over the past 8 years (from CDC WONDER). This is a steady number since the early 2000s and second highest in the state of Kansas. The city works closely with Olathe Public Schools (USD 233) to monitor estimated enrollments. In the fire department’s 2014 Fire Station Location and Optimization Report, school

Source: mySidewalk.com

enrollment was projected to increase to nearly 32,000 students by 2020. Tracking enrollment is one of several factors the fire department monitors when analyzing growth of the city and considering future resource requirements to maintain appropriate service levels. The breakdown of the percentage of population by age and by generation is illustrated in the charts to the right. Sometimes it can be helpful to consider

Source: mySidewalk.com U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates.

groups of people by generation. These groups often have commonalities and different attributes that separate them from those before or after. The population is divided primarily across the four large groups: Baby Boomers (born 1964-1964) – 19.9%; Generation X (b. 1965-1980) – 23.2%; Millennials (b. 1981-2000) – 21.9%; and Generation Z (born after 2001) – 29.4%.

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Race Olathe has grown increasingly diverse in the past few years. Currently, minority population per capita in Olathe census tracts is 0.26 based on 2010-2014 ACS 5-year estimates. The total percentages by US Census categories are below.

U.S. Census Bureau, 2010-2014 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates.

Language While most Olathe residents speak English, there are a variety of other languages spoken in Olathe homes. For example, almost 9% of people in Olathe speak Spanish in their homes. By definition, this can be in addition to English or in place of it. This is an important consideration for the fire department for both emergency response as well as fire prevention efforts. Public education materials have been made available in Spanish and several community training opportunities (CPR, Community Emergency Response Team – CERT) have been conducted in Spanish to help meet the needs of more community members. Additionally, Olathe has a significant deaf community. The Kansas School for the Deaf is located here. Care is taken to ensure firefighters and other department employees help eliminate as many barriers to communication as possible. In 2016, text to 9-1-1 capability was made available in the nine-county Kansas City Regional 9-1-1 System providing another option for people who are deaf or hard of hearing Source: mySidewalk.com U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

to request help.

35


Income and Employment The median household income in Olathe is $77,335 which is slightly higher than neighboring communities (Lenexa, $75,954; Overland Park, $72,463; Gardner, $67,422). Household income varies as seen in the chart to the right. For someone with the median household income in Olathe, roughly 30.4% of it is spent on housing. For those that rent, the median monthly rent is $903. Olathe does have 8,068

Source: mySidewalk.com U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates.

households below the poverty level with 1,531 families living under the poverty level. The following map shows where those households are by census block group. The darker the green color the more households in that block group that live under the poverty level according to US Census ACS 5-year Estimates. Another indicator of income vulnerability is the number of students that qualify for the free or reduced price lunch program at school. In 2013, 28.41% of students in Olathe Public Schools met that criteria. This was a 73% increase from the level in 2004. According to the most recent US Census ACS 5-year estimates (2011-2015), the top five employment industries in Olathe continue to be: Source: mySidewalk.com U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates.

36

Employment Industry

Number employed

Percentage

Education and Health Care

15,717

11.95%

Scientific and Professional

9,704

7.38%

Retail Trade

7,437

5.66%

Finance and Insurance

6,481

4.93%

Manufacturing

6,467

4.92%


The five largest employers in Olathe employ thousands of people. These employers are: • Garmin International • Farmers Insurance • Johnson County Government • Olathe Public Schools • Olathe Health Olathe has an overall 5.08% unemployment percentage. Those employed Olathe residents are classified as mostly “high wage workers” according to the EPA’s “Wage of Workers” dataset. Wages are classified into High, Medium, and Low Income. The data is reported at the worker’s home location. Low Wage = Less than $1,250/month Medium Wage = Between $1,250/ month and $3,333/month High Wage = More than $3,333/ month Source: mySidewalk.com U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Smart Location Database Version 2.0. How people move around the city is directly related to the type of emergency responses to which firefighters are called. The majority of people in Olathe drive to work, most of them alone. Injury accidents account for a significant portion of EMS call activity.

Source: mySidewalk.com U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

37


Education About 45% of Olathe residents who are over the age of 25 years old have some type of college degree. The national average is 29%. This includes all bachelors and graduate degrees. The chart below shows the highest educational level completed for Olathe residents. U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates. Health and Wellness The ability for the fire department to achieve its mission of protecting and preserving life and property is directly tied to the health and wellness of Olathe’s residents. The fire department uses this information in considering operational protocols, fire prevention initiatives and in emergency operations planning. According to the most recent US Census ACS 5-year estimates (2011-2015), more than 10,200 people in Olathe live with a disability defined as “a long-lasting physical, mental, or emotional condition. This condition can make it difficult for a person to do activities such as walking, climbing stairs, dressing, bathing, learning, or remembering. This condition can also impede a person from being able to go outside the home alone or to work at a job or business.”

Disability by Age (people) Age Group

Number of People

Under 5

42

5 to 17

1520

18 to 64

5383

Over 65

3257

There are 2,953 people in Olathe who report significant difficulty in living independently. Part of the fire department’s role as the emergency management lead for the city is to ensure Olathe’s vulnerable populations have been considered in all emergency operations planning. This includes transportation needs, medical equipment requirements, and other planning issues. Additionally, approximately 7.30% of Olathe residents do not have public or private health insurance. Source: mySidewalk.com U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates.

Source: mySidewalk.com U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey (ACS) 5-Year Estimates.

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Schools

Olathe is home to many things that give the community it’s own bit of character. Education is one of those things. In Olathe, there are three notable educational institutions, which have students who range from pre-school to college. These institutions are the Olathe Public Schools, Kansas State School for the Deaf, and Mid-America Nazarene University. Olathe Public Schools The Olathe Public Schools (USD 233) is home to more than 29,600 students. Olathe Public Schools is the largest school district in the Kansas City metropolitan area and the second largest school district in the state of Kansas. The district has 35 elementary schools, 9 middle schools, and soon-to-be 5 high schools. According to community growth projections, enrollment at Olathe Public Schools will continue to increase over the next 30 years. The strength of the district is attributed to the amazing,

Public schools in Olathe.

award-winning staff and students as well as outstanding community support. Olathe Public Schools prepares students for their future by offering challenging curriculum with state-of-the-art technology. The community is primarily served by Olathe Public Schools. However, school district and municipal boundaries do not align. Olathe is also home to Liberty View Elementary of Blue Valley Schools (USD 229) and Prairie Creek Elementary of the Spring Hill School District (USD 230). Liberty View is located in southeast Olathe (14800 S. Greenwood Street) and Prairie Creek Elementary is located in southern Olathe (17077 W. 165th Street). Kansas State School for the Deaf The Kansas State School for the Deaf (KSD) is the oldest state educational institution in the state of Kansas. The School was founded in 1861 by Philip A. Emery, a deaf man who had been a teacher at the Indiana School for the Deaf. The school was originally located in Baldwin City, which is about 25 miles east and south of Olathe. After four years in Baldwin, the school was moved to its current location in Olathe, in 1866, where it continues its rich tradition as a large center school serving deaf children throughout the state of Kansas. KSD is located at 450 E. Park Street.

Kansas School for the Deaf

The school is recognized nationally for its academic excellence in pre-college preparation and its career and transition program leading to job placement upon graduation. KSD is also noted for its winning athletic teams (National Deaf Champions in football, basketball, and volleyball) and still boasts of beating the University of Kansas in baseball in OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

39


1897 and 1900. KSD is fully accredited by the Conference of Educational Administrators of Schools and Programs for the Deaf and the Kansas State Board of Education. The school offers comprehensive educational programming from preschool through high school. MidAmerica Nazarene University Founded in 1966, MidAmerica Nazarene College opened its doors to students with an enrollment of 263. In 1969, the state of Kansas accredited the college as a four-year institution. The college changed its name to Mid-America Nazarene University (MNU) in 1997. MNU has more than 35 undergraduate programs; over 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students; and boasts students from 35 states and five countries. The 100-acre campus is located in Olathe near 143rd Street and Mur-Len Road. Over 70% of MNU’s undergraduate students live on campus among the university’s nine residence halls. The university also has 10 academic buildings, a fine and performing arts center, dining commons, athletics center, and library. MNU is affiliated with the Church of the Nazarene and is controlled by a board of trustees elected from the various districts of the North Central Region of the Church of the Nazarene (Iowa, Joplin, Kansas, Kansas City, Missouri, Nebraska, and Prairie Lakes). MNU offers many undergraduate academic programs and 15 graduate and professional degree programs. The average class size is 16 for traditional undergraduate; 18 for professional studies; and, 9 for graduate degrees. The university employs 81 full-time faculty members and many adjunct professors. MNU’s top five majors for first-time freshmen are: nursing, elementary education, business administration, sports management, and ministry. The university is a member of the NAIA Division I Athletics and Heart of America Athletic Conference. MNU has five men’s sports teams and five women’s sports teams. Additionally, the university is home of the 2007 NAIA Men’s Basketball national champions and 2016 NAIA Women’s Basketball national champions.

The Bell Center at MidAmerica Nazarene University.

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Transportation Olathe’s transportation network is comprised of roads, rails and runways. In Olathe, roads account for a total of 1,478 lane miles. These miles are made up of infrastructure from the City of Olathe (arterial streets, collector streets, and residential streets), Johnson County (county roads – local and minor arterials), Kansas Department of Transportation (I-35, US-169, K-7, and K-10), and private ownership. The vast majority of these roadways are maintained by the City of Olathe as it is responsible for 87% (1,286 lane miles) of the infrastructure. Roadway Infrastructure Infrastructure

Lane Miles

Miles

JoCo — Roads/Locals

2.08

1.04

JoCo — Roads/Minor Arterial

4.446

2.223

KDOT ­— Interstates/Highways

110.98

48.22

Olathe — Arterial Streets

387.65

131.73

Olathe — Collector Streets

210.31

103.08

Olathe — Residential Streets

687.83

344.06

Private — Roads

69.38

34.25

Private — Roads/Parks

5.81

2.90

Total

1,478.49

667.52

Source: City of Olathe — ­ Department of Public Works A roadway of note in Olathe is I-35. I-35 is a major north-south interstate highway, which runs from Duluth, Minnesota to Laredo, Texas. In Kansas, I-35 also connects the state’s two most populous counties – Joco and Sedgwick. Additionally, 125,000 vehicles travel I-35 in Olathe on any given day, according to KDOT. Rails carry trains daily through the community. Olathe’s rail system is comprised of two major lines which run north-south through the community. Each of these lines have a pair of tracks. These lines, or subdivisions, are part of the BNSF Railway company. These subdivision are connected by a centrally located spur (connection) line, immediately south of Olathe’s downtown. The spur, which runs from approximately Grace Street and Kansas Avenue to Dennis Avenue and Keeler Street, connects the Fort Scott Subdivision (east line) to the Emporia Subdivision (west line).The spur operates about seven to eight trains per day. The Fort Scott Subdivision carries approximately 52 trains per day through Olathe. These tracks transfer freight from the coal fields in Montana and Wyoming to power plants in the southern United States. The Emporia Subdivision moves about 88 trains per day. These tracks haul freight from California to Illinois, which are host to the some of the largest rail yards in the country. Rail Line (in feet)

Rail Line (in miles)

Rail Line

Primary Line

Secondary Line

Total

Primary Line

Secondary Line

Total

Emporia

50,374

80,745

131,119

9.541

15.293

24.833

Fort Scott

37,504

52,614

90,118

7.103

9.965

17.068

Spur

6,783

1,004

7,787

1.285

0.190

1.475

Total

94,662

134,363

229,025

17.928

25.448

43.476

Source: City of Olathe — ­ Department of Public Works OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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In 2007, the 127th Street Viaduct Project benefited both rail and roadway. The development provided an additional route for traffic

Railway At-Grade Crossings Rail Line

Location

Emporia Subdivision

Woodland Avenue

Emporia Subdivision

Harold (127th) Street

Emporia Subdivision

Mulberry Street

Both subdivisions are served by these grade separations. An

Emporia Subdivision

Sante Fe Street

engineering feat, in 2008, occurred when two miles of the Fort

Emporia Subdivision

Park Street

$42,000,000 and created historic grade separations, which removed

Emporia Subdivision

Loula Street

four at-grade crossings at Ridgeview Road, Santa Fe Street, Park

Emporia Subdivision

Elm Street

Emporia Subdivision

Dennis Avenue

Fort Scott Subdivision

Dennis Avenue

Fort Scott Subdivision

151st Terrace

Fort Scott Subdivision

159th Street

Spur

Kansas

Spur

Harrison Avenue

Spur

Dennis Avenue

to cross over the Fort Scott Subdivision and I-35 at 127th Street. The $27,000,000 project provided another connection of east and west Olathe. The Fort Scott Subdivision, Emporia Subdivision and spur combine for a total of 14 at-grade crossings. All of these crossings are signal controlled. In addition, Olathe has numerous grade separations in the forms of underpasses and overpasses.

Scott Subdivision’s “rail was raised.” This raising of the rail cost

Street, and Loula Street.

Runways in Olathe are found at the Johnson County Executive Airport, which is also referred to as OJC by the Federal Aviation Administration. The airport was originally constructed as an auxiliary field for the Navy during World War II. In 1951, OJC was deeded to the City of Olathe and from the City to Johnson County in 1967.The Johnson County Airport Commission manages OJC, which has over 50,000 annual air operations and approximately 210 based aircraft. OJC is the third busiest airport in the state

of Kansas. The airport is located on roughly 500 acres of land and has about 40 miles of pavement. OJC has a 4,100’ single runway, parallel taxiways, federal contract air traffic control tower, and medium intensity airfield lighting. Localizer and distance measuring equipment approaches are available from the north and the south. Businesses at OJC offer standard aircraft services to customers such as air charter, aircraft sales, and flight instruction. OJC does not require an aircraft rescue and firefighting operation because it is not a Code of Federal Regulations Part 139 airport. There are 532 Part 139 airports in the United States.

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Transportation Modes in Olathe


Water Distribution System

The City of Olathe and Water District #1 of Johnson County (WaterOne) are the community’s two water purveyors. The City of Olathe provides water service to nearly 73% of the community. This task is accomplished by the team work of the Environmental Services and Field Operations Divisions of the Department of Public Works. WaterOne provides service to some areas of north and south Olathe. The two purveyors have “around the clock” operations and manage water distribution systems which are contemporary, large, and complex. The purveyors also have flow information which is easily obtainable. In addition to the purveyors, water is readily available from other water sources such as tenders or drafting capable fire engines, which are supported by an automatic aid agreement.

Water Distribution System Components Equipment

City of Olathe

WaterOne

Water Line Pipes (in miles)

600

153

Water Valves

14,900

3,123

Fire Hydrants

5,700

1,004

Water Meters

36,500

7,847

Source: City of Olathe — ­ Department of Public Works and WaterOne

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

City of Olathe Water Production (in millions of gallons) 2010

4,705.99

2011

4,935.39

2012

5,918.72

2013

4,970.62

2014

4,429.89

2015

4,169.20

Yearly Average

4,854.97

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44


Area Development and Property Values

Olathe continues to be a vibrant city in which people choose to work and live. The OFD protects property appraised at a value of more than $11.2 billion. This is an increase of more than 9% from the previous year. The average appraised value of both new and existing residential homes in Olathe is $225,414 in 2016. A map and chart showing property values by Olathe subdivision is located in Section 3 under "Fire Risk — One- and Two- Family Structures.". New commercial building growth continues in the city primarily along the highway corridor (See map of 2016 commercial permits, pg.). In 2016, 61 non-residential permits were issued for 2.5 million square feet of development with a total value of more than $244 million. Olathe has seen several large warehouse/distribution centers built in recent years to correspond with the intermodal facility just south of Olathe off

Commercial Building Permits in Olathe Year

Number Square of permits Footage

Valuation

2016

61

2,583,533

$244,775,353

2015

83

3,030,452

$283,367,868

was the most for any city in Johnson County and second only to

2014

78

802,225

$137,054,384

Kansas City, Missouri in the metropolitan area. The value of these

2013

44

588,477

$62,041,148

2012

49

1,551,540

$82,186,932

of I-35. All non-residential permit information is in the table to the right. In 2016, Olathe issued 560 new residential building permits. This

residential projects (1 and 2-family homes) totaled more than $220 million with an average of $337,000 per home. As new development or redevelopment projects are considered by the city, OFD has personnel from the Community Risk Reduction Section who are part of that plan review process.

Land Use Type

Acres

Percent

Agricultural/Vacant

10,928

26%

Olathe has a master plan for all development activities focused

Rural Residential

751

2%

on promoting high-quality community growth that will advance

Single Family Residential

9,430

22%

qualities of a small town. Olathe’s Comprehensive Plan – known

Multi-Family Residential

3,209

8%

as Plan Olathe – provides basic guidance for land use decisions,

Commercial

1,385

3%

of existing and future residents. As an adopted City document,

Office

1,465

4%

decision-makers refer to Plan Olathe as an advisory guide when

Industrial

3,554

8%

Public/Semi-Public

2,276

5%

Parks and Open Space

3,192

8%

Streets & Right-of-way

5,816

14%

This helps ensure all buildings are reviewed for adherence to applicable building and fire codes.

Olathe as a vibrant, progressive city, yet preserve positive

promoting community development in ways that foster prosperity

evaluating future development proposals. In 2014, the Unified Development Ordinance was put in place to provide specific standards and procedures for new development and redevelopment within the City that promote appropriate land use decisions. This document helps to ensure the vision of Plan Olathe is implemented.

Source: City of Olathe Demographics and Development (2014)

Existing and future land use in Olathe is depicted on the maps on the following two pages. OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

47


SECTION 2: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES SERVICE DELIVERY PROGRAMS Community Risk Reduction

In 2016, a department reorganization of risk reduction efforts occurred to help better reflect the needs of Olathe. The reorganization consolidated the former Division of Community Risk Management (Fire Marshal’s Office), Building Codes Division (chief building official), and Community Enhancement Program into the Community Risk Reduction Section. The structure of Community Risk Reduction is comprised of the Fire Prevention Division, Building Codes Division, and Community Enhancement Division. Community Risk Reduction is also supported by an accelerant detection canine and explosives detection canine. The Fire Prevention Division is responsible for the communication and enforcement of regulations related to fire and life safety including fire inspections, permits (e.g., hazardous materials), plan review; and, fire and explosive investigations. Inspection services include the assessment of existing commercial buildings, new construction or renovation; commercial and residential daycare; public schools and universities; fire suppression systems; fire alarm systems; occupancy inspections; and, KNOX-BOX Rapid Entry Systems. The Fire Prevention Division also manages three permitting processes, which are open burning, explosive/blasting, and hazardous material storage. Additional Fire Prevention Division services include the review of site plans, code plans, fire suppression system plans, and fire alarm plans. The Building Codes Division, in the built environment, manages permitting, plan review, and building inspections. Ensuring that buildings are safe requires the active participation and collaboration of building and fire prevention officials, architects, builders, engineers, and others in the construction industry as well as residential property owners. Inspection services consist of structural inspections, plumbing and sewer inspections, electrical inspections, and heating and air conditioning inspections. The Building Codes Division also manages numerous permits such as commercial building (e.g., new construction, addition, remodel, tenant finish), residential building (e.g., new construction, alteration), commercial footing and foundation, individual trade (e.g., electrical, mechanical, plumbing, solar energy), and fire restoration. Other services include the review of commercial and residential site plans; architectural plans; mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fuel gas systems; and, accessibility and egress. The Building Codes Division additionally manages certificates of occupancy (temporary and final); works with other City of Olathe department and divisions; and, supports emergency services (e.g., electrical and natural gas emergencies, structural damage, rapid damage assessment). The Community Enhancement Division is committed to providing a safe and visually attractive community. An enhanced community helps maintain safe, attractive neighborhoods that add to the value of properties and provide a higher quality of living for residents. A plans examiner reviews construction drawings.

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Responsibilities of the Community Enhancement Division include in-home daycare inspections; property maintenance code enforcement (e.g., exterior maintenance, interior housing inspections/hoarding); and, City of Olathe ordinance enforcement. This ordinance enforcement consists of things such as nuisance enforcement; trash, debris, open pits of water, discarded appliances, and inoperable vehicles; and, parking of recreational and commercial vehicles in neighborhoods).

Fire Suppression

The department provides response to various types of fires involving structures (e.g., single family dwellings, multi-family dwellings, high rise occupancies, commercial properties, industrial facilities), mobile property (e.g., mobile homes, motor homes), vehicles (e.g., passenger cars, over-the-road trucks, trains, recreational vehicles, heavy-duty vehicles, aircraft), natural vegetation, and rubbish (e.g., dumpster, landfill). Every day a minimum of 28 firefighters are on-duty and provide service from Olathe’s seven strategically located fire stations (Station 1, Station 2, Station 3, Station 4, Station 5, Station 6, and Station 7). These 28 firefighters – who work a 56-hour schedule – staff eight “frontline” apparatus: one rescue (Rescue 51), one truck (Truck 52), three quints

Discarded smoking materials caused an early morning house fire.

(Quint 53, Quint 56), and four engines (Engine 51, Engine 54, Engine 55, and Engine 57). Firefighters “cross staff” Rescue 51 and Truck 51 at Station 1. At Station 7, firefighters “cross staff” Engine 57, Squad 57 (triple combination pumper/multiple agent car), and Tender 57. The department also has some “reserve” apparatus, which are used when frontline units go out of service for things like preventative maintenance or repairs. The frontline engine carries a complement of ground ladders; contains an array of firefighting and salvage equipment; transports a 30 gallon cell of firefighting foam; uses either a 1,500 or 2,000 gallons per minute pump; and, has 500 gallons of water on-board with 2,415 feet of hose (supply and attack lines). The department’s quints have a 75 foot ladder/aerial device; complement of ground ladders; array of firefighting and salvage equipment; vehicle extrication and stabilization equipment; 1,500 gallons per minute pump; and, 500 gallons of water on-board with 2,400 feet of hose (supply and attack lines). The rescue has a comprehensive cache of basic and technical extrication equipment (e.g., hand tools, concrete chain saw, struts, shores); and, mobile cascade filling station. The department’s trucks have a 100 foot aerial platform; complement of ground ladders; array of firefighting and salvage equipment; 2,000 gallons per minute pump; and, 300 gallons of water on-board with 2,300 feet of hose (supply and attack lines). The cross-staffed apparatus also have a comprehensive complement of fire suppression resources. The department’s tender contains an assortment of firefighting equipment; carries a 2,100 gallon drop tank; uses a 1,250 gallons per minute pump; and, has 3,100 gallons of water on-board with 1,200 feet of hose (supply and attack). Squad 57 has a variety of firefighting equipment; 1,250 gallons per minute pump; 30 gallon cell of Class A foam; 30 gallon tank of Class B foam (AFFF); and, 500 gallons of water on-board with 1,200 feet of hose (supply and attack). Also available for fire suppression needs are the OFD two brush units (Brush 55 and Brush 57). These four-wheel drive pick-up trucks have a small quantity of firefighting equipment; 250 gallons per minute pump; and, 250 gallons of water on-board with 340 feet of hose (e.g., hard suction, booster line). OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

49


Emergency Medical Services and Mobile Integrated Health All firefighters in Olathe are either emergency medical technicians or paramedics. Firefighters deliver emergency medical care from all frontline apparatus. The department has 42 certified paramedics, which is a 40% increase since 2012. All stations, with the exception of Station 1, provide 24/7 advanced life support service. The department’s frontline apparatus are equipped with basic life support equipment and those units with paramedics have advanced life support gear. Some of the advanced life support gear includes advanced airway equipment, intravenous therapy supplies, medications, and a monitor/manual defibrillator). The department is a non-transport agency, with this service being provided under contract by Johnson County Medical Action, which is more commonly known as Med-Act. Med-Act has three staffed

The Mobile Integrated Health Team is made up of an OFD firefighter-paramedic and nurse practitioner from the local Health Partnership Clinic.

ambulances in Olathe and each of those are staffed by two paramedics. The units are co-located with firefighters at Stations 2 and 4; and, one unit is based at Med-Act’s ambulance station in Olathe (Old Hwy 56 and Harrison Street). In 2016, the department deployed two, 40-hour, advanced life support squads to: (a) help deliver emergency medical services by matching the right resources to the right need at the right time; (b) maintain the availability and reliability of “heavy” apparatus such as an engine or truck. Each squad is dynamically used during peak demand times. A typical emergency medical service system is “emergency-focused only” where the option is care from either 911 or an emergency department/room. Many times this means there is no process by which to properly address the customer’s underlying cause of issues. Furthermore, first responders are usually not trained to properly deal with the customer’s complex situation that may be above and beyond an emergency response. These types of situations are where the Mobile Integrated Health Team works to match people with the right resources at the right time. Mobile Integrated Health uses a patient- focused, problem-solving approach with staff who are trained to assess and refer patients to the appropriate non-emergency resources. The team is made up of a department firefighter-paramedic and nurse practitioner from the local Health Partnership Clinic. The Mobile Integrated Health unit operates on a 40-hour work week.

Rescue

The department’s comprehensive rescue services are diverse and focus on the preservation of life through the rescuing of trapped or endangered persons from an array of life-threatening causes (e.g., collapse, vehicle crashes, swift water or submersion, fire). In 1997, the department conducted and published the Study of Technical Rescue Needs and requirements for the Olathe Fire Department. As A worker was safely removed from a roof after a construction accident.

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a result of the department’s vision and leadership,


the Special Operations Group was established and had two disciplines: technical rescue and hazardous materials. Over time and expansion, the Special Operations Group morphed into what it is today and includes the three disciplines of technical rescue, hazardous materials, and explosive ordnance disposal. All Special Operations Group members are also trained to the hazardous materials technician level [29 CFR 1910.120 (q)]. The technical rescue component of the Special Operations Group operates from Station 1. The Technical Rescue Team delivers specialized rescue services, which include the breaking and breaching of heavy objects, building collapse, confined space rescue, swift water rescue, and, trench rescue. The Technical Rescue Team is also supported by a disaster live find canine (Car 58). Additionally, the Technical Rescue Team is part of both statewide and regional rescue initiatives. These initiatives consist of Kansas Task Force 3 and the Kansas City Metro Rescue Team. Kansas Task Force 3 is one of seven geographicallyorganized teams in the state that can assist in locating and rescuing trapped victims. The Kansas City Metro Rescue Team – which has approximately 200 members – is made up of technicians from the Central Jackson County (MO) Fire Protection District, Kansas City Kansas Fire Department, Kansas City (MO) Fire Department, and Olathe Fire Department. The Kansas City Metro Rescue Team’s primary disciplines are boat handling and water rescue, building collapse, confined space rescue, extrication, rope rescue, and trench rescue.

Hazardous Materials and Explosive Ordnance Disposal

In 1988, the department began providing response to hazardous materials incidents. Eleven years later, in 1999, the service was integrated with the Special Operations Group. Today, at least five Special Operations Group members, who are also hazardous materials technicians [29 CFR 1910.120 (q)], are always on-duty. Moreover, the department has a cadre of Hazardous Materials Team members who are trained to the level of hazardous materials specialist [29 CFR 1910.120 (q)]. These specialists work from Station 2 where the specialty unit, HazMat 52, is located. HazMat 52 carries a broad combination of resources for incident mitigation (e.g., spotting scope, plug and patch boxes, bonding and grounding kit, radiation detection devices, booms, pillows, chemical suits, air shelter/tent, decontamination equipment). Additionally, all Olathe firefighters are trained to the hazardous materials operations level. As a safeguard to ensure adequate staffing at hazardous materials incidents, a simultaneous response is used which includes deploying an apparatus from Station 1. This simultaneous response guarantees that at least five hazardous materials technicians will be a part of incident mitigation efforts. The Hazardous Materials Team also works with other local teams and agencies and the Kansas National Guard’s 73rd Civil Support Team. The Explosives Ordnance Disposal Team (EOD or bomb squad), was established in 1990 and is one of approximately 500 squads in the United States. The EOD Team is an accredited “Type I Public Safety Bomb Squad” by the accreditation standards set forth by the National Bomb Squad Commanders Advisory Board. The National Bomb Squad Commanders Advisory Board operational response guidelines and bomb squad profession do not consider the use of time as a performance measure or objective (e.g., turn-out, travel, total). A “hurry-up” nature runs counter to the careful and thoughtful process needed to mitigate an explosives incident. The department provides full spectrum explosive ordnance disposal operations as a component of the Special Operations Group. The EOD Team's responsibilities include, but are not limited to: response to suspicious objects; OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

51


render safe potential improvised explosive devices; recover and render safe of military ordnance; recover and dispose of commercial explosives; recover ammunition; conduct explosive detection sweeps for “very important people” and special events; provide joint hazardous assessment team support at special events; provide subject matter expertise and education; respond to high profile bomb threats; conduct post blast investigations; store and dispose of recovered fireworks; and, provide training to fire A "bomb tech" goes down range to investigate.

department and law enforcement personnel and civilian organizations. The team is also responsible for the collection and preservation of evidentiary materials during the investigation phase of an incident. In addition, the team

works with various law enforcement agencies as a keen part of investigation operations. To support the full spectrum concept of explosive ordnance disposal technicians, team members attend various training courses offered by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. Some courses include: hazardous devices school, post blast school, advanced explosive demolition techniques, homemade explosives training, homemade explosives training, improved explosive device electronics (basic and advanced), and countermeasures for improvised explosive devices, large vehicle bombs, and robotic vehicles. The team also has members who are trained in the areas of tactical bomb technician, weapons of mass destruction, and level III – nuclear. EOD technicians regularly attend the monthly meetings and trainings of the Kansas-Missouri Bomb Squad Working Group. These monthly gatherings lend to strong inter-agency relationships and the cohesiveness of operations in the field. The EOD Team consists of six hazardous device technicians and one explosives detection canine. Equipment assigned to the team consists of a large response vehicle with command cab capability (HazMat 53), a total containment vessel, a quick response vehicle (INSP 50), a canine unit (Car 59), and other specialized equipment. EOD Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) in the event that the department’s Bomb Squad is unavailable or if additional EOD resources are needed to mitigate an incident, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) assumes responsibility and assigns other resources as needed.

Specialized Services, Homeland Security and Emergency Management

The department’s Emergency Management Division helps preserve life and property from the effects of disasters with programs to lessen, prepare, respond, and recover from the effects of all hazards. In Olathe, the fire chief is the director of emergency management. Some services include: assessing hazards in the community; maintaining the City of Olathe’s Emergency Operations Plan; guiding City of Olathe staff, schools, and community organizations; managing Olathe’s outdoor warning system; and monitoring weather and events that may impact the community. In addition, Olathe is designated as a StormReady® Community by the National Weather Service. Specialized Services, Community Services Accreditation/performance management, data analysis, public education, and public information and media services are under the auspices of Community Services. Community Services has an internal and external customer focus and works hand in hand with the Community Risk Reduction Section, Emergency Services Section, City of Olathe staff, and those who live, learn, or work in Olathe.

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A captain works in the Department Operations Center.


POINTS OF SERVICE DELIVERY AND RESOURCES The OFD’s points of service are physical resources that are strategically located across Olathe. Everyday a minimum of 28 firefighters are on-duty and deliver service from the community’s seven fire stations. The map below illustrates where Olathe’s fire stations are in relation to other stations within Johnson County.

Olathe's fire stations in relation to all other stations in Johnson County.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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Station 1: 501 E. Old Hwy 56, established 1983

Station 2: 1725 N. Renner Road, established 1989 Dedicated to the memory of Captain Bill Bingham.

Station 3: 14940 W. 143rd Street, established 1989 Dedicated to the memory of Assistant Chief Ernest “Ernie� Prather.

