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THE "I II ••

CANTUARIAN. No.

Vll.

I.

~==========================

EDITORIAL. In peace there's nothin g so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility.1! I hi" indeed would be our choosing if it were permitted us, but we have been uwak ' ned from OUT tranquil hibernation by an unmistakable feeling that somethin g I ~ IIt' ing wanted somewhere. Alas I it is not a selfish fee ling, not a prelude by any II II 'llII S to self-satisfaction ; we toil for others. It is our hard task to feed a pack III wo lves that clamour fOT our blood and ~ape at us with open jaws, not because liI,'\' hunger and starve and crave, even for the most un tempting morsels j but merely !!!lcnuse they are unde r an impression that we sleep the ete rnal sleep of si necures and Ihllt it is time that we were aroused again. For this reason alone, they a re so self~ dl' nying as to feed up on the scattered fra gments we throw to them. But it is not lunK befo re they repent of their unpremeditated audacity; and we receive as our I, wnrd an unvarying sy mphony of "harsh discords and unpl easing sharps." The Kings of the North hav e brought prese nts and wrought such wonders as we lutd th ought long extinct. We have all tri ed to speed on wings of steel and some illc\rcd in thei r vagaries have become more intimate with nature's ch,illy mood than Ih n/, at first bargai ned for. So sudden and so unexpected was this" entente cordiale II \tt II \ the North that we fear some have broken their bonds of allegiance to their IIn' ustomed lords. The devotees of the battle and the ball have been more conspicuous 111\ a field of ice than any other field. But when we had our own again and were once more shrouded in our native II


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of the perfidious devotee before the shrine which, mist, we still heard the wailing and diaped with white, was once again a pool though latel}' solid, transparent

of murky water. Now it is all past, and probably water will be water for many years to come despite dread prophecies of anoth er Age of Ice; and so we turn LO the prospects of other sport. We are glad to hear that there is every likelihood that the fleet of foot will this year be able to try their speed against Dover., our '.' â‚ŹXOpOs rillâ‚Źx.0pos."* In n:ference to Sports we hope that the letter of an O .K.S. m this Number will have a good effect, and that there will be a multitude of aspirants to a laurel crown. We feel fully justified in expressi ng thi s hope now that we have ourselves run the .gauntl et between rows of gloaming eyes which have noted each pace and we now retu e from off the field to await the cries of the insatiable.

31\ !lDemorim1\.

+ CANON

F.

J. H OLLAND. + ---""

It is with sincere regret that we have to record the death of Canon H olland the oldest membe r of our Governi~g Body. The obituary notice. which we reprint, in part. f:om 'Ihe Guardian of January 30th, glves a true appreciation of his work and his character; but we cannot omit to ~dd our own deep sense of the loss. whlch the School has suffered. in the death of one who always took the keenest interest in its welfare. Those who have the best reason to know, speak most warmly of the kind an(~ almost fatherly solicitude with wInch he

gu{d\;d and promoted the ~'arious stages in its) developme nt dunng the past twenty -four years. But his co.nnection with the School was so methlllg more than that of the wise counsellor at Governors' Meetings. By his freq uent attendance at. our school gatherings. and by the lectures he himself gave us in th e Parry Library, he shewed how pleased he was to take a perso nal share in the events of our T erm. Many of us will long remember the last lecture he gave to th e School, in which he described his voyage to see the total ) eclipse of the sun, The simple affec-


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tionate way in which he spoke made it clear~ ev:- n to the youngest present, that III hlln we had a most true and sympatheti c friend . "The news of Canon Francis James Holland's sudde n illness which reached Canterb ury on Saturdayafternoon, and was succeeded by a telegram on Sunday evening announcinO" that he h~d pa~sed to his rest, not o~ly fi lled wah gnef the Cathedral precincts, but also the whol e city. H e had intended to re~u rn home for the monthly Chapter m~etIl1g . on Saturday, but, having mIssed hIS steamer at T un is, he de cided to return by way of Ital y. At Sorrento he was seized with apoplexy, and died, after a ver)' short illness, on Sunday mornin g. H ~ entered his eightieth year on the 2cth mst., and to few persons of I~is age has it been granted more pe rt ~c t l y to retain to the last the vigour of lire, and th e enjoym ent, not only of hiS work, but also of his times of relaxati on and holiday, and beinO' a good sailor he found nothin g so restful as a soa voyage. In the last fe w years he had bee n to the \Vest Indies, Pales¡ tin e, and Syria, and it was in the course of a simi lar journey that his last and fatal illn 'S5 seized him. Born in 1828, he was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. A.s soon as he was of fit age he ofrered }umsclf for Holy Orde rs, and a t once took a curacy in the same Diocese in whi ch he worked for the greater part of his lif . Beginning at Plaxtol, Kent,

in 1851. he soon was appointed by Archbishop Sumner to the vicarage of St. Dunstan's/ Canter bury, where he md his wife, who was the daughter of the Rev. A ..Lyall (Rector of Harbledown ), and siste r to the two distingui shed Indian civ'i1ians. Sir Charles Jarvis and Sir Alfred Lyall. Mr. Holland evidently soon made his mark as a preacher, for wh en he had only been eight years in Holy Orders he was selected oy the Archbishop for the post of one of the "Six Preachers JI in Canterbury Cathedral, which office he retained till he was appointed by ~he Crown t o be R esidentiary Canon In 1882. H e held the vicarage of St. Dunstan's just eight years, and made his mark among the clergy of the City. The incumbency of Quebec Chapel became vacant in 186J. and the post was offered to Mr. Holland, and was held by him for twenty-two years. Up to his time the chapel had no district assigned to it, and to his efforts it was due that the district round it was made a parochial charge, and its name was changed to that which it now bears, th e Church of the Annunciation, St. Marylebone. 'W hile there he saw a need; which, at that tim e was only begi nning to be recognised. and he thr~\V his whole energy into meeting it by providing a good education, in which distinctive religious training should hold a high place. fo r the daught ers of the well-todo classes, and it is no secret that he

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him5~lf, out of his private means, contrIbuted largely to the success of the scheme. The two excellent schools in Baker-street and Graham-street, Eaton-sq uare, are so well known in London as to be standin g evidences of the success of his undertaking. When he went to reside in Canterbury as Canon Residenti ary in r882, he not only continued his general interest in the workin g of th e schools but as Chairman of the Committee ~f Management took the largest share in t heir management, and, what is, perhaps, mo~e remarkab le, he scarcely ever omitted to go up week by week during ~h.e school term to London to give Instruction in religious subjects at the schools, and this practice he contip.ued to the very last.

Canon Holland was by conviction and by taste an educator of the young. ~e loved teaching, and it is interestmg to know that he paid as much attention to the elementary schools in Canterbury as to the above-mentioned two High Schools for Girls in London. The Payn e-Smith Memorial School in Longport (erected in memory of the Dean of that name) owed much to him. It was commenced as a higher class ~l ementary school fo r both boys and g IrlS, and that it met a distinct want is proved by the way in which it has attracted pupils to it. As late as ! 900 h ~ was instrum ental in add ing to It an l11fa nt department which. cost over ÂŁ 1,200. H e was Chairman of its

130ard of Management to the day of !lis death. . Another Canterbury school 1J1 one of the poorest parishes in the city received eq ual attention from Canon Holland. He was a most liberal contribu tor to its support, and also was Chairman of its managers. In addition, week by week, he gave up an hour to eac h of these schools, in which he regul arly took a class in religious instruction, returnin g in time for the morning se rvi ce in the Cathedral, from which he was ra rely absent. It would be too long to enumerate all he did for the good of the city in which he resided .. Since 1897 , among other offices whIch he held, he had been Warden of St. j ohn's H ospital (almshouses fo r aged poor), and he held a service in the hospital chapel every week fo r the benefit of the inmates, and in other ways looked after their welfare. In his varied ac tivities he became one of the city's greatest benefactors. No good object in Canterbury and the Diocese ever failed to obtain his hearty and liberal snpport. H e was generous to a fault, and. both his work and his liberality evinced such complete si mplicity and absence of ostent.:1.tion that only those who were intimate with him kn ew how hard he worked an d how liberally he gave. i t woul d not be right to omit the mention of the part he took in diocesan matters. For twenty years he was Chai rman of the Sunday-school Teachers' Association. Only last year


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he was interested the support which often fai ls to be obtained by men who are more demo nstrative and more insistent. To say that he will be missed in the City of Canterbury and in the Diocese is an inadequate way of expressing what is felt . Very manyin all ranks of life- will feel that th ey have lost the best of friends. Canterbury will hardly seem itself without his active fig ure-of late years somewhat bowed by age-hurrying through the Precincts to be in time for the services of the Cathedral wh ich he loved with all his heart, and to which he was ready to devote time and energy and mon ey. The signs of his deep interest in its fabric will remain to future ge nerations, but the present will not forget that he valued above all else the spi rit ual influence of th e Cathedral.

he dec ided that his advancing years necessitated his givi ng up this chairmanship ; but it wo ul d be difficult to say how much this Society has been indebted to him and to Can on Nisbet, who. as Secretary, was so closely associated with him . If one might ve nture an opinion, what made him, with his apparently calm ex terior, so efficient a worker in so ma ny good causes was that und erneath there was a strength of convictiOll which amounted almost to enthusiasm in th e objects he had at heart j that he never thought of himself, bu t only of the work in hand; and that he saw the best in other men, and was ready to welcome as a fellow worker anyo ne who was¡ in earnest. Such a simple lovable character was able to enlist in undertakings in which

>i< GUY

MACKESON.

>i< Vve are sorry to hear of the death

of Dr. Guy Mackeson, which took place in the Malay States. H e was a

I

son of Mr. Charles Mackeso n, also an O.K.S., and was a member of the School from 1878- 1885.

A VISIT TO THE CATHEDRALS IN THE WEST OF ENGLAND.- Conc/uded. We stayed a couple of days at Wells and rode th rough Priddy over the hills to Cheddar. ~Ve went over th e caves j the owner has spent ÂŁ 12, 0 00 in excavation

and electric lighting. The Stalag-Tites and Mites looked very like large ta llow candles gone to seed. In the caves some where or other is a large river 29ft. deep.


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The chi..:f attraction is a skull 40,000 years old. The owner was found sitting 9ft. under a large Stalag-Tite or Mite. We were told the skull is valued at £3,000, I offered thereupon to trade my entire skeleton, when I had done with it, for :62,000, half paid down j but the man said No, for he could get any number like mine for £5 a piece j I never felt so cheap before. We rode through \'Vedmore to Glastonbury. The Abbey was 580 feet long . In the Abbots Kitchen dinner could be cooked for 500 people. It is a fine place. In the Museum there are many relics of a Lake Village, jewels, rin gs. corn, etc. j but my whole attention was given to a loaf. I shed tears of joy when I saw it, for did I not recognize it as the original Bath Bun, which Alfred the Great burnt, in my history book, when I was a boy. The road to ';Yells is made of stones from the Abbey. It is not a very good road j but, when I thought of some we had ridden over, I th ought it was a pity th ere were not a few more Monasteries handy. The shops in the districts we passed through are chiefly curio shops, and the population of the hotels almost excl usively American, and were pleasant at that. On mature consideration, I am inclined to think the beauty of the American lady is somewhat over-rated. but I may be wron g of course. From \Vells we rode to D evizes, th rough Trowbridge, where the country is rather uninteresting. Devizes, however, is a delightful town with a charming hotel. the Bear, one of the very best. In it we met the local antiquary who insisted on my visili ng the Museum which he, his father, and grandfather had got together. H e showed li S axes, spear-

heads, and other weapons. I should have thought they were ordi nary flints, and how he knew one from another I could'nt guess. May ' be one of th e Druids told his grandfather. There are many places of great interest near Devizes; Avebury, for instance, with its remains of a Druid T emple a third of a mile across. \Ve did not go to see it, as the flints had about done for me, and besides, an antiquary once took me to see what he said was a Roman Villa, but what seemed to me to be a few bricks in a potato patch; since then I have used no other. Then::: is, however, no such deception about Stonehenge which we saw on our way to Salisbury. \¥hether the ston es were brought there by the Delugc, the I ce Age or the Romans. they are SUfficiently remarkable. The railings rath er spoil the appearance, but apparently it has become necessary to protec t the ruin s against the British Tripper. An artist, America n, was painting there; he had a commission from a millionaire to come over and paint Stonehenge and Kenilworth, and all he wanted was to see Stonehenge in a storm . H e had'nt to pine long, fo r, shortly after that, therr: came one of the few heavy rain storms of the summer; but we were having lunch at Amesbury. On the road to Salisbury we passed Old Sarmll, evidently bound for th e next workho use. Vve should have liked to interview him, but we were coasting with the wind behind us, and besides, we were eager for the first sight of Lhe g loriolls spire of Salisbury Cathedral. When we did see it sticking up over the tOP of the ncxt hill like a crooked extinguisher. our enthusiasm


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knew no bounds; and we wcre a~out to gi ve vent to our cmotions in fitting lan f7 uage. when two motors passed us in O PI~osite direcLions and ~ovt:red us wi.th dust, a nd th ose t:xpresslO n ~ were qUlte out of date. On going a Iml~ or so we lound our classical education had misled us, we had jumped to the conclusion tl1(~.t 'arum was the masculine for Sarah, but It ilppeared that it was th e name of a place. It i ~ a hill, overgrown with bushes, and there is olle frag ment of a Roman wall;

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the modern town is not in such a picturesque situation, but it is probably more co nvenient. vVe had a look round before dinner, the Precincts, Cathedral, curio shops, etc. The finest view of the Cathedral is from the meadow .out of the town. At Salisbury I found my money had come to an end, with it one of the pleasa ntest o f trips, all the more pleasant that my companion was an old school pal of more years standing than either of us care to reckon now.

FOOTBALL. KING'S SCHOOL v. O.K.S. This match was played on Cullen's Ground on vVedne~day, Dec: 19th, ~n.d res ulted in a well deserved win for the School by z goals 3 tnes to z tnes. ThIS IS the first tim e the School have beaten the O.K.S. for five years. The School started the game with the sun at their backs. The O.K.S. pressed :ll once and kept the School on the defensive for so me tim.e, but Gardner and Goss~t co mpletely Olltplayed th e O.K.S. halves, arid so th e School managed to keep their npponents out. After so me loose play and a fe w sc rums, the C?K.S. scor~d, but the try was not converted. The O.K.S. forwards, now ~egan to tll"e, and the game :vas transferred to th eir twenty-five, but Strahan s tackhng was, as usual,. of CI: lugh Hta ndard, and the School were unable to score until Bassett cro~sed the hne With the School's first try. Abbott co nverted. The School kept up a vigorous attack, but at half~time had not scored again. After change of ends, the School went to work at ullce and took matters into their own hands. Burdett sco red from. a forward rush, and ~hortly afterwards Gosset gained I~i s. first try of the season WIth a good r~n. Abbott converted. Rey nolds, after a bnlhant run, scored bet\~'een the posts, but the l lIch-jud ge's flag was raised at half-way, so t~le try .was dlsall owe~. The thr~e ­ ql1aners were playinf7 an excellent game, theIr pass1l1g and handmg off bell1g v';y good. Moore g~t away, and sent Bassett over with th e School's fourth try. Hhortly afterwards the O.K.S. ~oused themselves, and after some good work by II uyshe, and one or tw o scrums m th.c ~c hool twe nty~fi~e, Good~cre scored, but the ) l aCe~ kick failed . Gosset scored agam .Jor the School Just on tuue, who thus wO.n 'Y J 9 points to 6. The team played a vigoro us game, and ~horoughly dcserved theu wi ll. Gosset, after his excellent work as serum-hal f dunng the term, thoroughly dl,.'gcrved his tries, and Gardner played his usual sound game. All the three-quarters

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pJayed well, handing off iJ~ a most determined manner. It is, impossible to pick out the best of the forwards. Since all played a hard game, which proved far too strenuous for the opposing serum. . The teams were as follows :Kille's SC//Ool.-L. P. Abbott (back); C. M. Dunlop, L. J. Bassett, K. Moore, R. M. Gent (three-quarters); I-I. Gardner, I-I. I-I. E. Gosset (halves) ; C. G. Williamson, E. T . Gage, H. M. J. Burdett, A. L. B. Thomson, I. R. Madge, C. W. Hunt, H. F. Reynolds, E. K. Barber (forwards). O.K.S.-G. C. Strahan (back) ; H . E. Green, J. L. Tomlin, O. F. Huyshe, H. Petley (three-quarters) ; J. Goodacre, A. de B. Hamilton (halves) ; J. Deighton, E. B. Kelsey, E. C. Green, W. Lucas, F. P. Walker, T.D . Dixon, R . T . Jenkin (forwards). KING'S SCHOOL v. HAMPSTEAD WANDERERS. Played on Cullen's Ground, Thursday, Feb. 14th. King's School, J goal, I try (8), to I goal (5). In this match, the first of this year, the School were without the services of Gosset and Hunt, who both had to !'tand down owing to injuries. Their places were taken respectively by Clayton and Miller, whilst Dunlop's place on the left wing was well filled by Mangin . The first half was of a very ding-dong nature. chiefly noticeable for the repeated ru shes of th e forwards of both sides alike. and various futile attempts of th e three-quarters to get going. From a loose scramble the Wanderers, getting the ball out. passed ~t down their line to Walker, who. drawing the defence upon himself, passed out to his wing who romped home. Carr conve rted. In the second half, the School got together much better, the forwards gai ninoground time after time by well supported dribbles and good hand to hand passin: Eventually Gent drew his opponents up to the touch-line and then by a well-jl1dgeOd punt centred to Madge who scored und er the posts. Abbott converted . Shortly afterwards Bassett intercepted a mulled pass, and, racing from nearly half way, scored what proved to be the winning points. At one time a long kick up the field being fumbled by the back, and the who le of our pack breaking up well, rushed the ball past all opposition, but managed to make a dead ball of it, thereby throw ing away a certain chance of scoring. Soon after time was called leaving th e School winners as stated above. This is, we believe, the first time that we have defeated the Wanderers . All the team played up woll. Williamson and Barber were conspicuous amongst a set of good forwards. Reynolds tackling at times was decidedly good. Gent tackl ed throughout too high, but otherwise showed improvement. The forwa rds as a whole mllst learn to hurl themselves individually and collectively upon thei r opponent whenever ncar enough, so long as he has possession of the ball, regardless of the fact that he may be on th e point of kicking. At present they are too fond of standing still and looking at him.


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9

CONCERT. WITH

SONG AND CHEER. By JOS EPH BENNETT.

" As in the winters len behind, Again our ancient ~ame s had place, The nlimi c picture s breathing grace, And dance and song and hood man blind."

