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OLATHE FIRE DEPARTMENT STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2021


OLATHE FIRE DEPARTMENT STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2021

We proudly exist to protect and preserve life and property through dynamic emergency response and excellence in training, preparedness, and prevention. PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 2016


CONTENTS Letter from the Chief .................................................................. p. 1 Executive Summary .................................................................... p. 3 Goals Outline ............................................................................. p. 4 City Overview ............................................................................ p. 5 Strategic Planning .................................................................... p. 6 Fire Department Overview:

Leadership Philosophy and Mission ........................... p. 7 Response Area Map ..................................................... p. 8 Values ......................................................................... p. 8 Department History ..................................................... p. 9

Setting the Standard for Excellence:

Accreditation and Recognition .................................. p. 11

About the Olathe Fire Department ............................................ p. 13 Goals and Objectives ................................................................ p. 15 Glossary .................................................................................... p. 27 Acknowledgements ................................................................... p. 28

Olathe firefighters use modern fire attack principles and cool this fire from a safe location. Tactics are based on National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research.


LETTER FROM

THE CHIEF

I am proud to be the Chief of the Olathe Fire Department for many reasons, but I am particularly proud of the outstanding people on our team. They are driven to do their best work on a daily basis, and our department's success is a result of their dedication. We have a 145-year history of providing excellent service to our community, and I am confident we will build on that strong tradition in the years to come. This Strategic Plan outlines our department’s goals and objectives through 2021. It includes seven goals that will help us maintain our commitment to service and ensure a continued focus on innovation and best practices. These target areas include promoting staff health and wellness and providing professional development opportunities; improving resource deployment; identifying how technology solutions may impact our work; developing strategies to manage expenditures; promoting effective communication; and renewing our commitment to relationships with other organizations that help us meet our mission. The Plan was developed with input from community members, City staff, and department employees. We feel fortunate to have the strong support of local businesses, schools, and Olathe Medical Center − all of which helped define the public’s expectations for the Fire Department, which ultimately became the basis for the Plan. Each of the Plan’s goals align with the City’s overall planning efforts, including its Organizational Scorecard and the City Council’s priorities. Throughout the lifetime of this plan, the Fire Department will provide updates on our progress related to each goal. I invite you to learn more about your Fire Department and the work we do. Reach out to me or any member of our team with questions, or visit www.OlatheKS.org/Fire/KeyDocuments for more information. Sincerely,

JEFF DeGRAFFENREID, ED.D, CFO Fire Chief and Emergency Management Director

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EXECUTIVE

SUMMARY

The Olathe Fire Department’s 2016-2021 Strategic Plan serves as a roadmap for the department to ensure we continue to meet the community’s expectations for the work we do over the next several years. The staff of the Fire Department are honored to serve the people of Olathe – a strong, vibrant city of 135,000 in the Kansas City metropolitan area. The Plan’s goals (shown to the right) have been developed with input from community members and department employees. Addressing these goals will help ensure the department’s tradition of providing excellent emergency services and comprehensive programs to decrease risk will remain strong. With careful consideration of the City Council’s priorities, the goals have been developed to ensure they align with the City’s overall strategic focus. It is important to know that the work we do is based on a leadership philosophy that recognizes the key role all department employees play in continuous improvement and as stewards of the public trust. The department’s mission and values are the foundation for the work we do – our collective spirit in which we will accomplish our goals. Next, to help frame the work ahead, the plan includes a summary of our proud, 145year tradition and describes our current services highlighting some of the stand-out programs that make OFD great.

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The goals are further defined in the Goals and Objectives section. Here, each of the seven goals include objectives and tasks that provide specific information on how these areas will be addressed over the next five years. For each task, responsibility has been assigned to a particular department section, and a timeframe has been included to ensure implementation of the goals stays on track. Recognizing that strategic plans are dynamic and numerous factors impact our department’s progress on all seven goals, it is important to us to do what we say we are going to do. Each year, we create a Plan of Action highlighting those objectives and tasks selected as priorities for the year. These are published plans with clear linkages back to our strategic goals. Additionally, we will continue to publish Progress Reports to document our success in implementing our action items and to serve as an annual opportunity to review the goals outlined in this Plan.


GOALS GOAL 1: PROVIDE EXCELLENT PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY SERVICES GOAL 2: CAPITALIZE ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES GOAL 3: CREATE AND FOSTER A DIVERSE, PROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE THAT PROMOTES HEALTH, WELLNESS AND SAFETY GOAL 4: STRENGTHEN COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND HOMELAND SECURITY The Fire Department coordinates the City’s planning for emergencies including severe weather events and man-made disasters. Our Emergency Management and Homeland Security program maintains the City’s Emergency Operations Plan and has developed a process to ensure all City departments review and exercise their responsibilities within the plan annually. In addition, Emergency Management staff manage Olathe’s outdoor warning sirens. In recent years, planning, prevention and preparedness efforts have also focused on homeland security issues. Department staff focus on analyzing and sharing information and intelligence reports to ensure the safety of our responders in an ever-changing and complex environment.