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Station 4: 13301 S. Mur-Len Road, established 1990

Station 5: 1128 W. Spruce Street, established 1992 Dedicated to the memory of Firefighter Alfred "Dub" Phillips.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

55


Station 6: 24200 W. College Boulevard, established 1999

Station 7: 16110 S. Mur-Len Road, established 2007

Fire Administration Building: 1225 S. Hamilton Circle, established 2005

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The OFD’s firefighters work a 56-hour schedule and staff eight “front line” apparatus and two battalion chief units. All of these apparatus and units are named using standardized radio nomenclature, which is part of a countywide model procedure for resource identification, numbering, and typing. The purpose of the model procedure is to “provide definition and guidance into the apparatus and station numbering and identification in Johnson County, Kansas.” The model procedure’s intent is to improve and to build capacity for current and future growth in the current radio numbering system and to identify a standard for station numbering and identification during radio operations. This is in an effort to support the National Mutual Aid and Resource Management Initiative, which in turn complements the National Incident Management System by establishing a basis to resource identification and typing. The model procedure’s radio identification is accomplished using three factors: unit type (e.g., car, engine, quint), agency, and station. For example, “Q53” is a quint (Q), from Olathe (5) Station 3 (3). The same formatting applies to battalion chief unit such as “BC51.” BC51 is a battalion chief (BC), from Olathe (5) Station 1 (1). In addition, a numbering scheme of three-digit numbers (e.g., Bo521) is available and may be used when necessary and appropriate. The use and assignment of these numbers is done through careful and thoughtful coordination with the Emergency Communications Center. Internally, the City of Olathe uses a unique numeric identifier called an “IBM” for all vehicles. This unique number is used to help manage the City of Olathe’s fleet. The standardized radio identification system also applies to fire stations all across the county. For example, Station 51 is in Olathe (5) and it is Station 1 (1). The OFD’s frontline apparatus and unit resources, including minimum staffing, is:

BC51

One staff

Engine 51

Three staff

Rescue 51 cross-staffs Truck 51

Four staff

BC52

One staff

Truck 52

Four staff

Quint 53

Three staff

Engine 54

Three staff

Engine 55

Three staff

Quint 56

Three staff

Engine 57 cross-staffs Tender 57 and Squad 57

Three staff

The OFD also has numerous unstaffed units, which are in service and easily accessible for incident response. Due to safety and security concerns, these resources are not publicly published. Staff working from the Fire Administration Building provide overall leadership and direction for the Community Risk Reduction Section; Community Services Program (accreditation, public education, and public information); Emergency Services Section; and, Special Operations and Professional Development Section. This location is also home to the Building Codes Division; Community Enhancement Division; Emergency Management Division; Emergency Medical Services Division; Fire Prevention Division; Logistics and Support Services Division; and, Training and Safety Division.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

57


58

EMERGENCY SERVICES SECTION

Squad 55 (S55) M-TH, 08:00 – 18:00

Station 51 Station 55 Station 57

Battalion Chief 51

C-SHIFT BATTALION

Squad 54 (S54) Coming 2017

Station 52 Station 53* Station 54 Station 56

Battalion Chief 52

- - - - - - - - - Secondary Report

_________ Direct Report (HSEM) Homeland Security & Emergency Management

Shading Represents Seasonal or Temporary Position

Battalion Chief 58

ADMINISTRATIVE BATTALION

Station 51: E51, TR51, R51, R50, BC51, BO51, BO521, BO531, ATV51, U51 / Station 52: TR52, HM52, BC52, S52, ATV52, BO52, U52 Station 53: Q53, HM53, INSP50 / Station 54: E54 / Station 55: E55, S55, Team TitleB55 / Station 56: Q56, S50 / Station 57: E57, T57, S57, B57

Station 52 Station 53* Station 54 Station 56

Battalion Chief 52

Squad 52 (S52) M-TH, 08:00 – 18:00

Station 51 Station 55 Station 57

Station 52 Station 53* Station 54 Station 56

Station 51 Station 55 Station 57

Squad 50 (S50) Mobile Integrated Health M-TH, 07:00 – 17:00

Battalion Chief 51

Battalion Chief 52

B-SHIFT BATTALION

Battalion Chief 51

A-SHIFT BATTALION

Assistant Fire Chief

Is responsible for daily emergency services response. Seven fire stations with eight staffed units deploy personnel 24/7 365 days a year to fires, medical emergencies, rescue calls, natural and man-made disasters as well as other calls for service. Uniform personnel maintain equipment in a state of readiness, participate in training, educate the public and conduct life safety inspections as part of a daily routine.

SPECIAL OPERATIONS & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SECTION

DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF

FIRE CHIEF & EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR

OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER

KCTEW – Seasonal Fire Analyst (Grant Fund)

Operations Technician Temporary

Planning Technician Temporary

Captain Inspector, HSEM (C40)

Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) CERT Coordinator

Health Partnerships Clinic, Inc.

Nurse Practitioner

Captain-Paramedic (C40)

MOBILE INTEGRATED HEALTH (MIH)

Assistant Fire Chief

Seasonal Admin Clerk Vacant (limited hrs)

(frtdsk)

Seasonal Admin Support

Seasonal Admin Support (frtdsk)

Seasonal Admin Support (trng)

Purchasing Coordinator

Division Chief

SERVICES DIVISION

Is comprised of the Logistics & Support Services Division, Training & Safety Division, Emergency Management Division, and Special Operations. They are responsible for providing services in support of the department's daily mission and direction of special events planning, emergency management, technical rescue, hazardous materials, and explosive ordnance disposal response.

Public Education Specialist – (ENG40)

Captain of Community Services & Accreditation Manager (C40)

Fire Analyst & Intelligence Liaison Officer

Medical Director

POSITION ORGANIZATION CHART – JANUARY 2017

OLATHE FIRE DEPARTMENT

MAYOR OF OLATHE & CITY COUNCIL MEMBERS

Fire Chaplain

Training Captain (C40)

Olathe West High School Coming 2017

Fire Resource Officer (40)

Training Captain of EMS (C40)

Battalion Chief

Fire Inspector Temporary

Fire Inspector Temporary

Fire Protection Engineer (40)

Fire Captain Inspector (C40)

* (C56)

Fire Captain Inspector – C-Shift

* (C56)

Fire Captain Inspector – B-Shift

* (C56)

Fire Captain Inspector – A Shift

CRM – Permit Technician

Zoning Enforcement Officer Temporary

Enforcement Officer (Grant Fund)

Enforcement Officer

Enforcement Officer

Enforcement Officer

Enforcement Officer

Senior Enforcement Officer

COMMUNITY ENHANCEMENT DIVISION

Assistant Fire Chief

COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION SECTION

Fire Chaplain

CHAPLAINCY PROGRAM VOLUNTEERS

Permit Technician

Permit Technician

Permits Coordinator

Plans Examiner

Senior Plans Examiner

Multi-Disciplinary Inspector I Temporary

Multi-Disciplinary Inspector I

Multi-Disciplinary Inspector I

Multi-Disciplinary Inspector I

Multi-Disciplinary Inspector I

Multi-Disciplinary Inspector I

Senior Building Inspector II

BUILDING CODES DIVISION

Responsible for communication and enforcement of regulations related to fire life & safety, fire inspections & investigations, hazardous materials storage, explosive ordnance disposal, building codes plan reviews, building inspections & code compliance, and community enhancement property management which are all vital to the safety and livelihood of Olathe’s residents, visitors, businesses, institutions and industry.

Fire Chaplain – Emeritus

Chiefs Admin Support, III & HR Business Partner


RESPONSE AREA All fire service agencies and the county’s EMS transport agency are dispatched centrally from the Johnson County Emergency Communications Center (ECC). The ECC uses automatic vehicle location (AVL) to automatically select the most appropriate resources for a response based on the programmed response plans for each agency and global positioning system (GPS). The ECC responded to 41,165 calls to 9-1-1 in 2016. Eleven agencies cover Johnson County and are dispatched by the ECC. These include: Olathe Fire Department Consolidated Fire District 2 Johnson County Fire District 1 Johnson County Fire District 2 Johnson County Med-Act Lake Quivira Fire Department Leawood Fire Department Lenexa Fire Department Northwest Consolidated Fire District Overland Park Fire Department Shawnee Fire Department The department’s immediate response area is within the city limits of Olathe. However, the department has a written automatic aid agreement with all Johnson County fire service agencies. Additionally, response plans are crafted to provide the fastest and most effective response to emergencies that happen within the county. For example, the Olathe Fire Department and Lenexa Fire Department share responsibility for covering areas of I-35 in each other’s jurisdiction because of the limited direct access their own closest fire units have to some segments of the interstate.

The response areas for all fire departments in Johnson County.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

59


RISK REDUCTION EFFORTS AND PROGRAMMING Risk reduction in Olathe is proactive and long-standing. The comprehensive array of risk reduction efforts target various ages, behaviors, and hazards within the community. Programming emphasis is diverse and includes components in such things as traditional fire prevention, comprehensive public education, mobile integrated health, building codes, and community enhancement. Risk reduction is key to helping ensure a safer community for everyone, including emergency responders. In Olathe, traditional fire prevention efforts are connected with building codes and community enhancement. The connection was made in 2009 when the divisions of Building Codes and Community Enhancement became part of the OFD. Although the divisions were a part of the OFD, the Fire Prevention Division, Building Codes Division and Community Enhancement Divisions were separate from one another. In 2016, the OFD strategically reorganized and linked all of these divisions together, along with their remediation endeavors, under the section of Community Risk Reduction (CRR). The services of fire, building, and community enhancement inspections; fire and building plans review; and, permitting (e.g., explosives, hazardous materials, residential building, commercial construction, fire restoration, open burning, tenant finish/remodel) are all managed by CRR. Community enhancement may sound unique to the fire service and it is. Typically, community enhancement programs are linked to traditional building codes programs and not a fire department. However, the safety and public health components of such a program have a direct and relevant linkage to all fire departments. The inspection of properties for exterior code violations is an important purpose of the Community Enhancement Division. The Community Enhancement Division works directly to reduce risk in Olathe by helping to manage hazards like tall grass and weeds; debris; exterior dangers (e.g., unsanitary premises); and, interior hazards (e.g., hoarding, missing or disabled smoke alarms). Furthermore, staff from the Community Enhancement Division are also cross-trained to perform in-home daycare inspections. The OFD’s comprehensive public education program is well established. In 1994, the OFD hired a public education specialist to pro-actively focus on risk reduction in the community. The public education specialist receives programming support from people across the organization. For over 22 years, the OFD has kept its commitment to public education and a safer community for all. The local, comprehensive commitment includes several OFD efforts and programs for both youths and adults: Firefighter Friendly — Preschoolers

A firefighter wears gear to familiarize children with firefighters and emphasize that “firefighters are their friends.” Additional safety information may be presented such as 9-1-1; Stop, Drop and Roll; Tools and Toys; and, What’s Hot/ What’s Not. Guest Reader — Preschoolers and Kindergarteners

The fire chief visits many preschool and kindergarten classes in the fall. During the visit, the fire chief reads a firefighterrelated book and shares a simple safety message with the children. Fire Station Tours — Kindergarteners

Students experience first-hand “life at the fire station” and learn safety information that goes along with their classroom fire safety unit. Students also get to see firefighters in bunker gear and learn about the various trucks and equipment a firefighter uses.

60


Fire Safety House (FSH) — Second Graders

Since 2001, the FSH has been a “hands on” classroom on wheels. Inside the house, children hunt for home hazards in a kitchen and living room; and, practice a fire escape from the bedroom. Firefighters use theater smoke, in the bedroom, to safely simulate the conditions of a real fire while children get low and crawl to their best exit. In this case, the door is warm and students must exit through a window, which has a short ladder at the rear of the FSH. Discover Fire and Life Safety — Third Graders

Beginning in 1994, Olathe third grade students have participated in the “Third Grade” program every fall. This fiveweek program consists of weekly lessons with graded take-home assignments. Based on homework scores, students receive awards such as Junior Firefighter, Junior Fire Captain or Junior Fire Chief. Adopt-A-School — Third Graders

Adopt-A-Schools start in October and complement the “Third Grade” program. On-duty fire crews visit schools once a month to present fire and life safety lessons that allow students to interact with firefighters in a positive way. Scouts Open House at City Hall — Youth

Every year, the City of Olathe hosts two events, in the City Council Chamber, for local scouts (boys and girls) to help them meet the needs of a government-related or citizenship requirement. The mayor, or another elected official, speaks to the scouts along with the Olathe Police and Fire Departments. Firefighters talk about OFD services and safety information (e.g., 911, smoke alarms, escape planning). Helmet Head Bike Rodeo — Children age 15 and under

Every spring, the OFD’s “Bike Rodeo” invites area children to bring their bikes to Olathe Medical Center (OMC) where kids receive free bike helmets (while supplies last). The event’s only caveat is that all parents must be accompanied by a child, which ensures a properly fitted helmet. Each year approximately 800-1,000 children receive helmets at the rodeo. The rodeo is a community partnership between the OFD and Atmos Energy, OMC, Pilot Club of Shawnee Mission, and Safe Kids JoCo. Other community partners who help are Bike America, Olathe Police Department, and JoCo Med-Act. Additionally, OMC hosts a Family Fun A firefighter fits a child with free bike helmet. Fest at the rodeo which offers free screenings, health information, and lots of family fun activities. Fire and Burn Prevention — Seventh Graders

A firefighter visits the Family and Consumer Science Classes in Olathe middle schools to show students how to prevent fires and injuries. Emphasis is placed in the kitchen as most home fires begin there. Burn prevention is also highlighted. Operation Prom Night — High School Youth

Since 1995, the program has emphasized the importance of responsible driving to high school students with a real-life demonstration using fire trucks, special extrication/rescue equipment, ambulances, police cars, and more. “It (the event) really made me think about my choices when driving” said Devin, an Olathe high school student. OPN teams up firefighters, paramedics, police officers, high school drama students, and others in an effort to help prevent the leading cause of death for 15 to 20 year olds in the United States – motor vehicle crashes. OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

61


Youth Fire Safety Intervention Team (YFIT) — Youth

YFIT is a safety education program for youth who engage in firesetting or hazardous devices. Participation in the program may be voluntary or mandatory (e.g., court referral). Safety education classes are scheduled as needed and geared to the age and needs of the participant. Open House — All Ages

The annual Open House occurs the Sunday before or after October 9 (National Fire Prevention Week). The event is an opportunity for the community to meet their firefighters; and, see one of their fire An Olathe second grader sprays water at the annual Open House.

stations, trucks, and equipment. More importantly, the Open House is a chance for the community to gather safety information from the OFD, Safe Kids JoCo, and Pilot Club of Shawnee Mission; get a free flu shot; receive a blood pressure check; and, learn CPR. The flu shots are provided by OMC and administered by OFD paramedics. College Fire & Life Safety 101 — Adults at MidAmerica Nazarene University (MNU)

This program is delivered every fall to resident assistants and resident educators of MNU. The program’s educational focus is on the power of fire, risk reduction, and knowing what to do in the event of an emergency. Programming uses a combination of OFD safety A student from MNU prepares to put out a fire as part of the College Fire & Life Safety 101 program

messaging and university policy. CPR: A FREEway To Save A Life — Primarily Adults

The OFD offers five ways to learn CPR through online learning, HandsOnly™ CPR, Heartsaver/AED®, Community CPR, or special delivery. The Heartsaver/AED® course is held on the third Thursday of every month with an alternating daytime and evening class schedule. Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) —Primarily Adults Following any disaster, the potential for large numbers of victims,

disabled telecommunication equipment, and road blocks may delay fire and medical emergency service responders from reaching victims. A firefighter performs CPR check-offs for a City of Olathe staff member.

Endorsed by the Department of Homeland Security, the CERT is an organized team of people trained for disaster planning, preparedness, and survival to help meet Olathe’s needs in the event of a disaster. The

CERT units of instruction are: disasters, basic fire suppression; terrorism; disaster medical operations; light search and rescue; team organization; and, testing (written exam and practical scenario). Fire Extinguishers At Work — Adults

Fire extinguisher training is targeted to businesses, schools, and civic associations. Students learn in the classroom and then they extinguish a fire. The class host may choose to use a fire extinguisher simulator or a small, controlled fire. If a controlled fire is chosen, the host must provide the extinguishers. A 10-pound ABC extinguisher, per every four students, is recommended.

62


Smoke Alarm Help — Adults

Residents may request smoke alarm help via the OFD’s by phone (primary business number or Smoke Alarm HelpLine, or online form (Smoke Alarm Help Request). The OFD uses these requests as an opportunity to ensure smoke alarms are properly installed and to share valuable safety information (e.g., smoke alarm care, escape planning). The OFD also uses an “old school” banner which flies over Santa Fe Street and reminds people to check their home’s smoke alarms by simply pressing the test button. On average, 25,000 vehicles travel by the banner each day, according to the City of Olathe’s Traffic Maintenance Center. Safer Kitchen Program — All ages

The OFD’s Safer Kitchen Program, in 2016 and 2017, collaborated with the Olathe Housing Authority and installed automatic fire suppressors (Stove Top FireStop) in 137 living units. The installs occurred in seven Section 8 properties; 66 units at Parkview Manor; and, 64 units at locations scattered throughout Olathe. These canisters will protect a typical four burner stove from grease and other cooking fires by automatically deploying when the flames from a cooking fire make contact with the fuse on the underside of the canister. Mobile Integrated Health (MIH) — All ages

MIH matches people with the right resources at the right time. When someone calls 911 for non-emergency reasons, the fire department responds even when the situation may not require emergency attention. This traditional system can be costly in a number of ways: vital resources become unavailable to respond to more urgent calls, the underlying patient needs are not addressed, and patients are not properly connected with the community groups or organizations that can provide appropriate care solutions. The MIH team responds to people who have requested or been referred for service, but likely don’t require emergency care. The MIH team performs a medical assessment, determines needs, and helps connect the patient with the appropriate care solution in the community. The community focus on risk reduction includes outreach and disease/ injury prevention (blood pressure checks, sidewalk CPR, fall prevention seminars, etc.). MIH covers topics important to the community and helps educate residents on how to handle chronic illness and prevent injuries (smoke alarms, escape planning, falls, etc.). Civic Engagement — Adults

The OFD speaks at several civic engagements throughout the year. These events are opportunities that better connect the OFD and community. The OFD typically talks about its services or a current event and a seasonal or “recent” safety message. Some of the engagements include the Olathe Clockwinders Optimists, Olathe Club of the Deaf, and, Olathe Rotary Club. Additionally, the OFD co-hosts an annual Chamber Coffee at the Fire Administration Building every October.

Nearly 50 community stakeholders participated in the strategic planning process. OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

63


Olathe Civic Academy — Adults

The City of Olathe coordinates this nine session Civic Academy where every meeting is led by representatives from all municipal departments. The OFD’s session not only includes information about history and service, but it also includes information about safety. The Civic Academy provides an opportunity for those who live or work in Olathe to: learn about City government, how it works, and how it impacts your neighborhood; meet others interested The 2017 Olathe Civic Academy with firefighters at

in the Olathe community; interact with city staff and elected

Station 1.

officials; and, learn about opportunities to become more involved in municipal government.

Media Services/Public Information Officer (PIO)

The OFD leverages traditional media and social media to share information with the community. In regard to risk reduction, safety information sharing and blitzes occur as information is distributed across several mediums about seasonal hazards (e.g., severe weather [lightning, tornadoes], fireworks, heating, holiday lighting). A model blitz, which was established in 2005, is the OFD’s collaboration with the University of Kansas Medical Center’s Burnett Burn Care Center to present a seasonal safety offensive. The partnership hosts a media day before the Fourth of July in an effort to raise awareness about the power of fireworks while working to reduce injury, death, and property damage caused by explosives. Public information initiatives also include the effort to maximize “recency” opportunities such as sharing information immediately following an incident (e.g., house fire, carbon monoxide poisoning). This type of information is shared not only to general audiences using traditional or social media, but it is also shared by geographic location using Nextdoor. Nextdoor is a private social network. The PIO shoots scene video and distributes it to the traditional media along with targeted safety messaging. Additionally, the PIO receives email notifications from TVEyes Media Monitoring Suite whenever the OFD is mentioned in the media. The notification provides information about when and where the mention aired; shows a transcript of the event; gives local market viewership; and, displays publicity value — in dollars and cents. The OFD’s risk reduction efforts are not only at the local level, but also include collaboration and participation at the county, state, and national levels. Some of these inclusive and deliberate efforts consist of the Johnson County Fire and Burn Prevention Committee, Safe Kids JoCo, Metropolitan Kansas City Chapter of the International Code Council (ICC), Fire Education Association of Kansas, Fire Marshals Association of Kansas, Kansas Smoke Alarm Initiative, Kansas Association After this winter fire devastated a home, the OFD did media interviews and shared heating tips on social media.

64

of Public Information Officers, Midwest Regional Burn Foundation, National Fire Protection Association (e.g., 1035 Committee), ICC Fire Code Development Committee, and ICC Fire Code Action Committee.


SECTION 3: COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT COMMUNITY RISKS A thorough risk assessment should account for all of a community’s unique factors and considerations. This allinclusiveness is integral to not only effective risk reduction, but it is also imperative to the proper matching or deployment of resources to risk. The OFD conducted a comprehensive community risk and emergency services analysis. The assessment and associated methodology included the complete and cumulative discussion and consideration of: • Community hazards (causes of danger) • Threats (likelihood or probability) • Consequences (e.g., emotional, economic, historical) • Impacts (affect on system, deployment, etc.) • Risks (classification and categorization) • Conclusions (judgment or decision reached by reasoning) • Critical tasks (tasks needed to mitigate a specific risk) This all inclusive development of the risk assessment methodology process had four primary steps and entailed the inclusion of each OFD program area (e.g., fire, EMS). These primary steps were those from the Center for Public Safety Excellence’s Community Risk Assessment — Standards of Cover (6th Ed.): • Identifying the risks by area hazards and threats • Assessing the risks • Classifying the risks (e.g., fire, rescue) • Categorizing (severity) the risks The community assessment classified and categorized risk. In doing so, the OFD followed guidance from the Center for Public Safety Excellence, which provided an interpretation of the process. A common example of the classification and categorization process may be illustrated using the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. For example, a Category 5 hurricane connects the category with the severity and the hurricane as the classification. This simple example was very important to ensure clarity within the assessment. Risk Identification and Classification The assessment identified risks in relationship to the OFD’s program areas which were fire, EMS, Rescue, HazMat/EOD. The programs were further split into more specific sub-classifications to better address the community’s unique features and hazards. The topics of “Disaster Potentials” and “Non-Fire” were added to the risk identification and classification process in an effort to help facilitate a more holistic discussion. The purpose of a holistic discussion, about global considerations, was to assist with the development and creation of reliable risk conclusions for the community.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

65


Risk Identification and Classification Fire

EMS

Rescue

HazMat

EOD

Commercial Structures

Traditional

Vehicle Extrication

Agriculture

Threat Protection

Confined Space

Business and Industry

Render Safe Operations

Trench

Illegal Dumping

One- and TwoFamily Structures Mobile Property Wildland

Mobile Integrated Health

Rope Water-Ice

Transportation

Disaster Potentials

Non-Fire

Recovery, Transportation, and Destruction

Risk Assessment Methodology And Categorization The risk assessment included the categorization (severity) of risk. This categorization was completed after risk identification and classification. This systematic process helped ensure a regular and standardized approach to the management of community risk using OFD resources (e.g., human, physical, essential). The community risk assessment approach must be dynamic and match the right resources to the right incident at the right time. For example, the risk and resources needed to mitigate a house fire are respectively higher and larger than those necessary to manage a passenger vehicle fire. The community risk assessment used a Parabolic Two-Axis Risk Categorization Methodology founded upon probability and consequence. A parabolic curve reflects the multitude of variables (e.g., quantities of hazards) that must be considered when determining both probability and consequence. The approach states that movement upon the Y-axis indicates greater probability and lateral movement (left to right), on the X-axis, indicates greater consequence. Consequence, to the OFD, community, or region.

Parabolic Two-Axis Risk Categorization Methodology

66


Fire Risks Since the America Burning report of 1973) and the establishment of the United States Fire Administration (USFA) in 1974, fire deaths were cut in half across the country by 2012. Even today, this “death by fire” trend continues to typically move downward.

US Fire and Fire Loss Rate Trends (2005-2014) Loss Measure

10-year Trend

Fires/Million Population

-28.5%

Deaths/Million Population

-18.4%

Injuries/Million Population

-14.6%

Dollar Loss/Capita

-26.6%

Source: USFA Although this downward trend is significant to the preservation of life, the hazard and threat of fire is still real. Annually, US fire departments respond to almost 1.3 million fire calls. While the country’s fire problem no longer ranks as the most severe of the “industrialized nations,” thousands of Americans die each year; tens of thousands are injured; and, property loss climbs into the billions. Besides the obvious impacts of fire, there are many other significant consequences as well. These include things such as the loss of: friends or family (emotional/psychological); quality of life, lodging, jobs, and revenue (economic); and, community interest or attraction (historic). For perspective, every year fires kill more people than all natural disasters (e.g., tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, floods) combined. Fires don’t affect just individuals; fires affect communities. The OFD’s community risk assessment methodology sub-classified fire risk into one- and two- family structures, commercial structures, mobile property, and wildland. This organization helped provide a finer focus for the assessment. Since 2012, the OFD responded to 1,372 fire calls with an average of 274 per year. These included structure, vehicle, vegetative/wildland and other fires as defined by NFIRS Incident Types. The number of fire calls are relatively low as compared to the OFD’s total number of annual calls for service (just 2.1% of 2016 total calls); however, the risk associated with fire can be severe due to the inherent nature of the hazard.

OFD Fire Responses 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

Annual Avg.

Structure

156

102

129

121

113

621

124

Vehicle

54

49

36

47

40

226

45

Vegetative/Wildland

79

44

53

58

37

271

54

Other

82

45

47

43

37

254

51

Total

371

240

265

269

227

1,372

274

Source: OFD (Based on NFIRS Incident Types)

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

67


Fire Risk — One- and Two- Family Structures In the US, “residential” is the leading property type for fire deaths (76.5%), fire injuries (78.0%) and fire dollar loss (55.0%), according to the USFA. More specifically, this large percentage of deaths occurred mainly on one- and two-family properties. Overall, people living in 24 states and the District of Columbia had a higher risk of dying in a fire in 2014 than the U.S. general population. Mississippi, with a relative risk of 2.2, lead the group followed by Oklahoma (2.1), West Virginia (2.0) and the District of Columbia (2.0). In 2014, Kansas had 48 fire deaths with a fire death rate of 16.5 and a relative risk of 1.5.

US Number of Fire Deaths 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

3,983

3,940

3,994

3,650

3,391

3,445

3,414

3,146

3,468

3,428

Source: USFA

US Fire Death Rates Per Million Population 2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

13.5

13.2

13.3

12.0

11.1

11.1

11.0

10.0

11.0

10.7

Source: USFA An evaluation of Olathe’s fire deaths and injuries found that there were two civilian deaths and 23 civilian injuries since 2012. All of the local deaths and injuries were residential in nature, which correlated to national data. The average age of the deceased was 54 and the average age of the injured was 45. The two civilian fatalities were the result of building fires while the injuries were the result of building fires (78%), cooking fires (13%), and vehicle fires (9%). The civilian fire injuries ranged in severity from minor (74%), moderate (13%), and severe (13%). All of the injury related incidents were the result of building and cooking fires. The analysis concluded that Olathe’s civilian fire fatalities and injuries were the result of building fires and occurred at home; most fire injuries were categorized as minor. The study also showed no firefighter deaths and 10 firefighter fire-related injuries.

Olathe Fire Deaths and Injuries Type

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Total

Avg. Age

Fire Deaths (Civilian)

1

1

0

0

0

2

54

Fire Injuries (Civilian)

10

4

4

4

1

23

45

Fire Deaths (Firefighter)

0

0

0

0

0

0

Fire Injuries (Firefighter)

5

0

2

2

1

10

Source: OFD

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The period between 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. continues to be the busiest for fire calls. In 2016, 38% of the home fires in Olathe occurred during this period. The most common area of the home for Olathe fires to begin are the kitchen, deck/patio/porch, and attic area. The most common causes were unattended cooking and discarded smoking materials. In 2016, Olathe’s fire loss per capita was $51.75 with a total loss of more than $7 million. This abnormally high loss was above the NFPA’s reported Midwest Fire Loss Rates for cities with similar populations and can be attributed to two large, multi-family structure fires (Avignon Apartment Homes and The Edge at Olathe). The causes of these fires were lightning and electrical, respectively. Additionally, Olathe structure fires were confined to the room of origin 76% of the time which was well above the national average. The conclusion could be made that early occupant notification (e.g., smoke alarms), combined with both reliable resource distribution and concentration and system resiliency, contributed to the favorable “confined to room of origin” data. A national consensus standard provided intriguing dialogue for the assessment. The standard focuses on an exact risk when talking about fire department response to a “single family dwelling.” This standard addresses the critical tasking for a specific risk which was associated with a typical 2,000 square foot, two-story single family dwelling without a basement or exposures. The OFD conducted an analysis of 2016 single family structure fire data. The data was acquired from the OFD’s records management system and the Johnson County Appraiser’s Office via Johnson County AIMS. The intent of the analysis was to: (a) identify where Olathe home fires occur; and (b) assess OFD critical task conclusions. The study’s methodology used eight factors: (1) incident count; (2) year built; (3) square feet; (4) value; (5) more than one-story; (6) structures with basements; (7) construction type [frame]; and, (8) construction type [siding]. The study data, from 2016, concluded that most Olathe home fires occurred in structures that were 1,706 square feet in size and built around the year 1981. The study data also showed that 87% had basements; 39% were considered to have more than one-story; 100% were made of wood frames; and, 90% had “plywood or hardboard” siding. The study intent was supported.

Olathe Analysis of Single Family Structure Fires Year

Incident Count

Year Built (Avg)

Square Feet (Avg)

Value (Avg)

More than one-story

Structures with Basement

2016

31

1981

1,706

$187,250

12

27

Source: OFD and Johnson County AIMS As part of the risk assessment, the OFD also considered the age of the community’s building stock. Data indicated that 90% of Olathe’s housing units were built within a 39-year period spanning from 1970 to 2009. The numbers also showed that 27% of these units were built between 2000 and 2009. The OFD used the Census Bureau’s definition of housing unit for the study. Source: mySidewalk.com OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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Another consideration of the community risk assessment was the use of scientific data to assist with the formulation of informed conclusions. A report from Underwriters Laboratories (UL) states that while the physics of fire development has not changed over time, the fire environment or more specifically the single family home has evolved. Several factors including home size, geometry, contents and construction materials have changed significantly over the past 50 or more years. Each of these factors equate to: (a) faster fire propagation, (b) shorter time to flash over, (c) rapid changes in fire dynamics, (d) shorter escape times, and (e) shorter time to collapse. Ultimately, these factors directly affect the well-being of both citizens and firefighters.

In 2012, retired Colorado Fire Chief Bob Parker clarified and simplified the concept of risk, to the OFD, by saying to simply look at risk as a noun (people, places, and things). The thought is that the incidents (calls for service) usually follow the nouns. Where there are more nouns, there are typically more calls (probability/frequency). And, the types of nouns frequently represent a specific risk with a predictable outcome (consequence). Historically, Olathe’s calls for service have followed its people, places, and things.

Olathe Permits Issued (2016) Residential Building

1,004

Mechanical

838

Cross Connect

768

Plumbing

487

Commercial Building

306

Electrical

272

Fire Misc.

133

Mobile Home

31

Demolition

28

Footing/Foundation

7

Commercial Shell Building

5

CD Rehab

4

Total

3,883 2016 Residential Building Permits

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To better understand the immediate future of the residential fire risk factors in Olathe, the consideration of building permits was examined. The OFD knows where existing risk lies; however, permit data allowed the OFD to make informed conclusions about where and what was being developed in the community. In 2016, the Community Risk Reduction Section issued a record number 554 “single-family” residential permits in Olathe. Only the City of Kansas City, Missouri issued more in the region. Kansas City has a population of over 467,000 people and covers 319 square miles. The residential building permits, as shown below, are primarily in the northwestern, western, and southern areas of the community. These permit locations follow the expected development in Olathe as ultimate future growth build-out areas are planned in each of these directions. The OFD monitors new development in the community and constantly considers its ability to provide equitable coverage to all areas and customers. In 2014, the OFD published a Fire Station Location and Optimization Report which indicated the need for additional fire stations in these areas to meet the growing service demand. The risk assessment also considered Olathe’s residential property values as part of the OFD’s all-inclusive approach. The data discussed was from the Office of the County Appraiser and contained the average appraised value and average sales price, which are both at five-year highs. Since 2012, the average appraised value has increased by 15% while the average sales price went up 14%. These values and the associated changes are important details when reviewing the community’s overall quality of life.