On th e last Tuesday as ever was, I went out into the dank and misty dark nn anoth er pilgrimage to th e hoary city of anterbury. Not. this time. to record Ih enthron ement, or the burial, of a Primate of All England and iVletropoiitan, nor even to picture the obsequies of a tl t'an. These be grave fu nctions. ill-suited lo lhe mood of the present hour. No; I had heard of something moret joyous Ihan a funeral as about to come off un der Ih(' shadow of the cathedral towers-an nrgie of more or less ancient songs, ,,\juvcnated by the vitality of two hundred hoys. all agog for home and holiday. ';Ye 11 11 want cheeri ng up. and to that end I have a capital recipe. of tried and )Ir ven efficacy. Go, all you who are in tlw cl umps, to the " breakin g up" of a big Hl' hool, and breathe its joyous atmosph~re, Hllhmit to the infection of its aboundlO g lIro, and let your laughter ripple or roar with the rest. Be young again, as far as rou can. It will do you a lot of good . I' rll " the precincts of a cathedral on a dnrk December ni ght are not generally "Khilnrating. They are badly lighted as III the paths in which you may walk; ~ou 111 11 1111 asil y conscio us of a vast impendlllg 11I1I1IiI , though you cannot see it; if you .. thnd still. half-afraid of the silence and "" Ill ude, you shall hear the measured II I"or ever, never, Never, for ever," of

the great clock in the high tower, and the inherited superstition which is, more or less, the appanage of us ali, whispers inwardly of fearsome things that may appear. The precincts on the doubly dark eve of Tuesday afforded dramatIc preparation for a change of scene to the gymnasium of the King's School, what time it had been swept and garl1lshed as for a feast. And, truly, the decoratiot,ls had been lavishlv laid on with a feast 111 view-a banquet 'of song. with Mr. Percy Godfrey, IVIus. Bac., as chef. Music is cultivated in Canterbury, as I have, ere this, more than once or twice set forth. So indeed, it should be, especially in th~ neighbourhood of a sacred building which has been a dignified home of the art as long as the flag of England has braved the battle and the breeze. It was fitting therefore, that when the welldressed audience trooped into the transformed place of athletics, they saw, in addition to lights and colours, serried ranks of young trebles and altos, with shining faces and such nice clean collars, backed by lines of big boys, tenors and basses, whose trumpet, accordin g to the ordinance of Nature, sometimes gave forth an uncertain sOllnd, but lacked nothing in firmness of intention. That audience, furth ermore, caught the glint of brass instruments, the flash of silver keys on flutes and clarinets, the ruddy hue of th e complete violin family, and all else that is literally ch romatic in the equipment of an orchestra. Again, they might have recognised some of our leading instrumental performers, Mr. Borsdorff,


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to wit. Mr. Woods. Mr. James. and. doubt- disposed to thiu k that he dealt rather less, other lights of the London Symphony frc.ely with the foreign folk-tunes, these Band. Also might they have found, on bemg less distinctive in rhyth m and enquiry, that a large batch of <I stri ngs l> general character than we usually find had come down from the Royal Academy them. Mall ), of the Canterbury ditties of Music, to make sure the most important were sun g in enjoyable style. The boys department of all. The orchestra was had bee n taught to prod uce their voices necessarily of the order" scratch," but properly. and the gene ral effect was one worked with admirable spi rit, and had to of delicacy rath er than harsh ness. Apart repeat the overture to "Der Freyschlitz." from whatever was du bious in the orchesOther things might be mentioned to its tral accompaniments, one can look back credit, but I pass on to the most distinctive upon .this ~olk-song concert with pleasure, and interesting feature of the occasion. . espeCIally If one reme mbers that nothinO' Readers of musical news have long can come amiss whe n si mpleness and d u t~ known what great and increasing attention tender it. Last of all. before the National is now paid to the lays of the people, the Anthem, came a school football sonO', Volkslieder of our German cousins, who .. Forty Years On." For it all ..the bo~s long ago did for their field-flowers of song made ready, and not the choir only. Trul y what some are now aiming to accomplish the deck s were clea red for action to some for those which flourish, or, perhaps, pU.rI?ose, the half-hum orous, half-pathetic languish, on English soil. 1\,1r. Pe rcy SPI!,lt of the song losing nothing of that Godfrey is one of these labourers among whIch author and composer had put into the highways and hedges, and he filled a it. \,Vith the last chord all was over but large part of Tuesday's programme with shouting. and th e shouti ng was well examples drawn from the stores of various breathed. Well discipli ned was it. to nations. Some of us are almost pers,uaded boot. The volleys of hurrahs could not to believ~ that cultivated music is going have been in bette r time or to mo re beyond Itself, and becoming such as ene rgetic purpose, as name after name was called out and acclaimed. So, with Shakespeare had in mind: so ng and cheer, the schola rs of bluff Ki nO' H This music made me; let it sound no more' Hal's sC'hool made ready for the Ch ristma~ For though it have hclp'd madmen to their ~\'its, joys of home.-DailJ, Telegraph . I n me, it seems, it will make wise men mad." ~oo~h, to .say, tha t may be a saving PROGRAMl\ Jc:. IIlS.tlllct \~}Hch sends li S to the sim ples. The item s marked wilh a St~r arc those chosen It 15 certam ly a natural reaction against a by the boys for performance. form of art intellectually unintelligible. PRIr.LUDlI, (Orch.) . , Russian Suite" Percy Codjre)'. emotionally sterile, and resthetically overTwo old Russian Tunes occu r in th is number. blown. (a) (Trumpets (Iud /Jrass) a rough peasant song. Mr. Percy Godfrey served up the plain (b) (Oboe) one of those ocld vague wandering melodies with all manner of orchestral melodies almosl devoid of rhythm, ancl accessories, including variations. I am so frequent in Russian folk¡ music.


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( .... ROI. ........ .... H Winter's Night" Words 6;> Afm;c by Bp. /lfilchimoll . I'UI .K.SONG (Chorus) "The Litlle Blue Flame" ." S1/fSex. Iq N .\I,I~ (KoUllchol·) "Russian Suite" (Orch.).. ..

Percy Godfrey.

If

F01.K-SONGS (Ch. and Orch.) (a) IC Rose de Provence " ...... Bas9.lIe. " Pepita" ............... .. Spams/t. (b ) { "Me Gustan T odas" ...... Bas'lllt. *Two MOVEMENTS (Ballet Music) (Orch.) "Fallst " ...... COIlIlOd, 1818- 1893·

FOI.K-SONGS (Ch. and Orch.) Though no actual Russian. tune is used, .the (a) Capstan Song" Haul up ,lhe} . themes ami rhythms are cast III that form, z.e., anchor I... Rlusum. the falling cadence of a fourth (as at the close (b) Harhour Song "Home again II of cnrol "Good King ~e~celas ") and v.ar~'ing 01.1) SEA.SONG ... " Amble Town" ......... English , "hythms find han~\On!c Idioms ch aract~ nst lc to arralt,r:ed bJ' Percy Cod/ny. R\I:;~ia n folk musIc. f he Cossack musIc occurs L. J. BASSETT. f\fter a pause on a short phrasc for Celli, and nlso in lhe Coda or closing section of thc T wo FOI.K SONGS (Ch. and Orch .) ( a ) "War-Song" . .. ' ... .. ...... ?'llltl. Ilhwcment. (b) "Taza-b-T axa" ............ Hu:doo. j' I\! .K.SONGS (Ch. and Orch.) *BALLET MusIC" Rosamunde" ..................... .. (a) .. LnGitana" .... · .. ·•., .. ·}SPan.;s/l. Schubert, 1787- 18::8. (b) " Hasta la Manana ." CHANTY (Ch. and Orch.) .. Sailor l\-1an" Eli/tUsh . (/I) Serenade iii Spanish-dallce rhythm (Jota) of the Seviilana type. SONG ....... .... '·Oxen Ploughing " .. West Corme",. L. P. ABBOTT. tl VlUtTURE (O rch.) "Der Freischiitz" ............. .. Weber, 1786-1826. BURl.E1"TA (for Flute, Clarionet. Horn, Bassoon) ... Percy Codfrey . A brilliant masterpiece of the Romantic ~chool. It opens with a slow movement in i\ lessrs. \\'OODS. GOLDSM ITH , BORSDORF, (' major, containing the famous passage for and JAMES . hum s. The Allegro, in C minor, !s a move· AtR ANI) VARIATIONS (Ch. and Orch.) Chanty.;. WCllt of rnpid and turbulent rhythn~s mter~upted .. A Yankee Ship " ......... Ell,{flrslt. lIy a charming melody for clauonet, III the * FINALI~ (Ch. and Orch.) Market Chorus ........... . ILInjor key; the music dies away at last .into a " Masan iello" ............ Auoer. "lIcnee broken by the joyous outburst of trLlllnph FOO'I'lI.'\LL SONG "Forty Years on" .. J. Farmer. which forms the closing: seclion of the work, in Ihe key of C major. The charm and the v~gour CHORUS: or the mllsic are enhanced by the extraordmary Basus : f licit), of the orchestral expression, notably thc G. n. Mcrcer. G. H. Pinsent. IIl't\u tlful sustained melody for clarionet in the G. I\'l. V·lebster. /\l\cl.: ' O, hovering over a quivering tremolando Mr. Austcn. G . F. H owell . •,f ,.jol ins, pianissimo. Rev. R. G. Moxon. L . P. Abbott. ~1 r. Reay. l'I II .K.SONCS (Ch. and Orch.) I. R. i\ Iadge. Mr. Daly. II. P. Sparling. (<<J '· Lullaby" .. . ... Spau;sll. Rev. W . H. MalmE. M. Tuke. (b) ., Serenade" ..... ..... . Hungarian. drell. C. F. F reeborn. Mr. C. Aitken. G. E. ~filler. PIUUI. GVNT SU ITE (Orch.) Rev. G. C. E. Ryley. C. A. ~'l. Richardson. Mr. Page. C. J. Galpin. (/1) "A~'s,TOTd""•.,,,. ·.·. } E. Greig. Mr. Gillman. C. W. Hunt. (b) "AOItas anx .. Mr. Sargeallnt. C. Battiscombe. This music was written for I bsen's play of D. G. Fraser. IhM name.


. T HE

CANTUARIAN.

Tellors : C. N. Smith. A . R. Bellars.

R. C. G. Hancock. J-I. r;, Dalton.

E. K. Barber. C. L. Druitl.

C. A. C. Parsons.

C. de H . Smith, iv, W. H . C. Mang in.

H . E. A. I·l orn. R. E. Money. L. J. Basselt.

J.

Trebles .' H. de H . Smith, iii. J. C. Morris, ii. R. I-I . Little. W. G. Hinds. W . J. T ravers, ii. W. T. B. Heslop. E. F. Housden. J. 1-1. Mowl1, iii. C. K. Mowll, iv,

M. Cou rtney.

Rev. G. H . Gray. ~·I r. Hunt. M r. Paul. Mr. Wi lson .

H. Gardner.

N . A. Mccking. G . Byron, ii. P . n. Bakp.T, ii: G. W. R. I-learn, i. C. Y. Snalt, ii. I-I. W. E. Hearn, ii.

Altos: i. A. Travers, i. F. L. Stdcbotham, ii. -G. A. C. Jones, i. J\'Tr. Plant. L. I-I. Jones, i i. Mr. Price.

J. n.

L. G.

Si~l ebothnm.

De~ne.

J. Byron,

Mr. Reid.

G. A. T ownend, ii. A, G. Collings, ii . B. Jones. H. Spence, W. H. Swinford. E. K. Moline, ii. M. A. Whatney. R. D . Maxted. E. R. I'l earn, iii.

READING .

SATURDAY, February 16th, 1907. Ballad in E Aat for Piano ..... ... Ptrcy Godfi-ey.

W. G. HINDS.

MR. GODFREY.

Folk·Song (Ch.) I I The Live-long Day. Genual/. 3. Kindersgenen , for Piano, Op. IS, No. 13, 17· .. · 2.

C.

NIGHT INGALE.

(Sc!mlllmm.

4. Song .. II Four Jolly Sailormen " . . Ed. Geyman

G.

5. Recitation

V{EBSTER.

J. S.

.

YATES.

6. Prelude in A flat for Piano

C.

Clloplu.

RICHARDSON.

7. Folk·Song (Ch)

II T o Alex is" ... German. 8. Song ... liThe Big Dlack Jack "FI. Bllnnlng.

L.

J.

BASS J~T'I'.

9. Norwegian Dance for Piano, 01'. 35 , NO. 2.... C. RYAN . (Ed. Gn'eg. to. Folk·Song (Ch) II Santa Lucia" ... Italian . II, Berceuse, Op, 20, I ntermezzo, O p. 21 fo r C. J. GALPIN, (Pinno, C. 'Cui. 12. Duel ... The Two Gendarmes n Offenbach. {I

J.

f~r Piano, Op. 43 , No. 6 E, h.. BARIum. [Ed. Grieg. 14. Plantation Song nnd Chorus ... Scott Gatt)l.

13· Lyrische Stiicke,

PROGRAMME:

L.

C. Cl1nningham.

1.

PENNY I.

P. S. Barber.

. C. G. F. Berryma n. B. W. Galpin. L. H . French.

BAS5E1'T, L. P. AllllO,),T.

IS· Or; T~~nhaiiser, Piano, :\4, :'Irr. hyVon Billow It. . lmRIN, MR . GODFREY. [N. Wa"lIer.

. Pianoforte music was made the ~11ief Interest of t.he programme. For the sake of the n~us lc and the player a Bechstt::in gral~d piano had been got in that both m~l slc· and performer fo r once might have fair play. Such instruments as we have are adeq~atc for the pur pose o f acq l1iri~g a cer~al~ a~nol1nt of. techniq ue. but now and ~gam It ~s only nght that a piano shoul d ~ provIded, but it shoul d be bo rn e in mmd that th e best of pianos will not make a good player out of a bad one ~emp~rament, arti stic taste, emotionai sl11c.e n ty o~ ~xpression are indispe nsab le to the mUSIClal? ; techniq ue is the means ~o that end. WIthout th e rest, technique IS utterly worthless, bllt \\'ithout technique


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it is not possible to attain to just expression of any music. It is of course in. tech nique that we must be lacking, school-l ife does not allow of sufficient ti me for it, all we ('an do is to acquire as much as is possible within our limits and for onr own music to learn to choose such as a small amount of technique allows and such as may be Huitab le to the individ ual temperament. The various pip.ces presented in the programme were we l\ played by all, with 11 0 little evidence of arti~t ic perception find evidence of temperament. "E. K, Harber's playi ng of the somewhat different Spring-Song by Grieg being especially

adm irable. Taking into account the fac t that a ll th e music here is voluntary a nd done during spare time. a very high standard obtains, and I was glad that the efforts of th e boys in the conce rt received ~mch kindl}' recognit.ion in the Dai(y Telegraph. from so famo us a critic as ;\'1r. Joseph Bennett. It is a pleasure to me to work at music together with the boys, and as this is the cia :)!;;! of Ollr season I take the opportunity of thanking a ll those concerned for their interest a nd help. PERCY GODFREY.

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. E. A. GRATy-Entered the School. May, 11)03

j

VI, Form, Sept., 19 06 .

6 C. M. DUNLop-Entered the School . Jan ., 1904; Cricket, 1St. X L, 11)05- ; Football XV., 19 06 .

DEBATING S OCI ETY . England and F rance, and w() uld be an At. a meeting of the Debati ng Society important factor towards the final abolition Illlld on Saturday, A. 8. Emden. brought lorwa rd a motion that' A Channel Tunnel of\~'ar. G, If, S. P/usent then rose and wo uld be ad\'antageo us to th e British poi nted out the many da nge rs that mi ght Nn lion.' I-lis mai n point was that as the arise from it in case of war, instanci ng .It'h 'me was to be undertaken by a private the case of the Mont Cenis T unnel in l \)lu pany no loss could fall on the the war between France and Italy. T he Urllish Nation as a whole, whereas com mercial advantages would be few , dl lOnite commercial advantages woul d and far out of proportioru,o the risks it 1111" 11t. from it. He dwelt on the fact that woul d entail. Experts had declared that It would be a bo nd of unity between


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it was q~lite possible that there might be a fissure 1Il th e Channe l hed wh ich would pre.vent the execution of the scheme, wl11 ch . would only be di scovered after great tun e and labor had been wasted. K. 11100re explain ed t hat the T unnel would be of no advantage to Fra nce in case of war. It woul d be possible to connec t a min e with several diffe rent points. and to blow up tlw Tunnel e ven If th e F rench occupied Dove r, th us cutlin g them off from their headquarte rs. After ?riefiy touC'hil~g on th e fact th at pro bably In 'a fewyears hme. war would be conducted by m.ean s of airships, he remind ed th em that It was proposed at the next Hague Conference to make both ends of the Tunnel neutral gro und in case of war.

C. J. N . Adams said that. however small th e ri sks were, it would be ab surd to und e rtake them for a scheme whose advantages were so doubtful. As for th e Hague Confere nce, International Laws had been broken before. and would probably. be so again. If it was necessary to build a Tmm el, it would be far more u~eful to build one connecting England With Ireland. . C. IV. Smith after painting a lurid pIcture of the character of the average Briton ..whi ch caused g reat wrath am ong the audI ence, went on to explain the advantag,es which it would gain from increased intercourse with th e Continent. He then depicted the conveni ences which

the Tunnel would bring to invalids and maiden ladies, who would be unabl e to undergo the sea crossing. J. S. Yates in scathing terms rebuked the last speaker for setting the com fort of a few e.l~erl\' females against the safety of the Bntlsh Empire. He said that th e Tunnel ~voulcl mean th e importation of cheap dalrr produce from the Continent. an.d t~lC lln :l ~ rs~ lling of hom e goods, thus bnngll1g nUll to the class of market gardeners. . IV. i l . K empe, after deploring th e frivolity of th e last speaker on so serious a subject, said that th e market gardeners form ed but a small part of the British Nation, and it was absurd to allow th e convenience Or50 small a class to Qutwcirrh that, o f th,e g reat majority of the nati;n. ~esld es It . would be possible to place Import dl~tt es on these goods, and Lhus save Enghsh goods from being un dersold . t?.lIE. JYt'bs/t'1" then pointed out th e in co nslste,ncl es of tl.le last membe r's speec h. One ot th e chief a rguments for th e Tunnel was that goods co uld he imported more cheaply from the Continent. Consequently th c impos i~ion of duties would exactlr neutralise any advantage de rived fro,m It. As for the British character, ~ntons themselves arc qllite satisfied wilh It, and anyhow France was hardly a nation from whi ch one would choose to take lessons in morality. . Money and Galpin spoke against the motton, and Burdett in support of it.


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'5

A VERY CRIMINAL CASE. Ju~t on the border of my charge Iht~ r~ a rc a number of semi-independ ent PI~ llY states. The Darbar of onc (th ese , , ~ n lc robbe r ba ron s keep up th eir style) hi li

Ollt of supplies. Feudal icleas are still

III vogue, and every caste has some kind nl flc rvicc to perform; th e Bhangi shows II ... way to strangers. the Dhecl carries It.udloads, the potter keeping donkeys to 1.lrry his earth is the comm on carrier. o il was the potter wh o on his way back 11111 11 th e market town with th e sad ,s of ,. ~ i n and a small ne phew to help to drive ,III' don ke),s was set on by tw o me n wh o HII ~ I him in a desolat e part of th e track. Ilu'), paid no heerl to th e boy, who ran Itli all he was worth, and chan ced to run .. 11.t1 Kht on; in thal war he blundered II Il hin a mile into a vi llage in foreign II~" ito r)" whi ch boasted not only a police I.ll ion but also a particularly e ne rgeti c nUker in charge. wh o sent off his men at IIII('C and jumped on his pony as soon as II was saddl ed. It was so close that he I ill/l ei onl y tie with his champion mil er. Mt.n nwhil e the robbers had bagged a sack III rice, J 601bs. of it, and leaving the pull' r to nurse his broken h ead, put it .11 ross a stick and walk ed off with it. rlH' bag was heavy. th eir prog ress slow; Ihl')' were on ly quarter of a mile off wh en Ihl'/' heard the police and had to drop it ,lilt run. Our nearest station was six tltlks off and they did not expect foriegne rs III intervene. The Chi ef Constable. hippi ng a moment to ask th e potter

whi ch way they had gone. galloped after, an d half a mil e furth er on crossed th e river and saw two men. His champi on runn ers W('TC not fa r behind and they were arre-sted. No w this policeman was as [ have said e nergeti c : the refore he jumped to conclusions as he jumped on his pony, hasti ly, . It was now dark. but one of his me n had brought a lamp. By its ligli t he showed his prisioners to the potter. Imagine his di sgust wh en the potter said he could onl y remembe r one of them! But he was energetic: he energetically beat th e potter until he rememhered both faces quitl! well! He had no doubts and he was not going to let the potte r spoil his expl oit. [-}avi n~ now tim e to think he now fo und he ,\;as in ou r territory; so he call ed the nearest headman, handed over his prisioners for the night, and sent to Ollr Chief Co nstabl e to tak e over th e case. Then he went to take his well-f'arned slee p. Our Chief Constabl e turned lip at 7 or 8 a. m., and wrote do wn th e depositions and fi lled in th e charge-sheet. The n th ey picked up th e bag of rice and retired tv th e village to get some breakfast. Breakfast a pparently bucked up the prisoners, for one of them did a most annoying thin g. H e made a conression; "I'm all right, but t'other is a wron g 'un . So and so is your man," The Chief Constabl e was very sad ; all th e papers drawn up too. S4ch a pity to waste th em! However he had an enquiring


16

THE

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mind. H e se nt for th e man. Sure en,ol1 gh,. the ~ottcr recog ni zed him. Now, this C::'lIcf Constable was not energeti c. H e (hd not li ke the fag of wri ting all th ose pape rs again. So he sat dow n to t hink. W~l at he wanted was a conviction to swell his record, and he tho ught th e two \\-ho were caught red ha nded would b~ convicted: and he realized that if he sent up . the ri ght me n a ma OO'istrate would hCsllatc to convict on the bare word of th e potter that he recog nized th em I

supp ose the thought of the papers t u;ned the sca le. H e sent..up th e origi nal two. Unfortun ately he forgot to reckon

with the potter. He was a fairly honest n~an, a n (~ he, had bee n beaten ! Also he dId not !lve III th e lim its o f either Chief Constable's jurisdiction, and had no reason to ~ear them . So the whole story came out 111 co urt, and I sent for th e third man and ga ve the right pair si x month s each. Howeve r th e robbers !lot off on appeal. The appeal Cou rt did not see the {Jotter, and so held the evidence was not clear enough. .one man must have t urn ed aside in the nv~r bed an d the other was a culti vator :eturlll11g home late, who met the second Just as the C hief Constable came on th em!

POETRY. To K. S. C. The veteran warrior lays his arms away, Far from th e battles of a bygo ne day : The aged ki~lC browse ¡ont thei r last long eve, And far be~llnd the toils and ploughshares leave: Th e c rumbling hulk sinks lonely on the shore ¡Whe re storms and tem pests wake it never 1110;e : ~h e ru sting spear hangs idly in the Fane, No dreams of bloodshed troubl e it agai n : Y e~ ne'e r an age, grey hairs, or tott'ring knee, Ca n dun th e sunshine of my love for th ee !

" O. K. S." [cf: Prope rtius ii. xx v.

I

5.1


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THE

HINTS

FOR

CANTUARIAN.