GOAL 5: DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM THAT IMPROVES PERFORMANCE GOAL 6: IDENTIFY COST EFFECTIVE SOLUTIONS TO MANAGE EXPENDITURES GOAL 7: INSTILL AN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE OF EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION

To review a full, detailed list of Olathe Fire Department goals and objectives, see pages 15-26. 4


CITY OF OLATHE

OVERVIEW

The Olathe Fire Department proudly protects this vibrant community. With a population of approximately 135,000 and growing, Olathe is the second-largest city in Johnson County and the fourth-largest city in Kansas. Part of the Kansas City metropolitan area, Olathe is 61 square miles in size, with more than $10 billion in appraised property. Olathe is a great place to live, work, and play. The school system is one of the best in the nation. Residents enjoy a wide array of recreation and entertainment options, including swimming pools, lakes, fitness trails, baseball and softball fields, and the award-winning Olathe Community Center. Olathe also serves as home to several corporate headquarters and hundreds of small, local businesses.

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STRATEGIC PLANNING The Fire Department’s strategic plan aligns with priorities and goals identified by the City Council and supports work in focus areas identified in the City’s Organizational Scorecard. The scorecard was developed to help Olathe manage progress toward strategic targets, continually improve efficiency, and ensure that residents’ investment of tax dollars lead to better delivery and value of city services. It also provides the framework to align City priorities, objectives, strategies, and activities, and ultimately provides a way to monitor performance – including the Fire Department. At the heart of the scorecard is the City’s vision of “Setting the Standard for Excellence in Public Service,” in which seven Community Focus Areas (CFAs) have been identified through a community-based strategic plan. These focus areas are: Active Lifestyles, Diversity, Downtown, Economic Viability, Public Safety, Utility Services, and Transportation. Each year, the City Council identifies priority statements for the future, which are then added to the Organizational Scorecard. In response to the CFAs and Council priorities, the City’s leadership team develops organizational objectives aimed at meeting the expectations of the Council as well as the community. Together, these three elements form the Organizational Scorecard. Visit www.OlatheKS.org/Finance/ Organizational_Scorecard to learn more. The Fire Department’s activities impact several of the organizational goals, and investments in public safety have long been a Council priority. The department measures our performance on key indicators that assess our contributions to those goals. Over the plan’s five-year timeframe, progress on the objectives and tasks will be measured to ensure focus remains on the key areas identified by department members, City leadership, and the community.

ORGANIZATIONAL SCORECARD CITY OF OLATHE VISION: Setting the Standard for Excellence in Public Service

COMMUNITY FOCUS AREAS (CFAs) • Public Safety • Transportation KEY FOCUS AREAS

• Active Lifestyles • Diversity • Downtown

• Economic Viability • Utility Services

CITY COUNCIL PRIORITIES

• Deliver high-quality customer service • Meet financial challenges of the future with priority-based decision-making focused on long-term strategies

• Optimize resources in the most efficient and effective manner • Citizens feel and are safe in person and property • Continue to support economic development and job creation • Utilize community engagement to align service delivery • Pursue environmental stewardship • Provide an excellent employment environment 2-YEAR GOALS: • Redevelop old fire station (Santa Fe & Kansas) • Start expansion of Indian Creek Library • Vibrant and exciting K-State campus in Olathe • Develop and implement a Healthy Communities Master Plan

ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS SATISFIED CUSTOMERS

FINANCIALLY STRONG

EFFECTIVE ORGANIZATION

ENGAGED WORKFORCE

Strengthen our safe & secure community

Foster a vibrant economy

Improve & maintain City assets

Advance safe & efficient transportation choices

Be responsible & accountable financial stewards

Employ visionary, innovative, & solution-driven business processes, practices, & systems

Recruit, develop, & retain employees committed to excellence

Deliver highquality customer service Safeguard our environment & natural resources

Strengthen our culture of leadership, innovation, & employee engagement Organizational stewardship

Provide quality public amenities Promote and active & healthy community

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OLATHE FIRE DEPARTMENT

OVERVIEW

LEADERSHIP PHILOSOPHY Together, all of us, as employees of the City of Olathe, Kansas, are leaders.

We are responsible stewards of the public trust and are accountable to our citizens and to each other.

We are passionate about making a difference while building a safe and quality community.

We strive for continuous improvement at all levels and encourage professional development and personal growth.

We believe we are at our best when we consult and collaborate, utilizing our individual expertise, knowledge and creativity in teams throughout the organization.

We celebrate achievements and use performance measures to benchmark our progress.

MISSION WE PROUDLY EXIST TO PROTECT AND PRESERVE LIFE AND PROPERTY THROUGH DYNAMIC EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EXCELLENCE IN TRAINING, PREPAREDNESS, AND PREVENTION. 7

The Mission and Values are the foundation of the Olathe Fire Department. Thus, every effort will be made to keep these current and meaningful so that they guide the individuals who make up the department as they strive to accomplish the goals, objectives, and everyday tasks.


134,234 RESIDENTS

61.3

127TH

*

DENNIS

DENNIS

SHERIDAN

143RD

LONE ELM

143RD

151ST

RIDGEVIEW

LONE ELM

151ST

145

159TH

159TH

167TH

MUR-LEN

167TH

HEDGE

FIRE STATIONS

BLACK BOB

EMPLOYEES

7

PFLUMM

MUR-LEN

HEDGE

CEDAR NILES

SANTA FE

SANTA FE

LAKESHORE

CALLS FOR SERVICE IN 2015

SANTA FE

BLACK BOB

Figure based on total appraised property (all classes) from Johnson County Appraiser’s Office Revaluation Report 2015.