Olathe Residential Property Values – Average Appraised Value vs. Average Sales Price Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Average Appraisal

$196,686

$196,261

$205,015

$216,616

$231,651

Average Sales Price

$229,290

$238,639

$251,476

$257,123

$265,133

Source: Johnson County — Office of the County Appraiser Average Property Value Ranges and Number of Subdivisions in Each Range Count of Subdivisions in Each Range 0 >= $1,000,000

1

900,000 ‐ 1,000,000

1

800,000 ‐ 900,000

1

700,000 ‐ 800,000

Range of Residential Property Value

10

600,000 ‐ 700,000

400,000 ‐ 450,000 350,000 ‐ 400,000 300,000 ‐ 350,000 250,000 ‐ 300,000

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

2 3

500,000 ‐ 600,000 450,000 ‐ 500,000

20

5 4 12 17 29 34

200,000 ‐ 250,000 150,000 ‐ 200,000

74 70

100,000 ‐ 150,000 <= $100,000

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

84 78

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Average Residential Property Value by Subdivision The consideration of historic structures and their vital relationship and meaning to any community is important. This importance was reinforced and emphasized coast-to-coast in 1940 when the National Fire Protection Association formed the Technical Committee on Cultural Resources. More than 75 years later, the committee continues to work on the preservation of our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich history. In 2009, the OFD recognized the importance of history to the community and took a proactive risk reduction measure by applying for a Johnson County Heritage Trust Fund Grant. The purpose of the grant was to help protect the J.B. Mahaffie House from the devastating affects of fire. The OFD received the grant and collaborated with City of Olathe

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staff to install an automatic fire sprinkler system; put in a new lightning rod system, and add “extra fire resistive features” to the historic home. This type of collaborative risk reduction effort was a first for the OFD. In late 2016, fire reminded us of its devastating reality when two blazes destroyed both the Evangelistic Center Church and William Chick Scarritt Home in Kansas City, Missouri. These events again emphasized the significant consideration of fire and its potential impact on a community’s historical places and locations.

National and State Registers of Historic Places in Olathe Place

Location

Register

Category

Ensor Farm

18995 W. 183rd Street

National (2004)

Museum

Hodges House

425 S. Harrison Street

State (1990)

Single Dwelling

Hyer House

505 E. Cedar Street

State (1984)

Single Dwelling

Lanter House

562 W. Park Street

National (2007)

Single Swelling

Lone Elm Campground Swale

21151 W. 167th Street

National (2014)

Transportation

Mahaffie House

1100 Kansas City Road

National (1977)

Hotel; Single Dwelling; Road-Related

Olathe Cemetery

738 N. Chestnut Street

State (2016)

Cemetery

Ott House

401 S. Harrison Street

National (1998)

Single Dwelling

Parker House

631 W. Park Street

National (1988)

Single Dwelling

Pickering House

507 W. Park Street

National (1980)

Single Dwelling

Mahaffie House OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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Fire Risk — Commercial Structures In April of 2015, an evening fire devastated a small strip mall in east Olathe. The 11,200 square foot structure, built in the 1980s, was home to five businesses. The fire caused an estimated $2.2 million loss to the structure and contents and left about two dozen people without jobs. The consideration and comprehensive impact of commercial structure fires upon the community and emergency response system is critical to an inclusive risk assessment. An important part of this assessment is the incorporation of fire protection and detection systems. The OFD made a concerted effort in 2015 to emphasize the importance of fire protection and detection systems in the

OFD Inspection Activities (2016)

community. In 2016, the OFD began use of The Compliance

Fire

3,036

Engine, which is a third party inspection reporting system. The

Building

11,761

Property Maintenance

5,364

Total

20,161

Compliance Engine is a simple, web-based service used to better track and drive code compliance, reduce false alarm activity, and ensure a safer community through third party inspection reporting and maintenance. The Compliance Engine collects, organizes, and categorizes the third party inspection reports. The state-of-the-art

Source: Community Risk Reduction Section

system tracks all of the community’s buildings with life safety systems; knows who is compliant and who is deficient; and, helps the OFD make more informed decisions, which helps keep firefighters and citizens safe. In 2016, the Compliance Engine sent 2,467 renewal notices, 465 deficiency notices, and 1,622 overdue notices. This beneficial tool helped ensure the proper maintenance of fire protection and life safety systems in Olathe and reduced the number of staff hours needed to traditionally safeguard system compliance. Besides the implementation of new and innovative ways to help manage risk in the community, the OFD also performs traditional inspection activities. As part of the community risk assessment, the OFD created an occupancy vulnerability assessment profile (OVAP) for commercial structures. The OVAP was made using the VISION™ Risk Assessment tool and methodology. This process, which included 18-specific factors, allowed for the reliable categorization of risk. The VISION™ methodology included these factors: 1. Number of employees

10. Construction Type

2. Number of floors

11. Regulatory Oversight

3. Square footage

12. Human Activity

4. Property value

13. Experience (incident frequency)

5. Occupancy load

14. Capacity to Control

6. Occupancy access

15. Hazard Index

7. Occupant mobility

16. Fire Load

8. Warning Alarm System

17. Available Water Flow

9. Exits

18. Fire Load Sprinklers

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The VISION™ Risk Assessment tool created a risk categorization, or OVAP score, for each occupancy. The score was based upon the program’s methodology and 18-factors. The scores were categorized as Low (14 or less), Moderate (15-39), Significant (40-59), or Maximum (60 or more). The OFD’s Community Risk Reduction Section spent countless hours as part of the OVAP’s three-phase process. The first phase of the process began with a methodical review of every occupancy in the OFD’s records management system (FIREHOUSE Software®). The second phase was the systematic consideration and appropriate entry of each occupancy’s 18 risk factors in VISION™. The final phase was the VISION™ Risk Assessment’s calculation, which established OVAP scores for 1,948 occupancies in Olathe.

Olathe Commercial Occupancy Risk Categorization and Statistics Risk Level

OVAP Score

Occupancies

Percentage

Maximum

60 or more

0

0.00%

Significant

40-59

50

2.57%

Moderate

15-39

1,891

97.07%

Low

14 or less

7

0.36%

Avg: 30.97

Total: 1,948

100.00%

Source: VISION™ The OVAP process also resulted in a historical comparison of the 2016 data to 2012. This direct comparison helped ensure better risk categorization conclusions. The process created several deductions about the 2016 data: • 29% increase in the amount of occupancies. • No change in the number of maximum risk occupancies. • 43% decrease in the number of significant occupancies. • 32% increase in the amount of moderate occupancies. • Seven-fold increase in the amount of low occupancies. • 5% decrease in the average OVAP score.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

OVAP Occupancies in 2012 and 2016

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The results of the OVAP scoring led to several conclusions. The OFD concluded that the 2016 OVAP process, which ended in early 2017, was not only more thorough than the 2012 product, but more reliable. The process better identified commercial structures across Olathe. It was also determined that the 5% decrease in the average OVAP score was simply relative and negligible due to the 29% increase in total occupancies. The increase was attributed to growth and the improvement of the overall OVAP process and its associated data. The OFD has yet to categorize an occupancy with "maximum" risk after two comprehensive OVAP processes. This recurring outcome lent to the conclusion that the "significant" risk categorization is the maximum in Olathe. With this reasoning, the average OVAP score of nearly 31 is perceived to be better categorized as "significant" than "moderate." The context of probability (frequency/experience factor) and consequence (magnitude) illustrates the aggregate significance of OVAP values for risk categorization. The inherent nature of the OVAP scoring yields the likelihood (probability) of service demands yet to come. Furthermore, the scoringâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all-inclusiveness also produces a reliable gauge to help understand the potential impact (consequence) to the community.

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In addition to the VISION™ Risk Assessment, of commercial structures and occupancies, the OFD also discussed other community information and considerations such as: • Zoning data and maps • Commercial building permit data and maps • Top real estate property values • Apartments, retirement communities and gratuated care facilities

2016 Commercial Building Permits

Olathe’s Top 20 Real Estate Properties Owner

Appraised Value Owner

GARMIN (building one)

$84,245,000

Embassy Suites And Conference Center $29,781,000

Santa Marta (main building)

$54,385,450

Tyson Foods

$28,681,000

Olathe Medical Center

$53,575,410

Cedar Lake Village

$28,083,140

Olathe Northwest H.S.

$46,241,870

Aldi Distribution Center

$27,494,000

U.S. Bank

$45,850,070

Stonepost Lakeside Apts.

$27,120,000

JoCo Sunset Drive Office Building $43,062,940

Kessing/Hunter/Sun Assurance

$26,972,000

Olathe South H.S.

$42,447,110

JoCo Communications Center

$26,071,780

Avignon Apartments

$41,693,000

Wyncroft Hill Apts.

$25,540,000

Olathe East H.S.

$37,817,910

Lennox Apts.

$25,157,000

Olathe North H.S.

$33,464,700

JoCo Jail

$20,911,900

Source: Johnson County – Office of the County Appraiser OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

Appraised Value

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Knowing that 19% of Olathe’s population is more than 55 years old, it is critical to assess the risks associated with congregated living facilities which are home primarily to older adults. More than 11% of all calls in 2016 were to the 41 senior care facilities in the community. As one can see from the map, many of the care facilities are in our top 10 list of addresses the department responds to in a given year. Fortunately, there were no fire incidents in these facilities in 2016. Additional fire risk factors involved the review of USFA data. The USFA states that six socioeconomic studies show an inverse relationship between fire risk and income. The poorer population groups have the highest risk of fire injury or death, while the wealthiest have the lowest. The information continues by saying that many older adults live alone on meager incomes and often in substandard housing stock. A reasonable and most logical

Olathe Care Facilities and 2016 Repeat Call Locations

conclusion is that poorer populations are more likely (probability) to die (consequence) as the result of fire. As part of the community risk assessment, the OFD took local housing situations into consideration. The Olathe Housing Authority owns and manages conventional public housing units, subsidized by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), at Parkview Manor and at “scattered sites” throughout the community. Parkview Manor has 66 apartments located in a four-story building where tenants pay 30% of their adjusted gross income or a flat-rate rent and the tenants do not pay utilities. The scattered sites account for 64 single-family and duplex units across Olathe where tenants pay 30% of their adjusted gross income or a flat-rate based on bedroom size. At a minimum, tenants in all of these units must meet program guidelines for (a) family income, and (b) household composition including families, single individuals, elderly, and/or a person with a disability. Additionally, the Housing Authority provides subsidized rental assistance to low-income families, the elderly and the disabled through HUD’s Section 8 Program. In this program, tenants pay 30% of their adjusted gross income while the Housing Authority pays the balance. Section 8 Program participants rent qualified privately-owned units located within the Olathe community. Families receiving vouchers choose where they want to live, providing the unit meets eligibility requirements and the landlord participates in the program. In 2016, the OFD recognized an opportunity to decrease fire risk in City of Olathe-owned housing units by installing Stove Top FireStop devices. The OFD collaborated with the Housing Authority and installed these devices in the kitchens of nearly 140 units. Kitchens were targeted as they are the most likely room for fires to start based on historical incident data.

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*Critical facilities are an essential consideration of any risk assessment. However, critical facility details are considered “secure” and not publicly published as many are noted in the Johnson County Hazard Mitigation Plan. Fire Risk — Mobile Property According to the National Fire Incident Reporting System, mobile property (vehicles) includes things like passenger cars, pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles, moving trucks, contractor vans, delivery trucks, recreational vehicles, campers, rail cars, and aircraft. All of which are an integral consideration of community fire risk as fire departments in the US responded to an estimated average of 229,500 vehicle fires per year in 2007-2011, says the National Fire Protection Association. These fires caused an annual average of 328 civilian fire deaths, 1,426 civilian fire injures, and $1.4 billion dollars in direct property damage. In Olathe, there were 205 mobile property fires between 2012 and 2016.

Olathe Mobile Property Fires (2012-2016) Code

Description

Count

$ Loss

130

Other

4

$        25,700

131

Passenger Vehicles

165

$      669,802

132

Road Freight/Transport Vehicles

26

$      523,050

133

Rail Vehicles

2

$        60,000

134

Water Vehicles

1

$          1,000

135

Aircraft

0

$                ---

136

Self-Propelled RV

1

$               ---

137

RV

2

$          8,000

138

Off-Road/Heavy Equipment Vehicle

4

$      434,000

Total

205

$  1,721,552

Source: OFD (NFIRS)

The OFD’s community risk assessment classified mobile property fire risk into three types: (1) Roadway, (2) Rail, and (3) Aviation. The three classifications best represent the risks found in Olathe. The assessment also considered both the probability of occurrence (history) and the correlating consequence (magnitude or severity) associated with these types of risks. The analysis used local, state, and national data to formulate logical projections regarding the happening of future incidents. The vehicle fire risk on roadways is an important consideration as Olathe has 1,478 lane miles and 667 miles of roadway infrastructure. In 2016,

The City of Olathe preserved 112 miles of existing roadway: arterial street mill and overlay (16 miles); local/collector street mill and overlay (34 miles); and, surface treatment (62 miles). Every day — on I-35 alone — 125,000 vehicles travel through Olathe. Historically, passenger vehicles and transport vehicles account for nearly all mobile property fires. The potential for a vehicle fire is high, simply due to the noteworthy amount of traffic volume. However, the occurrence and impact are low. The OFD’s categorical conclusion is that fires involving passenger vehicles (on or off road) or transport vehicles are considered low risk. In the US, from 2008-2010, approximately one in seven fire responses were to highway vehicle fires, according to the USFA. Passenger vehicle fires made up 86% of these highway fires. This noteworthy occurrence does not include the tens of thousands of fire department responses to highway vehicle crashes. Report data says that more than 6 in 10 highway vehicle fires originated in the engine, running gear, or wheel area of the vehicle. The leading factor which contributed to the ignition of highway vehicle fires was mechanical failure. And, over half of fatal vehicle fires were the result of or secondary to a collision. It is important to remember that vehicle fires do not just occur on highways, they can occur anywhere. OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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The National Fire Protection Association reports that fire

US Loss Measures for Highway Vehicle Fires (2008-2010) Average Loss

Highway Vehicle Fire

All Fires (Excluding Highway Vehicle Fires)

Annually, these fires cause an estimated

Fatalities/1,000 Fires

2.3

2.0

six civilian injuries and $28 million

Injuries/1,000 Fires

4.5

11.3

Dollar Loss/Fire

$4,870

$8,700

departments respond to an average of 1,290 rail vehicle fires every year.

in direct property damage. Almost one-third of rail vehicle fires involve box, freight, or hopper cars. The most

Source: USFA

common fire cause is typically some type of mechanical failure or malfunction, which accounts for nearly half of the incidents. Additionally, between 40-50% of rail vehicle fires occur on railroad properties. While other non-rail vehicles also burned on these properties, the most common types of fires were outside fires, particularly brush or grass fires. Events in the Kansas City metropolitan area are sometimes a great reminder of the true significance or impact of railrelated incidents. On July 3, 2010, a witness reported a train derailment in Sugar Creek, Missouri. The derailment resulted when 17 cars left the tracks and six cars overturned. During the incident, a car carrying toluene ignited and subsequently exploded. Information says that the “train engineers reacted quickly by separating the remaining cars from the fire and moving additional dangerous chemicals up the tracks.” However, the train derailed close to another and the diesel fuel in two locomotives ignited. The locomotives were worth about $2 million each. Additionally, hazardous materials crews worked to prevent chemicals from leaking into a nearby creek. Reports from BNSF Railway stated that 76 trains were re-routed and no injuries were reported. Although the OFD only mitigated two rail car fires from 2012-2016, the fire risk “on rail” is another integral factor as the community has over 43 miles of track. These tracks carry between 60 to 80 trains through Olathe every day. Although the occurrence of rail car fires are rare, the impact can be significant to not only the community, but the region as well. Fires involving rail cars are considered a special risk. Aviation risk in Olathe occurs as more than 50,000 air operations occur at the Johnson County Executive Airport. The airport is located in southeast Olathe and has a single runway, which is over 4,000’ feet long. About 210 aircraft are based at the location. On July 4, 2003, the OFD responded to an aircraft fire in a hangar at the airport. The fire occurred when a mechanic started the engine of a plane inside a hangar. The mechanic was trying to diagnose an engine issue reported by a pilot and student pilot. After the mechanic started the plane, smoke began bellowing from the engine compartment. Fire, smoke, and heat damage to the hangar structure and its contents (planes, etc.) was in excess of $1 million. Since 2012, the community experienced no aviation fires. Even though the occurrence of these fires is rare, the potential risk exists, and the impacts on emergency resources and sizable losses are major. Fires involving aircraft are considered special risk.

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Aircraft – Dispatched Problem Types 2012-2016 Aircraft Alert 1

0

Aircraft Alert 2

3

Aircraft Alert 3

3

Aircraft Emergency

0

Aircraft Standby

1

Source: Johnson County Emergency Communications Center


Fire Risk — Wildland Property The occurrence of wildland fire in Olathe is infrequent, according to historical data. The Kansas Forest Service previously conducted an evaluation and prepared a Community Wildfire Hazard Assessment Report. Findings from the report stated: The municipality of Olathe and the surrounding area were surveyed to have an overall low (risk) rating due to an apparent lack of larger and more volatile fuel types and an abundance of crop fields, shorter grasses and urbanized areas that will not carry wildfire as well as some other areas. Fire Risk Conclusions And Categorizations The OFD’s risk assessment created several fire risk conclusions based upon local, state, and national data. Since 2012, Olathe’s civilian fire fatalities (average age of 52) and injuries were the result of building fires and occurred at home; and, most fire injuries were categorized as minor and were cooking-related. Additionally, Olathe’s residential building fires occurs in homes that are 19% below the community’s average appraised value. The methodology utilized by the OFD’s community risk assessment made use of comprehensive probability (historical frequency) and consequence (magnitude/severity) data. This careful and orderly method allowed for the establishment of risk level conclusions and subsequent categorizations.

Fire Risk Level Classification – Conclusions and Categorization Low

Low risk examples include automatic alarms, investigations, vehicle fires, etc.

Moderate

Moderate risk illustrations are appliance fires, flue fires, and outbuilding fires, etc.

High

High risk instances are comprised of house fires and building fires.

Special

Special risk examples include aircraft emergencies and oil tank battery fires, etc.

As the severity/category of risk increases, so does the complement of resources (e.g., human, physical) needed to effectively mitigate the incident.

Fire Risk – Categorization by Call Type Low

Moderate

Aircraft Stand-by

Appliance Fire

Automatic Alarms

Flue Fire

Grass-Brush Fire

Modified Response House/Building

Investigate

Outbuilding-Detached

The OFD’s risk assessment methodology also made use of individual call types to better reflect the true emergency service needs of the community. This methodical use of call types allowed the risk assessment to fine tune the OFD’s deployment model — match the right resources (e.g., physical, human) to the right incident at the right time.

Still Alarm (e.g., fence) Trash-Debris Transport Vehicle Vehicle HIGH

SPECIAL

House Fire

Aircraft Emergency

Building Fire

High-Rise Plan Oil Tank Battery Fire Train

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

81


Fire Risk Critical Task Analysis There are several steps and points to consider in the identification and analysis of critical tasks, writes the Commission on Fire Accreditation International. The determination of critical tasks is done by: (a) determining the necessary human and physical resource capabilities (e.g., knowledge, skill) and capacities (number and type of resources) necessary for control and termination of an incident; (b) validating the model; and (c) documenting the process. The determination and summation of critical tasks establishes a fire department’s Effective Response Force (concentration) for each risk level classification (e.g., fire, rescue) and categorization (e.g., low, medium, high, special). Risk level classifications and categorizations are usually straight-forward and easy to understand. However, the categorization of “special” for the fire risk classification is notable. The special categorization is distinct as these incidents are typically one-of-a-kind; have minimal or no history of occurrence; and, pose a remarkable risk to the community and emergency responders. The OFD addresses these complex incidents through the use of a “response plan.” This pre-arranged plan is commonly referred to as the “response matrix” or “matrix.” The matrix is created by the OFD and used by the Johnson County Emergency Communication Center when the computer-aided dispatch “recommends units in accordance to each department’s (pre-determined) request.” In other words, the matrix

Fire Risk – Critical Task Low

is what assigns OFD resources

Moderate

Task(s)

Personnel

Task(s)

Command/Safety/Documentation

1

Command/Safety/Documentation 1

Fire Attack

1

Fire Attack

2

Pump Operations

1

Pump Operations/Water Supply

1

Ventilation

2

Utilities/Exposure Protection

2

Aerial Operations/Other

2

Total/ERF

10

Total/ERF

3 HIGH

Personnel

SPECIAL

Task(s)

Personnel

Task(s)

Command/Safety

1

Varies by complexity and type.

Attack Line

2

See response matrix for detail.

Pump Operations

1

Back-up Line

2

Rapid Intervention/On Deck

2

Search and Rescue

2

Ventilation

2

Water Supply

1

Utilities/Exposure Protection

2

Aerial Operations/Other

2

Total/ERF

17

82

Total/ERF

to all call types. This is especially critical to those calls categorized as “special” (e.g., aircraft emergency, high-rise plan, oil tank battery fire) since emergency responses are not cookie cutter.

Varies


By way of illustration, in response to a high-rise fire, the matrix will assign: “Ola Bat Chief, Ola Bat Chief, Ola Rescue, Ola Engine, Ola Engine, Ola Squad, Ola Insp 50, MICT by CP, ALS Ambulance, Ola Chiefs Pager, plus 7 Engines, 4 Trucks, High Pressure Air Supply, 3 Chief Officers, ALS BC, 2 ALS Ambulances, HM1173, Comm 1, and Salvation Army (canteen).” Dispatch will also, “Notify EOC, Pager IDT, Pager Olathe Chiefs, Set Chiefs Information Pager. This multifarious response provides at least 64 firefighters to the scene of a high-rise fire. All risk level classifications and categorizations are designed to match the right risk with the right resources (critical tasks - effective response force) at the right time (specific call type). This systematic approach also allowed for the appropriate critical tasking and ensuing effective response force determination. EMS Risk In Olathe, the most common type of call for service is EMS. Traditional medical incidents account for just over 70% of the annual, total call volume. Due to their frequency and complexity, EMS incidents are an important consideration when evaluating a community’s risk. A common risk factor — which is essentially bilocated in both EMS and rescue — is vehicle extrication. Vehicle extrication was a definite and important consideration of the OFD’s evaluation of EMS risk. An in-depth discussion about vehicle extrication is located under Rescue Risk. Since 2012, the OFD saw an approximate 5% increase in EMS responses every year. This consistent rise equated to a notable 19% increase when comparing 2012 to 2016. An assessment of the relationship between EMS responses and population change — since 2012 (125,872) — shows an approximate 8% increase for 2016 (136,282) of Olathe’s resident or “night time” population. The global or “balcony” view of EMS responses is also important to understand. Data is deposited in and gathered from the OFD’s records management system. The system is based on process and “incident types” from the National Fire Incident Report System (NFIRS). The system allows for the numerical coding or “typing” of incidents and adds further clarification through the use of “actions taken” codes. These data elements, along with “Incident Type,” enable a fire department to document the breadth of activities and resources required by the responding fire department to effectively handle the incident, according to NFIRS. Since 2012, the OFD saw a 15% increase in the amount of medical assists and a 22% jump in EMS calls. For the same time period, the total number of medical calls (medical assists + EMS calls) went up 19%. In a typical year, medical calls account for approximately 70% of the OFD’s total calls for service. Reasoning dictates that EMS calls are frequent (probability) and the severity (consequence) of the incident varies from call to call. In Olathe, these calls for service typically occur more frequently in the community’s densely populated areas.

OFD EMS Responses (2012-2016) 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

5-Yr. Total

5-Yr. Avg.

Medical Assist Calls (311)

2,880

3,037

2,998

3,257

3,402

15,574

3,115

EMS Calls (3112-324)

2,973

3,127

3,484

3,557

3,814

16,955

3,391

Total

5,853

6,164

6,482

6,814

7,216

Source: OFD OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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Time is a vital consideration of EMS risk. High priority calls such as non-breathers are truly time sensitive as the relationship of time to intervention may be critical to patient survival. These calls carry the highest of consequence. Conversely, time is also a consideration for low priority calls due to their perceived importance to the customer during their time of need. This contrast is easily illustrated by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;lift assist.â&#x20AC;? Since 2012, the OFD saw a 30% increase in lift assists. Lift assists accounted for nearly 2,200 calls for service in Olathe over a five-year span, which ranged from 2012 to 2016. Lift assists equated to an average of 439 calls per year. A descriptive study of the life assist call, by Cone et al, quantified this type of incident. Hot Spot of 2016 EMS Calls The study found that two-thirds of their lift assist calls (726; 66.8%) were to one-third of these addresses (174 addresses; 32.5%). Return calls equated to 563 instances at the same address within 30 days after the initial lift assist. For 214 of these return visits, the study noted that it was possible to compare patient age and sex with those associated with the original lift assist. This conclusion revealed that 85% of return visits were likely for the same patients. Of these, almost 39% were for another life assist/refusal of transport; 8% were for falls and other injuries; and, 47% were for medical complaints. Hospital transport was required in approximately half of these return visits. EMS crews averaged nearly 22 minutes of out of service time per life assist. The study concluded that lift assist calls were associated with substantial utilization of EMS. And, life assists should trigger fall prevention activities and other interventions. According to the study, this type of call may be an early indicator of medical problems that require more aggressive evaluation. Evaluation which could be made by a much more global healthcare approach.

OFD Lift Assists (2012-2016) 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

5-Yr. Total

5-Yr. Avg.

345

420

451

480

499

2,195

439

Source: OFD (NFIRS Incident Type Code 554) An integral and global consideration of the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s EMS risk is the local healthcare continuum. Typically, when someone calls 911, the fire department responds even when the situation may not require emergency attention. This traditional system can be costly in a number of ways: vital resources become unavailable to respond to

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more urgent calls, the underlying patient needs are not addressed, and patients are not properly connected with the community groups or organizations that can provide appropriate care solutions. To better serve the customer’s needs and lessen the impact on emergency resources, the OFD established the Mobile Integrated Health (MIH) Team. The MIH Team, which is made up of a firefighter-paramedic and mid-level practitioner, responds to people who have requested or been referred for service, but likely don’t require emergency care. MIH performs a medical assessment, determines needs, and helps connect the patient with the appropriate care solution in the community. Other EMS risk considerations of the community’s healthcare continuum are the traditional medical resources within Olathe. The global emergency healthcare continuum within Olathe is comprehensive and comprised of numerous facilities and locations throughout the community. Olathe also has one hospital-based emergency department and one freestanding emergency room. The freestanding emergency room is a part of Overland Park Regional Medical Center and the hospital is affiliated with Olathe Health. Olathe Health has a network of two hospitals and one of those is Olathe Medical Center. Olathe Medical Center – the community’s only hospital – is located in south Olathe on 151st Street near I-35. In addition to the hospital, the Olathe Medical Center network has 38 family and specialty care clinics throughout the community. Data from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services says Olathe Medical Center has “voluntary non profit – private” ownership. The center is an acute care hospital with a high emergency department volume. Hospitals with a “high” volume are characterized by 40,000-59,999 patient visits each year. Nearly 80% of patients would “definitely recommend” this hospital. Hospital quality measures are another important risk consideration as they may be part of the customer’s decisionmaking process when seeking care. In some cases, these quality measures, if perceived to be inconvenient, may lead to the misuse of the 911 system for low priority illness or injury. This misuse may perhaps occur because the patient perceives the system as a faster pathway through the emergency room. Especially, since the “fastest average ER wait times” are readily available on the web.

Hospital Quality Measures Waiting Time

Time Until Sent Home

Left Without Being Seen

Time Before Admission

National Avg.

27 min.

2 hrs. 40 min.

2%

4 hrs. 55 min.

Kansas Avg.

38 min.

3 hrs. 18 min.

1%

5 hrs. 2 min.

OMC Avg.

21 min.

2 hrs. 23 min.

1%

3 hrs. 30 min.

Source: ProPublica EMS Risk Conclusions And Categorizations The OFD’s risk assessment created several EMS conclusions. The majority of the OFD’s calls for service continue to be medical in nature and older adults account for 19% of the population, but 43% of the calls for service. Since 2012, the annual EMS call volume has notably increased by 19%. And, the majority of medical calls occur where the population is most dense. A reasonable probability conclusion is that EMS calls happen frequently and more commonly where people work, learn, or reside within Olathe. The severity (consequence) of the calls vary by type. Following dispatcher questioning, call types considered low are those deemed non-emergent and carry low consequence.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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Call types considered high (e.g., non-breather) or special (e.g., mass casualty incident)have obvious significant consequence. Reasoning also concludes that lower risk calls require less resources (concentration). Conversely, as the risk increases so does the required amount and type(s) of resources. The methodology utilized by the OFD’s community risk assessment made use of comprehensive probability (historical frequency) and consequence (magnitude/severity) data. This careful and orderly method allowed for the establishment of risk level conclusions and subsequent categorizations.

EMS Risk Level Classification – Conclusions and Categorization Low

Includes calls dispatched for medical issue, but through questioning by dispatcher are deemed to be C3 (non-emergent - Alpha, Omega). Generally, these are patients without life-threatening illness or injury.

Moderate

Includes calls dispatched for medical issue and through questioning by dispatcher are deemed to be C1C, C1 or C2 meaning personnel respond emergently. These are patients that could have life-threatening illness or injury (Charlie, Bravo, Delta. or Echo).

High

This classification is reserved for those incidents in which there is a life-threatening illness or injury or the mechanism of injury requires more personnel resources for the appropriate pre-hospital care.

Special

Incidents in which multiple, critically-ill or injured patients should be expected. carbon monoxide medical C1/C1C incidents or a mass casualty incident (MCI) such as a multiple-vehicle accident on the interstate involving a school bus. C1C (code one closest), C1 (code one), or C2 (code two) mean emergent response. C3 (code three) means non-emergency response.

The OFD’s risk assessment methodology also made use of individual call types to better reflect the true emergency service needs of the community. This methodical use of call types allowed the risk assessment to fine tune the OFD’s deployment model — match the right resources (e.g., physical, human) to the right incident at the right time.

EMS Risk – Categorization by Call Type Summary LOW

MODERATE

Abdominal Pain C3

Abdominal Pain C1C, C1, C2

Back Pain C3

Back Pain C1C, C1, C2

Behavioral C3

Behavioral C1C, C1, C2

Chest Pain C3

Chest Pain C1C, C1, C2

Sick-Ill Subject C3

Sick-Ill Subject C1C, C1, C2

Traumatic Injury C3

Traumatic Injury C1C C1, C2

Unconscious-Syncope C3

Unconscious-Syncope C1C, C1, C2

HIGH

SPECIAL

Injury Accident C1, C1C

Carbon Monoxide Medical C1C, C1

Non-Breather C1C

MCI

All risk level classifications and categorizations are designed to match the right risk with the right resources (critical tasks - effective response force) at the right time (specific call type). This systematic approach also allowed for the appropriate critical tasking and ensuing effective response force determination.

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EMS Risk – Critical Task Low Task(s)

Moderate Personnel

Task(s)

Personnel

Command/Safety/Documentation 1

Command/Safety/Documentation

1

Patient Care

1

Patient Care

1

Total/ERF

2

Total/ERF

2

High Task(s)

Special Personnel

Task(s)

Command/Safety/Documentation 2

Command/Safety

1

Patient Care

Documentation

1

Investigation/Hazard Control

3

Patient Care

6

Total/ERF

11

Total/ERF

2

4

Rescue Risk

The OFD classified rescue risk into six disciplines: (1) vehicle extrication; (2) confined space; (3) trench; (4) rope; (5) structural collapse; and (6) water/ice. The documentation, of rescue risks, is very important due to the inherent nature of such consequential hazards and activities. The consideration of the community’s vehicle extrication risk is important to everyone. In the United States, there are approximately 275 million registered vehicles, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). NHTSA “exposure data” shows that drivers in passenger cars, light trucks, large trucks, and motorcycles travel about 3 million miles every year — that’s more than 120 trips around the earth. In 2015, crashes accounted for over 35,000 fatalities (96 per day) and over 2.4 million injuries (6,693 per day). Passenger car occupants made up 36% of these deaths, which was the highest percentage of any category. In Olathe in 2015, there were four fatalities in vehicle crashes. In Kansas, nearly 60,000 vehicle crashes occur every year, according to the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT). November leads all other months with the most crashes and July accounts for the most deaths. The busiest day for crashes in Kansas is Friday, while most fatalities occur on Saturday. KDOT also says that more crashes occur during the 5 p.m. hour than any other and fatal incidents typically happen in the afternoon. According to the annual Allstate® America’s Best Drivers Report (2016), Olathe is the ninth safest driving city in the United States. The cities on this illustrious list are considered to be those who “are least likely to experience collisions.” Olathe moves up to the seventh safest city when “taking precipitation into account.”