SPORTS

'7

PRACTI CEo

I t is always a good thin g to ha ve pull you out ; this is especially useful when. YO ll wh ole di stance every day ; you run the are ru nnin g th e full distance. d!(k of overt iring and getting stiff. T wice, Always get your short practice ove r or at the most. thr ee tim es a week ought first, that is, jumping, sprinting, and 10 be quite suffici ent. hurdlin g. You cannot be abl e to jump The followin g arc L:onsidered good immediately after running three laps. di stances to use in practice :Hurdlers and jumpers would fmd two spikes in the heels of their runnin g sho es For the Mile : fro m 3 to 5 laps, with a great help ; they prevent slipping and occasionally I fast lap to increase ensure a good take off. your pace ; W'ith regard to train ing, do not think For the H alf-Mile : 600 yards; it necessary to make a ny chan ge in your For the Quarter- IVIile, 300 yards i diet, beyond the fact that it is not I,'or the 10 0 yard s : from 30 to 70 yards, desirable to stuff buns and pastry at a cid hours of the day. Regular hours, and with practice at getting off quickly. good plain meals is all that is necessarv, For the hurdles: practice ove r 5 hurdles; and this you get in your ordinary School run as hard as yo u can at the first life. hurdle without checking .

In practising for any race do not ntLcrnpt to run yoursel f out over th e someone runn ing with you to

SCHOOL NEWS. vVe most heartily congratulate Miss been with ll S now for seventeen years. a nd Gadd on her engagement to Mr. Charles we take this opportunity of thanki ng her Il em y Green, who holds a promi nent fo r all that she has done here, which has l)osition in the Goods D epartm~nt of the not failed to find full appreciation. Midland Railway at Derby, which was Iln nounced at the end of last holidays; lhc marriage is to take place at Whitsun- \ The School Sports are fixed for ti de. At the same time we cannot fail to March 19th and 20th . In addition to express our regret at losing one who has


THE

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these we are goi ng to have Sports against Dover College, o n Ap ril 3rcl.

T he Rev. Canon Page-Roberts ha s given t\\'O very interesting lectu res to hi s friends on K eats, 011 F ebruary 2" st and 26th. The Lecllncs wcrc g iven in the Par ry Library, and abo ut forty members o r the Sc hool were very kin dly permitted

I n s pite of the fact that His Grace the Archbisho p was unfortunate ly preve nted (rom visiting us this year by a bad attack of innuenr.a, he ha s ve ry kind ly askcd the H eadm aster (o r th t: customary whole holiday in hono ur of that event: it is to be added o n to the Mid s ummer ex eat.

On Sunday. F eb ruary 17th, the Sermon in tht~ School Chapel was preached by the Bishop of the Falkland Islanels.

" Magna cst ve ritas, et pracvalebit" is a fine saying. with which we heartIly sy mpathise. and which W I:! would willin gly believe if we co uld, but all investigatio n of sober fac ts ofu~n ~shows that its accuracy is open to doubt. An O.K .S. of lo ng standing was o nce asked by a member of the Sc hool if the tales told o f the School in hi s dav we re true . Be ing a strict adh erent of the tr uth he was obliged to admit that , th oug h t he majority wt;!re based a ll a foundation of truth , they had been exaggerated ont of all recognition. There co uld be no better exam ple of the idealizing po wer of memory than the legends of a public school. In them the boys are a ll represe nted as Stalkys, a nd th e masters as idiots of th e most a maz in g and un natural type. The ente rpri si ng yo uth who in time past sneaked behi nd a hedge, an d mad e himself sick with a c hcap cigar, is represented as a hero, adored by his companions, and regarded by the masters

with wo nder not unmi xed wi th fear. The com monpla ce and unintelli gent youth with a gift for cri cket is exalted into a hero of romance by late r generations, and is surrounded by a halo until he return s as an Old Boy, arrayed in mar vellous vcsturc. in company with othe rs like hi mself, when it is very soon di ssipated. If tht! popular hero wi shes to maintain his rt:!pm<:ltio n, let hi m not return to School in later days to disillusionize hi s worshippers. Even so is it with the history of the wo rld. If Achill es could return to us no w wc sho uld sec that he was but a rather dirty and un tidy sort of brigand, wh ose main aim in life was booty, and wh o spent th e tim e whe n he wasn't fighting some num erically inferi or e nemy. in refreshing hi s thirst with some boon compan ions at what was t he Greek equivalent for a public hou se. Pe ricl es would stand reveal ed as a typical London County Councillor with a mania for

to atte nd . %,y.~.,


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--- ------

wasting the ratepayers' money . .. And it is I'crtain that if we cO llld but VISIt Athe~lS II R it was in his day. our admiratio n for ~ts nrc h itectura~ beauties wO~lld be q~lte. cwershado wed by th e ObVIOliS fact tha,t the drainage was bad . The logical outcome of thi s idea .is that in the dim future our o wn age Will he cxalted into a fairyland of Roman ce, ,uld we ourselves shall be repre~~.nted as the" Supermen II dreamt of by NCltzsche. The petty quibblin O's of Mr. Balfour and Si r I-I. Campbell- Ba~nermal1 will be looked on by our descendants as a battle o( gi ants. Let us then follow the exampl e of the Roman Emperors. and slay those hair- splitters, who call them~~l~es scientific historians, and dare to CritICIse our greatness, by handing: down to poste rity the cold (acts of hi story. Let liS rather hestow our patronage o n poets li ke Cheste rton, who see a han so m-cab or a pillar-box through a haze 0\ roman~e, a nd who sec, beneath th e prosaic exte nor of the busincss man in his frock- coat. the spirit of his Viking ancesto rs. read)' to

leap forth upon his enemies in support ?f the Right. The ne wspaper" too .contalll a treasury of Ro mance. Imag me the fee lin gs of the Englishman of 1000 yca.rs hence on picking up a c.o py ?f th~ Dazl! Iliailof our day. To hun xlxth L.en ~l\I y Enrrland wo uld be a place wh ere c nme and viole-nee were still rife-wh ere every day afford ed some fresh .m.yst~T)r,. to deliO' ht and be wi lder the IInagmatIOn. Wh:t fee lings of awe and reve re nc~ would it not inspire in him for the li fe and politics of our time. "Vh)' tl~en shoul~ we despond if SUC t1 a future IS rese rvea (or us. VI/e at least shall not be a ble to clai m that we have lacked a sacre.d bard. for at th e prese nt day the marke~ !s overcrowded. with amateur bards VICIn g f~r th e honour of immor tali zi ng us. It IS poets such as these who show us that I~O aO'e, ho weve r prosaic, lacks a certall1 r~mance in th e eyes of future ge neration s, and ex plain Carlyle's remark that " History is a mi ghty drama,. enacted on th e theatre of inflllitude, with suns}o r lamps, and eternity as a back-ground.

O. K. S. This An nual Dinner too~ pla~e at the Monico Restau ~an t, P iccadilly Circus, o n Wednesday, Jan uary 16th, a nd pa~s~d off most successfully under the ab le chairmanship of lVIr. Frank \-Vacher.

D I NNER . There we re fi fty-five O. K.S. prese nt a better numbe r than we have had for a good man y years-and it was a thoroughlr representative gathering, the dates represented ranging from 1845 , when Canon


20

THE

CANTUARIAN.

Marshall Wild came to the School , down to several of those who le ft the School only last summ er. After din ne r, a sho rt Toast List was gone through, which was interspersed with a few songs by the Rev. A. W. Woodruft, iVIessrs. B. H. Latter, and G. F. Olive. but it seems strange that out of 55 O.1<.S.. there should have been no one capable of reading an accompaniment to a song. The Rev. L. H. Evans also kindly gave a recitation. The Chairman gave the loyal toasts wh ich were du ly honoured, and then Gene ral Chapman proposed "Floreat Schola RCp'ia," and told some amusing stories about the School in the sixties, showi ng th e advances that have been made since then. The H tad i\'faster responded and told the company of the doings of the School during the past year, and of the variolls distinctions gained. both in the scholastic and athletic world. He also gave an account of the progress of the rifleshooting.

The Rev. L. H . Evans th en proposed the health of ., The Chairman" in a witty speech, pointed with quotations, and i\Tr. Frank ,"Vacher replied, remarking on the pleasure it had given him to preside on suc h an occasion. The last toast of the evening. which not, however, on the program me. was that o f The Secretary, proposed by lVIr. H . E.. Morice, and respOI.l.ded to by that official. \~a s

Altogether a vcry succtssful evening was spent, and it is to be hoped that th e increa!)ed attendance-largely du e to the excellent numb er of Oxford O.K.S. present-may be an omen for the future, for th ere can be no doubt that these meetings hel p to keep O. K.S. in touch with the School, an d deserve at least an effort to attend 011 the part of those who live in town or within easy reach of it.

V ALETE. D. L. Robert son, J. W. Lewis, C. M. Morris, B. L. Rigdcn, A. W. E. Guttentag, N. A. iVIceking, T. Byron, D. G. Fraser.

J.

Lamb,


THE

"

CANTUAR IAN .

O. K. S. NEW S. \Ve hear with much regret th~t J. R. Parsons, who was to have taken hl.S F1Il.~1 Schools at Oxford this year, IS laid lip with sciatica ~t the ~cland .Homes. This will necessitate hiS stay mg up another year at College in order ~o t~ke his Schools. 'vVe heartily sympathise With him over such a piece of bad luck.

I-Jiti Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury, at the Chr i ~tmas Ordination.

BIRTH .-On Feb. 13th. at ClOllmo~c, Carminia Road, Balham. S.~'V., th e WIfe of the Rev . E. J. Janson-SJ1uth, of a son. .;:.~...\

.;.;. * * O . [3, Parsons has been playing hockey this season for Devonshire. *-x.-x. We congratulate the following on rowing in th cirTorpids at Oxford: H ..P. V . Towncnd (St. John'S), V. L. ArmItage R. B. Winser (Corpus ( Balliol n .\ Christi), A: W. Sanson (Lincoln), ~nd N. E. Smith (Keble). St. John sand Balliol II. were particularly successful.

The Rev. Vl. H. IVIaundrell WaS ordained Priest at Lambeth Palace, by

.;;'-;,.';:'

====== OXFORD LETTER. D..:AR SCHOOL, Our numbers still increase yearly. till it seems as though. in the near fUlur?, Y S Meetings will have to be held lIl. th'c \..¡T~wn Hall j the. ordinary .College room is rapidly be~otnl1lg too SllMll for a well attended Meeung.

o

There are now, we believe, only five 'olleges unblessed by the I?rc~en.se of one of our noble throng, while til l\..ebl~ we 5 0 swarm that it is said" the O.~.S. were given in as a toast at a recent dinner Lhere held.

The Keble half-back line at Hockey, by the way, is con~posed en l ~re ly of O.K.S.-Hl1yshe, Olive, and :,t~ahan, while N. E. Smith rowS for them lIl. th e Torpids. Other oarsmen. are Townend tSt . John's), who is pursulllg a car~er ?f victory at the rate of o~erlap l1l. . 'SIX strokes bump in eight, Armitage (BallIol), Winser' (Co rpus) who, with his old reg~rd for his comforts takes his sweater WIth him in th e boat, and Sarson. The last has changed from abuser. to abusee, <:n~ now rows bow in the Lmcoln TorpId. let us hope that he gets as good as he gavf:: .


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Am ong O Uf H ockey-players we count Spafford .-who has returned to us afte r for two years di sporting himself as" something in the city," Bax, Dibben, and Parsons, who, howeve r, is now on th e sick-li st .. It is impossible to place Bovcnschen Il1 anyone sport as we hear that he assiS,ts his College in a lt. ext.:ept only on the nver, and eve n there most mi ghtil v . with voice and rattle. '~'ickham ,

. Olive, Wickham, a nd BnnsicyRl chards .represent us on the runnin g grou nd , O li ve, Strahan. Mosse. a nd Adam s a re our co ntinge nt to the canse of National Defence. Mosse and Budd are our cam in '" doctors: wh en th ey come too-cther the~ speak an unintelligible jargo~. they are e ngaged in the laborato ries all da\', and their room s a rc li ttered with loathso m(; remains. They also di splay an unh oly passion fo r operating on their unfortunate friends .

H uyshe has come out as an orator and is. now president of a debating So~iet\' . RIchards rants at th e Union a nd we believe Ada ms lifts up his "oice at various deba tin g Societies. Olive is Secretary to the Kcble Musical Society, and has ,11~ad e¡ a promisin g d ~ but as d step dancer. I ow nend spends hiS spare time writing poetr~-not for pl.lbli c~tion-and de vising ne w ties of startlIn g hues for the vario us clubs to whi ch he belongs. There lately

appeared in the 'Varsity (a local rag) a poem signed V. L. A., but we have not enquired furthe r into its ori gin. So much for the arts: in the se verer realm s of pure intellect we ex pect a first thi s term from E. A. Roper in Honour Moderations, and two more next ter m, fro m Bove nschen in greats, and from Wickha m in Law (if only it were Bridge I). Of our oth er me mbers th ere is not much to relate . All we believe are flouri shing, bu t the ir exalted heads do not obscure th e fir mament, after th e mann er of the Keble contingen t. Scott plays tennis occasiona.lly, bei ng de barred from a ll other games b)' a weak heart, and gives quiet (?) little evening parties at Merton. If yo u want to fi nd !\1aclear inqu ir(' at the Union. We have bee n glad to welcome Tulloch a nd T om lin here thi s term: th e first was here on business for a few davs but fo und time to look some of li S up . . , T !)c scco nd is at prese nt engaged in countl'j: frol1.1 th e military a nd a bIcycle.

s ll ~veYll1g. th e POlllt of VIe w,

Best lu ck to th e School in a ll things. Yours, O.K.S. OXON .


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

23

CORRESPONDENCE. N. fl.-The Editors decline to auept any rupousiMlit), cOII-IICeted 1uitlz tIle oPiJ/.iollS oj ~/tei~' COrl·upon · denis, N ame and address mu st abuays 1M give//., /lot m:eessariiJ, lor pl/Obm/10lt, /lut as a /j uatantee of good faitlt. PCI sonalities 1vlll £ltvo/ve a rta/11 ,·ejeetiolt. Lettcrs shol//(/ /I, 1I)I'illm oJ/. Olle side of the papc1' onl),.

7'0 Ihe Ed/tors

of

<I

TH E CANTUARTAN."

Now that we shall soo n be thi nking or the Sports, I should like to say a rew words on the subject of entries. I think we shall all agree that a field of only thret! in th e open quarte r is not what we should expect from a Public School of our size and standing. I t is true that bad weather and infl uenza interfered with the practice last year, hut perh aps some of us are inclin ed to regard the Sports as run ~or tl~ e bc ne~t. of a limited' num ber of pn z(:! -wmn t: rs; HI S not ull comm on to hea r the remark, .. It is no good my go ing in, I ha~e no chance of winning." If so, we mISS allogetht:r th e val ue a nd importance of Sports. No one. whether he gets his colours or not, will dcny the lIse. of foot ball, .l:ricket, ~nd hoating. It IS the same WIth athl etiCS :

they are a regular form of our school O'ames and should be encouraged as ~lI ch . 'and everyone who takes a little care ' ove r his ·practice and tr aining, is improving his pace and staying pO\~er, developing his body, and belter fittm g himself for his othe r school games, even if he fails to win a pri ze on the day of the Spo rts. It may be ad mi~ted that for ma~y, prrtctising for Sports IS not very attractIve and owinO' to our climate is often carried on undet adverse conditions. yet let lI S not fo r th ese reasons undervalue its art, but hope for a good number of entri<:::.s, anel not only entries, but those who. Will turn out fo r practice and run on the day, \Ve do not want a programme full of entries with few starters. 0 .1<. 5.


THE

CANTUAR IAN.

NOTICES. We

beg

to

acknowl edge

with

G. C. Ryley ( 10/ 6). Rev. G. N. Fi nn (7/-), A. W. ~al1lmell. Esq . 17/-). G. B. Cockrem, !;sq. (3/6), F. G. T easdal e. Esq. H . E. H . Hayes. Esq. (5/-). J. Shar- (3/ b ). Rev. H. J. Mo wll. ( 10/ 6). C. F. man. Esq. (3/b). R. W. Mannering'. " sq . Sturgeon. Esq. (J/6). A. Gi ll ibralld. Esq. (3/ 6). W. L. E . Reynolds, Esq. (3/ b ), (3/ 6), GIbbs & Sons (7/-). Miss HutchinRev. H. A. D. PereIra (3/6). A. K. Mowll, son (3/ 6). T. R. Graty. Esq. (3/6). A. D . Esq. (7/-). F. M. Furl ey. Esq . (3/6). Rev. D. Spafford, Esq . (3/6), A. G. Blackford, H . H. H. Boys (7/-). Rev. F. H. Hall, Esq. (3/6). Rev. W. H . Maundrell (3/0). (7/- ), P. H emer.\'. E sq. (J/6). T. Dixon, Co lonel Trueman (i /6). E. Finn, Esq. Esq . (7/-). F . Cremer. Esq. ( 37b). Mrs. (3/6). K. S. Smith. Esq. (3/ 6). T . D. Hl chens ( 14/-). Mrs. B10re ( 14/ - ), Rev. DIxon . Esq . (3/ 6). M. Ware. E sq. ( .l Ib). thanks

the

receipt of the followi ng

subscriptions :-

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. ~Ve beg to ac kn owledge with thanks the reCclpt of the fOllowin g contemporaries:_ . Glena/Illond Chrome/e, Carlh1tSlfl1l (2), Eflzabelhalt (3), St. Edwm'd's School CllromC/, ( l ). 111'!Yll1a'l ( l ). Blu, (l), Swan, County Genlicmw ( 5). l eodmsia1l,

llro~J/sl{,.ovi(lJJ . Easlbotfnf.iall ( 2), Lily, F el . s/e(~mJl (2). W',Jl1JCm , .e:Y:onia1J., PLYlllollziall â&#x20AC;¢ Bng/lloll College llfagazine, King's Scl/oot Pan'amalla Jl1agazillC, K elly Colli!ge C Itroll':. cI~, .qu'hberl/aJt~ La~lCi1tg College l}(fagazt'nc, Billion, f.')lS / lorllllgM()I (4), Jlfaivernirl1l .

Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Palace S treet , Canterbury.


\

THE VOL. VI I.

CANTUARIAN. MA RCH.

Igo7.

NO.2 .

EDITORIAL. Those ev il spirits th at ever infest the gloomy darkn ess of the Easter Te rm have not failed to g ive us our due share of th ei r delight~ . Snow and rain. frost and c? ld, have paid us thei r usual visits, and have lin ge red WIth us longer than we coul ~1 wlsh . Their un fai lin g companion influe nza has swooped ,do~vn upon us ,and ,earn ed off many luck less victim s, cuttin g short their hopes of wllll1mg fame by vlctones whether in the Sports o r in the Boat Races . Those who have escaped the ravages of thi s dread sco urge , have pract ised unceasingly on a wind-swept fi eld to fit themselves for the gr~at tnals o f th e r~ce. On th e appointed day many of those who dared to enter the li sts and fight agalllst fury of the c leme nts, al most thought the ir last day had co me, as th~y struggled despairing ly 11, battling with the wind and longing fo r t~ e end. It a l~n ost seems as if th e gods of the weather released the fury ~f the wm ds on ly, to spIte our poor e fforts, for now they arc Sli nk to rest, and we bask 111 summer, sun shIne" Now a~l the agonies of SporLs arc over save for the chosen few who sttll Illlls t stn ve to gam by


26

THE

CANTUARIAN.

victory over Ou r riva ls the g lory whi I1 th I may seek relaxation from Our toil an d ~ oy t lcmselves have won. The rest of us violent exertion s. (evote ourselves to less a rduous tasks and less

f '-

vVe mlls t express th e most sincere S 'm th' S . h,or serio us illness, and with the H ead t p~ . IC.~ ~. t I? cho~ 1 w~th IvIrs. Galpin in as C1 111, t 1c cll1XlCty which It has caused him. 1 he eagerness with whi ch the memb rs parts of the sc hool hasten to read • Il<? t on r o~ th e school-house, but of other . I ~e dally bulletlll s of her condition, is a clear proof of the way in' which Mrs G of everJ'one that tl, e ,',n 0 • t<~ pI111 has endeared herself to all. It is th e hOI)e < pr vem en 111 l cr cOll ert' .I " mar SOo n be well e nOlJO"h to be a'n t 1,1011 rnaJ )C ma1l1tal.ned and that she o , ongs liS agalll .

l\i

tf

L

RIFLE

SHOOTING.