10,502

127TH

HAROLD

LAKESHORE

IN APPRAISED PROPERTY *

119TH

119TH

WOODLAND

$10.3 BILLION

LONE ELM

CLARE

SQUARE MILES

RIDGEVIEW

COLLEGE

175TH 175TH

183RD

VALUES TRADITION

COMPASSION

PROFESSIONALISM

We remember, respect, and represent the path forged before us.

We care about the wellbeing of the members of our organization and community.

COMMUNICATION

INTEGRITY

We demonstrate the best of knowledge, competence, and expertise to serve the needs and expectations of the community.

We embrace the transparent and open flow of information between the members of the organization and community.

We uphold the public trust through honesty and strong moral principles.

INNOVATION

LEADERSHIP

We use a pioneering spirit in our approach to emerging issues.

We value leaders focused on serving people through listening, caring, supporting, and developing others.

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DEPARTMENT

HISTORY

The Olathe Fire Department was established in 1871 when the City Council passed an ordinance creating the Olathe Hook & Ladder Company. The ordinance also called for the “digging” of four strategically located cisterns near the town square for fire suppression needs. Historic records indicate Olathe’s first fire station was located in the downtown area. A few years later, due to the growth stimulated by the completion of the Frisco Railroad Line, Station 2 was established. A department reorganization, in 1883, led to the fire chief earning a salary of $3.50 per day and volunteers received $1 per fire call. In 1912, consultants suggested a “total modernization...of the fire department” in order to better meet the needs of the community. The modernization included the purchase of Olathe’s first motorized fire engine in 1914. The “Velie” was not only Olathe’s first motorized fire engine, but it was also the first in Johnson County.

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The department operated with a paid fire chief and volunteer firefighters for almost 70 years. In 1950, the department hired four full-time firefighters, who were supported by volunteers. Over the decades, the department progressively transformed from volunteers to a force of full-time career firefighters. Today, the department has over 115 firefighters who serve Olathe’s nearly 135,000 residents. Every day, across Olathe’s seven fire stations, at least 28 firefighters are on-duty and providing life-saving service. Every year, firefighters answer nearly 11,000 calls for assistance. In 2012, the department received its first accredited agency status from the Commission on Fire Accreditation International. Four years later, in 2016, Olathe became an Insurance Services Office (ISO) Class 1 community. For 145 years, the department has placed service before self as firefighters continue to battle flames and provide critical emergency medical care.


1914 marked a milestone in the modernization of the Olathe Fire Department, as the city’s first motorized fire engine hit the streets. Produced by the Velie Motor Vehicle Company, the engine was also the first entered into service in Johnson County.

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SETTING THE STANDARD FOR

EXCELLENCE

Our City’s motto is “Setting the standard for excellence in public service.” The Fire Department has been recognized for doing just that. Community investment in fire and emergency services has helped Olathe earn a Class 1 rating from the Insurance Services Office (ISO) in 2016 placing it among the highestrated communities in the country. To determine a community’s Public Protection Classification (PPC™), ISO conducts a field survey to evaluate features of the fire protection systems including fire department performance, water supply, communication systems and community outreach efforts. The Class 1 rating generally means residents and business owners pay less for insurance premiums. Only six fire departments in Kansas currently have a Class 1 rating.

In addition to the highest ISO rating, the Fire Department has achieved accredited status from the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI). Achieving accreditation involves conducting a comprehensive self-assessment and evaluation to examine past, current, and future service levels and internal performance and comparing them to industry best practices. There are currently only 220 accredited fire departments in the world. The accreditation model promotes continuous improvement, strategic planning and evaluation of services provided on a regular basis. It has become the gold standard for fire departments worldwide. Currently, there are only 31 fire departments that are CFAI accredited and have a Class 1 rating from ISO. The Olathe Fire Department is proud to be in such a distinguished group.

$$$

Olathe Fire Department is among only

220

$$

accredited CFAI Fire Departments in the world

$ CLASS

1

CLASS 1: Superior property fire protection

CLASS 10: An area’s fire program does not meet ISO’s minimum criteria

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CLASS

5

CLASS

10

Most U.S. insurers of home and business properties use ISO’s PPC in calculating premiums. In general, the price of insurance in a community with a good PPC is lower than in a community with a poor PPC.


MOBILE INTEGRATED HEALTH (MIH) PROGRAM The Olathe Fire Department has developed an innovative program to help meet the needs of vulnerable people…even before they call 9-1-1. The Mobile Integrated Health (MIH) program deploys firefighter paramedics and a nurse practitioner to medically assess individuals who request or are referred for service, but do not need to visit an emergency room. The MIH team determines needs and resources, and helps connect patients with the appropriate care in the community. The program was launched in June of 2014 with two firefighter paramedics working 40 hours per week. In 2015, the team added the nurse practitioner and had 3,000 contacts with people in the community. Most commonly, MIH patients are underserved residents with limited connections to medical care; frequent 9-1-1 callers; people with chronic diseases; or elderly or disabled individuals trying to live independently. Our innovation is the “I” in MIH – integrated. Leveraging strong relationships, the Fire Department now has more options to help a patient than a trip to the ER. Teaming up with Health Partnership Clinic, the MIH team can provide direct care, schedule same-day appointments and plan for chronic disease follow-up care. With shared access to health information, the team coordinates access to the right care at the right time – even helping with transportation and social support needs. For more information on the MIH program, visit www.OlatheKS.org/Files/Fire/OlatheFireMIH.pdf.