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

87


The combination of crash totals with traffic volume data allows for the calculation of crash rates. Data from the Public Works Department says that on average, the at-grade intersections have a rate of 8.30 crashes per ten million

Olathe Public Property Crash Rate (per 1,000 population) 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

20.37

20.41

20.24

22.80

22.96

Source: Olathe Police Department

Olathe Public Property Injury Crashes

entering vehicles (crashes/TMEV). In total, nine Olathe intersections exceed KDOT’s statewide average crash rate for intersections, which is 10 crashes/TMEV for urban intersections. The intersection

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

384

425

459

376

422

Source: Olathe Police Department

at 151st Street and Black Bob Road exhibited the highest intersection crash rate with 14.68 crashes/TMEV. However, this intersection was improved in early 2015 due to existing congestion issues. Over time, the intersection is projected to show an improvement, or in this case, a reduction in its crash rate. Additionally, the Public Works Department data states that interchange

Olathe Public Property Non-Injury Crashes 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2,232

2,224

2,220

2,679

2,704

Source: Olathe Police Department

Olathe Top Crash Rate Locations — At-Grade Intersections 151st Street and Black Bob Road 119th Street and Lennox Road Santa Fe Street and Ridgeview Road

crash rates are ranked and calculated in

119th Street and Black Bob Road

the same manner as intersection crash

138th Street and Black Bob Road

rates. On average, the interchange ramp terminal intersections have a rate of approximately 11.0 crashes per (TMEV). The Santa Fe Street/northbound I-35/ Clairborne Road intersection has the

Santa Fe Street and Mur-Len Road Santa Fe Street and Parker Street 119th Street and Strang Line Road 127th Street and Black Bob Road

highest interchange crash rate, with 18.44 Source: Department of Public Works crashes/TMEV. This location is known as a high congestion area.

Olathe Top Crash Rate Locations — At-Grade Interchanges Santa Fe Street and NB I-35 119th Street and NB I-35 151st Street and SB US-169 151st Street and NB US-169 119th Street and SB I-35 Source: Department of Public Works

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Establishing an understanding of specialized services (e.g., confined

Census of All Fatal Occupational Injuries — Kansas

space rescue, trench rescue, rope rescue) and their relationship to risk is important to the comprehensive perspective of safety within Olathe.

2011

78

2012

76

as risk-based deployment. Additionally, these specialized services

2013

55

are many times directly linked to work-related settings. To better

2014

73

understand these risks, one must be familiar with occupational injury

2015

60

These specialized services are provided based upon the specific risks which occur within the community. This service premise is better known

and death data.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

In December of 2016, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2015. Some of the document’s key findings, in regard to fatal occupational injuries, included: • The number of fatalities (4,386) was the highest since 2008. • Hispanic or Latino workers incurred 903 fatal injuries — the most since 937 fatalities in 2007. • Workers aged 65 or older incurred 650 fatal injuries, which was the second-largest number for the group since 1992. • Roadway incident fatalities accounted for over one-quarter of deaths. • Fatal work injuries (937) in the private construction industry was the highest since 2008. • 17% of decedents were contracted by and performing work for another business or government entity rather than for their direct employer at the time of the incident. Olathe, like many communities, has areas where confined spaces are located. These unique spaces are usually associated with occupational settings. "Confined spaces" are not necessarily designed for people and may be simply large enough for workers to enter and perform certain functions. Functions such as cleaning, inspection, maintenance, or testing. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) says a confined space also has limited or restricted means for entry or exit and is not designed for continuous occupancy. Confined space examples consist of things like access shafts, bins, hoppers, manholes, pipes, pits, silos, sewers, tank cars, fast food grease traps, tunnels, utility vaults, and vats. When access or egress is limited, a ditch or trench could also qualify as an example of a confined space. Some examples of prospective confined space rescue locations are the Black Bob Park Water Towers, Exxon Mobil — Olathe Grease Plant, Cedar Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, Geiger Ready-Mix, Harold Street Wastewater Treatment Plant, Olathe Medical Center, Sysco Kansas City, Tyson Foods Distribution Center, and Water Treatment Plants #1 and #2. The precise number of confined spaces in Olathe is not known. The basis for determining the risks associated with confined spaces was accomplished by using occupational data (state and federal) and information garnered from local subject matter experts (rescue technicians), walk-throughs, inspections, and pre-plans.

A technical rescue technician saved a family's dog, named Gabe, from a sanitary sewer. OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

89


The incidence of confined space rescues are low. However, this low frequency is superseded by the significant, intrinsic risk associated with this type of hazard. Confined space rescues are complex and should be considered.

OFD Technical Rescue — Dispatched Problem Types (2012-2016) Confined Space

1

Trench — Cave-in

1

High Angle

0

Source: Johnson County Emergency Communications Center Excavation and trenching are among some of the most hazardous construction operations. The fatality rate for excavation work is 112% higher than the rate for general construction as stated by OSHA. On December 15, 2016, media outlets reported the death of a 33-year old man in Belton, Missouri who perished when the walls of the 12-foot deep trench he was working in collapsed. Belton is just southeast of the Kansas City metropolitan area. OSHA defines an excavation as “any man-made cut, cavity, trench, or depression in the Earth’s surface formed by earth removal.” A trench is defined as a “narrow excavation (in relation to its length) made below the surface of the ground.” As a rule, the depth of a trench is greater than its width, but the width of a trench (measured at the bottom) is not greater than 15 feet. A general rule of thumb to help remember the difference between an excavation and trench is that trenches are deeper than they are wide. Excavation and trenching work exposes serious, inherent hazards to all workers involved with operations. The greatest risk is a cave-in, which is more likely to result in a worker fatality. A single cubic yard of soil may weigh as much as a car. OSHA likens an unprotected trench to an early grave. As with other specialized operations, safety is paramount during trench work. Workers (people) should only enter trenches after adequate protections are in place. These specific protections address important potentials such as cave-ins. Falling loads, hazardous atmospheres, and hazards from mobile equipment are additional hazards commonly associated with trenching. Cave-ins and collapses generally occur because of unstable soil conditions combined with improper or inadequate shoring. The potential for additional collapse is every present and any action — by workers or rescuers — may disrupt the temporary stability thus causing another cave-in. Common actions which may cause additional cave-ins are the removal of soil or debris; adding weight near the edge of an open cut; introducing vibration (e.g., engines, vehicle movement); rain; or, the mere passage of time. The incidence of trench rescue response is low. However, this low frequency is superseded by the substantial, fundamental risk associated with this type of hazard and the regularity of construction in Olathe. Olathe is a regular leader in the Kansas City metropolitan area for the issuance of construction permits. Trench rescues, like other technical rescues, are complex and should always be considered. An administrative policy guide defines rope rescue as “any rescue attempt that requires rope and related equipment to safely gain access to, and remove patients from, hazardous geographic areas with limited access such as high rise buildings, above or below grade structures, by means of rope system.” Some examples of prospective rope rescue locations are the Black Bob Park water towers, Embassy Suites Olathe, Garmin, Harold Street Wastewater Treatment Plan, Hilton Garden Inn, Lake Olathe (cliffs and spillway). Other general structures in Olathe with rope rescue

90


potential include bridges, cell towers, radio towers, retaining walls, and silos. The basis for defining the risks associated with rope rescue was completed through the utilization of information collected from data, local subject matter experts (rescue technicians), walk-throughs, inspections, and pre-plans. The incidence of rope response is low, but this low frequency is trumped by the considerable and fundamental risk associated with the need for this type of rescue. Just as with any other technical rescue, rope rescue is intricate and multifaceted. Rope rescue must always be a risk consideration. Structural collapse, to some degree, should be a logical consideration of any community as buildings are everywhere there are people. Like other communities, Olathe has thousands of structures within its boundaries. The structures range from little to big, old to new, and residential to commercial. Daily, both resident and rescuer, encounter this unique array of structures.

A Special Operations Group member prepares for a tower rescue class. This OFD class was attended by rescuers from across the region.

Typically, a structure will collapse into itself and pull with it the exterior walls when the load-bearing structural elements fail. There are numerous reasons why a structure may collapse such as engineering, construction, deliberate act, fire, or weather (e.g. rain, snow). This type of inward collapse may yield a dense debris field and a small footprint. A structural failure caused by something like a deliberate act (e.g., explosion) or weather (e.g., high wind) may equally collapse in an outward direction. The outward direction of the collapse may result in a less dense and dispersed field of debris. When structures collapse — due to whatever cause — rescuers may be put in harm’s way for extended periods of time as they enter the collapse zone to perform search and rescue operations. Other responders (e.g., construction workers, government representatives) may also enter a collapse zone as they shut off utilities, assess structural instabilities, shore up safe paths of ingress and egress, evaluate other hazards (e.g., airborne contaminants), and investigate a potential crime scene especially if the collapse is secondary to a deliberate act. The occurrence of structural collapse within the community is infrequent. However, like other notable risks, the low frequency is outweighed by the substantial consequence attributed to such an event. Thus, the consideration of structural collapse is an integral park of risk assessment. The prevalence of water in any community is an absolute risk consideration. In communities like Olathe, where four seasons harbor both water and ice, the discussion of these conditions must be had when properly assessing risk. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says drowning is the fifth leading causes of unintentional injury death in the United

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

91


States. Every day about 10 people die from unintentional drowning and, of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. The CDC data continues and states that for every child who dies from drowning, another five receive emergency department care for nonfatal submersion injuries. Drowning is the leading cause of unintentional death for children ages one to four according to the CDC. Children’s drowning deaths and injuries are highest in warm weather months (May to August). As reported by the CDC, those at most risk are males, children, and minorities: • Males account for nearly 80% of drowning deaths. • Drowning is responsible for more deaths among children aged 1-4 than any other cause except congenital anomalies (e.g., birth defects). • The fatal unintentional drowning rate for African Americans, between 1999-2010, was significantly higher than that of whites across all ages. The CDC attributes seven factors as affecting the risk of drowning: 1. Lack of swimming ability 2. Lack of barriers 3. Lack of close supervision 4. Location 5. Failure to wear life jackets 6. Alcohol use. 7. Seizure disorders Information from the CDC, in 2014, showed only two “pool and spa” deaths for children younger than 15 in Kansas. In the United States, 58% of pool and spa fatalities — of children younger than 14 — occur at residential in-ground pools. Since 2004, 224 residential in-ground pool permits were issued in Olathe, according to the Building Codes Division.

Commercial Swimming Pools in Olathe Outdoor (HOAs, apartments, etc.)

86

Indoor (motels, etc.)

20

Municipal

5

Schools

11

Total

122

Source: Johnson County Department of Health and Environment The Kansas Injury Prevention and Disability Program noted that drowning injuries accounted for 162 deaths across the state from 2009-2013. People aged 10 or older accounted for 81% of these fatalities. In addition, males had a death rate per 100,000 that was greater than three times that of females. Program data also showed 79 hospital discharges and 272 emergency department visits between the years of 2008 and 2012. Individuals aged 10 or older made up 30% of hospital discharges and 50% of emergency department visits.

92


OFD — Ice and Water — Dispatched Problem Types (2012-2016) Drowning - Diving

17

Drowning – Diving C1

7

Drowning – Diving C1C

5

Drowning – Diving C2

9

Drowning – Diving C3

1

Ice Rescue

2

Water Assist

16

Water Rescue

5

Source: Johnson County Emergency Communications Center Fortunately, Olathe has not experienced a death related to drowning in many years. While the past incidence of drowning is relatively low, the life-threatening potential or consequence remains.

Swift Water Rescue — Low Water Crossing at Lake Olathe

Rescue Risk Conclusions And Categorizations

Conclusions about rescue risk are important because of the technical knowledge and actions, and specialized resources, associated with its safe mitigation. Technical rescues occur infrequently, but their consequences can be severe and the impact upon resources are significant. The OFD concludes that no rescue is of low or moderate risk. Other conclusions categorize call types such as vehicle extrications and industrial accidents as high risk while incidents involving technical rescue (e.g., confined space) are considered special risk. Due to the relationship of technical rescue and considerations such as weather events, a tornado strike is categorized as special, too. The methodology utilized by the OFD’s community risk assessment made use of comprehensive probability (historical frequency) and consequence (magnitude/severity) data. This careful and orderly method allowed for the establishment of risk level conclusions and subsequent categorizations.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

93


Rescue Risk Level Classification — Conclusions And Categorization Low

No rescue is considered low risk.

Moderate

No rescue is considered low risk.

High

Examples include vehicle extrications and industrial accidents as high risk. Special risks require additional resources; need specialized equipment; or, necessitate expert skills. Illustrations of special risk are technical rescues (e.g., confined space,

Special

high angle). As the severity/category of risk increases, so does the complement of resources (e.g., human, physical) needed to effectively mitigate the incident. The OFD’s risk assessment methodology also made use of individual call types to better reflect the true emergency service needs of the community. This methodical use of call types allowed the risk assessment to fine tune the OFD’s deployment model — match the right resources (e.g., physical, human) to the right incident at the right time.

Rescue Risk – Categorization by Call Type HIGH

SPECIAL

Industrial Accident C1, C1C,

Confined Space Rescue

C2, C3 Injury Accident Rollover C1

High Angle Rescue

Injury Accident With

Ice Rescue

Extrication C1C

Tornado Strike Trench/Cave-In Rescue Water Rescue All risk level classifications and categorizations are designed to match the right risk with the right resources (critical tasks - effective response force) at the right time (specific call type). This systematic approach also allowed for the appropriate critical tasking and ensuing effective response force determination.

Rescue Risk – Critical Task HIGH Task(s)

Personnel

Task(s)

Personnel

Command/Safety

1

Command/Safety

1

Rescue Group Operations

4

Rescue Group Supervisor

1

Support Functions

3

Rescue Group Operations

6

Patient Management

2

Support Functions

4

Patient Management

3

Total/ERF

15

Total/ERF

94

SPECIAL

11


Hazardous Materials (HazMat) Risk

The thought of an incident related to a hazardous material or hazardous waste is an important consideration for the OFD. An acute, intentional or unintentional release would potentially be hazardous to the well-being of Olathe’s environment, people, and property. Locally, the topic areas of significant consideration are (a) agriculture; (b) business and industry; (c) illegal dumping; and (d) transportation routes. These areas of consideration were identified as important since they convey the greatest probability of occurrence when discussing the risk for a hazardous materials incident in Olathe. Before risk conclusions may be made, it is important to understand a few definitions prior to creating assumptions about hazardous things (hazardous materials, hazardous substance, and hazardous waste). A hazardous material is any material or object that meets the any of the definitions of Hazard Classes in 49 CFR or that is listed in the hazardous materials table at 49CFR172.101. A hazardous substance is any material listed as having reportable quantities pursuant to Section 311 of the Clean Water Act (40CFR117.3). Finally, a hazardous waste is any material that is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) hazardous waste manifest specified in 40CFR262. For the purpose of this risk assessment, hazardous materials and hazardous wastes were the root of the discussion and considerations. The risk assessment determined that the foundation of the EPA’s “cradle to grave” program provided a simple way for any agency to holistically think about hazardous materials and waste in a community. Cradle to grave is a system created for hazardous waste. However, its global framework focus on hazards from the time they are: (1) created, (2) transported, (3) treated, (4) stored, and (5) disposed. Every piece within this framework, provides a comprehensive and thought provoking way to look at a community’s hazardous waste, and hazardous materials. This basic thought process is all-inclusive and should receive some level of attention by any community with vigorous business and industry sectors, or robust transportation systems. The area of agriculture is a local consideration because fertilizers and pesticides are a threat to the environment, people, and property when inadvertently released or misused. Olathe’s agricultural areas are minimal; however, the community’s location is in the heart of the Midwest, which has a strong farming influence. This influence leads to carrying of chemicals through the community via routes such as road ways. Another important area of hazardous materials risk consideration is business and industry. The Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Plan is the primary planning document for the Mid-America Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC). The plan serves as an emergency planning tool to facilitate an effective, coordinated, multi-jurisdictional response by all personnel during a hazardous materials emergency. The plan provides a framework for hazardous materials planning and response in the areas served by the Mid-America LEPC, including Cass, Clay, Jackson, Platte, and Ray counties and the City of Kansas City in Missouri; and Johnson, Leavenworth and Wyandotte counties in Kansas. The OFD is a member of the Mid-America LEPC. Facilities covered by the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act must submit emergency and hazardous chemical inventory forms known as Tier II forms each year. In Kansas, forms are submitted to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment and the county emergency management office. Counties then forward the forms to the Mid-America LEPC. All reported Tier II locations are available on an interactive map at the Mid-America Regional Council’s website at www.MARC.org.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

95


The Fire Prevention Division issues hazardous materials permits to local business and industry every year. Permits help give reasonable assurances that hazardous material risks are properly managed in the community. The process also provides a permanent record of hazardous materials locations. Hazardous materials permits also give the OFD information about specific chemicals, quantities, and specific locations via site or floor plans. In 2016, the OFD issued 406 hazardous materials permits to local businesses. Since 2012, the five year permit average was 407. Additionally, hazardous materials permit information is uploaded into the premise records of the Johnson County Emergency Communication Center’s database. This upload makes the permit information available at the fingertips of emergency responders via mobile data terminals, which are located in all response apparatus. The threat of illegal dumping consists of the improper, intentional, and illegal

OFD HazMat Permits Issued

discarding of things like biohazards, engine fluids, paints (all types), and other

2012

407

chemicals (e.g., solvents). Although illegal dumping is rare in Olathe, the

2013

413

2014

413

2015

409

2016

406

Annual Average

407

consideration of such an act is important due to its potentially substantial and adverse affect upon the environment, people, and property. In an effort to maintain a safe and vibrant community, the City of Olathe operates a Household Hazardous Waste Program. The program accepts any unwanted household chemical that cannot safely be either discarded in the

Source: OFD ­— Fire Prevention Division

trash or sent down the drain because of the substance’s toxicity, flammability, reactivity, or corrosivity. The program better ensures for the proper disposal of household hazardous waste while protecting the environment (e.g., groundwater, soil, streams), people, pets, and property. The topic of transportation routes is an important consideration when evaluating a community’s hazardous materials risk. Olathe’s principal routes of transportation − for the movement of hazardous materials − are pipelines, rails, and roads. The community has dozens of miles of pipeline; 43 miles of tracks (60-80 trains per day); 1,478 lane miles of municipal roads; one major interstate (I-35); and, three divided state highways (K-7, K-10, and US-169). The OFD also has access to AskRail®. AskRail® is an app that provides responders access to accurate, timely data about what type of hazardous materials a railcar is carrying. According to the Johnson County Hazard Mitigation Plan, the county has an “extensive transportation network” and ranks second in the state of Kansas for transportation hazardous materials incidents. Fortunately, fatalities have not historically occurred with these types of incidents. The Johnson County Hazard Mitigation Plan states that the probability of future occurrences for this type of hazard is difficult to determine. Releases of hazardous materials are generally accidental, but the possibility also exists for an intentional release. The human-factor of this hazard makes it difficult to predict the frequency of future occurrences. However, as a result of the quantity of hazardous substances in this populated planning area (Johnson County), the probability of a hazardous materials event was determined to be “possible.” The plan’s conclusions believe that a hazardous materials event is probable within the next five years. The magnitude of a hazardous materials spill can be critical taking into consideration the populated planning area, the numerous highways that materials travel on, and the quantity stored in the county, concludes the plan.

96


From 2012 to mid-2014, the department used “Action Taken” codes to collect data regarding hazardous materials responses as opposed to “Incident Type” designations. With the change in response analysis methodology, the focus on identification of risk categorization was based on “Dispatched As” and not “Situation Found.” Hazardous materials responses are now tracked using the “Categorization by Call type” table below.

HazMat — Dispatched Problem Types — 2012-2016 HazMat

39

HazMat Investigation

17

HazMat Task Force

0

Source: Johnson County Emergency Communications Center The methodology utilized by the OFD’s community risk assessment made use of comprehensive probability (historical frequency) and consequence (magnitude/severity) data. This careful and orderly method allowed for the establishment of risk level conclusions and subsequent categorizations. Special risk examples are train derailments and other confirmed HazMat incidents.

HazMat Risk Level Classification — Conclusions and Categorization Low

Low risk examples are carbon monoxide investigations, gas leak standbys, etc.

Moderate

Moderate risk illustrations are gas odor inside and HazMat investigations.

High

High risk instances are a HazMat modified response.

Special

Special risk examples are train derailments and HazMat incidents.

As the severity/category of risk increases, so does the complement of resources needed to effectively mitigate the incident. The OFD’s risk assessment methodology also made use of individual call types to better reflect the true emergency service needs of the community. This methodical use of call types allowed the risk assessment to fine tune the OFD’s deployment model — match the right resources (e.g., physical, human) to the right incident at the right time.

HazMat Risk – Categorization by Call Type Low

Moderate

CO Investigation

Investigate Gas Odor Inside

Investigate Gas Odor Outside

HazMat Investigation

Standby Gas Leak High HazMat Modified Response

Special HazMat Train Derailment

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All risk level classifications and categorizations are designed to match the right risk with the right resources (critical tasks - effective response force) at the right time (specific call type). This systematic approach also allowed for the appropriate critical tasking and ensuing effective response force determination.

HazMat Risk – Critical Task Low

Moderate

Task(s)

Personnel

Task(s)

Personnel

Command/Safety/Documentation

1

Command/Safety

1

Patient Care

2

HazMat Supervisor

1

HazMat Operations

6

HazMat Support

3

Total/ERF

11

Total/ERF

3 High

Special

Task(s)

Personnel

Task(s)

Command/Safety

1

Command/Safety

1

HazMat Supervisor

1

HazMat Supervisor

1

HazMat Operations

7

HazMat Operations

8

HazMat Support

6

HazMat Support

7

Total/ERF

15

Total/ERF

17

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Risk

EOD risk in Olathe is managed by the department’s Bomb Squad. The Bomb Squad has three primary areas of responsibility, which are: (1) threat protection; (2) rende-safe operations; and (3) recovery, transportation and destruction of hazardous energetic materials (explosives). The area of threat protection entails the readying of venues for things such as marathons, VIP visits, and more. The readiness also includes collaboration with numerous types of local, state, regional, and federal agencies in order to help address security-related matters. The collaboration may involve “sweeps” for improvised explosive devices (IED) or weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Sweeps can encompass people, property, or passenger vehicles. In the event of a bomb threats at a venue, EOD may offer recommendations in regard to considerations and actions like shelter-inplace versus evacuation. The act of making something inoperable is considered a render-safe operation. Render-safe operations are either the analysis of, or the dismantling or separation of the components of a suspicious package, unattended package, destructive device, IED, or WMD. The area of recovery, transportation, and destruction involves the transportation, removal and destruction of hazardous energetic materials. This includes all commercial explosive classifications, fireworks, hazardous objects, military ordnance, pyrotechnic materials, and unstable or deteriorated chemicals.

98


EOD is additionally aware of other community threat potentials such as colleges; large businesses; industry; medical facilities; municipal, county, state, and federal structures; places of worship; schools; and, transportation modes (roadway, rail, aviation). In addition, group efforts alongside law enforcement may involve activities such as force protection, sensitive materials security, and surveillance. From 2012 to mid-2014, the department used “Actions Taken” codes to collect data regarding EOD responses as opposed to “Incident Type” designations. With the change in response analysis methodology to focus on identification of risk categorization based on “Dispatched As” and not “Situation Found." Hazardous materials responses are now tracked using the “categorization by Call type” table below.

OFD EOD Responses — Dispatched Problem Types — 2012-2016 EOD Activation

12

EOD Recovery

39

EOD Standby

12

EOD Tactical (created in 2016)

0

Source: Johnson County Emergency Communications Center The methodology utilized by the OFD’s community risk assessment made use of comprehensive probability (historical frequency) and consequence (magnitude/severity) data. This careful and orderly method allowed for the establishment of risk level conclusions and subsequent categorizations.

EOD Risk Level Classification — Conclusions and Categorization Low

No EOD occurrence is considered a low risk.

Moderate

No EOD event is categorized as moderate risk.

High

Threat protection is an illustration of high risk. Special risk examples are (a) render-safe operations and recovery; and (b) transportation

Special

and destruction of hazardous energetic materials.

As the severity/category of risk increases, so does the complement of resources needed to effectively mitigate the incident. The OFD’s risk assessment methodology made use of individual call types to better reflect the true emergency service needs of the community. This methodical use of call types allowed the risk assessment to fine tune the OFD’s deployment model.

EOD Risk — Categorization by Call Type High

Special Transportation and destruction of hazardous energetic materials

All risk level classifications and categorizations are designed to match the right risk with the right resources (critical tasks - effective response force) at the right time (specific call type). This systematic approach also allowed for the appropriate critical tasking and ensuing effective response force determination.

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EOD Risk Level Classification — Critical Tasks Critical tasking and the determination of an effective response force is an integral part of any community risk assessment. This process is important; however, the consideration of responder safety is paramount. Because of the sensitive nature of bomb squad operations, the critical tasks associated with EOD activities are considered secure and are not for public dissemination. The responsible stewardship of secure information is in the best interest of all responders and the community as a whole.

Disaster Risk

Another beneficial consideration for a community risk assessment is the topic of disasters. The OFD applied existing regional and county level assessments in the forms of the Mid-America Regional Council’s Threat and Hazard Identification Risk Assessment (THIRA) and the Johnson County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan. The THIRA provides a broader view of regional considerations while the Hazard Mitigation Plan provides a more local focus. The THIRA used applicable threats and hazards; and, a list of potential threats and hazards for the Kansas City region, which was narrowed to those with a medium to high overall risk. Risk was defined as “the estimated impact that a hazard [may] have on people, services, facilities and structures in a community; the likelihood of a hazard event resulting in an adverse condition that causes injury or damage.” Methodologies outlined in the Kansas City Regional MultiHazard Mitigation Plan were used for context. The THIRA used two factors to calculate overall risk: the probability of an event occurring and the severity of that event. The regional “threats/hazards” identified by the THIRA as high probability, high severity, and high overall risk were: tornado, severe winter weather, and cybersecurity attack. The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 requires all political entities in the US to have an approved Hazard Mitigation Plan in order to be eligible to receive hazard mitigation funds following a disaster - should funding become available. The Johnson County Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan documented the local planning process and identifies relevant hazards, vulnerabilities, and strategies. This information may be used by participating jurisdictions to decrease vulnerability, and increase resiliency and sustainability. Over the course of 2013, Johnson County worked with local partners, Wyandotte County, Leavenworth County, and the Kansas Division of Emergency Management to develop the Region L Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan. The regional mitigation plan was approved by FEMA and adopted by the Johnson County Board of County Commissioners and City of Olathe in 2014. The planning process followed a methodology prescribed by FEMA, which began with the formation of a Hazard Mitigation Planning Committee (HMPC). The committee was comprised of participating jurisdictions, and state and federal agencies. The HMPC conducted the risk assessment that identified and profiled hazards that pose a risk to Johnson County, assessed the vulnerability to these hazards, and

Natural and Man-Made Hazards Agricultural Infestation

Hailstorm

Terrorism/Agri-Terrorism

mitigate them. The plan identified,

Dam/Levee Failure

Hazardous Materials

Tornado

profiled, and analyzed several hazard

Drought

Land Subsidence

Utility/Infrastructure Failure

vulnerabilities. The HMPC reviewed

Earthquake

Landslide

Wildfire

Expansive Soils

Lightning

Windstorm

Extreme Temperatures

Major Disease Outbreak Winter Storm

Flood

Radiological

Fog

Soil Erosion & Dust

examined the capabilities in place to

data and discussed the impacts of each of these 22 natural and man-made hazards.

100

Source: HMPC


The plan’s 12-step risk assessment process concluded that the highest probability hazards were winter storms and floods. The hazards with the greatest magnitude (consequence) were that of a dam and levee failure; major disease outbreak; terrorism/agri-terrorism; and, tornado. Since the assessment was comprehensive, it also created goals and objectives geared towards the reduction of risk from the identified hazards. The reasonable conclusion, based upon the assessment of the THIRA and Multi-Jurisdictional Hazard Mitigation Plan, is that severe weather is a primary high overall risk for the region, county, and Olathe.

Non-Fire Risk

The consideration of risks that are sometimes, by definition, not clearly connected to a specific program area are key to a thorough risk assessment. This consideration is important because these calls for service require: (a) assignment of human and physical resources, (b) commitment of resources, (c) intervention/action, and (d) application of safety practices. For the purpose of clarity, the OFD’s methodology defined these calls for service using seven NFIRS incident types. These incident types were: (1) False Alarm, (2) Good Intent, (3) Hazardous Condition, (4) Overpressure, (5) Service Call, (6) Severe Weather, and (7) Special. These incident types accounted for 33% of the OFD’s call for service for the years of 2012 through 2016. The conclusion is that these non-fire risks (incident types) are frequent and of low consequence (severity). The table below shows the number of incidents categorized as “Non-Fire” or “Other” based on dispatched problem type.

OFD Non-Fire Responses — Dispatched Problem Types — 2012-2016 Assist

548

Check For Injuries

69

Check The Welfare

198

Fire Inspection

282

Investigate Power Lines Arcing

74

Investigate Power Lines Down

135

Investigate Transformer

115

Lift Assist

2,195

Standby

851

Standby EMS

286

Standby with Police

5

Source: Johnson County Emergency Communications Center

Correlating Community Risks

The OFD’s assessment also considered several “correlating community risks.” In other words, correlating factors of peril, which may loan to an increased risk propensity for a specific population or demographic. This increased risk may not be simply specific to one OFD program area, but rather a risk that could have mutual parallels to multiple programs. These factors, when either alone or in combination, may reliably help in the projection of future service demands. For example, residents living in a chronically impoverished area may be more at-risk to both fire and EMSrelated incidents, which could result in a service demand increase – more calls for service.

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The OFD considered seven correlating community risks for every ESZ during the Community Risk Evaluation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Categorization and Conclusions process. The correlating community risk data was obtained primarily from US Census Bureau estimates. The risks were: 1. Percent of housing units constructed prior to 1940 2. 50+ units in structure for Olathe 3. Overcrowded housing in Olathe 4. Linguistically isolated households in Olathe 5. High concentration of vulnerable populations in Olathe 6. Chronically impoverished areas in Olathe 7. Residents over age 25 with very low educational attainment The US Fire Administration report "Socioeconomic Factors and the Incidence of Fire," found evidence to suggest that the age of housing units is related to increased fire risk, explaining a "moderate amount of fire rate variation" in Fairfax County, VA and St. Petersburg, FL. Older homes can have different fire risks associated with them simply due to their age. Fire risks of older homes may be attributed to things such as limited or no standardized fire or building codes at time of construction; less barriers between floors (uninhibited fire spread); knob and tube electrical wiring; lumber that naturally becomes drier over time; and, no or too few smoke alarms. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Percent of Housing Units Constructed Prior to 1940â&#x20AC;? map displays the percentage of housing units built prior to 1940. The US Fire Administration report "Socioeconomic Factors and the Incidence of Fire," found evidence to suggest that the age of housing units is related to increased fire risk, explaining a "moderate amount of fire rate variation" in Fairfax County, VA and St. Petersburg, FL.