. A Match look place between the Sci I' I I C . fhu rsday, March 21 St . As thi s is th e fir 100 <l~l ~ tl ~ an terbury Rifle Cl ub on has engaged in, the restllt record ed bel~~" n;atch th.n ? Ith c: of th~ competing teams team con tained a few Voluntee r shots s not a litt le Interesling. The C.R.C. weakened by th e necessity und er whi lwher;as Ithe School .te.am was co nsiderably se \ ~ra of the on g.mally . sC.lected team laboured of preferrin g th e Sick R oom t~ see how very fe w of th e members o f tl I ,a;lg~. It \\ ~S (hSapPOintl ng to me to Shooting Eight a good se nd-off on th .1.C fi c 100 tl l 0 1l~!lt Jt ne~~ssary to g ive their were - seven shots and one siO'"htin ~11 rst maLc 1. I h~ COJl(htIOIl S of th e Match open sights allowed H P S,., g lOt at 25 yard s. With team s of eight: on ly ("H. Townshend 30,' f. S: Y~te~4~CaPt~~;~~/.~. - 5'~~,C,C 22? j King's School, 225 . h. E. R. Dalwigk 28, ·B. Crowl ey 28 CB S' Q, . • Ow,'" 29, D. O. Fardell 28, . ' . . "neo n ' 7, G. Sp,c kenell ,6). I t IS already known, but has never b . r , Mr. A. S. Kcttclwcll has offered two P', ~ec n lann Ollll (;cd III The Call/uarian, that c?mpeted fo r every ear. Our be nzes Or t Ie enco urage me nt of s hoot in g, to be klll(! o ffer. Th e JUI~or Cham ionS!hf~a~:~s are . du e to Mr. Kette'w~1l fo r his very SenIOr Cham pionsh ip fell th rOlfO'"h fa I ~ s last term won by Gal plll, an d as the consented to the Prize for tJl"lt °co r t~~nous :casOlls, i\ 1r. Kette lwe ll m o~t kind ly ma rks o n th e T erm's TUllior C':ISS F~i~~ 1I1~1 fjo lE!f to til{' boy who scored high est next the Se nior C hanipions hip 'will 0'"0 t~ th .. 11~ , n~f wa s o n by !?enn e. I n Jull' SCOre all 30 p ra cti ces fired fr om "'S - t be 0) \\ lO n! ~1 es the. highest aggregate condi.tions will be ann Olln ce d later. ~e e~n er tf July. ,I h,e }tlllIor C hampion ship th e kind oflc r of Prizes whic h will be d ~ . la.v~ I a so to tllclnk .iV.rr. Fran k \Vacher for W . . eCI( C( )y op en com petitIOn during next term. e are th us assnr:cd of s igna l enco uragement fro", "'lll,ol,l. It on ly remain s

\hS

I

l?

,'k


T HE It It

CANTUA IUAN.

to show our a ppreciation of this kind ness by stead il y and seriously working A great improvement . has been made in the ar rangements under is conducted. The out-door range is open t wo days a week and as IHU II), as 50 p ractices can be taken in one hour, Shooting is quite properly part III the School curriculum, and those who are responsible for thi s branch of Ollr \\ ol'k have so far left no SLOne un turned in their efforts to put the Shoo tin g on a IhOl"o ug hly efficient basis. It would be a matter of the d eepest personal regret to 1111 ' ir those efforts were stulti fi ed by any s how of slack ness or any want o f appreciaIl nll o f the duty whiCh Publ ic Schools owe to the cause of national defence. â&#x20AC;˘ I wi sh publicly to record my sincerest thanks to Yates and Spickernell for the "'III'k that they have done as Assistant Range Officers. Their duties have been HIII ' rous and the-ir zeal ind efati gable . To Mr, Rosenberg. too, we owe a debt o f Ihll nks. H e has bl~en in constant attendance in th e Gym nasium every day after dilute r, and the improvem ent in the Shooting is ill no small measure due to hi s I Ilr..rul coaching. Last Term a few of our best shots had the great advantage of firing a few " IIcti ccs on th e :M ilitary butts with the Service Rifle. In th is privilege we were udllbtcd to Co lo nel Thompson who has j ust retired frolll the command of the II! Dragoon Guard s, and to whom the School owes much. We wish him , with IlI t'erc fep-lings of gratitud e, a long and happy period of reti rement. We have now had o'ne year' s experience in ou r Ri fle Shooti ng, with a good dl'1I 1 of necessary chopping and changing. 1 hope, however, that next term wi ll sec , I4t1Li lcd permane nt scheme of organ isation. C. W. B. li S

IlI ti practising. II hle h shooting

l

FOOTBALL. KING'S SCHOOL v. MR. G. B. COCKREM'S XV. This match was played o n Cull en's g roun d on Thursday, February 21St, ill .1 1'llth cr which was fine, thou gh cold. Th e opposin g team which was brought down 1111 1 captained by 1\'fr. G. B. Cockrem, him se lf an O.1(,S., was to have included such Ih llt-class playe rs as Mo rgan and Lee. As it was, it was suffi ciently overpowering ,~ lI h the additio n o f Stri nge r, the Kent three-qua rte r. The School team, which jllllY 'd remarkably well, considering t he scarcity of the ir practice owing to the long 111111 of cold weather, and the strength of the opposing team, included Mangin, \ lIlth cson and .Miller, who replaced Dunlop, who had left, and Gent and Burdett " ho we re out of schooL Our opponcnts pressed hard fr om the start, scoring a try


THE

CANT UARIAN.

in the fi rst three minutes. For the next twenty minutes they were almost continually over our twenty-five and sco red, but did not convert a second try. About tt;I1 minutes before half-time th ere was a brilliant rush by the School which landed them well over our o ppone nts' twenty-five, but owing to the exertion s of their back, we werO preve nted from scoring. Close upon half-time our op po nents scored a try owi ng to a magnificent r Ull by Strin ger. which, however, they failed to convert. During the fi rst twenty minutes of the s~co nd hal f some useful work was clone by the School forwards, culminating in a bri ll iant bout of passi ng by Gardner and Gosset, wh ich res ulted in a try for the School, converted by Abbott. Anothe r try was scored for our oppo nents by Strin ger whose play throughout was magni licent.The School team playf!d up very well, a nd made an adm irab le resistance. Especially conspicuous by its excellence was the work of the ha lves, an d Abbo tt's tackling and kicking was th e best we remem ber ever having sccn of his. The gam.e resulted in a win for th e opposing team by 4 tries to a goa l. 8cllool Tealll:-L. P. Abbott (back); H. Mang in, L. J. Bassell, K iVIoore, B. H. Matheson (three-quarters); H. Gardner, H. H. E. Gosset ( halves) ; C. J. Willia mson, E. T. Gage, A. L. B. Thomson, C. M. Dunlop, J. R. Madge, C. W. Hunl, H. F. Reynolds, E. K. Barber, G. E. Miller (forwards ). .

TUTOR SETS,

FOOTBALL. - 1907.

This year Tutor-Set games were playcd under very rail' conditIOns, both of gro und and weather. Mr. Evans' gained th e shi eld, having wo n 4 games anel d rawn I, scorin g '79 points to 8. Mr. Mason's wero eq ual with them as regards games, bu t in points were' ' 7 to 3. Many exciti ng stru ggles were seen, notably the one betwee n Mr. Mason's and Mr. Evans', in which Burdett sco red fo r Mr. l\lason 's in the first half, and Merrett scored for Mr. Evan,:;' just on the call of tim~ . Quite a surpri se was ca used by Mr. Latter's. dra wing with Mr. Cape's, bu t perhaps Gent would ha ve turned the scale in favour of his side, had he not been slightly stunned in th e fi rst half, and so took no further part in th e play. Mr. Evans' seem 1'0 have a liking for making the largest score in one game; this yca r they beat 1\Ir. Dell's by 66-0, and so ach ieved a feat they have been known to do before. Mr. Mason 's serum was all-powerfu l on a wet day, and this reason no doubt enabled them to beat Mr. Cape's br ] 5-0. Mr. Mason's have only lost twO matches during the last three years. which is 11 remarkable record, but as th ey never have been a heavy scoring side, they are gene rally beaten for first place on points. All the


\

THE

'9

CANTUARIAN.

. . S G d 1 I' especially being a tower of I'()lours worked h:ud for theIr va.nou~ ~tSI ~al~:s Taylor at full-back for Mr. ~rcngth to his side. Of those 111 t'le . ower d' Martin made a promising rance in Rugby football . Allsten's, played well, and shoul? be usefu l S01!le . ay. 116bllt as fl]lI ·back for ..Mr: ~!{~son Sb Flf~~;/~:'l h~f'l:t;~t~~~.ea Crowther at half, played ~hl'wcd up well, and IS Itkcl) J~ c1 ~ k' losi nO' Goad who piavcd a sOllnd game II plucky game. M~. Be!II'~ I~~l 'l~I'(tl OU~ u gl:~IY des~rved (tl;cir win" Below is a table IIKainst Mr. !\lason s. hi 1 . ~vans '1 r III' points :-

..,w \ •, OJ

\ .j

I

w

,w

~

w

'8.

·5

~

~ ,-U"~ -...,"- -----_.. - x--- ._15 36 41 2' 3 i:\l r. Mason's 1 -_.--------23 :;8 66 F , t 3 x ~~~\ -i\'lr. Bell's

0

49

x

0

0

5

3

- 0- - - x - -L.'1ltcr's - - --0 9 Mr. _.- - - -13-----0 x 18 0 3 0 Mr. Austen's -- - - -;-- -- -- -- --- x \I

l\ lr. Cape's

:

0

51

13

44

5

FINA L ORDER.

\____ ~e_'_____ ~j.