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ABOUT THE OLATHE

FIRE DEPARTMENT HOW OLATHE RESIDENTS FEEL ABOUT FIRE SERVICE

98%

SATISFACTION WITH LOCAL FIRE PROTECTION AND EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES

OFD IN THE COMMUNITY 1,532 PEOPLE TRAINED IN CPR IN 2015

MORE THAN 10,000 CHILDREN ANNUALLY PARTICIPATE IN OUR ADOPT-A-SCHOOL PROGRAM

KC Metro average – 89% / U.S. Average – 88%

81%

OVERALL VALUE RECEIVED FOR CITY TAXES/FEES

KC Metro average – 44% / U.S. Average – 46% (City of Olathe 2015 DirectionFinder Survey Findings Report; ETC Institute)

VARIOUS PUBLIC EDUCATION AND OUTREACH PROGRAMS HAD ALMOST 54,249 CONTACTS WITH COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO TEACH IMPORTANT FIRE AND LIFE SAFETY LESSONS MORE THAN 2,500 FIRE AND LIFE SAFETY INSPECTIONS ON PROPERTIES IN OLATHE – HELPS ENFORCE CODES, BUT ALSO HELPS FIREFIGHTERS UNDERSTAND HAZARDS IN THE COMMUNITY All statistics from 2015

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APPARATUS & PERSONNEL INMIN. UNIT SERVICE STAFFING

UNIT

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES Cardiac arrests to the ER with a pulse 1

41.1%

2nd year >40%

Fire confined to room of origin 2

73.7%

Consistent with similar-sized cities

MIN. STAFFING

Ladder Truck

2

4

Rescue Cross-staffed

Civilian fire injuries

4

Engines

4

3

HazMat Cross-staffed

Civilian fire death

0

Life safety is OFD’s number one priority

Quints

2

3

Cross-staffed

Property loss per captia

$39.25

A few costly fires in 2015

Accelerant detection, explosives, search and rescue

Mutual aid given

339

Mutual aid received

146

Continued to provide regional support

Canine

3

Other

Percentage based on cardiac arrest patients where resuscitation was attempted and patient arrived to ER with a pulse. 2 Based on 2015 fires in structures where flame spread was confined to object or room of origin. 1

THREE-YEAR INCIDENT DATA Incident Type

2013

2014

2015

Total 2013 - 2015

Fire

240

265

269

774

EMS

6,6164

6,482

6,890

19,536

Non-Fire

3,279

3,420

3,343

10,042

Total incidents

9,683

10,167

10,502

30,352

ESTABLISHING & MAINTAINING SAFE BUILDINGS New residential building permits (single -family and duplex)

498

Almost $165 million in total value for new homes

Fees collected by Building Codes

$6,227,785

Total fees collected by the Building Codes Division

72%

Continued improvement in satisfaction scores; well above 53% national average

Citizen satisfaction with overall enforcement of City codes and ordinances

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT FIRE DEPARTMENT BUDGET IS 23% OF CITY OF OLATHE’S GENERAL FUND

77% 23%

GENERAL FUND SOURCES BY PERCENTAGE

2016 FIRE DEPARTMENT BUDGET: $19,957,863 $15,553,679

Emergency Services

$1,754,856

Fire Administration & Support Services

$1,546,710

Building Codes

$1,010,484

Community Risk Management

$92,134

Emergency Management

51% Sales tax 16% Property tax 13% Franchise fee 20% Other

CURRENT LEVEL OF FIRE SERVICE IN OLATHE HAS ANNUAL COST OF JUST

$137 PER PERSON 14


GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

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16


RESPONSIBLE SECTIONS

Admin = Administration SpOps = Special Operations and Professional Development

ES = Emergency Services CRR = Community Risk Reduction

GOAL 1: PROVIDE EXCELLENT PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY SERVICES OBJECTIVE 1: IMPROVE RESPONSE AND TURNOUT TIMES TASKS 1

Evaluate squad deployment to maximize impact

2

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Upgrade all locution computers

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Install countdown timers in all stations and explore other station-alerting options

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Work to purchase land for future fire stations as recommended in Fire Station Location Analysis Report

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Consider station configuration to improve efficiencies

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

6

Update Community Risk Assessment and Standards of Cover (SOC) analysis to include critical tasking for effective response force

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 2: ENSURE EFFECTIVE DEPLOYMENT OF RESOURCES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Deploy Fire MUM 2.0

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Rework the current MOU with Med-Act to include performance reporting

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Evaluate the needed relief staffing required to manage overtime and workplace stress

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Review items in the VERF and small equipment replacement fund (ERF) for appropriateness

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Review deployment to incorporate findings from Community Risk Analysis and SOC analysis

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

6

Work with the ECC to evaluate the use of FIRE ProQA

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

7

Fully implement CAD to CAD integration

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

8

Create a Countywide Tender Task Force

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (CERT) Through the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program, thousands of people have been trained since 2001; hundreds are active in the program and retrain each year. Citizens learn to help themselves, their families and neighbors during an emergency which helps decrease the demand for emergency services and allows the Fire Department to help those in need more efficiently. The training includes light fire suppression, first aid, basic search and rescue, and emergency planning. In recent years, the program has focused on outreach to some of our community members most vulnerable in an emergency. CERT training has been delivered in Spanish and has been offered to members of our deaf community. Olathe CERT instructors train instructors for other communities in the Kansas City metro area.