102

mySidewalk.com


This map identifies areas with a high concentration of housing units in buildings that contain 50+ units. It does not say how many structures there are with more than 50 units, but instead it shows how many housing units are "housed" in structures that contain 50 or more units. These locations have a higher fire risk due to the large square footage of structures with 50+ housing units.

mySidewalk.com

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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The “Overcrowded Housing” map displays the percentage of overcrowded housing units for census block groups across Olathe, according to the 2011-2015 ACS 5-year Estimates. Overcrowded housing is defined as housing units with more than one person per room. This measure of overcrowded housing units was calculated by adding together all owner and renter occupied housing units with more than one person per room. For more information on the use of overcrowding measures visit HUD’s website.

mySidewalk.com

104


The “Linguistically Isolated Households” map highlights areas with high concentrations of linguistically-isolated households. Areas in a darker gradient of green have a larger share of limited English-speaking households. The chart included in the toolbar on the left displays primary languages spoken within each block group. This data could be useful to anyone looking to enhance community engagement by ensuring that public communication is carried out in the language of all households in an area. The U.S. Census Bureau defines a limited English-speaking household as “a household in which no member of the household 14 years old and over speaks only English, or speaks a non-English language and speaks English very well.”

mySidewalk.com

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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The â&#x20AC;&#x153;High Concentration of Vulnerable Populationsâ&#x20AC;? map identifies areas with a high concentration of vulnerable populations. The data was filtered to show census tracts where the total population over 65 and population with a disability are in the top quartile for Olathe, according to 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates.

mySidewalk.com

106


The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chronically Impoverished Areasâ&#x20AC;? map identifies areas in the top quintile of households living below the poverty level in both 2000 and 2010. The datasets in this map are normalized by the total households in each respective year, which allows you to reliably compare changes in the level of household poverty by accounting for population growth. Chronically impoverished areas in green saw a decrease in households in poverty between 2000 and 2010; areas in pink and purple saw an increase. Light blue areas had relatively low and stable levels of poverty between 2000 and 2010, and dark blue areas had relatively high levels of poverty at both points in time. The time series chart included here lets you see projected counts for households in poverty through 2020.

mySidewalk.com

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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The “Residents Over Age 25 with Very Low Educational Attainment” map identifies areas with a high concentration of residents over the age of 25 with less than a ninth grade level of education.

mySidewalk.com

Correlating community risks help identify populations or areas of the community, which may inherently have an increased risk or a potential to regularly consume emergency response resources. These factors may reliably help in the projection of future service demands. Additionally, these factors were key considerations of the OFD’s Community Risk Evaluation.

108


COMMUNITY RISK EVALUATION

The OFD's community risk assessment was a comprehensive evaluation of Olathe. The OFD’s Planning Area and ESZ methodology incorporated seven, distinct risk evaluation elements. Every risk assessment element was defined and assigned a weighted risk rating. The seven risk assessment elements were: 1. Incident History (probability) 2. Population Density (probability) 3. OVAP (consequence)

5. Property Value (consequence) 6. Target Hazard (consequence) 7. Local Considerations (consequence)

4. At-Risk Population (consequence) The risk assessment elements were defined as: • Incident History (probability): Defined as the aggregate number of historical incidents within an ESZ. Methodology (probability) assumptions included: ESZs with the “most common repeat call locations” received an automatic received a risk rating of two. • Population Density (probability): Based upon US Census Bureau data and interpreted as the number of people (rural or urban) within a one square mile geographical area. US Census bureau numbers are considered and qualified as professional estimates. • OVAP (consequence): Identified as the vulnerability assessment profile for commercial occupancies as founded upon the VISION™ Risk Assessment tool and methodology. • At-Risk Populations (consequence): Interpreted as correlating community risks, which included those more susceptible to harm or danger as compared to the mainstream population. This determination was supported by US Census Bureau data from mySidewalk. • Residential Property Value (consequence): Considered as the appraised value as determined by the Johnson County Appraiser’s Office —higher value equates to higher consequence. There is over $11 billion of appraised property in Olathe. • Target Hazards (consequence): Described as places or facilities where there is a significant potential for the loss of life or property. The potential consequence is greater where more target hazards are located. Examples of target hazards include things such as areas of high traffic counts, correctional centers, government structures, healthcare sites, multi-family housing locations, retirement communities, schools, subsidized housing, transportation networks (e.g., rail), and universities. Methodology (consequence) assumptions included: ESZs with rail; two schools or more (any type); or, a high school automatically received a minimum, overall Risk Level Determination of “moderate.” • Local Considerations (consequence): Designed to best represent those considerations which may not be adequately captured and represented within the study’s other six risk elements. Examples of local considerations include things such as (1) critical facilities/infrastructure — air route traffic control center, oil tank battery, pipelines, Tier II site, water production, etc.; (2) economic impact — large employer, unique tangible value, revenue source; (3) historic locations — Hyer House, Mahaffie House, Pickering House; (4) political impact; (5) topography/ landscape — elevation, limited access, undeveloped land, water feature; and (6) departmental impact — human resources, physical resources, etc. Methodology (consequence) assumptions were: (a) ESZs with an electrical substation or three Tier II sites or more automatically received a minimum local consideration risk rating of two; (b) ESZs with two or more of Olathe’s top real estate properties received a risk rating of three; and, (c) ESZs with critical infrastructure automatically received a minimum, overall Risk Level Determination of “moderate.” OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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The OFD assigned the assessment elements a weighted risk rating after they were defined. The risk rating was founded upon local, applicable hazard-related data/information and correlated to either probability or consequence/impact. The following table illustrates the relationship of the assessment element and its defined weighted risk rating.

OFD Planning Area and ESZ Methodology Probability

Risk Rating

Incident

Weight

History

1

0-225

Consequence Population Density 2,500 or less (Rural)

OVAP

At-Risk

Avg. Appraised

Target

Local

Population

Property Value

Hazard

Considerations

Low

Less than $94M

Low

Low

Mod.

Mod.

High

High

None

More than 2

226-375

---

Mod.

Mod.

$94M and less than $188M

3

376 up

More than 2,500 (Urban)

Significant or

High

$188M or more

Maximum

Community Risk Level Categorizations and Conclusions

The OFD meticulously and individually applied each of the seven risk evaluation elements to all ESZs. The process resulted in the assignment of a numeric representation and subsequent risk level conclusion. The numeric representation correlated to a standardized risk categorization of either Low, Moderate, High, or Special: • Low, 7-11 • Moderate, 12-16 • High, 17-21 • Special, Categorized to identify a very distinct attribute(s), which may considerably affect or negatively influence either the well-being of the community or the response considerations of the OFD. The ensuing table represents the methodical risk level conclusion process and resultant risk level categorizations.

OFD ESZ Risk Level Elements, Conclusions, and Categorizations Probability ESZ

Consequence

Incident

Population

History

Density

199

1

1

275

1

202 301

110

Risk Level

At-Risk

Property

Target

Local

Population

Value

Hazard

Considerations

1

1

2

1

3

2

1

3

3

3

2

2

1

1

2

1

OVAP

#

Cat.

1

8

LOW

1

1

12

MOD

3

2

3

18

HIGH

2

1

3

11

SPECIAL


The process yielded 77 individual, ESZ conclusions. These conclusions were based upon the comprehensive risk categorization process, which determined:

• 12% more ESZs in 2017 (77) than 2012 (68).

• 55% of all ESZs are categorized as moderate risk or higher.

• 6% of all ESZs are Special Risk.

• 9% of all ESZ are High Risk.

• 40% of all ESZs are Moderate Risk.

• 45% of all ESZs are Low Risk.

• All High Risk ESZs are in grids with urban population densities.

• 75% of Special Risk ESZs have urban population densities.

• ESZs with higher population densities have higher risk ratings.

Furthermore, the OFD aggregated the ESZ categorical data and conclusions by Planning Area. This process provided an additional perspective about the community’s overall risk. These Planning Area conclusions were determined:

• 27% of the North Planning Area is Moderate Risk.

• 46% of the Central Planning Area is Moderate Risk.

• 50% of the South Planning Area is Moderate Risk.

• The Central Planning Area has more High Risk ESZs than either the North or South Planning Areas combined.

• The Central Planning Area has more Moderate Risk ESZs than either the North or South Planning Area. In summary, the OFD’s Planning Area and ESZ methodology utilized seven, unique risk evaluation elements. Each assessment element had a weighted risk rating, which was founded upon local hazard data and correlated to either probability or consequence. This systematic process gave rise to numeric representations of risk and subsequent risk level conclusions by ESZ. Additionally, the aggregated ESZ data led to risk level conclusions by Planning Area.

ESZ Risk Level Conclusions and Categorizations OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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SECTION 4: DEPLOYMENT AND PERFORMANCE CURRENT DEPLOYMENT AND PERFORMANCE

The development of the CRESA-SOC allows the OFD to assess its own capabilities relative to the risks and demands of the service area. Additionally, this process considered the ever important components of deployment and performance. In other words, we looked at we do (current deployment and baseline performance) and how well we do it (evaluation of that deployment and performance). This all-inclusive process and its associated methodology also included the integral consideration of performance objectives and benchmarks. As part of the assessment the OFD considered two deployment perspectives. The perspectives were:

1. Current/Baseline Deployment

2. Evaluation of Deployment

A significant consideration of the OFD’s community risk assessment was the attention to the community’s program expectations (quality) and the department’s historical service demand outputs (quantity). This systematic balance of both quality and quantity helps ensure that the OFD matches the right resources to the right incident at the right time. The OFD’s qualitative and quantitative examination included the considerations of: • Community Expectations • Community Service Demands – Current/Baseline Deployment

- Incident History

- Incident Type

- Incident Location

- Incident Frequency

• Current Deployment Strategies • Baseline Performance Data Tables • Loss and Preservation (Save)

COMMUNITY SERVICE DEMANDS - CURRENT/BASELINE DEPLOYMENT Community Expectations

Community expectations are important to the OFD. In 2011, the OFD embarked upon it’s first strategic planning process. The process was community-driven and engaged more than 30 external stakeholders. These stakeholders personally gave their own time and provided the OFD with key feedback about department program priorities and expectations. This inaugural process created a living document that spanned a time period from 2011 to 2016. In 2016, the OFD began its second strategic planning process. This process was also community-driven and involved nearly 50 community stakeholders who gave important input to the OFD. The process was facilitated by CPSE’s Technical Advisor Program.

The OFD assembled the process’ findings and created the 2016-2021 Strategic Plan. The

Plan contains seven goals; 39 objectives; and, 138 measurable, time-bound tasks, which are assigned to specific sections of the OFD.

112


The OFD’s community stakeholders gave essential feedback about what the customer considers to be priority programs. Through a process of direct comparison, community stakeholders prioritized 11 OFD programs. The top three programs, in priority order, were:

1. Fire Suppression

2. EMS

3. Technical Rescue

The community stakeholders also provided critical input about what their expectations for the OFD. Input like this is fundamentally important to the department. The community stakeholders identified these top three community expectations, which are word for word and in order of importance:

1. Quick/rapid/prompt/fast response times. Timely response when called. Response time to emergency.

Respond in the most timely manner possible to emergency situations. Fast response to service area. Quick,

but safe response.

2. Training/Education: Well-trained personnel. Continuing education. Education of staff members/knowledge to deal with different scenarios. Train with industry partners. Educated responders. Up-to-date training on the

better way to do things. Highly skilled/trained for effective fire suppression. Quality training that allows for successful operation of all equipment. Highly trained and motivated firefighters and EMS personnel. Highly

trained leadership. Well trained and technically proficient.

3. Professional/Professionalism: by department as a whole and individuals. Professional, ethical behavior –

commitment to excellent service to the community.

During the strategic planning process, the OFD also engaged internal stakeholders (firefighters, engineers, captains, chief officers, fire protection engineer, and fire analyst). These stakeholders diligently worked on several departmentrelated items including the revisiting of the OFD’s mission and values. Collectively, the group believed that the mission statement needed no revision as it remained current and relevant. The OFD’s mission statement is: “We proudly exist to protect and preserve life and property through dynamic emergency response and excellence in training, preparedness, and prevention.” “Furthermore, the group made two additions – tradition and innovation – to the existing OFD values. The OFD values: • Tradition: We remember, respect, and represent the path forged before us. • Communication: We embrace the transparent and open flow of information between the members of the organization and community. • Compassion: We care about the wellbeing of the members of our organization and community. • Integrity: We uphold the public trust through honesty and strong moral principles. • Leadership: We value leaders focused on serving people through listening, caring, supporting, and developing others. • Professionalism: We demonstrate the best of knowledge, competence, and expertise to serve the needs and expectations of the community. • Innovation: We use a pioneering spirit in our approach to emerging issues.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

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Community Service Demands

An important part of a community assessment is the expression or measurement of risk through service demands. Since community risk and service demands are directly related, it is imperative to match the right resources to the right incident at the right time. This responsible stewardship of risk and resources is paramount to helping ensure an effective and efficient organization. The OFD systematical assessed historical data to help identify future trends. The assessment included the analysis of:

1. Incident History

2. Incident Type

3. Incident Location

4. Incident Frequency

5. Current Deployment Strategies

6. Resiliency

INCIDENT HISTORY

Overall incident call volume has steadily increased in the past several years. OFD calls for service have increased nearly 16% from 2012 to 2016 with an average increase of 3.7% per year. The chart below shows what call volume will be in the coming years using a conservative 3% increase per year. The OFD expects to be dispatched on more than 11,000 calls for service in 2017. 13,000

In the past five-year period, the

OFD Calls for Service 2008 Actual ‐ 2020 Forecasted (assumes 3% increase per year)

busiest months for incidents were

12,211

12,000 11,855

July, September and December with

11,510 11,000

each an average of 883, 874 and

11,174 10,833 10,502

Number of Calls

867 calls per month respectively. February had the fewest calls with an average of 764 calls per month

10,000

10,127 9,683 9,365

9,000

9,021 8,734

in the same period. As can be seen

9,139

8,613

8,000

in the chart below, December 2016 was the OFD’s busiest month in the

7,000

five-year period – and in department

6,000

history. The OFD responded on

2008

2009

2010

2011

1,040 calls that month.

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Incident History by Month 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 Jan

114

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec


Incident History by Day of Week, 2012‐2016 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

1800

From 2012 to 2016, Mondays

1600

and Fridays tended to be the

1400

busiest days for calls with a

1200

notable decrease in calls on

1000

Saturdays and Sundays.

800 600 400 200 0 Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

The OFD also examined calls by when they occur during the day. Better decisions can be made about deployment of resources and scheduling of activities (i.e. training, public engagement) with the understanding that the busiest time for calls is in the afternoon. The second chart shown here clearly illustrates that the busiest time for incidents is between noon and 6 p.m. Conversely, the least likely time for calls is from midnight to 6 a.m. Incident Count by Time of Day, 2012‐2016 Combined 20,000 18,000 16,000 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 midnight to 5:59 a.m.

6 a.m. to 11:59 a.m.

noon to 5:59 p.m.

6 p.m. to 11:59 p.m.

I N C I D E NT H I STO RY  BY   HO UR  OF   DAY,  2 0 12 ‐ 20 1 6 2015

2016

2780

2820

2727

2536

2511

3204

3172

2994

2718

2698

2674

2460 1327

1300

1245

1222

1211

3735

2014

3665

2013

3499

2012

MIDNIGH T T O 5:59 A .M.

6 A.M. TO 11:59 A.M. 

NOON TO 5:59 P.M.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

6 P.M. TO 11:59 P.M.

115


With the deployment of dynamically staffed EMS squad units, the OFD wanted to better understand when specific incident types occurred. The following chart shows the time of day for each of the broad NFIRS incident type categories. Understanding that medical calls were most likely during daytime hours (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) supported the decision to deploy the squads during those peak hours. Also notable in the chart below is the timing of fire incidents in Olathe. Fire calls are most likely in mid-afternoon to early evening hours. This aligns with when people are likely to be at home and cooking. In Olathe, as with national data, the most common place for a fire to begin in the home is the kitchen during this time of day.

Incident Type

In addition to when an incident occurred, the OFD also monitored incidents by type. Each incident type (EMS, Fire, HazMat, Rescue, Non-Fire) requires a different level of demand for service and resource allocation. In the past five years, medical calls have made up an increased proportion of the OFDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total calls. In 2016, 71% of calls for service were medical. Fire calls have decreased from approximately 4% of all calls in 2012 to just more than 2% in 2016. The following chart shows incident types from 2012-2016.

116


Incident Location

Another aspect to understanding service demand in Olathe is to evaluate where incidents happen. It has been said that calls follow people and that becomes clear when one evaluates maps of incident locations. More calls happen in areas where more people live. The following â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot spotâ&#x20AC;? map represents all incidents in the 5-year period (2012-2016). It is clear the areas with highest number of calls is in some of the most densely populated areas or along the highway and other major streets.

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The OFD drills down to evaluates structure fires specifically because of their relatively high risk to life and property. The following map shows those ESZs with the most structure fires from 2012 through 2016.

Olathe, KS - Structural Fires 2012-2016

§ ¨ ¦ 435

North Olathe

Central Olathe

§ ¨ ¦ 35

South Olathe

0

1.25

2.5

5 Miles

Structural Fires 2012-2016 0-1 2-5 6 - 11 12 - 16 17 - 22 OFD Planning Areas Interstate

118


OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

119


120


It is also important to examine incident activity in the OFD’s designated planning areas. The Central Planning Area where the most people live, also sees the highest volume of emergency calls – double the next-busiest North Planning Area’s number.

Incidents by Type in Planning Areas, 2012-2016 Planning Area

EMS

Fire

HazMat

Non-Fire

Rescue

Grand Total

Central

19,096

684

517

6,697

160

27,154

North

9,624

345

202

3,678

86

13,935

South

5,374

152

159

2,384

57

8,126

Emergency Service Zones

When assessing incident activity by location, the OFD also monitored incidents in each emergency service zone. Incident history in each ESZ is available in Appendix A. The 10 busiest ESZs for the five-year period of this analysis (2012-2016) are as follows:

Top 10 Busiest ESZs ESZ

# of Incidents

Population Density

250

4,050

Urban

202

2,843

Urban

296

2,768

Rural

226

2,466

Rural

180

2,412

Urban

249

2,232

Urban

203

2,150

Urban

248

1,989

Urban

227

1,958

Urban

224

1,880

Urban

Again, it is clear to see that incidents happen where people are. Eight of the busiest ESZs are designated “urban” based on their populations. The two “rural” ESZs (296, 226) are busy sections of the city that include stretches of highway, residential care facilities and retail centers. While people may not reside in these zones, they certainly spend time there generating a high call volume in those locations. Another consideration for incident location is service demand by station. The following chart shows the call volume by type for each of the OFD’s seven stations for the five years included in this analysis. Station 2 is the busiest station responding to an average of 2,108 calls annually from 2012 to 2016. The next three busiest stations are all in the heavilypopulated central planning area (stations 1, 3, 4 and 5) and when combined account for more than 66% of the total call volume. Stations 6 and 7 are in areas of Olathe that are continuing to develop. Call volume is expected to increase in both areas in the coming years. OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

121


Incident Types by Station, 2012‐2016 EMS

Fire

Non‐Fire

HazMat

Rescue

12000

10000

8000

6000

4000

2000

0 1

2

3

4

5

Percentage of Calls by Station/First Arriving

122

Station

% of total calls

1

19.5%

2

21.1%

3

10.3%

4

20.9%

5

15.7%

6

4.4%

7

8.1%

6

7


OTHER CONSIDERATIONS OF COVERAGE Equalization

The following table shows how each fire station contributes to community coverage given how resources are distributed currently. It is important to note that there is considerable overlap in station response areas especially in the Central Planning Area.

First Arriving (Distribution) Coverage Square Miles

% of total

Covered

square miles

Covered

lane miles

Served

1

10.9

13.4%

169

13.9%

23,116

11.5%

9,762

19.5%

2

15.05

18.6%

236

19.5%

34,115

16.9%

10,540

21.1%

3

11.26

13.9%

180

14.9%

38,202

18.9%

5,146

10.3%

4

11.26

13.9%

206

17.0%

40,112

19.9%

10,456

20.9%

5

12.00

14.8%

179

14.8%

30,727

15.2%

7,823

15.7%

6

9.74

12.0%

100

8.3%

5,882

2.9%

2,207

4.4%

7

10.85

13.4%

142

11.7%

29,666

14.7%

4,046

8.1%

Station

Lane Miles % of total

Population

% of

Call

population Volume

% of total call volume

Incident Frequency

Understanding the rate at which calls occurs also helps understand the level of service demand in Olathe. To evaluate this aspect of demand, the OFD monitored concurrent call volume. Concurrent calls are those that occur simultaneously or overlap in duration. More than one unit is required to handle the calls. Calls were considered concurrent if the alarm time for a call happened before another call was cleared. This has happened on average about 4,000 times per year from 2012-2016. The chart below illustrates concurrent calls by month in the same five-year period. Historically, September was the busiest month for concurrent calls. About 300 times per year, there have been instances where four or more calls overlapped. There have been five times in the five-year period in which there have been nine calls at once.

Concurrent Incidents by Month 2012‐2016 2500

2000

2012

1500

2013 2014 2015

1000

2016

500

0 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

Nov

Dec

123


When looking at concurrent calls it is helpful to note that the average time on scene has for all call types has not changed significantly over the past five years. Elapsed time on a scene is just more than 23 minutes.

Elapsed Scene Time, 2012‐2016 

0:25:55 0:23:02 0:20:10 0:17:17 0:14:24 0:11:31 0:08:38 0:05:46 0:02:53 0:00:00 2016

124

2015

2014

2013

2012


Current Deployment Strategies

While the OFD no longer refers to formal station response districts or areas because of advancements in AVL, it can be helpful to assess the distribution of resources throughout the city. The map below shows the seven fire stations with the areas highlighted in which they can travel within 4 minutes. These travel time areas take into account road types and speed considerations and are considered to be under optimal conditions. As can be seen in the map, there are areas in the north and west of the city that are outside of these 4-minute travel areas. When compared with development activity and future build-out areas planned for the city, it becomes clear that the OFD may have difficulty reaching some people and homes outside of these ideal travel time scenarios. The map also illustrates areas of concentration, or overlap, in station response areas especially in the

OFD Travel Time 4 minutes

central core and along the interstate. This overlap helps to ensure units are available to address concurrent call volume in the central planning area as well as provide an effective response force in a timely fashion. The following maps show the 4-minute travel time areas for each of the OFDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seven stations.

Station 1: 4-minute Travel Time

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

125


Station 2: 4-minute Travel Time

Station 3: 4-minute Travel Time

126


Station 4: 4-minute Travel Time

Station 5: 4-minute Travel Time

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

127


Station 6: 4-minute Travel Time

Station 7: 4-minute Travel Time

128


As for the time it takes for an effective response force to arrive at an incident, 8-minute travel time areas are used to match the benchmark standard. This helps visualize how fast the additional resources needed for an ERF could be at an incident within the city. When travel time is extended to 8 minutes, the OFD is able to cover the entire city under optimal conditions that assume all units are in quarters at their home stations.

OFD Travel Time 8 minutes

Resiliency

The OFD has created a response system built on consistency and reliability. However, there is recognition that, on occasion, service demand will be impacted by events that stress the system. For example, severe weather events, like a tornado, could overwhelm the system if Olathe or one of its neighbors was impacted. This important aspect of performance analysis helps understand the OFD’s capability to recover from these situations and to return to a normal state of operations. The OFD’s methodology for assessing this ability includes five considerations. The considerations are:

• Capabilities (knowledge, skills, training, etc.)

• Capacity (resources)

• Resiliency (resistance, absorption, restoration)

• Reliability

• Availability

Reliability Under Normal Conditions

Based on the performance of reliablity studies, the OFD determines the regular availability of resources within the system. This helps determine the OFD’s resistance – ability to limit resource consumption. While the OFD is part of a countywide system that uses AVL information to dispatch the closest available unit even if it is from another jurisdiction,

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129


examining the OFDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reliability can help evaluate the ability of the current system to meet service demands. The following analysis looked at the percentage of time a unit responded to an incident in their stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general area. The unit was where it was supposed to be and available for the response. The higher the percentage means the system performed as it was designed to. This provides an opportunity to consider how resources are being deployed currently and if changes are need for better system performance.

First Arriving (Distribution) Response and Reliability Station

First Arriving in Station Area

Total Code 1 Calls in Station Area

% Reliability

1

3,993

4,241

94.15%

2

4,647

5,093

91.24%

3

2,392

2,545

93.99%

4

4,878

5,305

91.95%

5

3,847

4,121

93.35%

6

947

1,001

94.61%

7

1,865

1,954

95.45%

As expected, the busier stations (2 and 4) have the less reliability than the others, but overall the system is reliable on 93.03% of all code 1 emergency calls. System reliability is somewhat better in the South planning area at 94.99% than in the North and Central planning areas at 92.27% and 92.86% respectively.

Additional Resource Availability

Because of its place in a countywide system, the OFD is able to quickly add resources as needed when a specific, largescale incident or system demand requires it. This absorption â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or ability to quickly add resources is addressed through automatic aid agreements with all neighboring departments that allow the OFD to receive aid even at initial dispatch. The OFD routinely provides more aid to neighboring departments than it receives. In 2016, the OFD received aid on just 1.5% of its calls. The annual numbers of automatic or mutual aid calls are as follows:

Automatic and Mutual Aid

130

Year

Given

Received

2012

418

172

2013

350

164

2014

325

122

2015

339

146

2016

336

169


The OFD also has call-back procedures in place to augment regular resources with additional staff if system demand requires it. While available, this capability is rarely required. In the five-year period of this analysis, there have been four instances of “Callback Olathe Shift” and four instances of “Callback Olathe All”.

Planned Special Events

Many times a year, Olathe is home to special events that could increase service demand such as charity walks/runs, a marathon, or parades with a large number of spectators. For each of these events, an Incident Action Plan (IAP) is created and additional units are put in service to address emergencies at these events. This keeps the regular system available to support the city as usual and provides units onsite to quickly help event participants. The IAP planning process for these includes the formal documentation that would be put in place for unplanned emergencies as well. This helps department personnel become familiar with the IAP process and the considerations required during operational periods. This builds capacity within the OFD to respond to unplanned emergencies in much the same way.

Large-Scale or Unplanned Emergencies

The OFD works to strengthen its ability to return to normalcy after large or unplanned emergencies through various planning and training initiatives. The OFD provides the emergency management function for the city of Olathe. As such, much of the work and planning that is done is motivated by the goal of restoring the system to its steady-state. For example, the department works with all city departments assigned responsibility for emergency support functions in the Emergency Operations Plan. Personnel meet monthly on a rotating cycle to review, discuss, and train new people on these functions. This helps ensure readiness for large or unplanned events. Similarly, the OFD’s training program provides opportunities to work with partner agencies on emergencies that would stress the system. For example, recent collaboration around planning and training for hostile event (i.e. active shooter) response has allowed OFD personnel to consider events that are outside of routine operations and would require close coordination with other agencies and disciplines. Understanding what to do in these events helps to restore overall system readiness more effectively.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

131


THE CONSIDERATION OF TIME AS A FACTOR

The element of time is an important consideration when evaluating deployment. Time has a significant relationship because of its potential impact upon the outcome of an incident. For that reason, the OFD looked at the importance of time and its connection to better incident outcomes. The OFD considered these three time-based components:

• Cascade of Events

• Fire Behavior

• Chain of Survival

The Cascade of Events is a predictable waterfall which is secondary to an act or instance impacting a system. In other words, it is the cyclical process of the system — initiated by an incident — as it goes from and returns to a state of normalcy. By understanding the cascade, it is possible for an agency to assess or predict future effects and their subsequent system demands. The Cascade of Events is the cumulative, cyclical condition of these parts: • State of normalcy

• Turnout time, hard data

• Emergency event initiation (insult or injury),

• Travel time, hard data

soft data

• On-scene, hard data

• Emergency event (fire, cardiac arrest, etc.), soft data

• Time to intervention, soft data

• Alarm, soft data

• Termination of action, hard data

• Notification, soft data

• State of normalcy

• Alarm/call processing, hard data The State of Normalcy is when conditions are normal or unchanging. The need for service/intervention does not yet exist. Following the “cause,” is the “effect,” which results in a need for service or intervention by emergency responders. This point in time is considered to be the Emergency Event Initiation. This “soft data” point may occur in the short term (seconds/minutes) or long term (hours /days). For example, over the past week a person had recurring issues with an electrical outlet. However, a critical point of awareness was not reached until the homeowner finally noticed a haze of smoke inside the home. The Emergency Event is when the critical point of awareness results in action. The Emergency Event element is a soft data point, which may also be referred to as the “point of awareness.” The point of awareness may be human or mechanical (e.g., smoke alarm, fire sprinkler). The Alarm element is the actual transmission or signaling, from a person or device, which indicates the presence or an emergency situation. For example, a person makes a 9-1-1 call. Immediately following the Alarm is the Notification. Notification is when a 9-1-1 center receives and acknowledges the Alarm element. The element of Alarm/Call Processing is the time interval from when an alarm is acknowledged at a 9-1-1 center to the time emergency responders are notified of a need for service. Turnout begins once responders, such as firefighters, are notified of a need for service. It ends when the unit goes “en route.”

132


The interval between a unit going “en route” and it arriving “on scene” is considered Travel Time. The On-Scene element is when firefighters simply arrive at the location of the emergency. The Time to Intervention element is currently soft data and not fully captured. The element that indicates the complete mitigation of an incident is Termination of Action – the end of the incident. At this point, emergency response units are available for service and the system returns to a State of Normalcy.

Cascade of Events

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

133


FIRE BEHAVIOR

In recent decades, there was steady change in the residential fire environment. Changes are comprised of larger homes, open home geometries, increased synthetic fuel loads, and changing construction materials resulted in faster fire propagation, shorter time to flashover, rapid changes in fire dynamics, shorter escape times, and shorter time to collapse. According to UL, scientific experiments have concluded that the changing fuel loads in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homes have flashover times of less than five minutes whereas legacy homes had flashover times around 30 minutes. These significant changes in fire dynamics directly:

â&#x20AC;˘ Relate to the importance of response times.

â&#x20AC;˘ Impact response times, firefighter tactics, and both citizen and firefighter safety.

The Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition (HFSC) developed a home fire timeline to show the growth of a fire both with and without fire sprinklers. During the first 90 seconds after the fire starts, the smoke alarm activates and heat from the fire activates the sprinkler. Without sprinklers, the odds of escaping decrease quickly as flashover can occur in three to five minutes, according to the HFSC. Designed to be a teaching tool, the timeline includes report of fire, dispatch, response to fire, set up, and fighting the fire. The consideration of time and fire behavior is critical to ensuring more positive outcomes.

Adapted from Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition (HFSC)

134


CHAIN OF SURVIVAL

Many people often interchange the terms heart attack and cardiac arrest. However, these time-sensitive emergency medical events are not the same. A heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked. A heart attack is a “circulation” problem where the longer the patient goes without treatment, the greater the damage. Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating unexpectedly. Cardiac arrest is an “electrical” problem where death occurs within minutes if the patient does not receive treatment. However, cardiac arrest is reversible in most victims if treated within a few minutes. A victim’s chance of survival can be doubled or even tripled with “immediate CPR” until the arrival of professional EMS. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), the term Chain of Survival provides a useful metaphor for the elements of the emergency cardiovascular care concept. The AHA states that a strong Chain of Survival can improve chances of survival and recovery for victims of cardiac arrest. The AHA’s Chain of Survival (five-link chain) for “adult out-of-hospital” cardiac arrest includes: 1. Recognition of cardiac arrest and activation of the emergency response system. 2. Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with an emphasis on chest compressions. 3. Rapid defibrillation. 4. Basic and advanced emergency medical services. 5. Advanced life support and post-cardiac arrest care.