Played. __

I IVo/1 Lost. ,Dnmm. --- 10 4

~~~ I

t

Mr. Evans'

L. P. Abbott

5

~ [ r \i,\son's

C. G Wi lli,lImuLl

5

4

0

1

] 17

Z.

Mr. Cape's

5

2

2

1

11 3

5

,

2

I

1

33

109

5

1

4

I

0

21

105

0

8

159

4· 5· .

6.

... H. Gardner

..

... L. J. Bassetl ... ... Mr. Austen's ... E. T. Gage .. C. J. N. Adams ... Mr. Bell's

Mr. Latte r's

5

0

5

I

:

3

I

51 \


-_ 30

THE

...

-~+

LIST OF O )/)(I/I(II ( S.

Th., " 1'11. , " Th. , " Tu., " Th., " W., "

23 25 31

7

\Y.,

"

21

Til.,

I>

13

Th., " Tu., "

i Remit.

F IR ST

Mr. A. Laller's xv. '" .... . Canter bury

11 Rev. W.I-J.Mallnd reIPs ." \'. C allterbury 16 S utton Valence School .~ ".. S ulton ..... 18

Sal., Nov. 3 W.,

MATCHES

Ground.

1906.

Th., Oct. 4

CANTUARIAN.

15 20

Tu., " 27 Th. , Dec. 20 1907· SaL, Feb. 2 Th., " 14 Sat.. " 23 Th. , " 2 1

XV.--· L osl Lo t W~1l

7th Dragoon Gua rds .. ".. ". . C WycCollegc . .... ,.. . ,,\~nterbury Lost Dover Colic .. . ye.. .. .. Lost Merchant T ge ... ... .... .. .. , Canterbury f WOIl Hyt he F.C.aylors' School . Canterbury I Won Dover ColJcg~' ::: ......... . H ythc .. ··· ·1 \Von S utton Valence School ' " gover b··· .. '/' Lost 7th Dragoon Gunrds an ter lIry \Von Eastboumc C I Cant erbury Lost 0 lege .. . Eastbourne Wo n IVyc College C , Epsom College·.. ·· ··· ·· ..... . antcrbu l'Y Won OKS ..... .. . Heckenham WOIl . . . .. . .. .. . Canterbu ry W all

Ifythe F.e. I-IampsteacI\V" 'd'" ... ..: .... Sideup F.C.. fin crers l· .C. G. B. Cockre·l· .. ··; .. · ~.. ··· .. 11 , Esq. s xv.

II

Cante r bury A.bnd. Canterbury Won canter burYI Abnd. Canterbury Lost

'1906. SECOND XV. Th .,Oet. 25 Dov ' C II Th N el' 0 ege 2nd x v .. . .. . Dover ...... WOIl 1

w::

W

ov. 7 TOllhridge School 3rd xv.. canterhu ry/ Lost

Dovcr CoHcge 2nd xv...... Canterbury Won " 1> 21 Tonbridge School 3rd xv.. T onbrido e L o"t T u,' Dec. J 1 SA C .,. " , , ........ , ............. .. , Canter bury Abne!.

----'--

Alatr.hes Played,

"

"

1St

XV. '7 ,'

2nd "

4 ;

F 0 0 T B ALL

W.

Olt,

"

10; 2 ;

Lost, 7.

For,

A¥ aitt,J/,

I=T.O=~

~I .z:.·'~ 1"',,/,. c,~ ~ !:Ei''!:;

J

3('1")/

1

j , , I I

2(lpcn.)

3

~

i --5 3

2

3

I

,. ..

3

25 34 '9

•, -•

-

.. ...... .

-

00

,

8

2

5

...

-

4

,

-,

3

-•

-

-

..... ..... ... , ..... ".

-

i

I

,

-

3 6

I

2

8

5 6,

"

9 8

....... .... .. . .. ... .

32

8

:~

-

5

8

35

~

-

.-

.. , ... . ,. . .. .,. ..,

"""

I

!

3 ,

2 -,

20

5

2

:I

6

-,

32

5 I

..

5 38 5

4

."; "'" ', " ,.

-

2. '0

-

2

6 22 40 '0

----

-

'2

4 " ' .

'7

"

, ... . "

;

Powls, for, 306 : agal1tst, 172.

2.

RET R 0 S P E CT

"

..

10 1;

"

32.

19 0 6 _ 7

I he pasl season has been a v r ' '. • ac tual rccord of res ult!i doe!i not lo~kY s~~cessfttl a nd !i<ltlsfadory onc. Thotwh the 7. defeats as agai nst I l win..; a nd d ef:~t= ~o g~od a~ , kl!il Season's, viz .., I 0 \Vi~lS and I!) t~e b(~st all-round side thal th~ Seho ,'I ve. h<!Ve httl e doubl that lhls year's team ment an d was 110t depend ent upon tl ' b ~l" las eve r had . !t was singularly level in If Ie n Idllce of any particular star we analyse the res ults shortl I I . Y we s la I fi nd that the two heaviest defeats we rt!


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

31

III th e ha nd s of the scratch teams at the very beginning of the season. Two of the IIlhcr defeats were inflicted by the 7th D ragoon Guard s. whose immense weight prevented our forwards from ever contromng the scrums, though they played a plucky Kft ille an d stood plenty of kn ockin g abo ut. ' Vye College beat us once wh en the II'alll was diso rganized by th e abse nce of se veral players, and a Guy's Hospital XV. \\filS too good for li S. The remaining de feat was recei ved in the return wit h OUf old !ivals at Dover, and was due to a remarkabl.v fin e display of tackl ing by the College whi ch reversed ulterly the result of the first malch played only a fortnight before, whi ch we had won in hollow fashion. Of lhe victo ri es, the most g ratifyi ng were those Over 1\1erchant Taylors. 1':lIl'1 tbourne College, Epsom College. Sutton Valence (twi ce), and the first match with Dover before-me ntioned, L. P. Abbott is to be heartily congratulated and Ihanked for these pleasing res ul ts, due in no small degree to his keenness and Hl\Ile ra l management, The secret of the success has lain, we think, in a n increasin g pe rception of the pOHs ibilities of the game whi ch has manifested itself i.n a marked way. There is !lI ore resource and origina li ty. an d playe rs have not been afraid to take ri sks. I,'urth er, th e tackling has on the wh ole been good, and the forward s played i good hUHtlin g game which often disorgan ized their opponents, whil e th e backs we re quick lu take advantage of any such disorgan ization. Some of the passing has been I' j'(' llent-for instance. hetter combination than wa~ show n at times in the match IH" inst Epsom one does 110t wish to sec. Another g ratifying fcature of the season WII H t.he fact that th ere was the keenest competition for the last few places in the Il l il~ l. and there were ce rtainly two fo rwards who could not find a place in it, but \~ li n would have been quite good enough to have got easily in to most of the teams II I r('cent years, One tempted to say, in the stock phraseology of articles of this nature, that where a ll did so well it would be invidious to particularize," but we feel it only " Mhl lo give a special word of praise to Abbott's clever ki ckin g, to th e centres for llin vigour and absence of hesitation which marked their moveme nts, to Thomson lill his all-ro und excellence as a forward , and tv the ha lves for the success with whi ch dl, jY adapted themselves to their new positions. Perhaps never before have we had wn halves who understood one another so well, and while Gard ner natura lly showed 1I10re conspicuously as he ge nerally stood back, the work of Gosset was desc rvin g â&#x20AC;˘ j,y ry bit as much praise. AN regards points. it may be noted that we scored 306 as against , 72 by our 1IIIIo nents, an d of t he latter no fewer than 7 1 we re made in the two sc ratch matches hll'll opened the season. Full BaCK. 1'. AOlloTT- (Captain).-His fie lding and kicking have again been .excellent, while hi s tacklin g has improved. Has kept his team together very well, and set them a very good example in keenness.

is

"\1


32

L.

THE

J.

CANTUARIAN.

Three-quarter }Jacks. rather va ri able, but has improved a good deal both in pace and skill, whi le he is learning to hand off strongly, Good tackl er and very rair ki ck.

BASSETT.-

!S

](, iHOORR,-Iias " come on" a lot. Hands oil' vcr)' powerfully and doe~ not ~Iip up so often as he used to do. Good tac kl er and has improvecl in ki cki ng. C. 1\1". DUNLOF.-Very useful wing, with pace which he has learnt to use. H as also a good swerve whi ch too k him through Some sides in a remarkab le way. Very fair tackler. R . M. GENT.-Promising wing. Plays a very plucky game and uses his head. If he ca.n put on more pace and learn to nUl rOllnel more instead of doubling in so often, he ough t to be good next year.

Haif Backs. taken to the new position ve ry kindly and promises to be very good. Kicks well and often goes thro ugh cle verl}" bu t must learn not to check so much before givi ng his passes. Very go od tackl er. H. H.' E. GOSSET.- Has partnered Gardner admirably. His best work is spoiling the opposing halves, but he coul d also open up the game vety well. Strong, and takes a lot of holdin g, also tackles well. H.

GARDNER.-Has

Fonvards. C. G. WILLIAMSON.-The heavy-weight of the pac k. improved on last year. E. T . GAGE.-Light but fast forward. up well.

He is still very slow but has

Uses his feet cleverly and tackles and foll ows

H. M.]. BURDETT.-Vcry useful forward, particularly in the open. Follows lip well, a nd when the bac ks arc in motion is ge nerally th ere for a pass. A. L. B. THoMsoN .¡-Perhaps th e pick of th e forward s. Docs plenty of work in thf' scrum, tackles wcll, and is ve ry smart wi th his foot-work. 1. R. MADGE.-\Vas tried as a forward solely because of his excellent tackling, and has fully justified the trial, having developed into a good playe r in that position. C.

V".

HUNT.-Very useful forward-is fas t and plays a real hard game. pluckily.

Saves very

H. F . R EYNOLDS.-Like Madge, was put fo rward as his tack ling was invaluable and there was no room for him ou tside. In his case too the experim ent was fully justified. E . K. BARBER. -Ve ry good out of touch and has com(' on remarkab ly all round during the Eilste r Term.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

GYMNASTIC

33

COMPETITIONS.

. .. The New Boys' and Under 1 6 CompetltlonS :vere I1eld in the Gymnasium o n Monday March I I tho The results were as follows . lVew, B lljIs. -I\-[axi mulll 60 j I , G. Byron, 47 .,Z, W. C . Fry, 47: . M . A. CI1appell ' 22' 2 D I-I. Cowle,5 0. {JudeI' 16.-Maximum, 70 ; I , " I' I C I I Onslow The Opcn Competition was h(' IIc on u11 fie' Ia),' .March 15t1 , Wl cn a one \(' I'Y kindl v acted as judge. . The followin g is t he tabl e o f· marks :.

-•

~

~

---"..

(:0 ~ sct

- - rtllgin

" - - -II \Lghes, i.

...

d:

-j

N

Sc

,

.§2

i ,

- -

91

9

N

9,

9

9~

-"

N

:. 1- 8 -

-

N

.:g" , fj --

- 1-

...

I I ellt

:r:

--

,

•a.0

g:, .S

'"

-- -

9.

8~

= 99~

'"

- -

9

9

9

9~

9

~

8,

9

=95.

9.

9

9

9

= 94'

9

9.

8

9~

9

8.

8~

8

8

8,

8,

9

8,

7.

9.

7,

8

9

71

8

7.

7.

8

8

6

8

9

8

9

9

9

7.

7.

9

7

8~

6~

7.

8

--7

9~1

8

7

5,

7

6

4.

5,

3

8,

9

-

---------=9 2 ,

-- -- --- - -- -- - - --

I9

- - - - - - - -- - - ...

0

N

-_. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _._--

- -- II unt

,

•~

-

9

--- -- - - - - - - -- - -- homson

N

6,

9

-

= 91,

- - - - - - - - --- --- - 8

8

=83

- ---- - - - ---- -- - - -- -- - - -----V rde, i.

6

- - - - -- ------ -- crrich

4

6

4

°

8,

6,

7.

=74

--- - - - - - - - - - I

=60

nslow after expressing his At th e co nclusIOn o~ tl~e CompetlliOn c~~l~~~~la?ed th~ eight competitors on y ,!lmpath with Mrs. Galpm Il~ ~er Il~h;CS~, rms ~o the capability of Staff-Sergeant m t It'ir perrormanc~ and. ref~rre 11 ug 11nrfed bv. wishi ng th e School pair good luck Wi lliamson and 1115 assistants. ~ e conc li t Aldershot.


, THE

CANTUARIAN.

POETRY . Sun set oV('r the di stant hill , Sunset over the sea Drifting clouds in the' fire-lit West And the sou~l(l of a great, great sea at rest And the sigh of the wind so free. Gleam of gold on a c rested wave Glint of a passing sail .' Glory of light over sea a;ld land. Over the cliffs and the rock strewn semel , An d down in the distant vale.

Twili~l.lt g loom in the great dee p woods, TWIlIght over the hill ~Fai~tly the sou~d of an' eveni ng bell folhng the day s departing kn ell , Silence,-a world is sti ll.

ATHLETIC

SPORTS.

Th e Annual Ath letic Sports were held 0 11 th St t , G r March 19th, and Wedn esday, March 20th. On ~ot'll' (I a·l\~' rteln ce JrOtllld on f ue sciay, . d bt l I ' < ys lo re was a strong crossln tl ,lie t ~ e Iw~~thl e rs was brI g h t an d sunny and the g ro und was in excel lent co nditio ;l . n 10 Irs (a) e ports were co ncl ud ed we ll wi th in the stated tim e but on the second day there was so mc delay. T his was du c to ti,e b f' ' . . tl "U I S' - "L ] nllln er a compctItors til 1e. . Be er , .Ixtecll ong ump. Possibly in future it wo uld be better to arrancrc p rehm1l1ary ' o r lOur r 0 a f the best · I _ tnals on Bla re's Piece so as to leave a n Iy tl1ree IIe canc ates to co mp.cte on the Sports' cia}' Mr Bal . .' k' II I · f S . S . . • y dg,ull ·tIle y un ( ertook the d utles a ta rtlll g teward, and we owe very nUH..: h of th e success of I _ S . in valuable help in thi s most important work. Of indi vi du al ce lt l le I por~~ tubln s was .B assetl's High Jump o f 5 ft . 2 in. Bassett for his si~e ~al. s pe r laps e es t t' S Da rCI' m~rkabIUY eas), action and in time he should do we ll Of ' ti,e otll'e " S' ·t " Q _ '.. . r eve n s un op s " nd er IX ee n "uartcr I~ 6 1 Z secs. w~s a very good performan ce and Cremer's ., Und e r F o urteen Qllart('r III 6q! secs. IS most promisi ng . C r e mCI. s IlOU I( I rna ke a ve ry good

a

C


\

THE

CANTUARIAN .

3S

midd le-distance ru n ner in time . Sund ry slight illn esses caused the absence of so me boys who mi ght otherwise have been successful. In particular we deplore the absence of Abbott, !\1adge and Gage (o f wh om the latter has hee n exceptio nally unfortunate in this respect). As usual the Tutor Mi le provoked the g reatest en th usiasm am on Q'st the ~pectal ors , so me of whom , howc\'t'r, nppcared my stifi ed by the pas~ing of the ha ndke rchief. The ehanO'c in Ih t.! funior School Co nso lation R n.c(' secmed also to a fford pleasure to th e v~ito rs . The Tu tor S~t Sh iclrl was won b~' NTr. Law'r's Set with th e excellent total of 180 points.

Vve must express our thank s to the fo ll owi ng for thei r kindn e~s in giving pri7.~s : The Lad ies of Canterbury, Mrs. Wace , Mrs. Farrar. 1\{rs. Hamilton. Mrs. Galpi n. Mrs. Hodgson. !'Hrs. Bell, Dr. Bla re, Rc\'. G. C. E. Rvl c.v. th e H ead Maste r, Rev. R. G. Hodgson, and Th e

Ma ~te r s .

SI<:NIOR S1' I~R I' I .EC;H"SI'..

L. P. Abbott

I 3. C. \r..,r. R. Si Ill P!><I1l. 2 I r. C. :'o1angin I 4· R. E. R. Dalwigk . T ime: 2Q mins. Ihlll on Saturday, March 91h. Abholl. last ycar's win ner, was hard prcsscd all the way by ~ lallgin, bU I managed to keep hi s lead. Th e tilllc was hctter than last yenr, and considering thai the wi nner was suffering from the effccts of n bad cold, it was a very good perfo rmance. I.

JUNIOR STEEI'L ~:C H ASV..

T. P. Filln 3· D. O. F ardcll 2. T. S. Cave 4. W. E. L. Bal,er T ime : 26 min., 15 secs. Run on Thursday, i\ \arch 7th, and won SO IllC ' what easily. Bal;er who had run neck 10 neck with Cave almost thc whole cot1r!';e, was jll!,;\ Ilvcrhauled at the last dyke by Fanlell nnd Martin, I\ lId all exciling fini sh wa!'; seen.

I

I.

LONG J U~ IP (01'1':1'1). I.

I. (:.

.,. J.

/-1. Gardner 2. W. N. Kempe Winning jump: 18 fl.. 8 ins. Kcmpe jumped l7 ft., 10 ins. 220 Y ARDS (JU:{ IOR SCIlOOI.). L. Tomkins 3· G. W. R. I-learn. R. Recve Time: 33~ secs.

I

QUARTER

lsI fltal:

~111 . E (UN D ER 16).

D. V. DnnJ('1p 2. A. F. B. Coll rell 3. R. C. Cumhcrb:'llch. Won by it yard in 62-1. sees. 211d fhal: I. T. P. F inn 2. T. S. Cave Won easil y in !>ecs. Filla! fleal: I. D. V. Dun lop 2. A. F. 13. Cottrell. Dunlop led for the first three hundred yards when COllrell closed up, but Dunlop, fini shing very strong-I)" come away again a nd won hy five yards. Time :-6 I t secs. I.

66*

\'0 1\'(; J U'\I I' (J UNIO R SCHOOL). J.

R. C. Cmwley t2

2.

P. D. Bakel'

fl. 6 in.

IIAU" M I LE (OI'~:N) .

J. C. N. Smith K. Moore 4. G . w. R. Simpson. 2. B. H . Mathesnl1 Bu rdell led, followed by Gardner and T homp· son, and thi s order held till the end of the first lap. Moore went ahead along the lOp straight by the Ladies' Pavilion ar:d was followed by Matheson and SllIilh. Smith made a plucky effort by the Pavilio n, bill smnewhal miSjudged his sprint and ~'[ oo r e won a good race by t wo ya rds fr om l\·lat hcson. T wo yanls between second :'I nri third , ten between third :md fourth . Time :- 2 min. , 17 !>ecs. I.

I


Tl-IE QU ART ER MII,R (UNDRR I.

H. L. Cremer

CANTU A RIAN.

) 14·

Finn got away excell ently and leading way won by n. yard.

3. W. Fry

2. A. H . Crowt her

I I UNDRv.n VAROS (JUNIOR S C HOOL).

P. D. Balter

I...

A. F. B. Cott rell

H UND lt ED VARDS (UNDER 14).

,

W. E. L. Bak er Height :- 4 ft. 6ft: ins.

311d Heal:

I.

C. C. ,~rillialll so n 2. G. F. Howell Time :- 1 J *~c~ . G . H. ~'rercer

120 VAROS I-I I\NDI CA P. ESt

I

\ .V'II I"lftm SOn got . t

I

h

In

0

st n de

nc es on ly between

220 YARDS U UNIOR S C HOOl. U NDKR It ).

L. Eo C. Evans.

2.

F,:lIal H eal.-

J. 2.

A. F. B. C:otlrcll R. C. Cumberbatch

2nd Heat ,'

I.

v.. S. Morle)'

J. T . P. Finn 2. L. H. J ones

Final Heal,'

T. P. Finn 2. A. F. B. Cottrell I.

f:?

Parsons V. Dunlop

3· G. H.

~1e r cer

Time, 131- sees. H URD LES (U NDER 16). I.

R. E. Martin

2. h . P. Coll ings

3rd Heat,'

Parsons

G. H. i\lcrcer

I. [-I. 2.

HU N DRED YARD S ( U NDER 16).

HUll:

1-1 . Edwards

Mercer and Battiscombe were the fastest losers.

F , P. Evans.

Time, 40 sees.

I S!

't.

1. C. ~. Nightingale 2. R. E. Dal wigk 41h !:feal,' 1. 1·1. M. J. Burdett 2 . C. S. Merrett Sih H eal.- I . T. S. Cave 2. C. Baltiscombe 61h Ileal ,' I. D. V. Dun lop 2. V. S. Morley

away to. a h' IS

W. N. Kempe

3 rd Heat.'

Time :- 1 I f. sees.

I.

I.

2.

3 G H M 4'. G .' F . ' I'I owe e reellr

first and won by inches ani)' second and th ird. .

I.

2. R.

3nd H u rl,'

In the final heat the qua rtett e gOI '

ver)' level Slarl ,.

Hea t .'

_'. G. S pickcrn cll

F,'lIal FIeat : I. C. G. Williamson 2. C . Spickcrncll

1·1. L . 1-1. C remer

2 . A. H. Crow ther Ti me, 14'} secs. Cremer got a ~ood start a.nd won with ea.se.

I.

H UNDR IW Y A RDS (OP H. N). I.

G . \V . R. I' I earn

heat. I h~l~n~:eo~,:~iso~V~ltk produced a t ripl~ dcad fcw inches. Recve WA$ .e bea,t IIearn I. br a close up. IIr( all( WAS also \'cry

, {T. S. Cave

/feat :

2.

J1

I·liG Ii J UMP ( U N U}-; R 16 ).

J.r(

t lC

Time, J2.} sees.

in 69~r~~~~~ I~~c n~lni~llcC{~... ny nnd won ns he liked morc ~opposition I perfectly fresh and with faste r tim e: wou II proh.'l.bly have clun e Illllch

I.

II I 1\

2.

T. S. Cnve

T ime, 23t sees. QUART I~ R MII.K (OPEN). J. 2.

K . Moore C. N. Smith

I 3· G.

Spickernell 4. B. H. Matheson S pickernell was firs t away followed by Moore


T HE

\ CANTUARIAN.

At the Ladies' Pavilion l\'[oore took the lead, Itmning wilh n long cas)' st ride. At Ihe Pavil ion he was leading by eight yards. At th is point Smith made his efforts and caught S picker .. ne ll but failed to overtake the leader, who won by ~ix ya rds. 1"0\11" yards scp:wl\tcd sceom! and third ,

37

nod Matheson.

1.

R. C. Ctlmberbatch

2.

R. F.. Martin

l.e n!!:lh , I Sf! , 7 ~ in!l. :\ poor j ump.

two y :l.r(I ~ third nnd fourth. Ti me,

57~

1I 1GII J u~t1· l J USIO R SC llon ,.) .

sec.... I.

220 YARDS HA Nm e AI'.

1St H eat:

I fcigh t , 3 ft. 9 ins.

L. ' 1.. Foster (23 yards) 2. R. L Got1w:\ll1. (30~ yards)

l,j'lIal fltat,'

1.

R . l':. Dnlwigk

H. ?\l. J. Bu rdett 3. H. Pnrsons

2.

\\ un h)' 2 ycIs. ; 2 ft. be l ween secund and third. Time,

26 ·~

600 VAIWS

Time, J e rram ran

2

min. 26 ~ sees.

3. L. J. Bassctt 4. C. W. H unt

All (om got away tq a very levcl start in which Bassell held a !>light ad\'ant age Bassetl was leading by a yard at the third hurdle which he !ltruck heavily and fe ll. Hunt had a similar mis· fort lint· . i\ lrtllg in won with great ease in 2o-! sees. PU'f"'I·t ;.1 G T ilE I I.

I.

D. O. Fardcll \11,' . E. L. Haker

2.

C. R. Simcon

Hassett won at 5 fl . 2 i n!l.-a vc r)' good pe r· \ '''' 'Ilnnee, probably the !)e!lt of t he Sports.

W ..: IG II 'i'.

Gardne r 2. L. J. Hass.ctt Length, 29 7 in.

rt.

Gard ner has done hetter than thi s in ~racticc. Q U ARTER M i tE (J U ;.11 0 R

mins. 33t seC!l ·

H IG H J U MI' (OPEN ).

Bassett

I

g:l'od race and wnn wcll.

I. fl . C. i\'b.ngi n 2. C. R Simco n

Martin fi nishing strongly won by twelve yanls ; Iwo yards between second and thi rd.

Time,

:t.

sccs.

I, 3·4.

t. R. E. Martin '1'. S. Cave

( H AN I) ICAP).

R. C. J erram (35 yareh,) E. W. (; oad (33 )'ard s) 3. C . It. Cl cmct son (65 y:wls) 4. C. J... Druitt (35 )'arcls)

1. 2.

H AI. F M I 1.E (UNDRR 16).

J.

A. G. Collings

J.

3ml H eal: L G. W. Beardmore (23~ yards) 2. { C. C. Reay (32~ yards) D. P. Bent (47, yards) 3 rt! Heat,' I. S. D. Turner (4~ yards) 2. E. W. Goad ( 17 ya rds) 41ft H eal : I. T . P. Finn (13 yards) 2. R. E . Dn'wigk ( t o yards) J i lt H eat: I. I-I. M. J. Burdett (7 yards) 2. R. H. Edwards (30 yards) 61h [ital: I. H. Parsons ( 19 yard s) E. D. De Jongh (24~ yaros) 2. { E. F. 1 Lousd ell (30 yaros)

, . J..

2.

G. C. Denman