OBJECTIVE 3: STRENGTHEN DELIVERY OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES TASKS 1

Implement hostile event and civil disobedience policies, practices and trainings

2

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Evaluate HIPAA compliance and adjust as necessary

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Consider implementation of PulsePoint

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Evaluate new EMS training model that is less centered on certifications and more on system improvement

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Identify position task, staffing and then implement a EMS point of contact for the organization

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 4: IMPROVE EFFORTS RELATED TO COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION TASKS 1

Analyze circumstances surrounding residential structure fires with significant injury or death

2

Evaluate current CRR organizational structure and make modifications as identified

3

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Update the Building and Fire Code

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Reduce the number of fires in occupancies where smoke alarms are not present or functioning

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Implement tools to increase capacity for fire and life system inspections

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

6

Improve records management documentation and processes

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 5: UPDATE THE CITY OF OLATHE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN (EOP) TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Participate in updating Johnson County EOP and evaluate how it impacts the City's EOP

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

City Council adopt updated City EOP

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 6: IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN FIRE STATIONS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Implement recommendations identified in the City Facilities Study

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Update furniture in fire stations

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Install message boards in fire stations

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Update weight rooms

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 7: FOSTER ECONOMIC GROWTH BY SUPPORTING CONSTRUCTION PROCESSES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Develop performance measures for processing of new building applications and inspections

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Measure Building Codes customer satisfaction

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 8: FOCUS ON IMPROVEMENTS TO SPECIAL OPERATIONS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Deploy a new HazMat apparatus

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Deploy a new EOD apparatus

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Fully develop program as the host agency for Kansas Task Force 3

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Formalize and teach a Tower Rescue program to all Kansas City regional rescue teams.

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Provide enhanced Tactical EOD Support

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

6

Develop Level 3 Response Team for improvised nuclear devices

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

7

Leverage intelligence in planning and operations

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

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GOAL 2: CAPITALIZE ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES OBJECTIVE 1: CONTINUE IMPROVING PERFORMANCE METRICS, DATA COLLECTION, ANALYSIS, AND REPORTING TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Develop Department Strategy Plan for Analysis

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Publish data for the purpose of analyzing and validating OFD effectiveness

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Use ClearPoint as a dashboard and increase awareness of performance measures to Fire Department employees

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Use data to create a culture of continuous improvement within the Fire Department which emphasizes performance and the customer

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 2: CREATE A FIRE DEPARTMENT TECHNOLOGY MASTER PLAN TASKS RESPONSIBLE 1

Include Fire Department Smart Cities opportunities in the Master Plan

2

PHASES

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Identify and implement inspection technology

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Use pre-planning software

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Evaluate strategy for fire records management

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 3: IMPLEMENT TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE COMMUNICATIONS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Install Hyper Wall in the Fire Department Operations Center (DOC)

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Evaluate need for body cameras for LEO members of OFD

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Evaluate the potential return on investment and potential implications of a Helmet Cameras initiative

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Determine the usefulness of vertical camera systems in OFD operations

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Continue storm sirens upgrade to include solar power and replacements according to replacement cycle

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

6

Implement automated staffing system

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 4: IMPROVE DEPARTMENT TRAINING SYSTEMS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Utilize High-Fidelity Simulation Training with EMS Mannequin, Blue Card and Driving Simulator

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Increase use of distributed training

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 5: DEPLOY A NEW PERMITTING SOFTWARE TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Project team develops implementation plan

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Plan is implemented and personnel trained

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Staff ensure software meets technical requirements

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Evaluate software use to ensure it meets needs

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Admin = Administration SpOps = Special Operations and Professional Development ES = Emergency Services CRR = Community Risk Reduction

19


OBJECTIVE 6: MODERNIZE THE EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Design, renovate and expand existing space in City Hall

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Identify, purchase and install selected technology and communications equipment

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Train City staff on new technology and EOC protocols

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUP In addition to more traditional firefighting and emergency medical services, the Fire Department has specialized resources to respond to other high-risk incidents. Our Special Operations Group, or SOG, was established in 1999 and includes three disciplines: technical rescue, hazardous materials (HazMat) and explosive ordnance disposal (EOD). SOG members respond to incidents within Olathe and surrounding communities as well as elsewhere in the state when needed. Personnel trained to the technician-level in technical rescue are on-duty at all times and able to respond to a variety of scenarios including rescues from confined spaces, high-angle, swift water, structural collapses and trenches. Our technical rescue SOG members are also part of Kansas Task Force 3. We also have a canine for search and rescue operations. Since 1988, personnel have received specialized training in hazardous materials response to include HazMat technician-level trained responders and those who are further certified to the specialist level in the areas of Highway and Railway response. All firefighters are trained to the HazMat operations level and are consistently called upon to perform basic tasks on HazMat scenes. Lastly, the department provides EOD as part of the SOG. The EOD team is also commonly referred to as the “Bomb Squad.” The department has trained hazardous device technicians and a canine. The department’s EOD team is responsible for the recovery, disposal, and rendering safe of various explosives; collecting and preserving evidence during investigations; and, working with the Olathe Police Department and other law enforcement agencies on investigations involving criminal activity.