Chain of Survival as adapted from the American Heart Association.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

135


Baseline Performance Tables (2012-2016)

Because time is such a critical element to positive outcomes on emergency incidents, the OFD monitors its response time performance regularly to identify ways to improve, or decrease, these times. The following tables document response performance for each program (fire, EMS, rescue, and HazMat) and for the associate risk classification within each program (low, moderate, high, special). The data also breaks down responses based on urban and rural areas of the city as determined by their population density. The department establishes benchmarks, or goals, to identify optimal performance, monitors baseline, or actual, response time data regularly and identifies strategies that help move baseline times closer to the benchmarks. For additional information on benchmark and baseline performance measurement including how it relates to critical task analysis, see Section 5. For risk classification by call type, see Section 3. Each table includes alarm handling, turnout time, travel time (for first arriving unit and effective response force) and total response time (for first arriving unit and effective response force). For the purposes of this analysis, these components of the response are defined as follows: • Alarm Handling time is the interval that begins when a 9-1-1 call is received by the ECC and ends when a unit has been notified to respond to the incident. • Turnout time is the time interval that begins when the “emergency response facilities” and “emergency response units” notification process begins by either an audible alarm or visual annunciation or both and ends at the beginning point of travel time. • Travel time is the interval that begins when a unit is en route to the emergency incident and ends when the unit arrives at the scene. • Total response time is the time interval from the receipt of the alarm at the ECC to when the unit(s) arrives at the scene. These response times were calculated and reported at the 90th percentile for each of the past five years individually as well as an aggregated result for the entire five-year period. Data reported here is based only on calls within the Olathe city limits in which Olathe units responded emergently. In June 2014, the department updated its methodology for response time analysis to evaluate call type based on the “situation dispatched to”, or the nature of the call at time of dispatch, and not by how the incident may have been categorized by NFIRS incident type following the call. This better reflects what responders expected to find upon arrival to the incident. The sample size (n value) for distribution and concentration vary in the data tables below because of this methodology. Because this improvement was put in place midway through this five-year period, caution should be used when comparing 2012, 2013 data with the times in 2015 and 2016. The department is confident this change in analytical methodology provides a more refined examination of department performance that aligns better with the department’s response plan and critical task analysis.

136


ANALYSIS STANDARD OF COVER Low Risk Fire Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016 Low Risk - FIRE

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

00:59

01:19

00:59

00:59

00:49

00:20

Rural

01:17

01:30

01:05

01:20

01:11

00:25

1:00

Urban

01:36

01:31

01:28

01:41

01:43

01:39

1:20

01:36

01:39

01:39

01:32

01:21

01:32

1:20

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Rural

Urban

05:32

05:25

05:41

05:21

04:40

05:03

4:00

06:49

06:27

07:51

06:38

06:08

06:00

5:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

06:34

05:49

06:45

05:53

06:38

04:50

8:00

Rural

07:39

07:26

07:47

08:10

07:39

07:53

10:00

06:54

06:47

07:04

06:31

05:50

06:02

6:20

410

87

120

76

56

71

N/A

08:23

07:31

08:58

08:39

07:39

07:55

7:20

264

83

63

49

26

43

N/A

07:20

07:15

07:59

06:41

06:54

05:56

10:20

29

28

N/A

08:53

08:28

12:20

17

21

N/A

Target (Agency Benchmark)

90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Alarm Handling

Turnout Time

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Urban

Urban Rural

Urban COMMUNITY RISK AND EMERGENCY Total Response 231 53 68 53 TimeANALYSIS ERF STANDARD OF COVER 08:53 08:40 08:59 08:39 Concentration Rural 50

2012 2016

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

01:23

01:27

01:35

00:50

00:40

00:19

Rural

01:12

01:12

01:15

00:45

00:48

00:19

1:00

Urban

01:31

01:46

01:28

01:28

01:19

01:25

1:20

01:34

01:33

01:28

02:05

01:40

01:33

1:20

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Rural

Urban

05:21

05:21

05:25

05:13

04:44

04:42

4:00

07:17

07:37

07:00

05:03

05:02

06:33

5:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

08:40

07:42

09:04

08:16

09:01

07:32

8:00

Rural

09:41

11:23

09:41

08:53

07:27

06:24

10:00

06:33

06:36

06:25

06:33

05:53

05:36

6:20

179

46

49

44

16

24

N/A

08:24

09:13

07:59

06:53

06:20

07:44

7:20

56

18

14

10

10

4

N/A

09:30

09:03

09:45

08:28

09:29

07:58

10:20

68

18

20

18

5

7

N/A

10:42

12:39

10:42

09:33

07:41

07:44

12:20

18

8

5

1

3

1

N/A

Moderate Risk - FIRE 90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Turnout Time

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Urban Rural

Urban Rural

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

37

34

SERVICES

1:00

159

Moderate Risk Fire Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016

Alarm Handling

Target (Agency Benchmark)

2012 2016

1:00

137


ANALYSIS STANDARD OF COVER High Risk Fire Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016 High Risk - FIRE

Alarm Handling

Turnout Time

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

01:03

01:17

01:04

00:55

00:58

00:28

Rural

00:50

00:58

00:58

00:46

00:38

00:21

1:00

Urban

01:32

01:37

01:29

01:26

01:26

01:34

1:20

01:36

01:41

01:37

01:40

01:23

01:30

1:20

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Rural

Urban

05:28

05:41

05:42

05:28

06:07

05:00

4:00

05:32

05:14

06:59

06:23

04:33

05:32

5:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

10:30

10:28

08:55

09:32

08:27

09:00

8:00

Rural

10:59

09:09

13:13

09:13

14:59

09:14

10:00

06:45

06:48

06:21

06:55

07:15

05:44

6:20

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Urban

Urban Rural

258

58

53

50

41

56

N/A

05:53

07:50

06:41

05:59

06:28

7:20

57

15

13

9

6

14

N/A

10:56

11:36

09:40

09:37

09:53

10:00

10:20

Urban COMMUNITY RISK AND EMERGENCY Total Response 90 25 18 13 TimeANALYSIS ERF STANDARD OF 14:10 COVER 11:33 10:02 10:33 Concentration Rural

Total Response Time

138

16

18

N/A

15:07

09:36

12:20

8

N/A

5

4

2

3

2012 2016

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

00:31

N/A

N/A

00:31

N/A

00:09

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1:00

Urban

01:05

N/A

N/A

00:34

N/A

01:05

1:20

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1:20

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Urban

05:17

N/A

N/A

05:17

N/A

04:48

4:00

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

5:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

8:00

Rural

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

10:00

05:53

N/A

N/A

05:51

N/A

05:53

6:20

2

N/A

N/A

1

N/A

1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

7:20

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

10:20

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

12:20

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Travel Time

SERVICES

22

Special Risk - FIRE

Turnout Time

1:00

06:34

Special Risk Fire Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016

Alarm Handling

Target (Agency Benchmark)

2012 2016

90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban Rural

Rural

Urban Rural

Urban Rural

Target (Agency Benchmark) 1:00


ANALYSIS STANDARD OF COVER Moderate Risk EMS Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016 Moderate Risk - EMS

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

00:54

01:09

00:54

00:43

00:37

00:15

Rural

01:01

01:22

01:02

00:47

00:42

00:18

1:00

Urban

01:27

01:25

01:23

01:25

01:30

01:35

1:00

01:26

01:24

01:25

01:27

01:24

01:33

1:00

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Rural

Urban

05:30

05:35

05:32

05:26

05:34

05:18

4:00

06:06

06:14

06:01

06:02

06:20

05:53

4:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

05:25

03:24

05:22

05:53

05:46

05:58

8:00

Rural

06:04

06:47

06:40

05:35

05:47

06:31

8:00

90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Alarm Handling

Turnout Time

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Urban

Urban Rural

06:32

06:35

06:34

06:28

06:37

06:25

6:00

2798

2776

2230

1602

1456

N/A

07:11

07:11

07:10

07:03

07:31

07:02

6:00

4716

1274

1121

915

629

777

N/A

06:35

06:35

06:37

06:28

06:42

06:31

10:00

Urban COMMUNITY RISK AND EMERGENCY Total Response 10218 2611 2562 2087 TimeANALYSIS ERF STANDARD OF COVER 07:19 07:20 07:14 07:10 Concentration Rural

Total Response Time

1557

1401

N/A

07:38

07:23

10:00

609

758

N/A

Target (Agency Benchmark)

1125

993

852

2012 2016

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

00:38

01:06

00:48

00:43

00:38

00:16

Rural

00:43

01:29

01:08

00:48

00:41

00:19

1:00

Urban

01:25

01:25

01:23

01:21

01:22

01:28

1:00

01:26

01:23

01:29

01:20

01:24

01:31

1:00

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Rural

Urban

04:53

04:55

04:48

05:05

04:57

04:43

4:00

05:41

06:27

05:29

05:53

05:42

05:18

4:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

04:43

06:07

05:37

05:43

04:59

04:03

8:00

Rural

06:19

07:25

05:20

06:06

05:58

05:06

8:00

05:52

05:59

05:52

06:07

05:52

05:44

6:00

90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Travel Time

SERVICES

4337

High Risk - EMS

Turnout Time

1:00

10862

High Risk EMS Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016

Alarm Handling

Target (Agency Benchmark)

2012 2016

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Urban Rural

Urban Rural

1:00

3262

90

130

731

1121

1190

N/A

06:40

07:10

06:48

07:02

06:39

06:24

6:00

1437

45

46

303

516

527

N/A

06:06

06:58

06:58

06:12

06:10

05:50

10:00

2972

56

92

654

1059

1111

N/A

06:50

08:25

06:46

07:02

06:45

06:47

10:00

1295

31

31

269

482

482

N/A

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

139


ANALYSIS STANDARD OF COVER Special Risk EMS Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016 Special Risk - EMS

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

01:03

00:54

01:35

03:54

01:03

00:14

Rural

00:33

N/A

00:33

N/A

00:24

N/A

1:00

Urban

01:24

01:08

00:30

01:20

01:30

01:34

1:00

01:38

N/A

01:38

N/A

01:22

N/A

1:00

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Rural

Urban

05:21

04:45

03:46

04:38

05:48

03:48

4:00

06:37

N/A

04:38

N/A

06:37

N/A

4:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

07:48

05:46

06:30

04:38

05:21

03:41

8:00

Rural

05:49

N/A

04:38

N/A

05:49

N/A

8:00

06:25

05:36

04:16

08:32

06:28

05:15

6:00

90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Alarm Handling

Turnout Time

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Urban

Urban Rural

17

4

1

3

5

4

N/A

N/A

06:16

N/A

08:00

N/A

6:00

3 08:17

Total Response Time

140

05:52

1 07:00

N/A 08:32

2

N/A

N/A

SERVICES

10:00

4

3

N/A

06:26

N/A

10:00

06:28

05:15

N/A

1

N/A

1

N/A

N/A

2012 2016

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

01:09

01:07

01:08

01:00

01:36

00:11

Target (Agency Benchmark)

Rural

01:30

01:45

01:21

01:02

01:14

00:29

1:00

Urban

01:22

01:19

01:21

01:22

00:53

01:21

1:20

01:33

01:16

01:37

01:34

01:00

01:34

1:20

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Rural

Urban

04:43

04:45

04:51

04:01

03:32

02:31

4:00

06:02

06:02

05:29

05:10

07:18

05:51

5:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

07:43

07:43

05:24

06:40

19:18

06:27

8:00

Rural

06:09

06:39

05:29

04:19

07:33

05:51

10:00

05:19

05:19

06:09

04:58

03:58

03:28

6:20

68

20

18

17

6

7

N/A

07:12

07:09

07:12

06:12

08:18

06:16

7:20

90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Travel Time

N/A

COMMUNITY RISK AND EMERGENCY Total Response Urban 14 3 1 3 STANDARD OF COVER Time ANALYSIS ERF 06:26 N/A 06:16 N/A Concentration Rural

Technical Rescue (All Risk)

Turnout Time

1:00

08:00

Rescue Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016 2

Alarm Handling

Target (Agency Benchmark)

2012 2016

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Urban Rural

Urban Rural

1:00

77

28

24

13

7

5

N/A

08:17

08:17

06:30

08:01

19:44

07:17

10:20

37

10

9

7

5

6

N/A

07:25

07:30

07:12

05:53

08:21

06:16

12:20

39

13

8

8

6

4

N/A


ANALYSIS STANDARD OF COVER HazMat Baseline Performance for 2012 - 2016 HazMat (All Risk)

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

01:05

01:21

01:14

00:57

00:49

00:20

Rural

01:08

01:25

01:28

01:06

00:43

00:18

1:00

Urban

01:30

01:22

01:33

01:36

01:23

01:29

1:20

01:35

01:30

01:34

01:33

01:22

02:02

1:20

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Rural

Urban

05:48

05:12

06:38

05:14

05:24

04:57

4:00

07:07

08:30

07:07

06:50

07:10

06:14

5:00

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Rural

Urban

08:00

08:09

08:36

07:20

07:36

07:34

8:00

Rural

07:11

08:23

06:50

07:00

07:11

06:23

10:00

06:52

06:30

08:44

06:34

06:28

06:01

6:20

434

77

118

94

75

69

N/A

08:11

10:03

08:06

08:28

08:00

07:51

7:20

148

26

36

32

30

25

N/A

09:00

08:51

09:55

08:17

08:50

08:08

10:20

90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

Alarm Handling

Turnout Time

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Target (Agency Benchmark)

2012 2016

Pick-up to Dispatch Turnout Time 1st Unit

Total Response Time 1st Unit On Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Urban Rural

Urban Rural

1:00

281

56

81

58

44

42

N/A

08:35

09:34

08:11

08:03

08:20

07:51

12:20

94

18

20

20

22

14

N/A

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

141


Response Time Performance by Planning Area In early stages of analysis by

planning area, the OFD examined total response time on EMS calls because EMS calls make up the majority of all incident types. When looking by planning area, the OFD found it helpful to evaluate response times using GIS. This allowed the department to identify where incidents were located when the first-arriving unit exceeded the benchmark total response time goal of 6 minutes for an EMS call. This data for 2016 is shown on the map below. Most of these calls were located in the North Planning Area (47.5%) followed by the Central Planning Area with 32.3% and the South Planning Area with 19.5% of these 2016 EMS calls. Almost 60% were found in ESZs with urban population densities. Most of the calls exceeding the benchmark were within the station response areas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the 4-minute drivetime polygons surrounding each fire station.

Top 10 ESZs with most EMS Calls outside of Total Response Time benchmark (for first-arriving) ESZ

# of EMS Code 1 Calls with > 6 min

Planning Area

180

165

North

296

89

South

202

54

North

how fast patients receive medical care.

225

38

Central

204

33

North

Emergency Service Zone 180 in the northeast

250

29

Central

section of the city had the most calls with

203

25

North

228

22

Central

300

21

South

226

21

Central

However, 130 Code 1 EMS incidents were located in areas of the city outside of station response areas. This has a direct impact on

a total response time longer than the benchmark. The other ESZs with the highest numbers are in the chart to right.

With a performance analytics project in partnership with the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Information Technology Services Department currently underway, the OFD will expand its capacity to evaluate performance in planning areas. These improvements are on track to be in place in 2017.

142


Loss and Preservation

Following a fire, the OFD, like most other fire departments, have historically attempted to track and provide accurate estimates in regard to the dollar amount of property lost. Typically, these presumptions were the sum of both the damage to the structure and its contents. Today, damage estimates are becoming more accurate simply because technology places much information at the fingertips of firefighters and fire investigators. This information, like appraised property values and replacement costs, is readily available online. Loss data is nothing new to fire departments. What is new are the efforts to not only track, but to accurately calculate data about preservation or “things saved.” This concept, like with most fire departments, is maturing with the OFD. Currently, the OFD is experimenting with two formulas in regard to “save” or preservation data. The first formula is referred to as a “Save Calculation” and the second is called the “Performance Calculation.” The Save Calculation is straight forward as it is a dollar amount. However, the Performance Calculation is a ratio – the higher the ratio the better the performance. The formulas are: 1. Save Calculation: What is at risk - What is lost = What is saved. 2. Performance Calculation: Save/Risk. Save Calculation and Performance Calculation Example: It’s 2:30 a.m. and smoke alarms alert occupants to a fire in a bedroom. The occupants safely escape the home and call 911. Because of the occupant’s early notification and the knowledge, skills, and training of the firefighters, the fire is quickly brought under control and confined to the room of origin. In this case, a bedroom. Fire damage was confined to the bedroom with some minor smoke damage throughout the rest of the home. A fire investigator estimated that the fire caused $25,000 in damage (structure and contents). The fire investigator also used the local appraiser’s website and determined that the home’s appraised value was $230,000. Here’s how the Save Calculation works for this scenario: What is at risk ($230,000 appraised value) - What is lost ($35,000) = What is saved ($195,000) Now, here’s the scenario’s Performance Calculation: Save ($195,000) / Risk ($235,000) = .83 Performance Calculation Ratio (higher ratio equates to a greater save/preservation, which equates to higher performance) This scenario was for illustration purposes only as there were many controlled variables within. Besides illustration, scenarios like these pose opportunities for fire departments to gather and better interpret data. For example, further consider what may be attributed to the occupants and their presence at home at the time of the fire. The outcome of this fire was directly affected by the occupant’s presence; maintained smoke alarms; and, escape actions. Adjust any of these three variables and the scenario’s results would logically change for the worse (injury, death, fire extends beyond room of origin, etc.). Analysis like this lends itself to important organizational dialogue and holistic conclusions, which may obviously affect citizen and firefighter safety. As part of the community risk assessment, the OFD looked at both loss and preservation data for the years 2012 through 2016. During this period of time, the OFD’s annual average Save Calculation was $37,375,266 and 73% of OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

143


the time the Performance Calculation Ratio was between .8 and 1. An interesting note is that the OFD’s “fire confined to room of origin” measure is 76%, which is merely 3% higher than the current Save Calculation. This correlation is fundamentally that of statistical equals.

Save Calculation (2012-2016) Formula: What is at risk - What is lost = What is saved Year

Property Value

Property Loss

Property Saved

2012

$41,980,750

$1,255,100

$40,725,650

2013

$42,165,973

$2,544,258

$39,621,715

2014

$22,094,250

$693,750

$21,400,500

2015

$54,903,563

$3,723,259

$51,180,304

2016

$38,651,330

$4,703,170

$33,948,160

2012-2016

$199,795,866

$12,919,537

$186,876,329

Source: OFD

Performance Calculation Ratio (2012-2016) Formula: Save/Risk Range

Ratio Count

0-0.2

39

0.2-0.4

9

0.4-0.6

13

0.6-0.8

17

0.8-1

212

Total Counts

290

Source: OFD These concepts are evolving at the OFD. And, there is much opportunity for improvement. However, the OFD is committed to more and improved data.

Baseline Performance Measures

The department’s baseline statements reflect actual performance from 2012 through 2016. The performance data tables in Section 4 provide additional baseline response time elements (alarm handling, turnout, and travel). The department’s total response time is considered in detail below in relation to the established benchmarks.

144


EVALUATION OF DEPLOYMENT AND PERFORMANCE Benchmark Performance Objectives and Baseline Performance Measures

The following benchmark statements describe the desired level (future) of performance for the OFD, based on community expectations. These goals describe the level at which the OFD is striving to perform, in the context of continuous improvement. The subsequent baseline performance statements describe the OFD's actual (current) performance and are provided for the same services as the benchmark statements.

Fire Benchmark Performance Objectives

Fire Benchmark Performance Objectives Urban

Rural

Alarm Handling

1:00

1:00

Turnout Time

1:20

1:20

Travel Time – 1st Arriving Unit

4:00

5:00

Travel Time - ERF

8:00

10:00

Total Response Time – 1st Arriving Unit

6:20

7:20

Total Response Time - ERF

10:20

12:20

First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for All Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all fires, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 3 firefighters and 1 officer, shall be: 6 minutes 20 seconds in Urban areas and 7 minutes 20 seconds in Rural areas. The first-due unit for all risk levels shall be capable of: providing 500 gallons of water and 1,500 gallons per minute (gpm) pumping capacity; initiating command; requesting additional resources; establishing a back-up line and advancing an attack line, each flowing a minimum of 150 gpm; establishing an uninterrupted water supply; containing the fire; rescuing at-risk victims; and performing salvage operations. These operations shall be done in accordance with the department’s administrative policy guides while providing for the safety of responders and the general public. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for All Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all fires, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, shall be, shall be: 10 minutes 20 seconds in Urban areas and 12 minutes and 20 seconds in Rural areas. The ERF shall be capable of: establishing command and safety; providing an uninterrupted water supply; advancing an attack line and a backup line for fire control; complying with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of two in and two-out; completing forcible entry.; searching and rescuing at-risk victims; ventilating the structure; controlling utilities; and performing salvage and overhaul. Also, the ERF shall be capable of placing elevated streams into service from aerial ladders. These operations shall be done in accordance with the department’s administrative policy guides while providing for the safety of responders and the general public.

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

145


Fire ERF Benchmark Staffing (based on critical task analysis)

Fire ERF Benchmark Staffing Fire – Low Risk

4

Fire – Moderate Risk

10

Fire – High Risk

17

Fire – Special Risk

Incident dependent. See response matrix for details.

Fire Suppression Baseline Performance Measures:

First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for Low Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all low risk fires, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters and 1 officer, is: 6 minutes 54 seconds in Urban areas and 8 minutes 23 seconds in Rural areas. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for Low Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all low risk fires, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, is: 7 minutes 20 seconds in Urban areas and 8 minutes and 53 seconds in Rural areas. First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for Moderate Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all moderate risk fires, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters and 1 officer, is: 6 minutes 33 seconds in Urban areas and 8 minutes 24 seconds in Rural areas. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for Moderate Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all moderate risk fires, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, is: 9 minutes 30 seconds in Urban areas and 10 minutes and 42 seconds in Rural areas. First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for High Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all high risk fires, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters and 1 officer, is: 6 minutes 45 seconds in Urban areas and 6 minutes 34 seconds in Rural areas. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for High Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all high risk fires, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, is: 10 minutes 56 seconds in Urban areas and 11 minutes and 33 seconds in Rural areas. First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for Special Fire Risks: For 90 percent of all special risk fires, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters and 1 officer, is: 5 minutes 53 seconds in Urban areas. There were no Special Fire Risk responses in Rural areas from 2012 through 2016. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for Special Fire Risks: There were no Special Fire Risk responses that required enough resources on scene to meet the ERF from 2012 through 2016.

146


EMS Benchmark Performance Objectives

EMS Benchmark Performance Objectives Urban

Rural

Alarm Handling

1:00

1:00

Turnout Time

1:00

1:00

Travel Time – 1st Arriving Unit

4:00

4:00

Travel Time - ERF

8:00

8:00

Total Response Time – 1st Arriving Unit

6:00

6:00

Total Response Time - ERF

10:00

10:00

First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for All EMS Risks: For 90 percent of all EMS responses, the total response time for the arrival of the department’s first arriving unit (with ALS capabilities), staffed with a minimum of 2 firefighters (with one paramedic) shall be: 6 minutes in both Urban and Rural areas. The first arriving unit shall be capable of establishing command and safety; providing appropriate patient care and documenting on-scene activities. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for All EMS Risks: For 90 percent of all EMS responses, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF), staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, shall be: 10 minutes in both Urban and Rural areas. The ERF shall be capable of establishing command and safety; providing appropriate patient care and documenting onscene activities.

EMS ERF Benchmark Staffing (based on critical task analysis)

EMS ERF Benchmark Staffing EMS – Low Risk

2

EMS – Moderate Risk

2

EMS – High Risk

4

EMS – Special Risk

11

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

147


EMS Baseline Performance Measures: The fire department considers low EMS risk incidents to be non-emergent which does not meet the criteria for response performance reporting. First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for Moderate EMS Risks: For 90 percent of all moderate EMS responses, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters, is: 6 minutes 32 seconds in Urban areas and 7 minutes 11 seconds in Rural areas. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for Moderate EMS Risks: For 90 percent of moderate EMS responses, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, is: 6 minutes 35 seconds in Urban areas and 7 minutes and 19 seconds in Rural areas. First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for High EMS Risks: For 90 percent of all high risk EMS responses, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters, is: 5 minutes 52 seconds in Urban areas and 6 minutes 40 seconds in Rural areas. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for High EMS Risks: For 90 percent of high risk EMS responses, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, is: 6 minutes 06 seconds in Urban areas and 6 minutes and 50 seconds in Rural areas. First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for Special EMS Risks: For 90 percent of all special risk EMS responses, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters, is: 6 minutes 25 seconds in Urban areas and 8 minutes 00 seconds in Rural areas. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for Special EMS Risks: For 90 percent of all special risk EMS responses, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, is: 8 minutes 17 seconds in Urban areas and 6 minutes and 26 seconds in Rural areas.

Rescue Benchmark Performance Objectives

Rescue Benchmark Performance Objectives Urban

Rural

Alarm Handling

1:00

1:00

Turnout Time

1:20

1:20

Travel Time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1st Arriving Unit

4:00

5:00

Travel Time - ERF

8:00

10:00

Total Response Time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1st Arriving Unit

6:20

7:20

Total Response Time - ERF

10:20

12:20

148


First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for High and Special Rescue Risks: For 90 percent of all technical rescue incidents, the total response time for the arrival of the department’s first arriving unit, staffed with a minimum of 3 firefighters and 1 officer shall be: 6 minutes and 20 seconds in Urban areas and 7 minute and 20 seconds in Rural areas. The first arriving unit shall be capable of providing rescue services to stabilize the incident and extricate patient from the emergency situation. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for High and Special Rescue Risks: For 90 percent of all technical rescue incidents, the total response time for the effective response force (ERF), staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, shall be: 10 minutes and 20 seconds in Urban areas and 12 minute and 20 seconds in Rural areas. The ERF shall be capable of providing rescue services to stabilize the incident and extricate patient from the emergency situation.

Rescue ERF Benchmark Staffing (based on critical task analysis)

Rescue ERF Benchmark Staffing Rescue – Low Risk

N/A

Rescue – Moderate Risk

N/A

Rescue – High Risk

11

Rescue – Special Risk

15

Note: No rescue incidents are identified as low or moderate risk.

Rescue Baseline Performance Measures:

First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for All Rescue Risks: For 90 percent of all rescue incidents, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters and 1 officer, is: 5 minutes 19 seconds in Urban areas and 7 minutes 12 seconds in Rural areas. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for All Rescue Risks: For 90 percent of all rescue incidents, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, is: 8 minutes 17 seconds in Urban areas and 7 minutes and 25 seconds in Rural areas.

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HazMat Benchmark Performance Objectives

HazMat Benchmark Performance Objectives Urban

Rural

Alarm Handling

1:00

1:00

Turnout Time

1:20

1:20

Travel Time – 1st Arriving Unit

4:00

5:00

Travel Time - ERF

8:00

10:00

Total Response Time – 1st Arriving Unit

6:20

7:20

Total Response Time - ERF

10:20

12:20

First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for All HazMat Risks: For 90 percent of all hazardous materials incidents, the total response time for the arrival of the department’s first arriving unit, staffed with a minimum of 3 firefighters and 1 officer shall be: 6 minutes and 20 seconds in Urban areas and 7 minute and 20 seconds in Rural areas. The first arriving unit shall be capable of providing HazMat services to stabilize the situation, stop the escalation of the incident, contain the hazard when applicable, and establish an action plan for the successful conclusion of the incident. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for All HazMat Risks: For 90 percent of all hazardous materials incidents, the total response time for the effective response force (ERF), staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking shall be: 10 minutes and 20 seconds in Urban areas and 12 minute and 20 seconds in Rural areas. The ERF shall be capable of providing HazMat services to stabilize the situation, stop the escalation of the incident, contain the hazard when applicable, and establish an action plan for the successful conclusion of the incident.

HazMat ERF Benchmark Staffing (based on critical task analysis)

HazMat ERF Benchmark Staffing HazMat – Low Risk

4

HazMat – Moderate Risk

11

HazMat – High Risk

15

HazMat – Special Risk

17

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HazMat Baseline Performance Measures:

First Arriving Unit Total Response Time for All HazMat Risks: For 90 percent of all HazMat incidents, the total response time for the arrival of the first-due unit, staffed with 2 firefighters and 1 officer, is: 6 minutes 52 seconds in Urban areas and 8 minutes 11 seconds in Rural areas. Effective Response Force (ERF) Total Response Time for All HazMat Risks: For 90 percent of all HazMat incidents, the total response time for the arrival of the effective response force (ERF) staffed with the appropriate number of personnel to meet critical tasking, is: 9 minutes 00 seconds in Urban areas and 8 minutes and 35 seconds in Rural areas.

Summary of Benchmark and Baseline Performance – Total Response Time (2012-2016)

Citywide Response Analysis

Fire – Low

Fire – Moderate

Fire – High

Fire – Special

EMS – Moderate

EMS – High

EMS – Special

Rescue – All

HazMat - All

Total Response

BENCHMARK

BASELINE

BENCHMARK

BASELINE

Time (TRT)

Urban

Urban

Rural

Rural

1st Arriving

6:20

6:54

7:20

8:23

ERF

10:20

7:20

12:20

8:53

1st Arriving

6:20

6:33

7:20

8:24

ERF

10:20

9:30

12:20

10:42

1st Arriving

6:20

6:45

7:20

6:34

ERF

10:20

10:56

12:20

11:33

1st Arriving

6:20

5:53

7:20

N/A

ERF

10:20

N/A

12:20

N/A

1st Arriving

6:00

6:32

6:00

7:11

ERF

10:00

6:35

10:00

7:19

1st Arriving

6:00

5:52

6:00

6:40

ERF

10:00

6:06

10:00

6:50

1st Arriving

6:00

6:25

6:00

8:00

ERF

10:00

8:17

10:00

6:26

1st Arriving

6:20

5:19

7:20

7:09

ERF

10:20

8:17

12:20

7:25

1st Arriving

6:20

6:52

7:20

8:11

ERF

10:20

9:00

12:20

8:35

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Conclusions

The department monitors response performance on a regular basis. Over time, these metrics have continued to improve as the department has focused on strategies to support faster times. This includes automated routing directions from dispatch to unit MDTs enroute to incidents to improve travel time and countdown timers in stations to help promote awareness of turnout times. The above table summarizes performance by call type and risk level. For several call types, the department will continue to look for ways to decrease response times. Analysis is regularly done to support this effort including examining distribution issues outside of current station travel time standards. This work will continue in the coming years as the need for more fire stations becomes more apparent. In several cases, the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current performance exceeds the benchmark established for that incident type and classification (i.e. HazMat ERF total response times). Annually, the department evaluates these times and determines whether to adjust the benchmark to provide continued motivation for improvement. For most of the times under benchmark, the sample size of data is small. As noted in CPSEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community Risk Assessment: Standards of Cover, 6th Edition, this greatly increases the margin of error and may not be indicative of true performance. Additionally, the department plans to make improvements to its processes for data analytics in 2017. Several projects are underway that will improve reporting of response times and incorporate data from aid partners and the transporting ambulance agency. Because of these pending changes and small sample size on some call types, no benchmarks were adjusted at this time. These will be reevaluated after these improvements have been put in place.

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SECTION 5: PLAN FOR MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING PERFORMANCE MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING PERFORMANCE Maintaining and improving performance is important to the OFD. As part of the community risk and emergency services analysis, the OFD assessed its risk-based strategies and deployment model. Since 2012, the OFD’s strategies and deployment have greatly evolved and they continue to do so today. Simply stated, the OFD always strives to “get better.” This continuous improvement philosophy helps safeguard the people and property of the community while ensuring the safety and security of the men and women of the OFD. This philosophy of continuous improvement takes time as it works to truly affect the cultural change of an organization. The OFD is committed to this maturation of cultural change.

Compliance Methodology

The OFD’s methodology for monitoring, maintaining, and improving response capabilities includes five parts. The parts are to: (1) Monitor; (2) Evaluate; (3) Identify and Modify; (4) Share; and (5) Approve. The methodology is consistent with CPSE’s Community Risk Assessment: Standards of Cover, 6th Edition, as it helps exercise due diligence; makes appropriate revisions; helps ensure capabilities to provide resources to mitigate risks; and, provides assurance that performance and deployment meet expectations. This extensive methodology’s third, fourth, and fifth elements, may also be similarly viewed to that of a Performance Improvement Plan.