I.

2.

G. L. T omkins P. D. Baker, ii.

I

3

!=;c nool.).

G. W. Hearn, i.

W o n by rom yards ; twO hetween second and

thi rd.

Timc, 7J! sees.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

ONl~ M H,Ir. (O I'I~N) .

r. C. N. Smith

3· C , W. R. ~i mpson 4· .I. w. S. Price

2. I r. C. ' lang-in

. At the start H owell ..• I d lvelsion. At the end of th CI C~ IC( a _ tempo ra ry

"'Ioore lcd , followed h , TI~ {j1.~1 la p Adams and

TUTOR MILE. I.

Mr. Evans' (K. Moore B H 1\'1 , I ' .D"Wlg ' I ' k' :tll{I "Simeon). alcson,R 1, C.' B. . !'"

2. 1\'1 r. Cape's (C. SI>ickerncll IV II . C'.' ~1rdn e r anci C. \:V. Hunt ,N . Ketlll>C . ). •

fell o ut 'm d Si } Otnson. .M oore then TholllSO~l Smimpso~ and Smit h closed tip. Adams 3· Mr. Latter's (C. N. S mith , C . H . haIr-mile 'I~' t~, SlllllPson and Mangin passed Ih~ J. Ii . H oughton and T . P. Finn ). ?I'! ercer, -'V,' III ' ord cr lasted unll. l the bel! F at . custer ' • 'and ' IliS This . the lead :Sn~ ~hc las t !np Mangin took enthusias m.race, as usual ' p ~ov o k'i c( consld erahle

(olJo'wc/b

:1~PJ~:r~:111~~I~~I;d/ OI~n~n~ ~~(~h~"~.l:C!~:~; p~~, \ ,f~l~

A t the end of the fir~t la) 1\1 follo wed by Matheron a ' 1 ;) I creer W:'1 S leading. lap Simeon an~1 Hun t ~~~nedelllpe:d 1n the ~econd ya rds between secor,d' 1I1IS 1I!1g' vcry fa st. T e n for Iheir respecth'e Tutor_Set~onsl crable d.lst:'lIlce t ll'e('11 third and fOl1rti,. and tlmd, twenty·five he- Gardner callgl~t H oughton b' (lIn. ~he third lap behind Dalwigk Cons ut ill S ed IS ya rds the In st lap wi tl; a eO'~~~~an~l~ Moore star~ed on Time, 5 min. 64 sees. was never dispossessed I c. start of which he len yards T an{ ultlmalely he won by CONSO I.,\T/O N RACE (QUAR'I' JU: t hird.' . went)' yards separated second nnd 1\'1I u.:). s trongly and L;lti n~atc l I I c P~ \' Jhon he s printed

Mangin who also 'wa!

1.

fjIW:U,,

Y ten yards from

G, F. r-I nwell.

T ime, 3 min., 56* sees.

Inn tllntch n(Min st G enl, II' owe ll wns successful. b '"

T able (If Marks : _

Tim e, 64t sees. C ONSO I.AT/O /\, RA CI,; (J UN 'OI' I.

Hearn, ii.

SCIlOOl.).

2 . S na u , ii.

Tim e, 16* sec>:.

Mr. Mr. Mr. M r.

Latter's Evans' Cape's Mason's

Mr. Bell's Mr. Au slen's

Open.

126 118 100 2. 8 0

U uder ,6.

Under

38

16

'7

0 0

0

'4 ·

6, 6

0

0

8

0

Grand T Olal.

180 118

"7 85

"8


THE

CANTUAR lAN.

3')

SCHOOL NEWS,

We hea rtily cong ratulate G. M. Webster o n being- ciectl:;d to a I-lasker I':xhibilioll at Exeter College, Oxford.

O n March 5th, General R ussell gave IlIl' Sc hool an interesting Lecture on th e

\rmada, wh ic h was

I1lllCh

apprec iated .

oJ.< ...,.

<-

Un March '3th, at S. George's Hall, ( 'aptain Hi rst gave a most instructi ve 1,Ilcture on Rifle Shooting to the Canterhury Rifl e Club, which was attended by a lIu Ke num ber of the School. ~

..*

T he I st Compulsory Paper-chase was run on i\ Ionday, February 18th, L. P.

Abbolt and E . T. Gage were hares. The fi rst of the hounds lo come in we re C. N. Smith, 1. R. Mad ge and G. W. R. Simpson, T he seco nd Paper-chase was on T uesday, Ma rch 5th , with l. R. Madge and G. VI/. R. Simpso n as hares. E. T. Gage was the first of the ho unds to fi nish, C. Battiscombe was second, and C. B. Si meon third . The School GYlllnastic Pair ( I-l , I-1. E . Gosset and H . C. Mangi n) were placed 11th in the Public Schools Gymnastic Competition at Al dershot.

The Rev. Preb. E. A. Stuart, Vi car III !)l. Matthew' s, Bayswate r, has been "I' poi nte d by the K ing to the Canonry of I Il lHc rbury Catherlral, vacant b)' the I The Boat Race against Tonbridge dJ'ltLh of Canon F, J. Holl a nd. School will take place this year au \Vcd nesday, J une 12th, al T onb ridge. ox¡ ~

"

The School Fives Pair (G. F. H owell IIH I I-I. Gardner) won th e home game St. Augusti ne's College, but lost th e 1IIIIrn match . Against St. Edmund's I hoo l, as the t wo members of the pair ,ql' unable to play, the S c hool was se ntcd by the second pair (C. J. N. ,lIlun s and H . C. Mangi n) who were dl Il' aled in the S. Edmund's S c hool Court.

"w

It is also hoped that at least one O.K .S. boat may co me down to com pete against the School, but no date has ye t bee n fixed . O n T hursday March 2 1st, th e Lord Bishop of Do ver held a Confirmatio n in the Cathed ral for the School.


~o

THE

CANTLJARIAN.

----

-

-- _._----

THE WADDINGTON GIFT. The Rev. He rbert Waddington, who entered the School J an uary, 1838, and left in 184-7, at his death in January . ' 9 0 4. beq uea th ed to the School a sum equid to th at wh ic h ho had received from the School for hi s Exhibition. \~'ith this the " .Waddingto n Gift ,. was founded, and th e pl1lpit was placed to his memor}' i n the School Chapel. H e also desi red that on th e deat h of his sister, the books which he received as prizes here should

be left to Lhe School Library. Miss \Vaddingto n died last D ecembe r, and her exec utor. E. C. Frend, E sq. (O.K.S.), ha!:i now se nt th e prizes to the Sc hool, and has also Vf~ ry kindly presented several other books from Mr. \Vaddin gto n's collection, with a portrait of lVIr. 'Vallace, He ad master of the School from 183 3 to 1859 . The books are soo n to be placed in the Library in a special book-case with an insc ripti on reco rding the gift.

LIBRARY. The rollowing books have been recently added to th e L ibrary;" Thc Unvcil i n~ of Lhasa" .. Kind ly presented by I{. H. Hrinsley¡ Richards, " Modcrn Europe" by W . Alison Phillil)S H. P. V. Townend, Esq. .. Stmy Studies from E ngland and [t.lly , II. L. Dibben, Esq. "Thc Drcam of J ohn Bull "... ... \ 'Vm. !lforris. " G ucncvcre " .. Wm. Morris. "Thrce "'f cn in a Boat " Jcrome K. J erolllC. " Ancient Classic Drama " .  Euripidcs as a Rationalist" A. W. Verrall. " Four Plays of Euripides" . A. \:V. Verra ll. " T he Baccha: oj Euripides " '" .. A. W. Venall. :: Tra~i~ D!'am:~ ,in Aeschylus, ~uphodes and Sha kespeare" Lewis Campbell. AntiCipations .. ... ... . H. G. Wells. o Im pellalism" Em il Reich. " Success among: Nations" E mil Rt:ich. " rn Peri l of Change" J. H. B. !\'lasterman. <I Colonial 'Nationalism " Jcbb. " The Pocms of Rossetti" I< The Apostles in Art" ... "Nincteenth Centllry Poets (8 vols. ) ... .. Mathematic.'ll Recreations and Essays" W. W. l-:.ou:sc Hall. .. Sciencc and Hypothesis" Poincare. " Sir Ni~<: l " COllan Doyle.

..


\

THE · CANT LJA lU AN. Sophy of K ravonia " " " T he Garden of Allah .. T hc Call of the Blood" . " My Sword for I~~fayelte " " Old Cantcrbury ' "Benita " .. " Running H orse In n ,. " !'tonarch the Big Bt:al' ,. A Knight of St. Tohn :' .;. " "The Yarn of Old H ar~u l' rO \~:l " Rccollcctions of an r fi sh R. ;\1. " F rom Sca to Sca" .. . . . .... ." .. Historical Geography of th e Bntlsh Cololllc:-i " English Music" . ... " An Englishman III Par is" " Stray Lcavcs" . " Prisoners" ... "George \Vashington " .. H omcr and his Agc " . . :. ,. " Essays on the A rt of l'hel~h a~. · " Companion to G reek Stud ies . " History of Cl~ssical Se~~larsl\1p " Ancicnt Life III Athens ... " Ancient Ships" . ." .• Across the Spamsh Malll ..." ... " Truc ROIll<l;nces of Scol!ari-r . Engi~~nd " .. A Short l'l!story of ~ocla ,~ c 111 , . The Doctor of C ro ~ s Ncs; ." " Lovc among thc Chlckcns .. Puck of Pook's Hill " " A Lady of Rome" " I will rcpay" ... .. " " Rocolleetions of a Lucknow Vetcran "Somc Irish Ycsterdays I. Dickens" " \Vatls"

H

Anthony H ope. Robert H ichcns. Robert I-lichens. Pcmberton. Cozens. Rid cr Haggard. Shepard. . Thompson Seloll. Brereton. Clark Russell. Rudyard Kipling:. C. r. Lucas. Southgale. Hcrbcrt ('aul. l'. iaq' Cholmonuclcy. Lodge. And rcw Lang. Waldslcin . Whitby. Sandys. I-I". Colli ll~wood . Graham and Patlerson . Synge. Ralph Connor Wodehollse. Kipling. Marion Crawford . Baroness Orc1.Y· Somerville ~lIld Ross. Chesterton. Chcsterlon.

O. K. S. NEWS. ... : F R. Hawkcs has bcen appointcli Hlln H.-At K lang, Selangor" IFd~r~t~~1 \ Assist~nt Traffic Superi ntcndt:nt ~on ~r~i' Malay States, on Tucsda), Vel' ,J or bation) on th e North-west Ra\lw~) the '9°7, the wife of G. C. a Pl· India, in Class llI , Grade IV., 0 a son.


THE

CANTU A R1 AN. C. Covell . C. H. Murray J A f cC uli och. W. W. Lock J D'· R. T. Jenkin, E. A. Rope; GC1ii tOil, [-J. L. Dibbe n, A. C. D~ut~n' C op~r, Dunlop. Rev. H. J. Mow ll G D 'M' '1 j f. W. T e lfer a nd £ . C. F. dN~ill . dC ear.

SuJ?lcrior Revenu e Establishment ')f State ' R at ways. ~

~.

•.

A

;"

P. S. F. ,Nai rn has o btained a post un,deT th~ Raja of, Kelaman, and started [~~t~h c Ma lay PClllllsuiar on l\'farch 16th

h .

';;-:/.f :I; 'l.'

.

We

o

c;ongratula~ "

'I . The O. l~.S . Match tbi s yea r will take P ,ace on July 30th and 31 St. All '1 wish to, ph), ' nam es\\ 10 < III US·t ·se n d theIr to G. C. Strahan. Keble College. Oxford.

0 ' i\:1iss Gadd wou ld like to thank

~'hle fo llo,wing O.J{ S. ha ve visited

S

C 100l

this term .'-G .II. Coc krem,

CAMBRIDGE

C ,\'\(HR1DG I~,

,liar,1i IS/h, IQo7 .

SCHOOL, After a pe ri od o r "uIesscd f rcc(Iom t (I' . ~x e~l tng ove r nearly th ree years the IneVitable .boll has rallen, and with ~eek leart we Sil down to obey the Editorial PEAR

~II

.K.S. who have so kind ly co t 'b ~O\~",lr~ls th e ~estimonial fo r her j I~I~~ ;~t~l~ It IS Ilnposslble at slich a b f wri te to each one. • usy Ime to

*.;;.* th e

made

.1, .5: who have leI', ,h e Sch

a mounted to £ . 6 I ~ od TI ,g I presen t been g iven to Miss' 'G'ldd' IllS las now 'I < , W 10m we feel ~~r~ WI I choose somcthino whkh will .l W,ly::; ,stand to rem ind °her o f I ' con ncc tlon with the School and O.I( Slei

~

-;"

~ ~ t..:vllcction

among so me I . 1890 lo r i\ I iss Gacl d' s wcddin 00 ,slIl,ce.

H.. H. Brin sle ,_ R\(..: har~s OIl hcing elected on the Libra~' Comm ittee of the Oxford U n ion. Y

LETTER.

. Com ma nd ,. Write us a letter I" T crm IS we ~ l o ll c arc left, and an account o r Our dOi ngs must be around out in so ,ltude. \,Vltole volum~s might be wntten on such . a subject, not because we do much that IS worth writing of but bcc~u se there are now so ma ny of ~s t do It. 0 I

"

o~el,

C

'

.


\

TI-IE

CANTUARIAN.

With due apologies for this prologue, t lally unnecessary. but established by l)fCCedent. we proceed. First then of our patriarch the Rev. II . J. Mowll. most worthy of mention, hf'cause of the regularity of his attendance at O.K.S. meetings. H e is still with us and of us. though onl y in an c'xlernal capacity. ,\7ith befi ti ng and !lecent slowness he is recoverin g from th e shock he recei\led at the newS that r.ardn er had departed th is Cambrid ge mc. full of years and social. if not I4cholasti c honours. Now the owls shriek lhe ir nightly lamentation by ni ght in Sl. Cath erin e's Grove. Methuen is still wilh us and nearly a Bachelor. He has Iwcn coachin g a Lent boat and rowin g in a May boa t. H. A. J enkin, not content with one First, is now seeking another, this time on a Histori cal basis. Durham is ('hanning the air of Ridley, and incidentnil " that of Newnham, with much music. I. Twells has been prevented by illness from h elpin~ Jesus to the H ead or the I. nts. or his seco nd boats to win their Im rs. but he consoles himself by trifling wi th work and love, only pausing a mo ment to explain th at somehow the two I'lash. H e is also reported to have Littered advice to any who mi ght care to tcC'c cpt it, based on the Pi ndaric remark I hat water is of sove reign worth, and Muperior to olher refreshm ent, presumably of a less simple nature. Preston says thal he is workin g. but he also admits to ,\ partiality for. golf. Richardson would " 1....'111 to be undergoing a treatment fOf uhesity on the towing path of the Cam. It'orlunately some boats a re not remarkablc ror the. rapidity of the ir motion.

+3

Gillibrand has been working hard and rOlYin g in the Corpus Lent Boat. Repetition becomes monotonous. Let it henceforth be taken for granted that all are working hard. F. M. Deil\'hton has been amusing himsel f with Trinity Major Scholarship Examinations and now awaits results. Sopwith rowed in 'Emmanuel II. and is persevering with Moral Sciences. T elrer sheds the ~Iory of a cro ss-country blazer upon Clare and other places, and is presumably still runnin g. H e held the second O.K.S. meeting of the term. Of this year's birds. now well- grown fiedglings,'ÂĽatkins rowed four in the Corpus boat and helped it up another place. J. D eighton plays football for Trinity teams and when desi rous of further exercise rubs brasses. Dickson rowed in Olle of th e Trinity boats-we dare not be more definite--but it really was not his fault that it went dowII . R. T. J enkin is also a n enthusiastic devotee of Father Cam . Of all those not mentioned in this catalogue we crave humbl e pardon, but really they mi ght have turned up at O. K.S. meetings. As a united body we send our belated congratulations to Miss Gacld, none the less warm because so late. Lastly we send our best wishes. May the sports days be fine; may we be successful at Ald ershot ; l1).ay acconnts of Sch ool matches appear in th e Field; and may Nemesis not overtake the Running team in vengp.ance fo r the bad Greek of the Editors. Ever yours, O.K.S. CANTAB.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

OFFERTORIES. The Offertories this term have been as follow :_

Tan.

ODJECT.

The Cathedral Reparation F und Feb. 3. Royal National Life-Boat Institution ,. " '7 · Canterbury Diocesan Education Society March 3. The South American Missionary Society " ' 7. 21. Restoration Fund for Halsto w Church, Kent ( Rev. E. R. I Olive. O. K.S .• Vicar) .. .. .. ( 20.

A"lOUKT. £2

+

0 d~ 7 201 I

I

o

II

14

7

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. 'We beg to acknowledge with tha nks the receipt of the following contcmporaries:St. Edward's SellOot Chromde, Radldan, Shirburtlirw, jl£alvermall. G/enalmond

Leodzells/all . Vigorllirl1l , Strand S l'!Jool llfngaz//U, Felles/an (2), Blue ( 2), P orlcullis Ciljl oj Lonr/oll SellOot l1fagazillt!, EliSf1~ bellJan, Cho/mdeifl1l , PlymollJiall, Broms-

College CIJJ'01l1de, COUllty Gm/Leman ( 2),

grovlfW,

NOT ICES. We beg to ac knowledge with than ks the receipt of the following subscriptions ;G. F. Hers. Esq. (3/6). F. Nl. Deighton, Esq. (3/b). C. E. O. Bax. Esq. (3/6 ).

K. B. Dickson, E sq . (3/6). Rev. P. Malde n ( 14/-). Mostof the back num bers of Vol. \ '1, of Tile Call/uarian can be had from the Hon. Sec. : A, R. Sellars, price 6(1. each.

Gibbs a nd Sons, Printers, Palace Street, Canterbury.


THE VOL. VII.

CANTUARIAN. JUNE.

1907.

NO¡3¡

EDITORIAL. It pains us sorely to hear so many people of th e present day complai n of the unreliability of the weather. Do they perchance suppose that their ancestors were laO fortunate as to have the elements more submissive to their wishes; would Ihey suggest t hat the seasons have grown careless of the limits assigned to them? After deep thought, therefore, and mature consideration, (as befit the true editorial I1fiture), we have decided to offer our most heartfelt sy mpathies to the weather fo r ~he abuse that has of late been so thoughtlessly hurled at "it by those arou nd us. We are not surprised that Nature has inspired the seasons, si nce she has nowadays ,II uch an unstable example ever before in man himself. In fact, we think such a c;hange most suited to this present age of inconsistency. Vve are well aware that rain lWeI wind have made loud lamentations to be raised by eleven seekers after fame


THE

CANTUARIAN.

and their satellites; but till greater co nsistency be found in these regions of the mighty, we would venture to maintain that Nature's present mood, erratic though it may be. is surely best. Alas, anothe r ba nd of sportsmen have been swept by adverse currents. We sigh deeply for them ; hut water, it would seem to us, is unfavourable to both sports this year. We would point out, however, that the seaso n's inclemency has not the power of the spoiler in those regions where consistenc.\¡ reigns. For again the School has seen her reputation put to the tOllchstone by untiring I nspectors, and a second time she has proved herself to be of thC:' truest metal. Indeed, no long manuscripts or detailed announcements have enab led us to rea ch th is happy conclusion, but we have watched those who best know and the keen eye has not failed to perceive that sincere smile of satisfaction that none but victors wear. Even the School can not wholly escape the charge of being infected with the spirit of change, but in this change of hers we rejoice. At last she has determi ned to try and spare T... atin the ignomony of a tortured pronunciation at least, for a tortured grammar must ever be her lot. It is a noble effort and we hope it will fi nd a speedy ach ieve ment. Some fear, however, that the Chapter House, as the council chamber of the monks of old, would refuse to re-echo anything akin to Reformation, and so the Latin Speech is to be omitted from the Speeches this year. We cannot end our prologue without congratulating Mrs. Galpin ve ry warm ly on her successful recovery from her illness. As we know thi s is the most welcome piece of news we have to chronicle, and th at here we shall leave our readers in the most favo urable mood, we will postpone any furthe r efforts to another day.

ATHLETIC SPORTS

v.

DOVER COLLEGE.

The Sports against Dovel' College were held 0 11 the St. Lawre nce Cricket Ground on Wednesday, April 3rd . It was unfortunate for competitors and spectators ali ke that, after a fortnight of brill iant weather, the actual day of th e contest sho uld have


\

+7

THE CANTUARIKN .

. . .d t be in till the afternoon, was not sufficient to hfc n wet; but the ram, whIch dl no ~t The School team , who had show~ litt ct the conditions to any great ext~. ctice are to be congratulated on theIr ('(:)Ilsiderable keenness and improvemenit \~a~r~e th'a t Dover Cullege were not seen 11xccllent win of seven events to ho~e . _ti~ors had not sufficiently recovered fro m 1\1 their best. and that some of t eIT co~pe t' s 0"0 to show that the performances Ih exertions of their own Sports; yet t 1e Ime 0 . were very creditable and well up to the average. . I 0 had to stand dow n from the School Sports It was disappointing that Abbot~. W t' . had he been fit, we should have nwi ng to influenza, could n~t do. hlmse JUs Ice, < (':< pccted great thing!\ from h1m th IS year.

\r'

. H If Mile which was won by Jones for Dover The contest openr:d w.lth the a. 'Aft r this all the events went to the Collcg-c with an excellent pIece of ruolllt t ~lmp . 'Bassett the H igh Jump and School. Gardner wi nning the W'eigStyan\ . ~~~or~ th~ Q~larter Mile; and Mangin Ilurclles ; Spickernell the B undre an s, lh Mile. The following was the ord cr of the eve nts, with results :Gardner won with quite a fair put of 29 ft. 2 i~ . ; Watson and Bassett liec! for second place WIth

I._HA1.F-MILE.

DOVER COI.LEGF..

\

KI NG'S SCHOOL.

4· K. Moore 5. L. P. Abbott I: L.· R: Mills 6. B. H. Matheson 1St , J. S. L. Jones; 2nd, K. Moore.

I.

I. S L Jones

W C p'

1":

Time 2 min . lot· A very fine race and perhaps the best performnee of the day. Moore took the lead at the end Iff the first quarter which he increased up to ~he d'I:Itnul tree, but Jones closed up, and catchmg him at the Pavilion, won hy 2 yardS. H ._PUTTING T H E WRIGHT.

n

W

28

ft . 10 in.

Barretl

~VC~tson

Ga~d~er

\. 3. H. 4· L .

J.

1St, H. Gard ner i 2nd, L.

J.

" It' R' Fletcher i. . .

Bl\ssett {H. L. \\latson

Length, 29 ft. 2 in.

Bassett

1H. - 120 YARDS HURDl.ES. K.S.

D.C.

(. A. S. Green L. R. F. Mills

2.

I S, t

L.

J..

3. H. C. Mangin \ 4. L. J. Bassett

Bassett·, 2nd, A. S. G recn. Time, 18, secs.

A splendid race. Green led to the fi fth hurd le. where Bassett caught him, and began to. sh~w a. vcr sl ight lead, which he appeared to malOtalO. to theYlast hurdle; Green hit his last hurdl~~ w~~~ enabled Bassett to win by five .yards, 'A Ith yardS separating Green and Mangin.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

IV. - HuNDRED YAROS. D.C. I. 2.

I