20


GOAL 3: CREATE AND FOSTER A DIVERSE, PROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE THAT PROMOTES HEALTH, WELLNESS AND SAFETY OBJECTIVE 1: IMPROVE STATION SAFETY, SCENE SAFETY AND THE RETURN-TO-WORK PROCESS TASKS RESPONSIBLE 1

Create an annual process to evaluate fire station cleanliness, safety, and life-cycle issues

2

PHASES

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Evaluate feasibility and methods of making the Safety Officer position 24/7/365

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Increase departmental participation in City Wellness programs

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Re-envision the Peer Fitness Team and the program

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Purchase new SCBA for the Fire Department

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

6

Update portable radios for the Fire Department

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

7

Formally re-evaluate the fire apparatus vendor choices to maximize value and safety

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

8

Update APG 4-207 Exposure to Infectious Diseases and Blood-Borne Pathogens

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

9

Replace the exhaust removal system in the fire stations

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

10

Update APG 4-190 Risk Management at Fire Scenes

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 2: REINFORCE THE CITY OF OLATHE LEADERSHIP PHILOSOPHY TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Evaluate leadership opportunities for staff development (i.e. Leadership Olathe, KU Emerging Leaders, National Fire Academy)

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Train members on the City of Olathe Leadership Philosophy

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Review APG 1-002 Organizational Expectations with all Fire Department employees through CentreLearn

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 3: PROVIDE TRAINING AND SUPPORT TO SUPERVISORS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Identify ways to reinforce the value of a diverse workforce through training, mentorship, and professional development

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Update APG 1-031 Qualifications for Acting Positions and Minimum Testing Requirements

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 4: IMPROVE EMPLOYEE WELLNESS AND MEMBER FITNESS THROUGH EDUCATION, TRAINING AND METRICS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Evaluate post-fire rehab and exposure control

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Develop plan for routine distribution and review of NIOSH Reports

ES

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Promote APG 4-011 Near Miss and Close Call Reporting on CentreLearn

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Provide behavioral health education for firefighters and to employees and family

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Develop a systematic approach for behavioral health support of employees

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Admin = Administration SpOps = Special Operations and Professional Development ES = Emergency Services CRR = Community Risk Reduction

21


OBJECTIVE 5: SET A VISION FOR SUCCESSION PLANNING TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Develop process to forecast future retirements and share with command staff regularly

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Promote processional credentialing and education (EFO, CFO, FM, FO)

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Fill pending staff vacancies early when possible

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Send current employees to paramedic training

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 6: DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT A RECRUITMENT AND PROMOTION PLAN THAT PROMOTES HIRING OF WELL-QUALIFIED CANDIDATES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Develop a process for lateral hiring and compensation

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Continue preparatory programs and identify new ways to assist recruit candidates

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Host a family meal after academy graduation to discuss the well-being of employee and families

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Evaluate existing process for new-hire psychological evaluation

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Continue the Chief Officer Mentoring Program and identify new ways to support emerging leaders

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

6

Maximize recruitment efforts to include intentional fire academy visitations

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

7

Investigate the possibility of a college intern program in operations and CRR

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION The Fire Department has a comprehensive risk reduction program that goes well beyond fighting fires. Our Community Risk Reduction section is responsible for several initiatives designed to improve the overall fire protection for our community. By adopting and enforcing modern building codes, administering building permits, conducting plan reviews on construction projects, and working with business and property owners on fire and life safety inspections, the Fire Department works to prevent or mitigate the impact of fires and other emergencies. We use data to help us identify risks in Olathe and develop strategies to address them. A recent example is our effort to install StoveTop FireStop® devices in all City-owned housing units in an effort to avoid kitchen fires from inattentive cooking. Our efforts to reduce risk are not focused only on fires. We analyze demographic and emergency response data and engage community partners to understand potential risks and identify areas where the Fire Department can make a difference. For example, knowing that nearly 75% of the 9-1-1 calls we receive are of a medical nature helps prioritize our public education and outreach efforts, including our CPR offerings which have recently expanded. Fire personnel teach Sidewalk CPR (a hands-only version) throughout our community. This program has been successful in increasing the number of people who know CPR in Olathe and we know that can help save lives. Effective bystander CPR – provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest – can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival.

22


GOAL 4: STRENGTHEN COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS OBJECTIVE 1: INCREASE EFFORTS TO ADDRESS SPECIFIC NEEDS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Identify vulnerable populations in Olathe and their specific needs

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Develop outreach plan to address needs, assign resources and build relationships to foster engagement

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Evaluate department activities annually to ensure needs are addressed

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 2: REDESIGN ONLINE PRESENCE INCLUDING AN INCREASE IN SOCIAL MEDIA EFFORTS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Work with City project team on website update

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Develop and implement vision for social media engagement

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 3: STRENGTHEN RELATIONSHIPS WITH PARTNERS THROUGH TRAINING, EDUCATION, AND EXERCISES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Provide support to the Olathe West Public Safety 21st Century program

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Continue HERo Day and increase opportunities for women to explore fire service careers

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Leverage HeartSAFE activities in Olathe and evaluate program's impact

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

4

Collaborate with Olathe Schools on safety and crisis related activities

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

5

Assess communication and training with stakeholders and review for effectiveness

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 4: CONTINUE PARTICIPATION IN LOCAL, COUNTY AND REGIONAL PLANNING, TRAINING AND EXERCISES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Identify organization members to serve as liaison to planning and training teams in the region

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Share information on planning and training intiatives and determine organizational commitment

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Formalize process for communicating lessons learned from training and exercise activities with department personnel