Compliance Methodology Monitor

Evaluate

Identify & Modify

Approve

Share

Performance:

Performance

Strengths/Gaps

CRESA-SOC

Stakeholders

• Real time

• Weekly

• Capabilities

• Fire Chief

(internal or external)

• Daily

• Quarterly

• Capacities

• Strengths

• Monthly

• Annually

• System

• Gaps

• Quarterly • Annually Trends:

Trends:

• Annually

• Annually

Change:

Programs:

• Annually

• Annually

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Monitor

The regular monitoring of performance is important to the continuous improvement philosophy and culture. The OFD’s methodology employs the use of several methods, which monitors performance in real time, daily, monthly, quarterly, and annually; and, monitors for trends and change annually:

Real Time Email: Automatic emails are sent from the computer-aided dispatch for every incident. The information goes to all chief officers, accreditation manager, and fire analyst. The emails include the address, nature of the call, and incident number. Text: Automatic texts are sent to all chief officers and the accreditation manager whenever a battalion chief is assigned to a call. The texts help maintain situational awareness. FirstWatch™: The OFD has four specific “triggers” within the application that automatically emails the Command Team when a set of pre-determined rules are met. For example, an email is auto-generated when an extreme baseline turnout time occurs (120 seconds or greater) or when a total response time of 10 minutes is exceeded. The four triggers are viewable via an online dashboard, within the app, or on monitors at the Fire Administration Building. Daily The Daily Performance Report is an automatic document that is emailed every morning at 8 a.m. to the all chief officers, accreditation manager, fire protection engineer, and the fire analyst. The information contained within the report comes directly from FIREHOUSE Software® and provides a snap-shot of the previous day's shift. The report has five sections and some sub-parts: (1) Total Incidents by Type; (2) Incidents Where Aid Was Given or Received; (3) Repeat Addresses for 24-Hour Reporting Period; (4) List of Incomplete Reports; And (5) Station / Unit Data. The first Daily Performance Report was emailed on December 7, 2016. The report was a result of the collaboration between the OFD and Information Technology Department as part of the Performance Analytics Reporting Project. The project’s original intent was to find a replacement solution for a previously acquired and unreliable “off the shelf” intelligence and analytics application. Coincidentally, this application was yet a replacement for another unreliable, pre-packaged software. The collaboration between the departments also yielded the Fire Reports. The Fire Reports are a repository of the OFD’s risk-based performance data (tables). The data is located on the department’s intranet (O-ZONE) and is readily available around-the-clock. Further collaboration between the OFD and Information Technology Department began in January of 2017 which created an additional, third phase of the Performance Analytics Reporting Project known as Enhanced Filtering Capabilities. This third phase is in process and the progress is monitored and shared weekly by the Information Technology Department. Another enhancement to performance analytics is the “Fire Metrics Interactive Map Project” that will provide interactive public and private maps for response analysis. Currently, the fire analyst creates maps on an ad-hoc basis to review performance data. This project, to be completed in 2017, will allow for real-time access to this data for use by all department members and the public. The data mapped will include emergency responses, fire inspections and building information needed for risk assessments.

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There are three more initiatives underway to help improve performance. In late 2016 the OFD began installation of countdown timers in the fire stations. Since approximately 70% of the calls for service are medical in nature, the timers countdown from 60 seconds, the benchmark for turnout on EMS calls. The installation is still in process. In January of 2017, the OFD began the installation of cable for a digital signage project. The intent of the signage is to push information to the stations in real-time. In February of 2017 the fire chief and chief information officer for the City of Olathe met to discuss a project that could also push information to individual firefighters. The scope of this project is being defined. Weekly The Weekly Activity Report has 20 sections (A thru T), which address all facets of the OFD. Each section is marked with their owner’s name and their direct linkage to the Fire and Emergency Self-Assessment Manual, 9th Edition (e.g., 4, 5A, 5E, 5F, 8). The report is sent to all chief officers and accreditation manager. The report’s sections are: A. Year-to-Year Comparison in Monthly Calls B. Monthly Call Volume C. Incidents by Type D. Unit Response E. Total Training Hours by Shift F. 90th Percentile Response Times G. % of Code 1 Calls – 1st Arrival in 5 min or less H. Turnout by Shift – Code 1 Medical Calls I. Turnout Baseline on High-Risk EMS Calls J. Travel Time by Shift – All Code 1 Calls in Olathe K. Overall Budget L. Monthly Overtime – Emergency Services M. Monthly Overtime Costs Comparison N. On-the-Job Injuries (with time lost) O. Evaluations P. Building Codes Q. Community Enhancement – Month-to-Date R. Community Risk Management – Activity YTD S. Continuous Improvement T. FIREHOUSE Reports – Outstanding QC by Shift A Significant Event and Incident Summary is submitted on a bi-weekly basis to the City Council. It includes a short description of 8-10 emergency response calls in the period intended to be representative of the department’s activity. Monthly The Weekly Activity Report has sections specific to month-to-date information. Additionally, the OFD reports several “key result indicators” every month to the City of Olathe’s COMPASS initiative. City of Olathe departments maintain and analyze measures appropriate to the services they provide in COMPASS. OFD response time results are reported here monthly including total response time on Code 1 (emergency) calls in Olathe as well as turnout times for EMS and fire calls. COMPASS is the City of Olathe’s performance measurement system. These measures align with the strategic

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planning efforts of the municipality as a whole and it allows departments to evaluate and understand changes in service delivery. COMPASS is a web-based tool that requires a log-in for access. Nearly all of these indicators are performance based. Quarterly Performance is also a part of the quarterly Command Team meetings. The meetings include all chief officers, accreditation manager, fire analyst, and other staff members by invitation. Data is also reported every quarter to COMPASS including fire confinement data. Also, citizen satisfaction scores are reported quarterly in COMPASS. The fire chief and fire analyst review the results and provide updates and additional analysis as needed. In 2017, the City of Olathe plans to roll-out an online dashboard that will provide community members access to performance data. The OFD will identify key measures to display on this dashboard. The current plan is to update this information quarterly. Additionally, the city is researching various ways to make data more available and transparent including making more datasets, including incident data, available online. Annually Furthermore, OFD data is monitored annually when it is reported within COMPASS. Annual measures include the following: • Percentage of cardiac arrest patients arriving to the hospital with a pulse • Estimated property loss per capita • Number of structure fires, civilian injuries and deaths • Cost of fire service per capita • Total new residential and commercial permits issued • Number of citizens reached through public education and engagement efforts (CPR, CERT, etc.) Most performance measures are included as key result indicators in the City of Olathe’s annual performance report. The actual data and established targets are included as well as a short analysis to explain changes from the prior year.

Evaluate Weekly The information within the Weekly Activity Report is discussed in detail during the weekly “Chiefs’ Tuesday Meeting.” The meeting involves the fire chief, deputy chief, assistant chief of community risk reduction, assistant chief of emergency services, and assistant chief of special operations and professional development. The participants review each section of the report and request additional information from the fire analyst as needed. The continuation of this meeting is important to the OFD’s continuous improvement. Monthly, Quarterly, and Annually The fire chief and fire analyst reviews data every month, each quarter, and annually. Performance data in COMPASS is reviewed quarterly by the City of Olathe’s Leadership Team. . This team consists of the city manager, assistant city manager and all department directors. A PerforMax meeting is held quarterly to review specific measures. A department presents analysis of their performance specific to the selected measure in considerable detail. This allows other departments to better understand the issues and help brainstorm ways to improve the measure. The OFD

156


reported on a community enhancement measure in December 2016 and will focus on response times at the first quarter meeting of 2017.

Identify & Modify

The OFD works to identify gaps in service delivery where department performance does not meet community expectations. Monitoring citizen satisfaction on a variety of measures is often an indicator of service issues. The City’s ability to hone in on specific issues has been improved with the opportunity to conduct focus groups with citizens based on survey results. The OFD did this in 2016 to better understand citizen dissatisfaction with our enforcement of mowing and weed violations. The OFD was able to confirm the ordinance limiting vegetation to a specific height was reasonable according to the focus group participants and that responsiveness to complaints also met expectations. This in-depth analysis will help support the PerforMax meeting focused on response times in 2017. Chief officers also consider gaps in service during the annual year-end planning process. Progress on strategic goals is reviewed and action items identified that become part of the department’s Plan of Action for the coming year. Data is reviewed to help inform the budget-planning process that begins about this same time. This may include review of overtime costs, contractual service expenditures, lease fees, etc. Data is also prepared and reviewed for the various program appraisals conducted each year. These appraisals and the deliberate year-end planning help identify areas for improvement across programs. Once strengths and opportunities for improvement (gaps) are identified, it is important to communicate these needs. The OFD shares its Plan of Action with all employees and posts on the OFD’s Key Documents webpage. This articulates the priority improvement areas for the year as identified by chief officers. The plan is monitored quarterly and a progress report documents if the plans were achieved at the end of each year.

Approve

The cumulative effect fashioned by the regular and systematic monitoring; evaluation; identification and modification; approval; and, subsequent sharing of data/information (compliance methodology) lends to the assurance that prescribed service levels are maintained and performance expectations are improved upon. To help ensure targeted and methodical improvement, the fire chief authorizes actions which relate to the OFD’s performance initiatives. This consent also includes the approval of the CRESA-SOC and any consequent modifications or updates.

Share

The sharing or communication of organizational strengths and opportunities for improvement (gaps) is important. This proactive sharing helps reinforce performance expectations for all while at the same time maintaining the situational awareness of OFD key leaders. The fire chief, fire analyst, and accreditation manager are tasked with internally communicating OFD strengths and opportunities for improvement. Sharing is not just limited to internal stakeholders. The fire chief and accreditation manager are also tasked with the sharing of information to the OFD’s external stakeholders. The fire chief’s communication focus is with people such as municipal key leaders (e.g., city manager, City Council, department directors) and partner agencies (e.g., fire chiefs, emergency managers). The accreditation manager is tasked with interacting with the OFD’s community stakeholders. These stakeholders are engaged at least quarterly.

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SECTION 6: CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The CRESA-SOC process was an important part of the OFD’s continuous improvement commitment. The process was undertaken to better identify the OFD’s strengths and its areas for improvement. Ultimately, the process helps ensure both excellent and equitable service to the OFD’s customers. This all-encompassing process yielded both inclusive conclusions and recommendations.

CONCLUSIONS

The OFD conducted a thorough community risk assessment by judiciously evaluating both itself and the community for which it serves. Risk was evaluated by program, geographical planning areas (North, Central, and South), and ESZs (77). As part of this evaluation, the OFD classified (fire, EMS, rescue, and hazmat/EOD) and categorized (low, moderate, high, and special) risk throughout the community. These classifications and categorizations subsequently resulted in the appropriate determination of an ERF (concentration) through a critical task analysis. The critical task analysis is reflected within the Olathe Response Plan. The community risk assessment’s geographical planning approach incorporated a parabolic two-axis risk categorization methodology. This methodology was founded upon both probability and consequence. The use of historical data (types and frequencies) and weighted elements included things like population densities, OVAP, at-risk populations, property values, target hazards, and local considerations. The results concluded a risk rating categorization for all of Olathe’s 77 ESZs. Aggregate data also provided risk conclusions for the North Planning Area, Central Planning Area, and South Planning Area. This thorough assessment was also comprised of the review and evaluation of the OFD’s current deployment baseline data and benchmark performance objectives. The data and objectives both contained measurable components such as response time standards for the OFD’s “first due” (distribution) and ERF (concentration). This deployment assessment helped the OFD identify a gap in equitable coverage within the southwest portion of the community. The assessment also supported the belief that data can always be improved upon. The continuous improvement of statistics typically results in better data-based decision making. The extensive risk assessment process resulted in reliable, comprehensive conclusions, which were used to derive continuous improvement recommendations.

RECOMMENDATIONS

In closing, the OFD established several recommendations based off of the CRESA-SOC process. These recommendations were a direct result of the systematic and time intensive community risk and emergency services analysis. The recommendations are a continuation of the OFD’s commitment to service excellence and its belief in quality improvement through accreditation. Recommendation 1: Improve resource distribution The OFD should establish a fire station within southwest Olathe to provide equitable, “first due” coverage (distribution) for this area’s customers. These OFD resources (human and physical) would address an identified gap in service.

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Recommendation 2: Improve data quality The OFD should improve the quality of its data via things such as enhanced incident report writing training, better standardized report documentation, and an improved quality control process for all incident reports. Recommendation 3: Integrate data analysis The OFD should complete the project, which is currently in process, that would better integrate data and help improve analysis. It is recommended that the project be completed no later than the end of quarter three in 2017. Recommendation 4: Better communicate expectations The OFD should better communicate performance expectations (e.g., turnout, situational awareness about location at time of dispatch [dynamic distribution]) throughout the department. Recommendation 5: Endorse CRESA-SOC The OFD should endorse the formal adoption of the CRESA-SOC by key leaders of the City of Olathe.

Published 2017 CRESA-SOC Annual Updates 2018 Update

Staff

Fire Chief

Date

2019 Update

Staff

Fire Chief

Date

2020 Update

Staff

Fire Chief

Date

2021 Update

Staff

Fire Chief

Date

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

159


160


APPENDIX A

OFD COMMUNITY RISK & EMERGENCY SERVICES ANALYSIS

161


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

123 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 95th Street S: 103rd Street E: 27900 Block W: 29500 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Small population resides outside of Olathe city limits. Only undeveloped areas within Olathe.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

24

HOUSEHOLDS

6

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

0

FAMILIES

4

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

14%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

13%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$33,868

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

10

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$4,454,290

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

47 years

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation fire risk exists. EMS N/A HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

1

0

1

EMS

0

0

0

1

0

1

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

1

0

1

0

0

2


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

124 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 95th Street S: 103rd Street E: Cedar Niles Boulevard W: 27900 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW K-10 highway intersects grid. High household income. Large single-family homes.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

117

HOUSEHOLDS

59

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

12

FAMILIES

50

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$158,702

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

4

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$76,518,100

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

18

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

1

POTENTIAL

FIRE Single-family homes surrounded by timber. EMS Residential neighborhood and highway. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

2

2

0

0

5

EMS

5

11

11

5

7

39

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

1

1

OTHER

6

2

5

5

3

21


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

125 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 95th Street S: 103rd Street E: 24700 Block W: 26300 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Light commercial. High household income. Single-family homes. Timber-lined, rolling hills.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

264

HOUSEHOLDS

115

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

28

FAMILIES

96

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$155,382

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

10

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$147,151,210

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

18

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

1

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

2

POTENTIAL

FIRE Single-family homes. Office building. EMS Residential and highway. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident on highway requiring extrication.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

1

0

4

0

6

EMS

3

11

3

13

7

37

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

2

2

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

1

1

OTHER

4

6

5

6

14

35


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

147 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 103rd Street S: College Boulevard E: 27900 Block W: 29500 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Undeveloped area of Olathe.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

16

HOUSEHOLDS

6

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

0

FAMILIES

4

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

14%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

13%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$33,868

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

7

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$56,510

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

47

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation fire risk. EMS N/A HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

0

0

0

EMS

0

0

0

0

0

0

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

0

0

0

0

0

0


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

148 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural BOUNDARIES N: 103rdStreet S: College Boulevard E: Cedar Niles Road W: 27900 Bl0ck GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential only. High household income. 65-acre lake in development.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

903

HOUSEHOLDS

350

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

91

FAMILIES

292

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$158,702

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

33

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$244,939,090

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

18

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

7

POTENTIAL

FIRE Large single-family homes and neighborhood clubhouse facility. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

1

1

1

0

3

EMS

15

17

8

21

13

74

HAZMAT

1

2

2

2

1

8

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

1

1

OTHER

11

12

8

19

20

70


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

149 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 103rd Street S: College Boulevard E: 24700 Block W: 26300 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Small, private airpark. High household income. Primarily large single-family homes.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

746

HOUSEHOLDS

287

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

75

FAMILIES

239

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$158,702

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

28

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$87,781,900

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

18

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

6

POTENTIAL

FIRE Large single-family homes. Large areas of undeveloped land. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

1

3

0

5

EMS

3

19

14

10

4

50

HAZMAT

1

1

1

0

0

3

RESCUE

0

0

0

1

1

2

OTHER

14

3

3

12

4

36


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

150 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 103rd Street/K-10 Highway S: College Boulevard E: 23100 Block/K-7 Highway W: 24700 GENERAL OVERVIEW Bordered by state highways on north and east. Mid-sized residential. Isolated commercial facilities.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

183

HOUSEHOLDS

54

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

18

FAMILIES

45

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$158,702

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

7

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$234,896,660

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

18

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

1

POTENTIAL

FIRE Largely undeveloped areas with pockets of residential. Isolated commercial structures. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident on highway requiring extrication.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS A commercial structure located here is one of Olatheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most valuable real estate properties. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

2

2

0

1

6

EMS

18

20

17

15

21

91

HAZMAT

0

0

1

1

1

3

RESCUE

0

0

0

1

0

1

OTHER

4

11

5

8

9

37


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

151 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 103rd Street/K-10 Highway S: College Boulevard E: 21500 Block W: 23100 Block/K-7 Highway GENERAL OVERVIEW Bordered by state highway on north and west. Half of zone is undeveloped. Large food distribution center. Two schools.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

68

HOUSEHOLDS

16

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

9

FAMILIES

14

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

17%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$109,107

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

2

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$83,667,400

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

2

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation fire. High number of transport vehicles at distribution center. EMS One of Olathe’s two districtwide activity centers. Department provides medical standbys for sporting events. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Location for city’s annual fireworks display. Aldi distribution center is one of Olathe’s most valuable real estate properties. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

3

4

2

2

5

16

EMS

20

24

17

26

32

119

HAZMAT

0

0

2

0

0

2

RESCUE

10

12

8

8

10

48

OTHER

10

20

21

16

12

79


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

152 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 103rd Street/K-10 Highway S: College Boulevard E: 19900 Block/Woodland Road W: Lone Elm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Bordered on north by state highway. Two neighborhoods one with large lot size. High school. Vineyard.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

523

HOUSEHOLDS

141

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

67

FAMILIES

122

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

17%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$109,107

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

14

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$186,138,920

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

16

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential. Numerous residential building permits in 2016. EMS Residential and high school. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway. Several small ponds in neighborhood.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Olathe Northwest High School is one of Olatheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most valuable real estate properties. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

1

3

2

0

6

EMS

15

15

17

13

22

82

HAZMAT

2

4

3

3

1

13

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

10

8

11

6

16

51


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

153 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 103rd Street/K-10 Highway S: College Boulevard E: Ridgeview Road W: Woodland Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Two small neighborhoods and electrical substation. Rail, stream and walking trail. Retail center with gas station.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

596

HOUSEHOLDS

207

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

103

FAMILIES

166

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

4%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$108,810

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

52

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$85,779,930

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

18

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

3

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential neighborhoods with single-family homes. EMS Residential. HAZMAT Railroad bisects zone. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

2

2

4

3

0

11

EMS

13

13

23

22

24

95

HAZMAT

2

1

3

3

1

10

RESCUE

0

1

0

0

0

1

OTHER

12

9

6

18

17

62


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

154 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 103rd Street/K-10 Highway S: College Boulevard E: Renner Road W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Large areas of undeveloped land with several multi-story office buildings, a large fitness center and a 10-story hotel.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

Insufficient data

HOUSEHOLDS

Insufficient data

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

Insufficient data

FAMILIES

Insufficient data

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

Insufficient data

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

Insufficient data

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

Insufficient data

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

Insufficient data

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$149,550,990

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

Insufficient data

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

Insufficient data

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

Insufficient data

POTENTIAL

FIRE Commercial structures including high-rise hotel. EMS Limited. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Garmin marathon routes through this zone. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

2

0

1

3

EMS

19

15

19

17

13

83

HAZMAT

0

0

1

0

0

1

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

1

1

OTHER

10

8

6

3

8

35


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

172 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: Cedar Niles Road W: 27900 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Mostly undeveloped, heavily wooded land with isolated cleared sections. Approximately 100 single family homes.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

87

HOUSEHOLDS

30

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

7

FAMILIES

25

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$158,283

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

3

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$13,988,140

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

17

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with vegetation areas. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

0

0

0

EMS

0

0

0

1

3

4

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

1

1

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

0

2

0

0

0

2


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

173 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: Clare Road W: Cedar Niles Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Mostly undeveloped land with one school and a few estatestyle single family home lots in the southeast corner.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

353

HOUSEHOLDS

110

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

10

FAMILIES

101

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$157,001

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

7

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$32,738,430

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

16

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

3

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

1

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential and school with vegetation areas. EMS Residential and school. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

0

0

0

EMS

2

1

0

5

4

12

HAZMAT

1

0

0

1

0

2

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

4

1

3

1

2

11


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

174 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: K-7 Highway W: Clare Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Half of the zone is residential with medium-sized single family

homes and thick wooded areas. Remainder is undeveloped.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,383

HOUSEHOLDS

377

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-71

FAMILIES

377

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

4%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

3%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$155,074

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

0

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$176,600,180

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

21

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential fire risk with some vegetation areas. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

3

2

1

1

1

8

EMS

15

36

48

40

50

189

HAZMAT

3

1

2

0

1

7

RESCUE

0

1

0

0

0

1

OTHER

6

12

13

17

18

66


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

175 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: Lone Elm Road W: K-7 Highway GENERAL OVERVIEW Medium-sized single family homes with some 2-4 family homes, retail center, church, school and cleared land.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

819

HOUSEHOLDS

287

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

105

FAMILIES

247

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

17%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$109,107

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

23

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$98,163,210

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

33

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential including multi-family homes. Vegetation areas. EMS Residential and school. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Planned location for Olatheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tenth middle school. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

2

1

1

1

6

EMS

38

37

36

24

30

165

HAZMAT

0

2

1

2

3

8

RESCUE

0

0

0

1

0

1

OTHER

12

7

18

25

12

74


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

176 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: Woodland Road W: Lone Elm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW

Medium-sized single family homes with some multi-family homes. Large single family homes on bigger lots in southeast.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

2,376

HOUSEHOLDS

754

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

536

FAMILIES

631

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

11%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

1%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$104,911

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

44

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$261,812,640

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

12

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with multi-family homes. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

1

0

1

1

4

EMS

43

37

53

49

49

231

HAZMAT

3

5

2

2

5

17

RESCUE

0

0

0

3

0

3

OTHER

15

22

17

21

22

97


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

177 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: Ridgeview Road W: Lone Elm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW

Rail, creek and trail. Partially undeveloped with school, single family homes, ECC, offices, nursing facility, apartments/villas.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,775

HOUSEHOLDS

621

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

306

FAMILIES

496

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

4%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$108,810

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

156

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$237,411,200

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

18

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

8

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with some apartments for older adults. EMS Residential and nursing home. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Critical infrastructure located here. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

2

2

3

3

1

11

EMS

158

149

182

131

112

732

HAZMAT

4

3

4

5

2

18

RESCUE

0

0

1

0

0

1

OTHER

48

33

33

32

31

177


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

178 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: Renner Boulevard W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW

Single family homes, a church, assisted-living/nursing facility, retail centers and multi-story office buildings.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,750

HOUSEHOLDS

582

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

75

FAMILIES

388

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

8%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$96,136

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

175

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$324,541,060

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

7

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential. EMS Residential with graduated senior-care facilities. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 119th Street and Lennox St is one of the most frequent crash intersections in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Sub-ground parking garage in office complex. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

3

1

1

0

3

8

EMS

142

51

64

40

47

344

HAZMAT

4

1

2

3

1

11

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

39

13

20

16

15

103


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

179 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: Black Bob Road/15100 Block W: Renner Boulevard GENERAL OVERVIEW

City water tower, Home Depot, a large auto dealership and retail area. Interstate 35 and railroad run through this zone.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

6

HOUSEHOLDS

4

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-238

FAMILIES

3

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

8%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$76,909

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$224,073,180

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

Insufficient Data

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Retail/commercial. EMS Limited. HAZMAT Three Tier II facilities. Railroad and I-35 transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway. Some of most frequent crash locations in Olathe are at 119th Street and I-35, 119th Street and Strang Line Road, and 119th Street and Black Bob Road.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

4

1

0

7

2

14

EMS

58

40

34

48

48

228

HAZMAT

4

2

2

3

4

15

RESCUE

0

0

1

0

0

1

OTHER

23

19

15

20

18

95


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

180 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: College Boulevard S: 119th Street E: Pflumm Road W: Black Bob Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Apartments, multi-family townhomes and single family homes. Mixed-use commercial. School and graduated care facilities.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

HIGH


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

3,924

HOUSEHOLDS

1,967

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

937

FAMILIES

945

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

13%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

4%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$59,888

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

436

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$534,324,700

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

17

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

9

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with graduated care facilities and school. Light commercial. EMS Two graduated care facilities are most frequent locations for medical calls in 2016. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 119th and Black Bob Road is one of the most frequent crash locations in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Avignon Apartments and Santa Marta community are two of Olatheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top real estate properties. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

6

5

7

4

3

25

EMS

269

294

337

398

449

1,747

HAZMAT

4

2

6

11

8

31

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

2

2

OTHER

105

126

103

134

139

607


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

197 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 119th Street S: 127th Street E: Clare Road/24700 Block W: Cedar Niles Road/26300 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW

Heavily wooded and undeveloped. Light residential across the south side. Contains a large wastewater treatment plant.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

66

HOUSEHOLDS

21

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-3

FAMILIES

21

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

4%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

3%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$155,074

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

0

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$21,800,800

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

1

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Some residential with vegetation areas. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Confined space considerations at wastewater treatment.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Wastewater treatment plant. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

0

0

0

EMS

0

0

0

0

0

0

HAZMAT

1

0

0

0

0

1

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

2

0

0

0

0

2


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

198 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 119th Street S: 127th Street E: Hedge Lane/23100 Block W: Clare Road/24700 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW

Residential development of medium to large single family homes and one elementary school.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

503

HOUSEHOLDS

148

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

108

FAMILIES

109

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

9%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

1%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$85,748

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

50

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$236,937,920

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

16

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

11

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with vegetation areas. EMS Residential and elementary school. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Under development. One of the highest number of new residential building permits in 2016. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

1

1

01

2

5

EMS

11

16

8

22

17

74

HAZMAT

1

0

2

1

0

4

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

1

11

8

6

9

35


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

199 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 119th Street S: 127th Street E: Parker Street/Lone Elm Road W: Hedge Lane/23100 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW K-7 highway. Undeveloped near highway. Small/medium one and two family homes with area of multi-family townhomes.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,156

HOUSEHOLDS

480

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

325

FAMILIES

317

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$87,471

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

2

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$133,764,140

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

11

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with multi-family structures. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on the highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS City compost facility. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

2

1

1

2

3

9

EMS

29

36

28

28

43

164

HAZMAT

0

3

2

1

0

6

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

23

24

14

10

24

95


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

200 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 119th Street S: Harold Street E: Woodland Road W: Parker Street/Lone Elm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW

Single family homes and a school. Street maintenance facility and wastewater treatment plant near the railroad.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,306

HOUSEHOLDS

1,287

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

1,030

FAMILIES

1,201

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

4%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$114,279

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

94

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$308,925,750

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

17

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential. EMS Residential. Two large ponds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one in neighborhood. HAZMAT Railroad. RESCUE Confined space considerations at wastewater treatment facility.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

4

3

2

4

1

14

EMS

51

46

82

74

81

334

HAZMAT

4

0

1

4

4

13

RESCUE

0

0

1

0

1

2

OTHER

17

32

30

31

26

136


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

201 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 119th Street S: Harold Street E: Ridgeview Road W: Woodland Road GENERAL OVERVIEW A railroad, single family homes, one school, electrical substation, multi-story apartments and a senior living facility.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

3,618

HOUSEHOLDS

1,310

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

54

FAMILIES

976

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

7%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

1%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$77,571

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

190

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$247,257,760

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

31

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

27

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Primarily residential. EMS Residential and school. HAZMAT Railroad. RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS The Mill Creek Streamway Park serves as an access point for a walking and biking trail that extends 17 miles though Johnson County. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

4

10

10

5

3

32

EMS

100

105

127

113

121

566

HAZMAT

2

0

8

11

10

31

RESCUE

1

1

1

0

1

4

OTHER

17

38

44

39

48

186


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

202 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 119th Street S: Harold Street E: Renner Road/Mur-Len Road W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Mobile homes, apartments, townhomes, single-family homes, nursing care facility, schools, retail/commercial. I-35 and rail.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

HIGH


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,299

HOUSEHOLDS

1,675

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

352

FAMILIES

976

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

40%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

10%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$42,106

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1,489

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$297,144,430

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

29

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

394

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

1

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential and commercial areas. EMS Residential, schools, graduated care facilities. HAZMAT Three Tier II facilities. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway. 119th and Lennox Road is one of the most frequent crash intersections in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS The Lennox Apartments are one of Olathe’s top real estate properties. Two Title I schools. Olathe’s only manufactured/mobile home park. 40% of households speak a language other than in English in home. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

16

10

13

18

7

64

EMS

335

483

451

442

491

2,202

HAZMAT

14

11

19

17

10

71

RESCUE

0

0

1

2

1

4

OTHER

90

113

117

85

98

503


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

203 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 119th Street S: 127th Street E: Black Bob Road W: Mur-Len Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Hotels, apartments, duplexes, single family homes, two schools, retail, large churches and movie theatre. I-35 and rail.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

HIGH


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,316

HOUSEHOLDS

1,532

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-289

FAMILIES

996

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

18%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

9%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$57,219

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1,067

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$438,126,150

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

33

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

17

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

2

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential and retail areas. Several multi-story buildings. EMS Residential and schools. Hotels. HAZMAT Railroad and I-35 transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE Accidents requiring extrication on highway. ESZ has four frequent crash locations: I-35 and 119th Street, 119th and Strang Line Road, 119th and Black Bob Road, and 127th and Black Bob Road.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Two Title I schools. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

18

10

11

11

14

64

EMS

222

291

314

277

306

1,410

HAZMAT

21

27

22

20

22

112

RESCUE

2

1

2

3

2

10

OTHER

104

109

121

113

107

554


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

204 PLANNING AREA North POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 119th Street S: 127th Street E: Pflumm Road W: Black Bob Road GENERAL OVERVIEW

Residential with 2-3 story apartments, medium-sized single family homes, retail area, one school and two churches.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

5,029

HOUSEHOLDS

1,855

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

143

FAMILIES

1,413

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

4%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$88,467

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

272

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$474,797,180

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

23

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential. There is a gated, multi-story apartment building with limited access for fire apparatus. EMS Residential and school. Stream overflows banks periods of heavy rain. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 119th Street and Black Bob Road and 127th Street and Black Bob Road are two of the intersections with the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

7

7

1

4

3

22

EMS

113

94

103

94

131

535

HAZMAT

12

11

4

9

4

40

RESCUE

1

0

0

0

0

1

OTHER

56

47

57

62

54

276


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

222 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 127th Street S: Santa Fe Street E: Hedge Lane W: Lakeshore Drive GENERAL OVERVIEW Medium-sized single family homes near a small lake. Multifamily homes, three schools including a new high school.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

3,277

HOUSEHOLDS

1,017

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

202

FAMILIES

908

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

8%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

1%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$93,056

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

30

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$263,568,300

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

23

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

24

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential area. EMS Residential and schools. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

3

5

2

4

1

15

EMS

42

41

59

60

40

242

HAZMAT

1

5

2

4

5

17

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

15

25

16

21

23

100


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

223 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 127th Street S: Santa Fe Street E: Parker Street/K-7 Highway W: Hedge Lane GENERAL OVERVIEW

Single family homes, duplexes and townhomes, park, nature trail, K-7 highway, Walmart and retail.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

2,047

HOUSEHOLDS

658

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

440

FAMILIES

486

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

9%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

1%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$85,227

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

203

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$122,332,850

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

16

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

46

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential area with vegetation areas. EMS Residential. Prairie Center Park has numerous sporting activities. Nature trails with limited patient access. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway. Santa Fe Street and Parker Street intersection is one of the most frequent crash locations in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS City compost facility. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

3

4

2

4

14

EMS

59

72

66

74

89

360

HAZMAT

0

5

5

6

3

19

RESCUE

0

0

0

1

0

1

OTHER

16

17

19

24

14

90


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

224 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 127th Street S: Santa Fe Street E: Woodland Road W: Parker St/K-7 Highway GENERAL OVERVIEW

Single family homes, townhomes, small retail center, one elementary school, railroad, city hall and office buildings.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,504

HOUSEHOLDS

1,656

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

471

FAMILIES

1,099

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

24%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

14%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$51,983

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1,061

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$249,182,820

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

42

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

90

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with multi-family structures. Some retail, office, commercial areas and municipal buildings. One of the zones with the most fires in the past 5-year period. EMS Dense residential and school. County juvenile detention center. HAZMAT Railroad. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway. Santa Fe Street and Parker Street intersection is one of the most frequent crash locations in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Title 1 school. 24% of households speak a language other than English primarily. 14% of population does not have high-school credentials. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