A. S. Grecn E. A. Girling

K. S.

3. C. G. Williamson 4. G. Spickernell

1st, G. Spickerneli: 2nd Time,

{A.

[Ii- sees.

K.S.

L. R. F. Mills

J.

K.S.

3. H. Gardner

r. H. W. Watson

2. A. S. Green

Jhssett ; 2nc1.{B. W. Watson L. R. F. Mills.

Lengt h , 18 ft .

I-Ieighl, 5 ft. q . in.

I O~

in.

~over did not fulfil their expectations, as both of ~he lr re~resentatives had jumped over 19 ft. in their own Sports.

VIIl.-ONF. ~ c.

I~. T. Brandreth C. JI: ~arrett 3. E. A. Culmg r. W.

2. \Y.

Quite ,a good jump. Bassett knocked the bar al 5 fr. I ~' In. and wns ro rtunate in not rlisplaci ng it.

1 4. W. N. Kempe

1St, H. Ga rdner; 2nd , B. W. Watson.

3· L. J. Bnssclt 1 4. C. B. Simeon

B. W. Watson 1st, L.

VII. - LONG JUMP. D.C.

V.- I1 IGH JUMI'.

D.C.

nnel won easily by 13 yard s in the good time of

55* secs.

S. Green • E . A. Girling.

, Another good mce. All got off the mark well. Splckerncll look the lead 10 yards from home and won by nine inches, with Grcen and Girlin~ dead heat for ~cco nd plnce, nod WilIinmson (flirly close np.

I. 2.

.T ones had been rather upset by the Half, and was not well. . Moore mn very well and strongly

;\'[ ILE.

I 4. C. N. S~i"l KS

I

5. L. P. Abbolt 6• II . C. 'I Iy angm .

1,<:', H. C. Mangin; 2nd, C. N. Smith. Time,s min.

r-! sees.

Vr.-QUARTRR i\'fll .E.

1. s.

· I 3. C.K.

D.C.

L. Jones 2, A. S. Green I.

4.

K.'.

!\'i oon.! N. Smith

1St, K. Moore; 2nd, A. S. (:rccn.

T ime

S5~

sw.;.

This mce prod\lced an excellent finish between and Smith. Brandreth took the lead and kept It for 3 Inps j then Smith went ahead and loo~eillikc winning. easily, bUl r-.'langin '~ith a g~od ~p nnt cn me up and Just passed Sm ith on the post · It wns a fine piece of judgment. ' Mn n g~n


\

THE

+9

CANTUARIAN.

CRICKET. /

LIST OF

FIXTURES. RJ;;<;U T.l'.

GROUND.

- - - --- -------... ------------ - - 1st Xl. Drawn ....... Beverley ... Rev. L. 11. Evans' XI . .. .. .. Tu. May 14· Won 01'I'ONKN1'5.

DATE.

16. T h. Mon. " 20. Th. " 30 . F ri. " 3 1. 'fl!. J"une 4· 6. Th. Tu. " ll. T u. " I I. Th. " 13· 18. Tu. " Mon. " 24· " Tu. 25·

Sat. " 29· " 2. Tu. July

Fri. Sat. Tu. Wed.

Tu. Wed.

"

" " " " "

n

9· 10. 101} 3

'I'll. !\fay 28. Tu. June 4· 6. Th . Tu. " 18. " Wed. " 19· Tu. 25· " 27· Th.

Tu. J ~'ly Wed. "

2.

10.

Chartham Asylum Wye College S. Lawrence" A. " S. Lawrence

R.M.L.I.

Chart ham ... Beverley .. Beverley Beve rley .. . Beverley ... Hythe Beverley Beverley ... Eastbourne Beverley ... Beverley Beverley Wahner Beverley

...

.. ..

'

...

H ythe C.C. ... Highgate School .. . Mr. A. Latter's XI. .. ' Eastbourne College Sutton Valence School ... ... The Masler:; M.C.C.

R.M.L.I.

..

'

Dover Collcg..:

...

Felsted School

...

Clergy of K":l\t S. Edmund's School

O.K.S.

..'

2na- XI.

.. '

... ... ..

Felsted

...

...

...

Beverley

...

...

.....' ..

'

.. . ...

Lost .......... Drawn ....... Drawn ....... Lost Drawn ....... Abandoned ... Lost .. ". . Drawn ... Losl .......... Abandoned ... Lost .........

.... ......

..

.. .... ....... .... ........

... ..

. ........ ............ ..' ..' " ....... ... ..... .. . .. " .... ........

...

-

S. Edmund's Sch . zne! X I.

S.A.C.

...

Beverley S. Edmund's

.. . ... ... ... ... ...

...

..

... HarbledowlI c.e. Dover College 2nd XL ... S. Edmund's Sch . 2nd X I. S.A.C. ..' Harbledowll C.C. Dover College 2nd Xl. .. S. La\vrenceColl. 2nd Xl.

...

Beverl ey ..' Beverley .. ' Harblcdown Beverley S. Edmund 's Beverley B1ore's Piece Dover S. Lawrence

Won

.. ' ..

.. . ... ..

\VOII

.... ........

Abandoned ... Losl .... .... ·· Won .. .. ...... Wall ... .... ...

... " .. .... .. " . .. ... ....... ........ ... ..'

KING'S SCHOOL v. REV. L. H. EVANS' XI. This match was played on the Beverley on Tuesday) May 14 th . As it was the ~rgL of the season, unusual interest was atlached to it. It resulted in a "draw," with ho nours very fairly divided. Our op ponents won the toss and commenced the play ynry favourably for themselves. After Merrett had despatched Messrs. Maundrell and I.aller} their hope of euding their innings successfully vanished and wickets fell fast. I'h innings was declared closed when the score had reached '2 I 5 for 8 wickets.


50

THE CANTUARIAN .

The School opened th eir b ' . attll1g with Bassett and K a good pace. At 39 1{c runs Howell and Marti 'bP~ was bowled b\, Sldnner a d e~pe, and runs came at Bassett. who had been n 1Qt, succumbed to 'the same b~:\'l a ter the addition of a few broken at the close of aymg very excellent cricket ~r. ,Here Garcin er joined form Jor the first matcl:\~(theBassett's innings was fat:ltfenss :~~ tartner~hip was not but made some good str k season. Gardner was a trifI I ,e was ~n ve~y good o es. Full Score and ana lysis :_ e ucky In gettlllg IllS runs,

t

Twyman , c Bassett b D In.:r- V. L. 1I. EVANS' Xl a wl~k .. , '. A. Latter, b Merrctt • c Martm b Merrett

J.

nev. W. H. l\faundrc'lI

~i~'e~~t~~~r~e7:crret~:'

b Dunlop" W. S. Barroll b Th o ',. '" A. P. Truema~ c K m Son ',. C. E. H arris: n~l ou~mpe, b Thomson ~, Godfrey, run out ". '" E. p, Guest, nOl OUl ' .. Rev, L, H. Evans d'd'" Extras '" , I not bat.

52 ~

4 9

8 7 o 6

Total • Innings declared closed,

KING'S SCHOOL.

W, N. K empe, b Skinner L. J. Bassett, not out G. F. I'Towell, b Ski nn~~' R. E, Martin, b Skinn~r H, Gardner, not out C. J. Adams C, S. N. Merrett H, Parsons D. V. Dunlop A. L. B. Thomson R. E. R. Dalwigk Extras" .

10

86

}'"

3 o

"

37

did not bat.

6

Total ((or 3 wickets) ."

DOWLING

Thomson Dalwigk Marlin Merrett ' " Dunlop :::

Rav. L, I-I.

AN'\LYS rs . EVANS'

XI. '0

g

"7

, o

35 28 38

2

28

2

,

57

2 I

o 3

142


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

51

KING'S SCHOOL v. CHARTHAM ASYLUM. PhlVf'f l nt Chartham on May 16th, The ' School went in first and 60 runs were ,,1 HII lor the fi rst wicket, Bassett doing most of the sco ring . After Kem pe had II ItmvltlCl, Howell was soon dismissed for the addition of I z run s to the t otal. , 'lit' """Ie IS by some strong hitting and W<l S eventually caught in the long field, I t .00111~ what lu cky innings. Bassett left a few runs late r through a catch in the 111' nil Il hall which bro ke to the off. H e had again played a very skil ful innings ""hiM li nd d riv ing most beautifull y. At th is point there was a collapse and three II I I ItllI f r the addition of ten run s. Merrett stopped the rout by some vigo rous 11I1I1tH, htll after he had run himself out, the innings soon closed for 203. "'lIuLhaOl Asylum soon lost th ei r first wi cket and after the dismissal of III 1 11I~U (lra l d, wickets fell pretty regul arly to some very good bo wling by Dalwigk 1111 .,I(lIH Ud e ight victims. The School fielding was by no means as good as it 1,,111111 hl l. Five or six catches were dropped. and although one or two in the slips II " \1 her hard , for the rest there was no such eXC llse. F ull sco re and analysis :/

1st Innings. N Kf1 lllPC, h Davy

KING'S ...

I Il""fllt, c Lister, b D r. Hodgson I I I"w II, c Fagg, b Davy.. . I MIII,lu, c Hill s, b D avy " 1I""I"flr. b O r. H odgson ... ... I N "dRillS. b Dr. H odgson ... I It , DRlwigk. st Fagg, b Dr. H odgson II I 111ft'!. C Of. J oplin, b Dr. H odgson Mfllrell , run out... ... I II, 'f'hoillson, not o u t . . . V Dun lop, sl F'agg, b Dr. H odgson I . II ~ . '. ... I

TOln!

SC H OO L.

85 4 25

3 10

°

2

27

8

30

not out

2

10

CilARTHAM Hodgson, b Thomson II . I I ill s, c Gardner, b Thomson I h. Fitz~cralci , h Dalwigk (" nndler, c Howell, b O alwigk J. Lister, C Adams, b Oalwigk . Fngg, not out Ik J O\llin, b Dalwigk R('; v, !. oil, b Oalwigk n. Jordan, b Oalwigk K . Else. b Dalwigk 1\ OA.vy, b Da\wigk I':xtras .. T ota!

c Can<l ler, h J ordan ..

30 0 b Jordan ... 0 not out

... 203

I)r.

2nd Innings.

l2

5

Extras

... 50

Total ASYLUM.

18 4

I.

'5

4

'3 '9 o

,

o 2

IS 105


f\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

BOWI,ING ANALYSTS. KING 'S SCHOOl ••

Thomson Oalwigk .•.

o.

M.

Tl

3

14 3

Merrett ...

3

o

••

\\' .

34

8

46

10

2

o

KING'S SCHOOL ". ST. LAWRENCE " A." Played on the St. La\\'Tcnce Ground on May 30th, and resulted in a oraw in favour of our opponents. Score and Analysis :ST.

LAWRENCE " A. "

G. Twyman, b Oalwigk \Y: Dutnall, b Oalwigk Clmch, b Dnlwigk C. E. Harris, not out o. J, B. Blain, c Parsons, b Merrell Rev. H. Rigg, c Howell, b i\'l artin .. R. Rhodes, not out

A. P. TrUeman}

J.w.Dowen Holmes

30 25

58 34 '3 8 16

". did not hal.

H. Pines Extras

...

...

16

,T ota l

200'

* lnnings declared c1osc:d.

KING'S L. J. Dasselt, b Pine G. F . Howell , c Rhodes, 'b 'Clinch H, Gardner, c Rev. Digg, b Clinch R. E. R. Dnlwigk, b Clinch W. N. Kempe. b Clinch R. E. Martin, not out ... C. J. N. Adams, c and h Clinch H. Parsons, b Cl inch C. S. Merretl, run out .. A. L. D. Thom::;on, not D . V. Dunlop E';!r:ls

01;;·

Total (for 8 wickets)

SCHOOL. o 34 12 2

9 25 T

7 I

2

94


\

THE

BOWLING ANALYSIS. KI NG'~ SCHOOl.. /

53

CANTUARIAN.

Thomson Dalwigk Dunlop ... Bassell ...

O.

M.

R.

w.

6

0

52

0

15 3 2

4

49

3

0 0 I

23

7

0

• 21

7 6

Merrett Adams ... Martin ...

4

23 l!

0 0 I 0

KING'S SCHOOL v. ST. LAWRENCE. This match was played all. the Beverley on Friday, May 31st. Rain unfortunately put a. stop to a game which was in a very' interesting state, and deprived us of one of th e best · chances we have ha d for a long · time of defeating St. Lawrence. Ilnssctt was again fortunate with the toss and went in to bat with Kempe. Runs came ,dow ly owing to some good bowling by Skinner and Clinch, who had both batsmen in tliniculties more than once. Kempe was the first to leave and was soon followed by Ilnssctt, who had not been playing in quite his usual form, and had two or three times llt'cn beaten by balls which only just missed the wickets. Howell and Marti n con~inued the good start and by some careful cricket brought the score to Q6. Of the n'st, Parsons played a very promising innings, and although at first rather shaky, he M (,ttlcd down and made some very pretty cuts. Thomson helped him to add the runs li nd carried his bat out for a useful twenty-one. The chief feature of the innings was Ihat although no large individual score was made, the majority of the team scored vl' ry evenly against some very good bowllng. St. Lawrence started badly losi ng two good wickets for seven runs in the tlrst three overs. Hilton and Bigg added a fe w runs but did not stay long. and after Ihe dismissal of the last named, the game had to be abandoned on account of rain . Mr. Latter succeeded as usual in making runs against us and, when the game was ,.~opped, had scored 42 not out without a chance. The School fielding was again YMY clean, while the bowling was also better than it has been in the previous matches. F ull Score and Analysis :KING'S SCHOOL. 28 L.

T.

Bassett, b Clinch

'\T. N . Kempe, b Clinch G. F . Howell, b Clinch.. ". R. E. Martin. cHon. James, b Skinner H. Gardner, b Clinch ~. . .. C. J. N. Adams, cHilton, b Clinch R. E. R . Dalwigk, c Reid, b Clinch H. Parsons, c Skinner, b Hilton C. A. Merrett, b Skinner ... A. L. B. Thomson, not out O. V. Dunlop, c and b Clinch Extras

18

30

20 10

15

6 32 4

21

o 19 203

Total

...


THE

54-

CANTUARIAN.

ST. LAWRENCE. A. L1.tter, not out Rev. W. H . Mau ndrell, h Dal wigk H on. ':\". James. b Thomson A. N. Hiiton, c Dnlwigk. b ThmmOrl Rev. H. R. Rigg, h D:\lwigk Skinner, not out. ..

o I

16 10

o

A. P. Tm,man} Clinch C. E. H arris

J. Reid

did not hat.

C. Auly

8

Extr:'l s

T OIQ.\ (for 4 wickets)

77 BOW LI NG A NAhYS IS : ST. Lt\ W RF. NC E.

o. 8 9'5

T homson

Oalwigk Merrett

2

KING' S SC H OOL

11.

WYE

M.

R.

W.

39 2

26

2 2

o

3

o

COLLEGE.

This match was played on th e St. Law rence Ground, on May 20th, and resulted in OU f first de feat. Bassett won t he toss and decided to bat. Our di sas ters began early, as Kempe was bowled before a [un had been scored. H owell then joined Bassett and took th e SeOfl! to 47, when Bassett was caught in t he slips. For the additi on of only te n runs we lost Martin. Ga rdne r and Howell, and at 65 Parsons and T homson. bu t at this point Adams and Dalw igk mad e a short stand, the former being content to kee p up his wicket while Dalwigk made the ru ns. The innings closed for 129. Dalwigk played a very use ful inni ngs an d made some very pretty off-drives. H e had hard luck in not reaching his fi fty . On going in to bat \Vye College lost their fi rst wicket in the third over of the innings owi ng to a fi ne one hand ed catch in the slips by Howell. Fitzroy and J ackson. made the res ult alm os t ce rtain, and th e runs we re hit o ff for the loss of five wickets. T he School fi eldi ng wa~ very good throughout th e in nings, and in addition to H owell's catch in tht! sli ps, Parson s at mid-off and i\l arti n at t hird man deserve men tion, the lirst named both fo r catc hil1{r and ground fi elding.


T HE

/

55

CANTUARIAN.

Full Score and Analysis :K I NG'S SCHOO L. W N Kempe , b Scott-Moncricff , .. .

2,o

.

18

L: J. Bassett. c Morrell, b Scotl-Moncnetf G F Howell b Morrell ... .',' . ..: R: E'. Martin 'c Redmayne , .b SCOll· ~'I oncncA H . Gardner, b Scott·Moncneff : .. ... C. J. N. Adams, st Stayner, b Hames ... H . Parsons, (till out S ... b S~~tl' l\'roncricff A. L. B. T homson, c layner, . . R. E. R. Dalwigk, not out. ..· .. C. S. Merrett, b Scott .Mo~cneff D. V. Dunlop, c amI b I-l ames Extras

3 o II

5 o

,8 o 4 16 12 9

Total WVE

CO LLEGE. 29 2 12

W H. R. Filzroy, c Dunlop, b fo.l errclt E.' W. Morrell, c l-lo:Ycll, b Thomson. k A. H. G. I-Iaines, c Gardncr, b Dalw1g G. R. Jackson, not out.. . ... H A Clive c Parsons, b Bassett : .. F: H : Vaughan, c Parsons, b Marlin J. W. Stayner, llotout .,. . .. H. B. Redmayne } G. Tatrot did not bat N Mount .. \V. Scotl-Moncrieff E xtras

48 5

16

6

17

135

Tolal (fo r 5 \Yickets~ BOW LI NG ANALYSIS : WY I~

C OLLEGE.

o. Thomson Dalwigk Dunlop .. ' Merrett ... Bassett Marlin Adams

8 9 3 6

, 4

3"

:\\.

2 I

0 0 I

0 0

R.

W.

28 25

I I

II

0

2. 8 14

8'

0


THE

CANTUARIAN.

. KING'S SCHOOL v. R.M.L.r. TillS match was played Jun e ...th't on the St. Lawrence Ground. OUf opponents started batting on on a sodd Montgomery was now joined by Sutcli~en ~ ~h, an,d lost a good 0wicket first ball. forrn.er was out through a smart bit e~;nfie:(;~l pair put on about 7 rt':l1S before the contmued to play very steadily advan' I' g by Gardner. Sutchffe, however short of the century, he was li S score by singles, till, when gave any trouble, hitting the slower bY [un out. aJor Wray alone of the rest closed at 3.30, leavil~g us 23 8 to get. Ba~~:t~r=n~eIt successfully, and th,e innings be~an to hope for victory; but when the ~ . .c~pe started off mernly and we domg well, until Dalwigk came in 1.1' lfatter lclft. ~l collapse ensued, Bassett alone best s t ro ke an d was very much to . th IS . un d ou b ted ly his ~ arwarc . .cut l>ast co ver IS short by 50 odd runs. e ore 111 a VIgorous 49¡ None the less we fell

u~fortun~:;lg

~ostly

6

Scores and Analysis : R.M.L.I.

o 94 40

Lieut. Festing, b Dalwigk Sergt. Sutcliffe, run out Captain ~10ntgomery, ru~'~ut Pte. Wilhams. b Dalwigk Sergt. i\lu rphy. Ibw, b Dalwigk CaI?tain Hutchison , b Dalwigk Major Wray, b Dalwig:k ... Pte. Aorteon, b Dalwigk ... Pte. Bateman. b Thomson Captain Graham. not out ... Pte. Kitchingham, b Thomson Extras ... ..

20

o 16

49 3 2

S o

6

Total

K ING 'S SCIIOOL. L. J. Bassett, b Montgomery W N K . ... G . r' empe, c Sutcl Iffe, b Montgomery ... " ~. H ow~U, b Kitchingham h. E. [I.'l artln, b Kilchingham H. Gar,dner , b Montgomery .. ~. T: N . Adam~, c Graham, b Kltchll1ghum . E . R. Dalwlgk, b Kltchingham I-I. Parsons, not out C. S. Merrett, b i\'rontgo~{~ry ... A . L. B. Thomson, b Montgomery" D. V. Dunlop, b Montgomery Extras ... Total

53 31 9 3 o 14

49 I

4

o o

15

'19


\

57

CANT UARJAN.

THE

BOWLING ANALVSIS:

R.M.L.I. Dalwigk Thomson Dunlop .. . ;\'l erretl .. . Adams .. . Bassett .. '

o.

M.

22

4

10

51

W.

6 2 0

0

32 36 26

0

19

0

6

0

10

I

3 5

••

68

0 0

KING'S SCHOOL v. HYTHE C.C. This match was played at H ythe, on Thursday, June 6th, and resulted in the Inevitable" draw." Our opponents won Lhe toss and cornmcnced batting at about haIr-past twelve with' Edwards and Leney, Lhe latter being dismissed shortly2 by a Hlraight ball from Dunlop. De nn e took his place, and with Edwards put on 7 runs hefore he was bowled by Ad·ams. Another wicket" fell in the next over, just befo re Lh. luncheon interval. Rain fell during the interval. but play was resumed and fast "coring resulted, Chichester being missed in the long field. Another heavy shower postponed play for an hour when the score stood at 18 0 . On resuming, our opponents I\(:ciared when 2 00 was reached without further loss of wickets. Bassett and Howell began for the School, and soon seemed quite at home with lh bowling; bat after a short combination Howell was bowled. Gardner joined IJnssctt, but after a nice bit of fast scoring was dismissed by a very smart one-handed i [\Lch by Edwards in the slips. \·Vickets fell pretty regularly until stumps were drawn, h'tlVing us 153 for 6 wickets. Basselt played a very good and bright innings, only Ki ving one chance at the wicket. and that not till he had reached 60. Martin also llln)'cd good cricket. The fielding of the School team was not up to its u~ual high standard, a fact which was largely due to the greasiness of the bal\. For Hythe. Edwards played Illlplendid innings, scoring freely all round the wicket. Score and analysis :H VTHE.

125

3

A. C. Edwards, not oul B. Leney, b Dunlop T. T. Denne. b Adams J. Proclor, b Merrett

21

... .

..

...

5 39

J.a~~. TChh;~~~~~cr, 1l0}t0\\1. .. G. Philpott, C. Bushel, F. G. Small, C. D. Snowdon, Appleton, Extras:

d'd I

no

Byes. 9

j

tb at.

Leg·byes,

I ;

Wides,2 .. ... * 205

Total (3 wickets)

* I nnings declared closed.


THE

58

CANTUARIAN .

KING'S Bassett. c and b Philpott G. F. Howell , b Chichester H. Gardner, c Edwards, b Chichester R. E. Marlin, c Edwards, b Philpott \Y. N. Kempe, run oul ... C. J. N . Adams, c Edwards, b Denne R. E. R. Dalwigk, not Ollt H . Parsons, } C. S. Merrett, did not bat. D. V. Dunlop. L.

SCHOOL.

J.

E. P. Collings, Ext ras:

Byes, 4; Leg¡byes,

2 j

72 12

'4

"13 ,9 Widcs ;

2;

No-ball,

I ;

9

Total ...

'53 BOWLING ANAl.VSIS, HVTHE.

Dalwigk Dunlop Adams

Merrett

o.

i\f.

R.

IV.

14 7

I

0

0

II

I

64 33 54 26

8

KING'S

SCHOOL v.

0

MR . LATTER'S

I

XI.

Played on June I I tho Mr. Latter most kindly got together a team at a day's notice to replace the Highgate Match . We won the toss, an d went in at 12.4°, Kempe left at 1.20, and Gardner stayed with Bassett till lunch. when the score stood at 1 00 for one. Gardner played a characteristically vigoro us innings, and was well caught at square-leg for 3 I. Martin made a steady 49; but Bassett's century was' the chief feature of the match. At 80 he put one up dangerously close to first slip ; but beyond this he played faultlessly, his cutting especially being superb, and his driving very forceful. The innings closed for 275. Our opponents started badly. losing a wicktt in the first over; but with Mr. Latter and the Rev. Rashleigh together, the fielders had plenty to do. Both played excellent cricket, and really placed the side in a winnin g position. There was an hour left and <)0 runs to get. To our great surprise Murrin ran up a brilliant 81, which, except for a very dilflcult chance at lhe wicket at 10, he madc without blemish, thereby winning the match. As the wickct was good, it is quite likely that the absentee, Howell, would just have made the ditlerence. Score and analysis ;-


THE

59

CANTUARIAN .

KING'S

SCHOOL.

128 '0 3' 49 10

J.

Bassett, c and b Nea~e W. N. Kempe, c sub., b Blgg I-I. Gardner, c sub., b l\~alden R. E. Matlin, c and b Neame. 'C. J. N. Adams, Ibw, b l\,l~rnn ... R. E. R. D alwigk , c Murnn, b Neame H. Parsons, b Neame C. S. Merrett, nol out 1 , .• A. L. B. Thomson, b Ncamc D. V. D unlop, b Nca.n~c .. . E. P. Collings, b Murrm .. , L.