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 5: IMPROVE CUSTOMER SERVICE THROUGHOUT DEPARTMENT TASKS 1

Identify ways to improve customer service in each division

2

Create a Customer Service Improvement Team in Community Risk Reduction

3

Deliver customer service training tailored to each division and evaluate effectiveness

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 6: ENHANCE RELATIONSHIP WITH CONSTRUCTION COMMUNITY TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Reenergize Board of Code Review

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Host builder forums

CRR

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Admin = Administration SpOps = Special Operations and Professional Development ES = Emergency Services CRR = Community Risk Reduction

23


GOAL 5: DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM THAT IMPROVES PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVE 1: DEVELOP ADDITIONAL COMPANY PERFORMANCE BENCHMARK STANDARDS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Identify essential fireground and emergency services tasks that should be benchmarked

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Develop additional benchmarks and integrate into ongoing training program

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 2: EVALUATE AND RE-DESIGN THE CURRENT PERSONNEL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION DOCUMENT TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Develop task force to redesign evaluation document

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Discuss limitations of current document and review evaluation documents from other organizations

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Determine best option for department and plan for implementation

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 3: STRENGTHEN AVAILABLE DEPARTMENT RESOURCES IN THE STATIONS AND BENTLEY LIBRARY TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Review and catalog existing materials to identify additional resources necessary

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Ensure standardized reference resources available in fire stations

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 4: BUILD A LIVE-BURN TRAINING FACILITY TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Acquire land for training facility

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Work with City staff and vendors to identify scope of project

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

3

Build training facility

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 5: DEVELOP MORE COMPLETE UNDERSTANDING OF STAFF INVOLVEMENT IN VARIOUS ACTIVITIES THAT SUPPORT DEPARTMENT TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Document staff commitment on committees, projects and other assignments (i.e. SCBA, small equipment)

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Ensure monitoring and visibility of basic training (not specifically related to qualifications/certifications).

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

24


COLLABORATION Recognizing that any incident or emergency can quickly overwhelm local resources, the Fire Department works with neighboring departments to provide automatic and mutual aid when needed. This collaboration happens on a regular basis in planning and training, too. Training together helps improve our ability to work together on an incident scene. And, planning together helps ensure expensive resources are not duplicated and that response plans are coordinated. Our Special Operations Group members meet regularly with others in their discipline from around the Kansas City metro area to standardize response plans, equipment purchases, and training as appropriate for more effective responses. The Olathe Fire Department has a long history of leadership in county, regional, state and national planning efforts. For example, Fire Command Staff members are actively involved on committees and in programs through the county and at the Mid-America Regional Council, including the Regional Homeland Security Coordinating Committee and the Terrorism Early Warning Center. These groups work together using a whole-of-community approach to enhance the region’s ability to prevent, protect, mitigate and respond to all types of emergencies, ranging from natural disasters to potential terrorist threats. The Fire Department also serves as the host agency for Kansas Task Force 3.

GOAL 6: IDENTIFY COST EFFECTIVE SOLUTIONS TO MANAGE EXPENDITURES OBJECTIVE 1: OPTIMIZE FISCAL EFFICIENCIES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Identify needed improvements to department's procurement, budgeting and financial oversight mechanisms

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Develop and implement strategies to improve these areas

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 2: DEVELOP LONG-TERM, MULTI-YEAR PLANS THAT ADDRESS CURRENT AND PROJECTED NEEDS TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Identify resources needed in next 5-10 years

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

For significant investments (high dollar amount or significant planning required), document a plan for budget and procurement

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 3: DEVELOP REVENUE ENHANCEMENT STRATEGIES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Pursue full cost recovery of fees for HazMat bill back, nuisance alarms, and building code fee schedule

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Research and identify fee-for-service reimbursement opportunities in training (e.g. driving simulator, Blue Card)

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 4: PUBLISH BUDGET STATUS ON A REGULAR BASIS TO COMMAND STAFF TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Identify budget elements to report

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Develop tool to best share information

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

Admin = Administration SpOps = Special Operations and Professional Development ES = Emergency Services CRR = Community Risk Reduction

25


GOAL 7: INSTILL AN ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE OF EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION OBJECTIVE 1: EVALUATE EXISTING COMMUNICATION METHODS BETWEEN THE ORGANIZATION AND EMPLOYEES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Evaluate communication needs throughout department

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Develop strategies for improved communication

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 2: CREATE CULTURE IN WHICH INFORMATION IS DISSEMINATED EFFECTIVELY AND FACE-TO-FACE COMMUNICATION IS VALUED TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Be deliberate in selecting how information is disseminated

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Provide training in effective communication for supervisors and Command Staff as appropriate

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 3: SUPPORT CITY ORIENTATION PROGRAM FOR NEW EMPLOYEES TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Participate in development of citywide onboarding program

Admin

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Encourage new employees to fully participate in program

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

OBJECTIVE 4: PLACE OLATHE FIRE COMMAND STAFF ON THE JOHNSON COUNTY ESF 4 TEAM TASKS

RESPONSIBLE

PHASES

1

Identify department personnel to serve on county ESF 4 Team

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

2

Partipate and share information back to City ESF 4 Team and OFD Command Staff as appropriate

