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(re)

a Greensgrow initiative

Mary Fluehr, James Hughes, Amory King, and Brianna Stevens


Project Statement

As part of our group’s collaboation with Greensgrow Farm, our goal is to unify its retail space and simplify the overall aesthetic in a functional and attractive way. Given the current layout of the space, an opportunity for design exists in making some aspects visible and others not. The design allows for an easily-repeatable, customizable, and sensitive solution to the problem.


Brief

Pallet Pavillion, 2010 Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark


Pavillion A-Team

We were conscious of the other Pavillion team’s designs and spoke with them and shared information throughout the project.


Research: Greensgrow

We were interested in many areas of the Greensgrow site, particularly the open outdoor retail space. While customers were easily able to choose and obtain the product that was right for them, the area lacked a separation from the rest of the space.


Research: Pallets

We focused our research and explored industrial pallets, responding to the photos Greensgrow provided us with. We were most drawn to projects that utilized customizing, repeating and reinterpreting their form.


Sketching/ Concept Generation


Gaul St.

94.80 ft

Area of Focus

19.2 ft

6.2 ft

Soil

18.3 ft

87.08 ft

10.9 ft

Bathroom

16.5 ft

16.5 ft

Office

Green House

Chickens

Green House

Retail space Layout changes often 15 ft

People, carts move through

Green House

Some permanent structures

43.30 ft

Cumberland St.


Gaul St.

94.80 ft

Area of Focus

19.2 ft

6.2 ft

15 ft

Soil

18.3 ft

87.08 ft

10.9 ft

Bathroom

16.5 ft

16.5 ft

Office

Green House

Chickens

Green House

Green House 43.30 ft

Cumberland St.


Gaul St.

94.80 ft

Area of Focus

19.2 ft

6.2 ft

15 ft

Soil

18.3 ft

87.08 ft

10.9 ft

Bathroom

16.5 ft

16.5 ft

Office

Green House

Chickens

Green House

Green House 43.30 ft

Cumberland St.


Gaul St.

94.80 ft

Area of Focus

19.2 ft

6.2 ft

15 ft

Soil

18.3 ft

87.08 ft

10.9 ft

Bathroom

16.5 ft

16.5 ft

Office

Green House

Chickens

Green House

Green House 43.30 ft

Cumberland St.


Gaul St.

94.80 ft

Area of Focus

19.2 ft

6.2 ft

15 ft

Soil

18.3 ft

87.08 ft

10.9 ft

Bathroom

16.5 ft

16.5 ft

Office

Green House

Chickens

Green House

Green House 43.30 ft

Cumberland St.


Gaul St.

94.80 ft

Area of Focus

19.2 ft

6.2 ft

15 ft

Soil

18.3 ft

87.08 ft

10.9 ft

Bathroom

16.5 ft

16.5 ft

Office

Green House

Chickens

Green House

Green House 43.30 ft

Cumberland St.


Initial Scale Model


Initial Scale Model


Feedback

Likes: -Monolithic, minimalist design -Hides unsightly area(s) well -Slats provide customizable surface -Can be used during demonstrations Concerns: -Requested shelving/storage -Warned us against using pallets -Concerned about weight/stability -Wanted system to be easily movable -Didn’t want space to seem smaller -Wanted more display space


Material Source: Revolution Recovery

After some consideration, we decided that pallet wood had a form that would work for our design. However, pallets are painstaking to take apart and splinter easily. We contacted Revolution Recovery and obtained a standard 1� thick material that we paired with store-bought 2x4x96� planks as a cheap and cleaner alternative.


Material Source: Revolution Recovery

The reclaimed wood we obtained has interesting residual markings and natural grain. It is a standard “1x� material and is readily available at most home improvement stores.


Proof of Concept

After feedback frrom our partners, we decided to move forward with our concept for the following reasons: -Simple and straightforward construction -Vertical space allows for customizability

i.e. hooks, information, shelving, etc.

-Unifies/redefines the outdoor retail

space for customers

-Hides the “soil area� well -Minimalist aesthetic using

reclaimed/recycled materials


Hardware

The hardware we originally bought proved to be too complicated and unstable. We resorted to using just screws to assemble our structure. This simplified the construction and gave it the strength needed.


Construction of First Prototype


Realizations

Our first prototype proved to be surprisingly stable and strong. The only hardware used were screws and clamps (to hold pieces together during construction). The slots allowed for lifting the unit and the braces on the back held the structure upright well.


Second Prototype

Our first attempt to build an incorporated bench into our structure used a simple joining method with the same screws and reclaimed wood used in our larger structure.


Installation at Greensgrow Farm

We assembled our structure at the studio and then transported it to Greensgrow Farm in Northern Liberties. After the bases were removed, both of our prototypes fit into the bed of a standard truck.


Installation at Greensgrow Farm


Build Times

Construction time (total): 14 min. 35 sec. Breakdown time (total): 11 min. 19 sec.


Conflicting Feedback

Dave: -Permanent storage bench -Hinged top -Attach shelving system Ryan: -No storage area under bench -Impermanent floating bench/shelf

(detachable)

-Tripping hazard of flat horizontal supports -Variation in the spacing of front slats


Natural Evolution

We left a dry-erase board hanging from the front of our structure to gain feedback from visitors, employees, or volunteers.


Natural Evolution

While we were gone, Greensgrow staff placed their own D.I.Y. shelving/display system alongside ours. The result is a clean separation of spaces without sacrificing retail space in any way.


Instruction Manual


Instruction Manual


Instruction Manual


Future Iterations

We found an area of our structure that had been damaged from the placement of soil pallets. In the future we may consider using additional hardware or, if the structure were permanent, cement the vertical supports into the ground, eliminating the need for supports in the back.


Future Iterations

We took feedback from Dave, Ryan an several customers into account and designed variations of easily-detachable floating benches that could also be used for shelving. We have also considered introducing color into the design using paint.


Future Iterations

We attached inexpensive adjustable shelving to the front of the structure using parts Greensgrow itself uses and is familiar with. The parts are readily available from most home improvement stores and catalogs such as McMaster-Carr.


Photo Sources

Project by Christiana Piraino Brandbase Pallets Project

by Most Architecture

Project by Drew Makepeace Sticking Sticks

by Kawamura Ganjavian

The Pond

by Raw Edges

Project by Erik Sjodin Project by m+m+t Tweed by Mike Mills The Redbird All other photos taken by group members or Tim Moyer


Thank You

(re)

a Greensgrow initiative

Mary Fluehr, James Hughes, Amory King, and Brianna Stevens


Pavilion Group 2