16

9

11

13

14

63

EMS

297

225

262

295

332

1,411

HAZMAT

21

23

12

15

17

88

RESCUE

0

0

0

1

0

1

OTHER

73

62

66

68

58

327


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

225 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Harold Street/127th Street S: Santa Fe Street E: Ridgeview Road W: Woodland Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Single family homes, multi-family homes and an 8-story subsidized housing building. Schools, community center. Rail.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,876

HOUSEHOLDS

1,691

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

84

FAMILIES

1,164

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

18%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

10%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$60,059

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1,278

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$288,958,630

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

43

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

184

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with some commercial areas. Two high-rise complexes with older adult residents. EMS Dense residential and schools. High number older adult housing units. HAZMAT Railroad. RESCUE Santa Fe Street and Ridgeview Road is one of the most frequent crash locations in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Title I school. Olathe North HS is one of Olatheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top real estate properties. Zone identified as one with the most overcrowded housing units in Olathe based on US Census estimates. Mahaffie House (Historic). 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

13

11

10

7

5

46

EMS

247

213

184

239

246

1,129

HAZMAT

9

16

13

20

7

65

RESCUE

6

3

3

5

7

24

OTHER

55

54

62

76

59

306


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

226 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Harold Street/127th Street S: Santa Fe Road E: Mur-Len Road W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW

Retail, commercial, several auto dealerships, single and multifamily homes and a residential care facility. Railroad and I-35.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,439

HOUSEHOLDS

834

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

81

FAMILIES

238

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

15%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

6%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$39,380

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

291

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$271,494,760

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

23

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

11

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Commercial and multi-family structures. EMS Isolated dense residential areas. HAZMAT Railroad and I-35 transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE Santa Fe Street and Ridgeview Road, Santa Fe Street and I-35, Santa Fe Street and Mur-Len Road are three of the locations with the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Highest traffic congestion area in city. According to US census estimates, this zone has some of the most overcrowded housing and chronically impoverished people in Olathe. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

26

7

12

9

6

60

EMS

288

362

332

383

441

1,806

HAZMAT

11

15

13

12

5

56

RESCUE

2

0

0

0

0

2

OTHER

108

79

115

117

123

542


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

227 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 127th Street S: 135th Street E: Black Bob Road W: Mur-Len Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Light retail, single family, duplexes and apartments. One

independent living facility for older adults. One school.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

HIGH


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,628

HOUSEHOLDS

1,823

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

209

FAMILIES

1,220

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

18%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

7%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$48,776

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

946

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$325,013,780

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

30

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

28

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with some multi-family structures. EMS Residential and school. Older adults in independent living facility. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 127th Street and Black Bob and 135th Street and Mur-Len Road are two intersections with the some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS One area of Olathe with a high number of structures with more than 50 units in each. Also, population in zone is in top quartile of people living with disabilities based on census estimates. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

11

6

10

11

6

44

EMS

245

253

305

320

338

1,461

HAZMAT

14

5

9

15

8

51

RESCUE

6

7

3

4

2

22

OTHER

89

51

81

83

79

383


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

228 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 127th Street S: 135th Street E: Pflumm Road W: Black Bob Road GENERAL OVERVIEW

Light retail, medium-sized single family and two multi-story apartment buildings. Three schools. Electrical sub-station.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

2,166

HOUSEHOLDS

637

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

79

FAMILIES

585

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

13%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

4%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$130,288

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

65

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$297,343,220

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

Insufficient data

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

10

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

6

POTENTIAL

FIRE Mostly residential with multi-story buildings. Some vegetation areas. EMS Dense residential and three schools. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Olathe East is one of Olatheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top real estate properties. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

7

0

3

2

3

15

EMS

53

48

66

94

148

412

HAZMAT

4

2

2

1

0

9

RESCUE

0

0

1

0

1

2

OTHER

21

19

31

30

26

127


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

245 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Santa Fe Street S: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street E: Lake Olathe W: Cedar Niles Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Recreation area with light residential. Medium Single family homes. Large lake with public access area.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

66

HOUSEHOLDS

28

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

12

FAMILIES

24

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

3%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

9%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$71,897

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

10

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$28,549,310

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

15

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

2

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation areas with sparse residential areas. EMS Recreational use of lake. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Low-water crossing below spillway has been site of several water rescue calls.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Expect service demand to increase in future as Lake Olathe Master Plan is implemented. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

3

0

1

5

EMS

2

6

2

7

5

22

HAZMAT

0

1

1

1

0

3

RESCUE

1

7

4

23

8

43

OTHER

1

2

1

9

8

21


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

246 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Santa Fe Street S: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street E: Hedge Lane W: Lake Olathe GENERAL OVERVIEW Recreation area with light residential. Medium single family homes.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

497

HOUSEHOLDS

185

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

89

FAMILIES

159

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

3%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

9%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$71,897

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

77

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$93.042,190

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

15

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

13

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation areas with sparse residential areas. EMS Recreational use of lake. Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Expect service demand to increase in future as Lake Olathe Master Plan is implemented. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

4

0

1

3

1

9

EMS

13

20

14

19

22

88

HAZMAT

1

1

3

3

2

10

RESCUE

0

3

4

0

1

8

OTHER

3

7

6

7

3

26


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

247 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Santa Fe Street S: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street E: Parker Street W: Hedge Lane GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential area with light retail. Small/medium duplexes, twostory apartment buildings. Three schools, electrical substation.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

5,133

HOUSEHOLDS

1,917

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

448

FAMILIES

1,444

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

22%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

11%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$65,510

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1,131

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$321,093,090

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

30

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

116

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential area with multi-family homes. EMS Residential and schools. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Santa Fe Street and Parker Street intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

16

9

11

4

9

49

EMS

186

201

269

274

269

1,199

HAZMAT

9

11

16

18

11

65

RESCUE

1

1

0

1

2

5

OTHER

66

64

85

61

59

335


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

248 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Santa Fe Street S: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street E: Harrison Street/Woodland Road W: S Parker Street GENERAL OVERVIEW Commercial, retail, residential, municipal and railroad properties. Three schools.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

HIGH


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

2,915

HOUSEHOLDS

1,124

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-489

FAMILIES

648

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

30%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

19%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$38,884

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

995

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$248,646,990

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

62

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

242

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential and commercial areas. One of the zones with the most fires in the past 5-year period. High percentage of homes constructed prior to 1940. EMS Residential, schools and county jail. HAZMAT Railroad and rail spur. Three Tier II facilities. EPA Superfund site for old battery production facility. RESCUE Santa Fe Street and Parker Street intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Title I school. Per census, 30% of households speak a language other than English. Almost 20% of people do not have high school credentials. One-third live near poverty level. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

15

12

11

15

5

58

EMS

207

345

311

306

319

1,488

HAZMAT

11

18

17

17

18

81

RESCUE

3

5

2

4

3

17

OTHER

70

61

74

77

64

346


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

249 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Santa Fe Street S: Dennis Avenue/1433rd Street E: Ridgeview Road W: Harrison Street/Woodland Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential and light commercial. Small one and two family homes, multi-story apartments. School. Lakes. Raised railroad.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

HIGH


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,108

HOUSEHOLDS

1,593

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

202

FAMILIES

830

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

31%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

12%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$36,363

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1,513

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$198,224,810

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

55

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

170

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

5

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential and commercial areas. One of the zones with the most structure fires in the past 5-year period. EMS Residential and school. Three public lakes. HAZMAT Railroad and rail spur. EPA Superfund site on Chemical Commodities, Inc. RESCUE Santa Fe Street and Ridgeview Road intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS One Title I school. Per US Census estimates, 37% of people live near/below poverty level and 31% of households do not primarily speak English. Zone is noted for high percentage of overcrowded housing. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

19

8

18

8

8

61

EMS

278

270

328

344

274

1,494

HAZMAT

15

17

15

15

14

76

RESCUE

0

2

0

0

0

2

OTHER

119

119

131

124

107

600


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

250 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Santa Fe Street S: Sheridan Street E: Mur-Len Road W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential, commercial and educational. One and two family homes, two-story apartments, high-rise, MNU, and I-35.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

HIGH


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,608

HOUSEHOLDS

1,577

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-212

FAMILIES

921

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

34%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

18%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$37,603

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1,192

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$293,443,770

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

43

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

71

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

5

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with high concentration of multi-family housing, commercial, educational dorms, transport and other vehicles fires. EMS Residential, educational dorms. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway. Santa Fe Street and Mur-Len Road, I-35 and Santa Fe Street, Santa Fe Street and Ridgeview Road are three intersections with some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Title 1 school. Per census, 26% of people live near/below poverty level and 34% of households do not speak English. FAA regional air routing center here. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

19

12

8

14

15

68

EMS

475

548

578

599

595

2,795

HAZMAT

25

21

20

21

19

106

RESCUE

0

1

2

1

4

8

OTHER

192

201

224

201

259

1,077


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

251 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 135th Street S: 143rd Street E: Black Bob Road W: Mur-Len Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential, light commercial/retail/office. Small/medium single family homes. Four schools. Home improvement store.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

3,680

HOUSEHOLDS

1,211

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

682

FAMILIES

973

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

8%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

3%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$94,650

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

237

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$382,087,290

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

32

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

43

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential, retail and office units. EMS Residential, schools. HAZMAT Four Tier II facilities. RESCUE Santa Fe Street and Mur-Len Road and 138th Street and Black Bob Road are intersections with some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Title I school. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

17

6

9

4

6

42

EMS

138

141

116

159

154

708

HAZMAT

8

13

9

18

8

56

RESCUE

0

0

0

1

0

1

OTHER

50

77

59

41

59

286


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

252 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban BOUNDARIES N: 135th Street S: 143rd Street E: Pflumm Road W: Black Bob Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential, commercial/retail. Single-family, two-family and a multi-story apartment complex. Walmart. Oil tank battery.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

SPECIAL


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

3,912

HOUSEHOLDS

1,451

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-25

FAMILIES

1,005

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

20%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

3%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

83,250

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

205

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$408,643,140

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

17

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

14

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Oil tank battery. Dense residential with multi-family structures. EMS Residential. Free-standing emergency room. HAZMAT Oil tank battery. RESCUE 138th Street and Black Bob Road intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Bulk-fuel storage facility in mostly residential area. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

4

1

2

3

3

13

EMS

136

131

131

158

140

696

HAZMAT

6

5

11

8

15

45

RESCUE

1

0

1

1

0

3

OTHER

31

27

33

22

37

150


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

268 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Cedar Niles Road W: Moonlight Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Mostly undeveloped. Single family homes.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

247

HOUSEHOLDS

90

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

75

FAMILIES

87

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

1%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$125,288

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

7

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$16,153,930

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

2

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential and vegetation areas. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

1

0

0

1

EMS

0

0

1

2

1

4

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

0

0

0

0

1

1


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

269 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Lakeshore Drive W: Cedar Niles Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Partially developed residential golf course community with medium to large single family houses.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,379

HOUSEHOLDS

443

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

421

FAMILIES

432

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

1%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$125,288

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

41

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$151,132,970

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

13

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Area under development. High number of new residential building permits in 2016. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

1

1

1

2

6

EMS

11

11

14

12

26

74

HAZMAT

0

2

2

0

6

10

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

7

11

12

8

9

47


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

270 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street S: 151st Street E: 23100 Block W: Lakeshore Drive GENERAL OVERVIEW Mostly undeveloped and wooded. Developed areas are medium to large single family houses.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

201

HOUSEHOLDS

74

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-24

FAMILIES

47

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

38

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$26,890,880

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

3

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential and vegetation areas. EMS Residential. Small lake behind neighborhood. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Future plans include a trail connecting Lake Olathe to Cedar Lake bisecting this zone. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

1

0

2

4

EMS

8

7

10

10

9

44

HAZMAT

0

1

2

3

0

6

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

4

10

7

1

1

23


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

271 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Lone Elm Road W: 23100 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Light industry/business/commercial. Some single-, two- and multi-family residential. Railroad and highway.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

370

HOUSEHOLDS

139

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-44

FAMILIES

88

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

70

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$104,284,390

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

6

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Industrial. EMS Some residential. Small community sporting park. HAZMAT Seven Tier II facilities. Railroad and Old 56 Highway transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

2

5

6

14

EMS

48

44

33

49

46

220

HAZMAT

3

3

4

5

7

22

RESCUE

1

0

1

0

0

2

OTHER

19

26

32

24

29

130


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

272 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Harrison St/US-169 Highway W: Lone Elm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Railway. Light industry/business/office. Three hotels. Two nursing care/rehabilitation facilities. Great Mall removed.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

420

HOUSEHOLDS

90

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

6

FAMILIES

60

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

25%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

20%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$45,734

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

101

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$139,843,950

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

54

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

22

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Industrial. EMS Nursing care and rehabilitation facilities. Medical offices. HAZMAT Railroad. RESCUE 151st Street and US-169 Highway is intersection with some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

5

5

3

2

4

19

EMS

237

92

117

161

143

750

HAZMAT

6

8

4

4

6

28

RESCUE

1

1

1

0

0

3

OTHER

85

30

23

23

26

187


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

273 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: Dennis Avenue/143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Ridgeview Road W: Woodland Road/K-7 Highway GENERAL OVERVIEW Interstate rail overpass. Industry/commercial/office. 1-family homes. Exxon plant. Garmin HQ. Dillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s distribution center.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,708

HOUSEHOLDS

524

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-3

FAMILIES

430

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

28%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

12%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$78,975

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

174

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE4

$302,459,050

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

33

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

34

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential, retail, industry and transport vehicle. High-rise building. EMS Residential. HAZMAT Six Tier II Facilities. Exxon Mobile Olathe Grease Plant. Railroad and I-35 transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE 151st and US-169 Highway intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Garmin’s 8-story high-rise building is one of Olathe’s top real estate properties. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

4

2

0

5

10

21

EMS

144

174

163

162

185

828

HAZMAT

16

13

15

25

12

81

RESCUE

0

1

2

0

1

4

OTHER

72

74

65

65

63

339


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

274 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Mur-Len Road W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential small-medium single family homes. Small retail center. Four two-family homes. Three schools.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,912

HOUSEHOLDS

1,626

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

76

FAMILIES

1401

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

13%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

3%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$75,896

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

720

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$330,901,280

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

40

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

34

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential with several schools. EMS Residential. Large high school. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Olathe South High School is one of Olatheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top real estate properties. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

4

8

6

8

2

28

EMS

124

168

162

149

109

712

HAZMAT

11

10

18

21

11

71

RESCUE

0

1

1

1

0

3

OTHER

41

44

46

44

43

218


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

275 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Black Bob Road W: Mur-Len Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Single family residential. One school. Small retail area.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

5,674

HOUSEHOLDS

1,834

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-531

FAMILIES

1641

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

4%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

1%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$92,625

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

321

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$389,025,440

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

33

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

47

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all single-family homes. EMS Residential and school. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 151st St and Black Bob Road intersection with one with the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

10

7

5

7

3

32

EMS

93

112

108

128

154

595

HAZMAT

14

19

8

16

11

68

RESCUE

1

2

1

2

1

7

OTHER

40

44

46

68

57

255


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

276 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Pflumm Road W: Black Bob Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Single-family, two-family homes and retail. City park and aquatic center. City water towers. Three schools.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

4,435

HOUSEHOLDS

1,318

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

600

FAMILIES

1,139

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

13%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$114,822

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

126

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$342,406,970

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

23

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

65

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

15

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mostly single-family homes. EMS Residential. Large city park with sporting venues. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 151st and Black Bob Road intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

4

5

4

2

3

18

EMS

80

57

71

65

68

341

HAZMAT

5

3

4

9

7

28

RESCUE

0

0

1

0

1

2

OTHER

24

35

32

34

21

146


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

277 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Quivira Road W: Pflumm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential single family homes. One neighborhood pond.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

538

HOUSEHOLDS

170

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-7

FAMILIES

157

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

1%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

6%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$144,712

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

6

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$85,882,560

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

15

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

6

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with open, undeveloped land. EMS Residential. Neighborhood pond. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

4

0

4

EMS

17

12

18

13

20

80

HAZMAT

2

2

2

4

1

11

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

7

1

5

6

3

22


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

278 PLANNING AREA Central POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 143rd Street S: 151st Street E: Switzer Road W: Quivira Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential with medium/large homes. Neighborhood ponds.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

2,468

HOUSEHOLDS

767

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

104

FAMILIES

737

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

12%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$157,269

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

26

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$368,568,700

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

15

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

11

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all single-family homes. EMS Residential. Small neighborhood ponds. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

1

1

2

EMS

21

28

29

30

29

137

HAZMAT

2

1

1

2

1

7

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

5

24

6

6

10

51


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

293 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: Clare Road W: 26300 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Light industrial and undeveloped. Single spec building.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

0

HOUSEHOLDS

0

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

0

FAMILIES

0

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

0

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

N/A

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

N/A

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$39,155,100

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

N/A

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

N/A

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

N/A

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation and light commercial. EMS Vegetation. HAZMAT N/A. RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

0

0

0

EMS

3

1

0

3

4

11

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

0

1

0

1

2

4


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

294 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: 23100 Block W: Clare Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Undeveloped land around a large rock quarry.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

0

HOUSEHOLDS

0

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

0

FAMILIES

0

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

0

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

N/A

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

N/A

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$4,445,480

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

N/A

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

N/A

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

N/A

POTENTIAL

FIRE Heavy equipment. EMS Employees at quarry. HAZMAT Railroad. Quarry with explosives stored on site. RESCUE Contains intersection with history of fatal accidents.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

1

0

1

EMS

2

2

2

2

3

11

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

1

1

0

0

2

4


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

295 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: Lone Elm Road W: 23100 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Undeveloped land, rock quarry and a City of Olathe lake. Railway.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

13

HOUSEHOLDS

5

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-1

FAMILIES

3

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

2

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$1,942,600

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Heavy equipment. EMS Large public lake. HAZMAT Railroad and I-35 transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE N/A.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Expect service demand to increase in future as Cedar Lake Master Plan is implemented. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

0

0

0

EMS

4

4

7

7

4

26

HAZMAT

1

1

3

5

6

16

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

4

2

4

8

7

25


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

296 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: US-169 Highway W: Lone Elm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Light industrial/retail/office. Hospital complex. Graduated care/rehab facilities. Two hotels. I-35 and US-169 highways.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

317

HOUSEHOLDS

123

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-38

FAMILIES

78

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

60

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$249,983,140

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

5

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Commercial and healthcare facilities. EMS Several healthcare facilities. HAZMAT Seven Tier II facilities. RESCUE 151st Street and US-169 Highway intersection is one with some of the most crashes in Olathe. Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

8

7

4

2

6

27

EMS

335

364

415

415

482

2,011

HAZMAT

10

12

6

5

10

43

RESCUE

2

1

1

2

3

9

OTHER

107

149

167

133

122

678


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

297 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: Ridgeview Road W: US-169 Highway GENERAL OVERVIEW Industrial/commercial with some residential. Single-, two-, multi-family homes. Apartment complexes. Railroad.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,243

HOUSEHOLDS

596

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

248

FAMILIES

332

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

13%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

1%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$63,821

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

321

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$223,242,130

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

16

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

12

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Industrial and residential with some multi-family homes. EMS Residential. HAZMAT Five Tier II facilities. Railroad and US-169 highway. RESCUE 151st Street and US-169 highway intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe. Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

6

4

4

6

3

23

EMS

131

123

118

108

120

600

HAZMAT

4

4

3

3

5

19

RESCUE

0

1

0

0

1

2

OTHER

52

41

54

44

56

247


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

298 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: Mur-Len Road W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential with small retail areas. Single family homes. Two schools.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

5,951

HOUSEHOLDS

1,812

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

102

FAMILIES

1,535

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

11%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

5%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$90,387

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

689

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$391,227,720

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

29

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

133

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

19

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential with primarily single-family homes. EMS Residential and schools. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 151st Street and Mur-Len Road intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

6

12

5

2

7

32

EMS

136

168

182

190

194

870

HAZMAT

12

19

14

24

11

80

RESCUE

0

1

0

0

0

1

OTHER

57

49

77

74

96

353


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

299 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: Black Bob Road W: Mur-Len Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential with small retail area. Single family homes. One school. Electrical sub-station.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

5,781

HOUSEHOLDS

1,768

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

1,031

FAMILIES

1,503

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

12%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

4%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$91,093

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

106

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$386,864,810

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

22

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

40

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential with all single-family homes. EMS Residential and school. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 151st Street and Black Bob Road intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

9

2

2

4

1

18

EMS

104

105

88

99

71

467

HAZMAT

14

12

3

14

7

50

RESCUE

0

1

0

0

1

2

OTHER

47

40

44

38

43

212


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

300 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: Pflumm Road W: Black Bob Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential with one retail area and small sports park. Medium and large single family homes. Multi-family homes. Small lake.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

3,243

HOUSEHOLDS

1,061

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

848

FAMILIES

859

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

13%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$129,245

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

120

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$324,226,980

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

14

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

19

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with some multi-family homes. EMS Residential. Public park with sport activities. Neighborhood lake. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE 151st Street and Black Bob Road intersection has some of the most crashes in Olathe.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

1

5

1

8

EMS

58

46

87

75

97

363

HAZMAT

6

2

5

5

4

22

RESCUE

0

0

0

1

1

2

OTHER

33

32

41

24

37

167


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

301 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 151st Street S: 159th Street E: Quivira Road W: Pflumm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Area within City of Olathe boundaries contains the Johnson County Executive Airport.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

SPECIAL


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

742

HOUSEHOLDS

229

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

115

FAMILIES

221

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

12%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$184,300

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

46

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$107,598,530

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

13

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

6

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

22

POTENTIAL

FIRE Aviation fuel and small air traffic control tower. Aircraft emergencies. EMS Residential and airport employees. HAZMAT Aviation fuel. RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Approximately 50,000 aircraft operations annually. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

0

0

1

2

EMS

2

2

3

2

7

16

HAZMAT

1

1

0

0

1

3

RESCUE

1

0

0

0

0

1

OTHER

0

5

1

0

0

6


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

318 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 159th Street S: 167th Street E: 23100 Block W: Clare Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Undeveloped land, rock quarry, railway, Interstate 35.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

37

HOUSEHOLDS

13

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-4

FAMILIES

8

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

7

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$3,681,870

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Heavy equipment. EMS Quarry employees. HAZMAT Railroad and I-35 transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

1

0

0

1

EMS

1

2

5

5

1

14

HAZMAT

0

2

1

1

0

4

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

1

3

2

0

3

9


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

319 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 159th Street S: 167th Street E: Lone Elm Road W: 23100 Block GENERAL OVERVIEW Undeveloped land, Interstate 35 and DOT weigh station, large spec warehouse.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

7

HOUSEHOLDS

3

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-1

FAMILIES

2

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$23,754,890

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vehicle fire. EMS Limited. HAZMAT I-35 transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Increase in number of spec warehouses due to nearby intermodal center. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

2

0

1

1

0

4

EMS

21

4

4

13

8

50

HAZMAT

1

0

2

0

1

4

RESCUE

2

1

0

0

0

3

OTHER

5

1

4

1

4

15


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

320 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 159th Street S: 167th Street E: US-169 Highway W: Lone Elm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Industrial and assembly. Large warehouses. Olathe District Schools athletics complex. Large church.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

12

HOUSEHOLDS

4

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-1

FAMILIES

2

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

2

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$177,724,780

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Commercial. EMS Olathe district activity center with large crowds for sporting activities. HAZMAT Railroad runs along highway. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Large food distribution center. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

2

1

2

6

EMS

16

26

21

31

23

117

HAZMAT

3

3

3

3

8

20

RESCUE

5

5

6

7

9

32

OTHER

4

10

17

27

23

81


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

321 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 159th Street S: 167th Street E: Ridgeview Road W: US-169 Highway GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential with a large area of undeveloped land. Single family homes. Small group of multi-family homes. School.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

2,942

HOUSEHOLDS

947

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

828

FAMILIES

842

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

4%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$101,066

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

82

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$227,595,840

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

17

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

63

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential and vegetation areas. EMS Residential. HAZMAT Railroad and US-169 Highway transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

2

2

1

0

0

5

EMS

31

32

30

38

39

170

HAZMAT

3

9

4

3

5

24

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

21

22

28

12

13

96


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

322 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Urban ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 159th Street S: 167th Street E: Mur-Len Road W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential with a retail area. Single-family homes. Three schools.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

2,676

HOUSEHOLDS

813

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

783

FAMILIES

710

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

5%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

7%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$97,171

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

85

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$290,962,800

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

12

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Dense residential with single-family homes. EMS Residential and schools. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Designated moderate risk because of third school (Spring Hill middle school) under construction. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

2

2

3

8

EMS

53

58

38

40

59

248

HAZMAT

3

5

9

4

5

26

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

28

18

23

22

26

117


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

323 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 159th Street S: 167th Street E: Black Bob Road W: Mur-Len Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Residential with a retail area. Single-family homes. A group of multi-family homes. Two schools.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

1,632

HOUSEHOLDS

440

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

416

FAMILIES

430

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

7%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

2%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$123,684

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

160

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$278,029,420

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

12

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Residential with primarily single-family homes. EMS Residential and school. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS A high number of residential building permits issued in 2016. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

2

3

1

3

1

10

EMS

35

37

48

51

58

229

HAZMAT

3

1

2

7

3

16

RESCUE

0

1

0

0

0

1

OTHER

27

23

31

14

19

114


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

342 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 167th Street S: 175th Street E: Hedge Lane W: Clare Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Undeveloped. Interstate 35.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

6

HOUSEHOLDS

1

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-1

FAMILIES

1

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$432,820

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation. EMS Limited. HAZMAT I-35 transport vehicle traffic. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

0

0

0

1

EMS

5

6

2

4

4

21

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

1

0

1

2

OTHER

4

1

1

0

3

9


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

343 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 167th Street S: 175th Street E: Lone Elm Road W: Hedge Lane GENERAL OVERVIEW Mostly undeveleloped. Two large warehouses.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

5

HOUSEHOLDS

2

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-1

FAMILIES

1

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$43,851,440

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation. Large spec warehouses. EMS Limited. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS Increase in number of spec warehouses due to nearby intermodal center. 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

0

1

1

EMS

1

20

4

4

7

36

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

0

4

4

3

11

22


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

344 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 167th Street S: 175th Street E: US-169 Highway/Woodland Road W: Lone Elm Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Park with soccer and softball complexes. Rail borders zone.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

5

HOUSEHOLDS

2

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-1

FAMILIES

1

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

16%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

25%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$40,938

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

1

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$4,426,390

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

24

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation. EMS Park with sporting complexes. HAZMAT Railroad and US-169 highway vehicle transport traffic. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

1

2

1

0

4

EMS

9

5

4

7

3

28

HAZMAT

0

1

0

2

0

3

RESCUE

0

1

0

0

0

1

OTHER

3

1

1

1

3

9


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

345 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 167th Street S: 175th Street E: Ridgeview Road W: US-169 Highway/Woodland Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Mostly undeveloped with sparse single-family homes. Rail borders zone.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

MODERATE


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

207

HOUSEHOLDS

76

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-61

FAMILIES

69

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$142,500

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

0

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$12,194,710

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

15

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation with few single-family homes. EMS Limited. HAZMAT Railroad and US-169 vehicle transport traffic. RESCUE Accident requiring extrication on highway.

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

0

0

0

EMS

0

0

2

0

1

3

HAZMAT

0

0

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

0

1

0

0

0

1


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

346 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 167th Street S: 175th Street E: Mur-Len Road W: Ridgeview Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Undeveloped land.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

57

HOUSEHOLDS

17

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-16

FAMILIES

15

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$134,841

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

0

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$1,606,810

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

17

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation. EMS Limited. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

0

0

1

2

EMS

1

1

3

2

1

8

HAZMAT

0

0

1

0

0

1

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

1

2

1

0

0

4


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

347 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 167th Street S: 175th Street E: Black Bob Road/Lackman Road W: Mur-Len Road GENERAL OVERVIEW Mostly undeveloped. One neighborhood of single-family homes. One neighborhood of multi-family homes.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

662

HOUSEHOLDS

201

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-193

FAMILIES

183

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

10%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$142,500

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

0

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$85,002,830

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

15

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

0

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Vegetation areas and residential with primarily single-family homes. Multi-family homes in northwest corner. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

1

0

0

1

0

2

EMS

1

5

10

8

13

37

HAZMAT

2

1

1

1

1

6

RESCUE

0

0

0

0

0

0

OTHER

1

2

0

3

3

9


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

ESZ

367 PLANNING AREA South POPULATION DENSITY Rural ESZ BOUNDARIES N: 175th Street S: 183rd Street E: Lone Elm Road W: Hedge Lane GENERAL OVERVIEW Developed area is residential with single-family homes.

RISK LEVEL DETERMINATION

LOW


PEOPLE PLACES

ESTIMATED POPULATION

525

HOUSEHOLDS

185

CHANGE IN HOUSEHOLDS (2000-2010)

-276

FAMILIES

166

LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH SPOKEN IN HOME (% of total)

3%

POPULATION OVER 25 YEARS WITHOUT HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALS

0%

HOUSEHOLD MEDIAN INCOME

$89,722

HOUSEHOLDS LIVING AT OR BELOW 150% OF POVERTY LEVEL

14

APPRAISED PROPERTY VALUE

$78,097,720

MEDIAN BUILDING AGE

19

% OF HOMES VALUED BELOW $100K

13

% OF HOMES VALUED ABOVE $1 MILLION

0

POTENTIAL

FIRE Single-family residential. EMS Residential. HAZMAT N/A RESCUE N/A

PROBABILITY

SPECIAL RISK CONSIDERATIONS N/A 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2012-2016

FIRE

0

0

0

2

0

2

EMS

2

3

12

10

11

38

HAZMAT

0

1

0

0

0

0

RESCUE

0

1

0

0

0

0

OTHER

3

7

3

4

6

23


OFD EMERGENCY SERVICE ZONES

Notes on Risk Analysis by Emergency Service Zone (ESZ) Population density was determined by population estimate apportioned to ESZ. If more than 2,500 residents lived in a zone it was labeled urban. If less than 2,500 residents it was labeled rural. Risk Level of ESZ was analyzed and coded based on methodology outlined in Risk Level Categorizations and Conclusions. US Census estimates were used to provide demographic data and statistics about each ESZ. MySidewalk, a third-party software company, provided assistance in the apportionment of data to each ESZ through a process defined below. From MySidewalk: Apportionment refers to the process of allocating data and statistics from one geographic unit to another in situations where the boundaries containing the source data and destination data do not alignâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that is, areas that do not neatly conform to the underlying, original boundaries. Apportionment allows us to tabulate statistical profiles for custom/irregular geographies, or areas that do not neatly conform to the boundaries to which the statistics were originally reported. It involves using a couple of techniques depending on the data and the type of geographic boundary. The first and the simplest technique is aggregation, which is the process of summarizing data from smaller geographic units into larger units. Typically, this methodology is used for interest areas that are regular geometries comprised of smaller regular geometries - the statistics from the smaller regular geometries are simply summed up for the interest area. The second technique that we use utilize, known as weighted block point apportionment, uses block centroids that are weighted based on the percentage of population, housing, or households they represent within their parent geographies. Those weights are then used to estimate statistics across the study area. This weighted block point methodology includes/excludes a block group based on the location of the block centroid in relation to the target geography. If the blockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centroid is within the target area, its population and their characteristics is wholly included. If the blockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centroid is outside the target area then it is completely excluded.

Appraised property value was obtained using GIS files provided by Johnson County AIMS.


Incident history data was obtained from NFIRS reports in the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s records management system. Incidents were categorized by incident type categories. Incident Type Category Fire EMS HazMat Rescue Non-Fire

Incident Type Code 100s 311-324 400s 331-381 All remaining incidents


Olathe Fire Department 1225 S. Hamilton Circle Olathe, KS 66061

913-971-7900 (non-emergency) â&#x20AC;˘ OlatheKS.org/Fire Facebook.com/OlatheFire @OlatheFire

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