SpOps

Phase 1: 2016-2017

Phase 2: 2018-2019

Phase 3: 2020-2021

26


GLOSSARY Admin – Administration

FM – Fire Marshal

APG – Administrative Policy Guide

FO – Fire Officer

CAD – Computer-Aided Dispatch

HazMat – Hazardous Materials

CFA – Community Focus Area

HIPAA – Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

CFAI – Commission on Fire Accreditation International

ISO – Insurance Services Office

CFO – Chief Fire Officer

LEO – Law Enforcement Officer

CPR – Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

MIH – Mobile Integrated Health

CPSE – Center for Public Safety Excellence

MOU – Memorandum of Understanding

CRR – Community Risk Reduction

NIST – National Institute of Standards and Technology

DOC – Department Operations Center

NIOSH – National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

ECC – Emergency Communications Center

OFD – Olathe Fire Department

EFO – Executive Fire Officer

PPC – Public Protection Classification

EMS – Emergency Medical Services

SCBA – Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus

EOC – Emergency Operations Center

SOC – Standards of Cover

EOD – Explosive Ordnance Disposal

SOG – Special Operations Group

EOP – Emergency Operations Plan

SpOps – Special Operations and Professional Development

ES – Emergency Services

VERF – Vehicle and Equipment Replacement Fund

27


COMMUNITY REPRESENTATIVES:

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

John Andrade, Olathe resident Emily Baker, Olathe Public Library Alison Banikowski, Olathe Public Schools Jerry Barrios, Atmos Energy Val Bentley, Olathe resident Joe Beveridge, Solid Ground Environmental and Board of Education Shana Burgess, Regional Prevention Center of Johnson County Madeleine Burkindine, Kansas School for the Deaf Rick Castillo, Olathe Public Schools Bob Courtney, Olathe Historical Society Brian Deer, Johnson County Joe DeGrandi, Federal Aviation Administration Tom Grindinger, First Student Isabel Gutierrez, Kansas City Area Parents as Teachers Consortium William Horton, Exxon Mobil Mike Jensen, Olathe Medical Center Andrena Keesee, K-State Olathe Maggie Kolb, Olathe Public Schools Cindy Kolich, Olathe Medical Center Barb Kunz, Olathe resident Erin Lynch, Mid-America Regional Council Amy Martin, Amy Martin Portrait and Board of Education Craig Mauk, Federal Aviation Administration

The Olathe Fire Department thanks the following people for their contributions to the strategic planning process. Jeff DeGraffenreid, Ed.D. Fire Chief and Emergency Management Director

Dante McGrew, Westar Energy Sam Miceli, Olathe Running Club Gary Milligan, Atmos Energy Dan Murray, Goodman Gravley Insurance Source Ruth Nelson, Olathe Noon Optimist Club Anne Oswald, Sir Speedy Alisa Pacer, Johnson County Community College Harlan Parker, State Farm Brad Perere, Exxon Mobil Greg Prieb, Prieb Homes, Inc. Robert Reese, Healthcare Resort of Olathe Jeff Rouse, Chick-fil-A Tamra Rouse, Chick-fil-A Katie Schatte, SafeKids Johnson County Heather Schoonover, Olathe Public Schools Susan Sherman, City of Olathe Rod Smith, Olathe Public Schools Brad Sorensen, Garmin International Tamara Stelting, Olathe resident Beth Ann Vann, Federal Aviation Administration Nina Von Behren, Farmers Insurance Group Walt Way, Olathe resident Casey Wilhm, Olathe Chamber of Commerce Aaron Witt, Johnson County Wastewater Beverly Wittenborn, Olathe resident

28


DEPARTMENT REPRESENTATIVES: Eric Barnum, Battalion Chief Sean Brooks, Captain Pat Brown, Battalion Chief Scott Darlington, Firefighter Jeff DeGraffenreid, Fire Chief / Emergency Management Director

Charles Ozonoff, Battalion Chief Joshua Parrish, Captain of Training, FIRE Donnie Pfeiffer, Public Education Specialist Ed Reschke, Battalion Chief of Training and Safety

John DeJulio, Captain

Tim Richards, Assistant Chief of Special Operations / Deputy Director of Emergency Management

David Dock, Division Chief of Support Services and Logistics

Marty Robbins, Captain

Jeff Doherty, Battalion Chief

Jason Seipel, Engineer

Matt Essex, Engineer

Tim Solberg, Firefighter

Doug Fischer, Assistant Chief of Operations

Jason Stenberg, Captain

Maureen Griffin, Firefighter

Mark Wassom, Assistant Chief of Community Risk Reduction

Mike Hall, Captain of Community Services

Kevin Weyand, Battalion Chief

Todd Hart, Deputy Chief Joey Heideman, Captain

PHOTO CREDITS:

Kevin Hilboldt, Firefighter

Mike Hall, Jerry Peel

Kevin Joles, Captain of Training, EMS Benjamin Laxton, Fire Protection Engineer Kristine Martin, Fire Analyst Kiel Mason, Captain

CONSULTING TEAM: Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE) Technical Advisor Program

HAVE AN IDEA FOR HOW WE CAN BETTER SERVE OUR COMMUNITY? 29

Contact us at OlatheFire@OlatheKS.org


Credit: Jerry Peel


Olathe Fire Department 1225 S. Hamilton Circle Olathe, KS 66061

(913) 971-7900 (non-emergency) OlatheKS.org/Fire Facebook.com/OlatheFire @OlatheFire

Strategic Plan  

The Strategic Plan, with its foundation based in community and membership input, revisits our pillars (mission, values and vision) and sets...

Strategic Plan  

The Strategic Plan, with its foundation based in community and membership input, revisits our pillars (mission, values and vision) and sets...

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