0

0 25 0 0

5 275

Total.,. MR. LATTER'S A. 1\'1. Hilton, b TI,t0mson G. Neame, b Oalwlgk .. . . ' . . .. . Rev. W. Rashleigh, c Thom;>on , b Dalwlgk .. . A. Latter, c Bassett, b M?-rtm .. . Rev. 1-1. R. Bigg, b Martm A. P. Trueman, b Thomson 'yV. Murrin, run Oll t : '. Rev. E. Malden, b Oalw1gk C. E. Harris, did not bat. H. Baly, b Dalwigk C. Auty, not oUl

Xl.

17 0

72 59 53 0

Ho 8

7 0 302

Total BOWLING ANAl,VSIS.

l\b. LATTER'S XI.

Dalwigk Thomson Collings Martin Merrett Hassett

o.

M.

17 17 3 8

2

•.

I

o

73 70 29 66 18 13

2

o

'9

5

I

o I

o

\v •

4 2 0 2 0

0 0

parson:s=~==;================;;

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES.

.

S I 1 S t ' 90 " Vlth from Sept., 1( . MOORE-King's Scl~01Iar. ;t E~t:pr~d ,t,9h~5 . c H~u'se Mo~~itor, S~Pt .• 1906; 1st. XV. 19 0 4 ; l' om or, ". : C 1 '19 0 7' Sports' Commtttee, 19 0 5- 6, 19 06 -7 j Sports . 0 ours~ , 1906-7; Hon. Sec. Cml/1~aYlan, ~ 9~.)-orts' Colours, 1907 . II C MANGIN-Entered the School, Sept., 190 P 'r 19 ' 1St XV 1906-7' . W·. HUNT-Entered the School, Jan., 1901; ym. pal, 06 , .

8


60 THE

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL NEWS. The Boa r~ of Educa tion has ins ccted . ~Ve c~ ngratlil ate H. F. Re Holds on it claims th~ right o lIl~pcct all th e Public Schools und er WlIlll lllg Ius firs t boat colours ' ~ld H G Dalto n, G. M. Webster' B .G. ' Gan'ba'Id I" th e pow~r transferred to tha t Boa rd b ' V C T ~he C~anty Comm issioners. Th e Schod, ,: .' aylor, and H . de H. Smith o~ IS no t 111de bted to any Go vernm ent Depart ~lI1.nll1g thell' second boat colours. The mcnt [or pec un ' . . ~ ­ rst b~at now. have a cap, blazer, a nd The ~ II . Ia l Yo r any other assIstance vest Wi t h rowing crests and s k . .. °d owmg are the na mes of those wh~ colo h ' • oc s. as cm n c out th e Inspecti on :_ .u rs; t e second boat, a vest with ro wlIl g crest and socks Mr." Wi; C. Fletcher-the Chief In spec tor *, ~.' o~ e,c ondaryEd ucation wh o inspected p rlllCl pally th e IVJ athe matics. . . ,.'vVc cOll.!fratlilatc G. H. Bella rs on P r aSSI.ng z+th .lJl to Osborne College direct Dr. R. F. Scott. a StaffIn spe"IO,' . d tJ E ' '- -lIlSpcClro m th e J Ull lOr School. ~ 1e ' nghsh Subj ects. and a ll t he -.:.' ,;;. ~eller~1 ~rran gcm ents of th e S·' I Its BUlld lllgs, &c . C 100 , I, refo rmcd of Latin Dr·MF·d Spcncer, a St;df I nspec lor_ the .'ld,s een adopted throughout the School t liS tenn. 1 0 ern Languages. .

~hc ,S:hool tIllS term , as

~rhc

';"'1/~

Mr. A. Dufto n-Science D rd.wlIlg ' &rc Mr , R • W. 1'v" 1' 'J ' I , . ' lI te- lompso n - Classic and the Boarding H ouses, &c. s

I ~o lll e alterations have been made for t 1C peech Day, a nd the new a rra ngements are as foll ows :_

J

The .full 0 fl"lela I J', eport has not "'t een receIved, but the rema rks nnde)c.:: the Inspectors ci min o- the" " < by ~ett~rs received fro m ~hem l~i!~~~t~l~l~I!~tC lI1cilcate that they were mu ch plca ·· ., )1 . I' what they saw. ~C( WI t 1

7·+5 · l~JolyCo mmllnion in the Cathedral. o. Commemoration Service. z. 0, T he Sp~eches a nd D istri buti on of Pnzes, +- 6.3 0 , Ga rden Party in t he Grange Garden.

b

' Ve co ngratulate Air C· , b' elected a Fellow of the.R ~tfcH.n e.lllg Society. \,.°Yd Iston cal ~

,,~

11 b ' We congratulate ARB ' . earson elOg made a monitor this term.

p:~nllllciation

J o.

T,l~;

* ,'.'

. An ni,versar; IJreac her this ear Ihe" l,ev. F. H a rrison M.A. (0 S 18 4 2 1847 ) S . ~ [h' . . . f 0, ?lllO r ' at ematical Scholar xfo rd University in r852 ; Fellow of T fl Cl Collcg.e from 1852- 1868; Dean and utor at One I College ti ll , 867' Tunior Proctor in 186+; Rector of North \V hall, Wilts. rax.

IS

o'

k


\

-

THE

CANTUARIAN .

VALETE.

I,:. 1Vf. Tuke, R. B. Goad, 1':. A. Freeman, Parsons, T. P. Cane, C. de H. Smith.

J.

IUNTA

As I journ eyed through. th e wil de rness o f this world, I lighted upon a ce rtain

river and wandered th ereby in search of Home new thin g. It was floated upqn by divers kind s of boats in whi ch some were Hecking pleasure, others pain. First a ('unoe bore two languidly propped on lIshions, In the heedlessness of youth they had forgotten the potato patches whi ch ran down to t he ri ver from th e backs of most prosaic cottages; they turn ed a deaf ear to t he grunt of a distant n'Olor and heard only th e splash of th eir paddl es, let their eyes rest only on sky .,od field. They san g as they dri fted ; Mllrely some hymn to river hauntin g godI hen the wo rds came, "Hello, hello. hello, its a differe nt "_" Degeneracy! H J cri ed, H degeneracy of mind and body, I float thus idly to such a measure. 0 fo r some swift moving kcel. mightily driven "- and as if in a nswer to my prayer It cam e. In it one alone and girded, struck with his blades now the reeling

T. Kempe, G. W. R. Simpson, C. A. C.

PEL

stars, now t he fathoml ess mud of rive rhed. Zeal an d clumsiness dwell ill togethe r, thought I. But he ex ultin g went furiously, blindly as if disdaining the bounds of th e stream and willing to carve so me fresh channel with his prow. T oo late he saw, and, with a cry to pat ron saint or gods . below was dashed into the ba nk. wh irled round , a nd a way. away. Wh o shall say whithe r ? Doomed perhaps to float next upon that rive r H wherein no man casts an gle." that river which none crosses tw ice. I followed to resc ue, but suddenly so terrible an odo ur was bo rne to me fro m t he farLher bank that I turned, left ingloriously my quest a nd fled. Yet wh en afar I forgot t he pale eyed suffe rer, th e Stygian stenches, and longed again to look upon those waters. "Never more" quoth Necessity. more ominous a fowl than any raven. " never morc," and with harsh croak winged past the river to t he wilde rness beyond,-and I must fo llow.


6,

THE

,.

CAN T UAR IAN.

RIFLE SHOOTING

Ea rly 111 th e te rm a match took I - • ~~efZI\I~,~r~goon Guards, ,;'110 we re' J~te~"~e~C~~"~np~I~I~t~Ch~Ohl team from . . e Eight teams and and ascores were 7TH D RAGOOK GU AR DS.

Mr. Corn fi eld Sergl. Lynch SergI. Clive ·~rumpt.. Major 'vVi·l·lcoc1.:~· · Scrgt. Hastings ... Sc rg~. Phill ips ... Scrgt. Adams Sergt. Evan s

K ING'S SC HOOL

II. Townshend D. 1-1. Cowie

30 30

28 28 27 27

.. .

. ..

.

31 30

D, O. Fa rdcll

30 28

B. Crowley W. E. Baker I~ . 1-1 . Warde, ii. : G. Spick crncli J. S. Vates .

26

25

.8 28 27 24

221

o

226

betw ~

JUll \! I I ,-There was a rnatch won by 2 0 1 points to 186.

cen our 2nd VBl. and Kent College. T he

n

School On Ju ne 13.-The 2nd VI II . C.R.c::. Their excellent total of ; we~~ agalll successru l, against the 2nd VIII. 'of the especially to be congratulated on ~nncour.lglllg the .tn':ltch easIly.. Galpi n and Hancock arc start with 32 each. <

trl!ir

THE BOAT CLUB b i" ~~a~~:Jo pu~ ani an}' n~:lVices' crews this yelr. se~~~~I~y... a~.te~. Th ~ Fours were rowed on th e T uesda

I

.Unfortunately we were as m1l1ute vacanCIes had to up 111 t 1e senIOr crews F or tl . ~bbott' s boat \\- as speciall r unfo;tl u s reason the Seni ors were rather scrat I Irke winning but Abbott h[mself On the, few occasions it went out it cll~d the late change wrecked t h' I e. to 10\\ . and a fresh stroke had to be fo I WlIlIlcrs formed th e one crew .. I t is consoling that The foll owing were the results ;ge ler steadily during practice.

w~~~~~~bl whic~l:v~nl:~~~~oco~~plctely

Heal Bow. 2.

~.

Slr. Cox.

I. - 13,\CK S TATI ON.

C. F. 1\1. Ryan c. L. Nighting:\lc E. K. Barber . V. L . Taylor H. de I f. Sm uh , 'v' •

st. 7 11 9 5

Ib S.

9 1 3 II 2

loo{e~ l~~~~

F RONT S T ATJ ON.

1::. B. Nelson, il . S. D. Turner.. . It C . Ganha l(h T. S. G A Nelson C ' i. . . . Jones, I.

. . ..

st .

Ibs.

8

9

II

2

13 T aylor gai ned at the start but N I~ • mo re than a length to the good . .~ :s~n drew away along th e straight but was never catch the leading boat and was beat ayborl cla.me up to ward:s t he fi nis h but could not en y 1a t a length. 6


\

THE

Bow . . 2. J. !-ilr. Cox .

CANTUARI AN .

Heat II.

~

~

A. G. Lennon Brown H. G. Dalton G. H. K. RlIrge

9 10

6 6

TO

C. W. Hunt ...

II

1T 3

~

~

G. Spickernell A. C. F luke .. . C. M. Webster H . P. Sparling W. G. H inds ...

R. S. Glyn, ii. 5 10 6 10 Hunt began to gain at th e start and rounding the co rn er part of th e \f ood of Wcbsters' rowloc k broke and he nearly lost his oa r. On gettin g going again . aided h)' a bad corner by Hunt's boat Sparlin g regai ned th e distance lost. Hunt came up lignin and nearin g the finish was nearly bumpin g. To avoid the fo ul their cox nearly look them into t~e bank, but clearing they won easily by about z length s.

Final Heat.

Hunl

11.

Nelson.

Nelson went off fast at the start drawi ng away a little until the corn er. H ere I run t was picking up a bit but his boat was taken almost into th e inside bank. On Hotting clear of this the boat had a narrow escape for th e other bank, stroke hav ing to h Id her to bri ng her st rai ght. Nelson by this got a comfortable lead of about fo ur or fi ve lengths. Along the straight Hunt made a big effort and pulled a little back. lind a crab in the leading boat redu ced the lead still furth er. T o end a chapter of ~lC'cidents another crab in Hun t's boat put Lhe finish beyond doubt ancI Nelson won by I~bout th ree lengths.

BOAT RACE. T he Annual Boat Race against T onb ridge School was rowed at T onbridge on Hnlllrday. J une 8th. Tonbridge had measles so we did not see so much of om0 hosts 11 11 we shoul d have wished. The ra ce betwcen the fi rst boats was started at 2.3 p. m. I'onbridge hav ing the front station. T he School rathe r lost by the corn er at the "tart, as T onbridge missed a good deal of it. After the corner our boat went up a Itlll â&#x20AC;˘ but the stroke was not fast enough. and T onbridge graduall y drcw " wa)'. At Ih(' bridge they had a leael of about a length and a half which t he}' kept to the end I1 IH\ won by I O~' seconds. The School rowed very wel1 under the strange co nd itions j II H lrange boat and a strange course tend vcry much to upset a crew. Had the fo ur hl'on able to keep together aLa quicker strok e we mi ght verr well have won. T he "IN'ond boat did not shapf! so well , they slarted from the back station, bu t the stroke flK,\i n was too slow, and th e tim e not so good as t he ir opponents. Tonbridge gradually drew awa), and won fairly easil y by 35 seconds. Vve take t his opportunity of t hanking ' linn bridge for their hospitality to us, also we thank most heart ily M r. Douglas Reid II)r lhe interest he has taken in th e Boat Clu b, and for his great kindness in giving up


THE

CANT UARIAN.

so much of his time in coaching the First Boat, and Mr. Reay for coaching the Second Boat. The First Boat have at last got thei r long deserved blazer, and the efforts of th e Second Boat have been rewarded in the form of special socks and vests. The O.K.S. and whiff races are on July 4th, when a crew from Oxford are coming down. rST BOAT.

Dow. 2.

Sir.

Cox.

2ND BOAT.

I-I. T. E. L.

F. Heynolds S. Nelson K. Rarber P. Abbott G. A. C. Jones

Bow. 2.

SIr,

Cox.

V. C. Taylor G. Garibaldi G. M. Webster

n.

H. G. Dalton T-I. de H. Smith

HARVEY SOCIETY. On Ascension Day the Society once again arranged the time honoured expedition to the Folkestone V\'arren. The weather was very favo urabl e, th ough the twenty-eight members that set out had to battle against a strong breeze. The encouragement o f Natural History has ever been the ohject of this expedition j

but th e beauties of Nature seem to have been studi ed in their entirety rather than in their various branches. Though no specimens. the refore, of any special interest were obtained, all were sor ry to turn their backs on the wind a nd speed homC'.

H OPE. See the gold glory of the Western sky Gleaning the scattered radian ce of th e day; Well may the light of heaven pass away If with gilt wi ngs it fly !

But 10, the gold is gone : yet red remains Red has its own sad charm. tho' gold is bright, 'Twere hard to say wh ich shed the softe r light Over the darkling plains. Red too departed; now the sky is grey Yet 'twas a gorgeo us scene-and who can tell But that more gorgeous red, yea, gold as well May come with break of day!


\

THE

65

CANTUARJAN.

O. K. S. N E W S. J. A. H ellard has played for Somerset.

Brevet-Major H. Isacke. Royal ~Vest I ont Regiment, has been appomted ''\If\tT-Capt. Administrative Hea?quarters. ;' Sn uthern Command, in succeSS10n to the 1i\I~ Capt. H. S. Pennell, V.C.

~

~;.

A. VV. Sarson'':-rowed bow in the Lincoln Boats in the Eights at Oxford. ~

.;;. \';'

oJ:, %

D. K. Anderson \~nd R. M. H end erson II/we obtained commissions in the Army h'om the Militia.

H. P. V . Townend is going as spareman fOI the St. J oh n (Oxford) Roat at Henley.

"

L. T. \\Tatkins is rowing in the C.C.C. Cambridge boat at ~l;nley.

~:-f:.+;'

% ~

D. J. Preston ~ained a 1st ~Iass I I on ours in the Classlcal Tnpos at Cam-

"',,:.'

hridgc, J. Twells gained a 2nd Class, A. Gillibrand gai ned a 3rd Class.

-;'\ *' ;'<:.

S. S. Sopwith took a 2nd Class Mora~ H iences Tripos, and A. P. ~p.thuen ~ook It t 2nd Class Mechanical SCiences Tn p05 I\t Cambridge. +;. oX·

H. A. Jenkin gained a 2nd Class in I'llrt II. of th e Histor)' Tripos. ~~c

E. A. Roper gaine~ a 2nd Class Honours In Classical ModeratIOns at Oxford. oJ(.

+;.

~~

A service written by the Rev. G. .C. I';. Ryley was played in t~e Cathed ral on the occasion of th e DIOcesan Choral Union Festival, on Wednesday, May 29 th . .x. * O. F. I-Iuyshe *has been given his II Etcetera" colours, a nd. played lor xford against th e South Afn cans.

...•.

,

The O.K.S. Supper will take place on Tuesday, July 30th. The Captaw (G. H. S Pinsent) will be glad If all who Wish to ;lttend, would send him th ei r nam es. ~.'

The 0.K.8. Match will take place on Tuesday and Wednesday, July 30th . All who wish to play should send their nam es as soon as possible to G. C. Strahan, l{rhle Colkge, Oxford.

,.*'

%

CANTERBURY PILGRTMS

C. C.

As usual , the above Club will play two matches after Speech Day. Fhe matches arranged for this year a.re aga\l1st the R.M.L.L at Walmer on Fnday, Aug. 2nd, and against Hothfield at l-Iothfield Place on Saturday, August 3rd . Any O.K.S who wou ld be willing and able to play in either or both are ~eqlle-st.ed Lo com municate as early as pOSSible With the Rev. R. F. E1wyu. Felsted School,

G. C. Strahan pla)'{'d in the Freshmen s Match at Oxford and Tor Keble College. !Essex.


66

THE

CANTUARIAN.

IN THE STILLNESS OF NIGHT. Oh! Hark to the 50no- of the wave As it kisses the sho;e. ' , ~ sig~ is its song, TIs a kISS ano no more. Oh! I-l a rk to the SOI1O' of the wind As it sweeps o'er thOe deep. It sighs in its song For a haven of sleep . Strike softly your harp' Sing s\~eetly your SO:lg ; For the sIlence of niO"ht Bears its burth en ~on~ o¡ J

But hark to the song of the Moo n As silver she gleams. I , ~ 1~h ere' s p,eaee in her song: 1 here s hope 1Il her beams. . H ark, hark to the song of her soul As she shines in the night " Man sigh not," she sings " But look to the light." ' Stri~e softly your harp; SlIlg sweetly your song: Let peace be the burthen That night bears along.

I

OXFORD LETTER. Dear School, . \Ve write und er the depressing ~nfluen~es of a wintry term, and the week ImmedmtAly followi ng Eights Week. For all that 9 .K.5. are flourishing up here, and testdled to their well -being at a largely attended meeting in Scott's palatial Our most ancient member rooms. ~ovenschen , is s.ufferin g fro m an attack of .... c ho o~s , and h~tle news of his usual centUries at c ricket has reached us. Hu)'she (as all the wo rld and the School k~ows) play~d against th e South Africans With the assistance of nine or ten other men, but hi s chief glory is that he succes.sfully shed Adams out of a trailer while 1l1troduci.ng hi m to the delights of a. motor bicycle. The last nam ed occasIOnally mak es so me run s against

5eco~Hl El even~, and shares S~a~ord,. and fown encl a

with Mosse, punt which r("-jolces III the name of Rhanhjigamp . Mosse spe nds his ti me at the Museum except when he iS ,fishing, in a punt, or walklIl g .back from Dorchester where ~ motor bicycle requires repairs. Spafford ~s full of good works and tennis, while rown cnd has been enjoying himself as spar? man for the Eight. He has not published a ~lew poem for some weeks. C~n the ~dltors say why? Budd and WlI1 ser. claim all the credit fo r the success of theIr respective Eig.hts; they may perhaps c0!1.ch the Varsity next sprin g. Our on ly E.l g ht~man this year is Sarson, \V~o led the LlIlcoln boat on its way. Dlbben and I3rinsley-Richards have at last revealed th eir latent power of playing


\

THE

f"

CANTUARIA N.

the air in th e " Keble Gardens." Frewer tcmnis, but we are sorry to hear a rt\mour we have not seen this term, neither has lhat the last named was really responsible Smith shewn himself. \¥e suspect the fo r a regrettable raid on a Grand Stand. fonner is preoccupied with Schools. Of Armitage was flooded o ut of his rooms by the rest Ricketts, Box and Roper (A. G.) Saturday's storm, and with admirable are enjoying themselves in divers methods promptitude immediately set to work to until the temperature of the river is Hllt an O.. K.S. four together to row against suitable to punting. Parsons is not with . the School. Strahan has been teaching us this term, and as he has not condescendI cble and others how to hit, and then ed to honour uS with a letter, so no one prol.:eeded to bowl them wh eu they did knows wheth er he is still a much-to· beII t do so. H e has found the strain of pitied im'alid or an unmitigated slacker. 110nour Mods : too heavy a burden to Report says that he is attacked by gout. \) I.'ar, and has(withcommendable fortitude ) \Ve trust Report i$ false. VIc were very H't out to urganize an onslaught o n P. . glad to see the H eadmaster last week, Mods. May it prove as small an obstacle and look forward to his promised visit on lt~ "Divvers." Two O. K.S. are still the 19th, to the O.K,S. dinner which Itlriving to satisfy the Examin ers in thi s Dr. Field is 50 generously providing. last School-hitherto they have been Firminger has been the only Non-Oxford I'ontemptuously rejected. Maclear has O.K.S. whom we have seen this term . Kl1 ccessfully accomplished two whole May th e best of lu ck attend your cricket (lrills-or nearly two. while \oVickham has (and certain papers in the Certificate ye been seen the centre of attraction to the VIth). Strahan has good ho pes of bringlairer sex. This however occupies quite ing a representative team down at the end l ~ small part of his time, his chief delight of July. OUf news is given, but we have h ' ing in Law, or is it Badminton? one request. We want lots of recruits to K A. Roper is frequently to be seen in supply our losses at th e end of th is term, Il punt , and we have heard a melodious so avoid ye <I the other place." VOtce from. Queens. Is it - - ? Olive is Ludying humanity-and history-from a O.K .S. aXON. window in Keble. He occasionally takes

A PIG-I-STICK.· There is an air of somethincr being in \ waiting on an open rocky space by the roadlhe wind, as the sun gri ns gaily down on to side. It is mid-day; and the bush~s and I~ collection of carriages and horsesJspears- trees scattered among the rocks glImmer mon, shikaris and junglis which are all with faint greenJ picked out by the mere


68

THE

CANTUARIAN .

ghost of a shadow and the waves of air travel in swift little waves along the surface of the brown and purpl e rocks. 'We are met here for the cult of

Mr. Pig. A fine old specimen has been tracked in the early morning by his foo tprints to a clu mp of bushes in a shallow rocky water-course not far off; and we are met here, si x mounted spearmen ( five with puggarees, one v.."ith a topee, ÂŁ.e., five Rajputs and one Augrezi). awaiting the arrival of H. H. the Rao of Cuteh who is 11 noted hand at this noble art. There are some mOllnted attendants carrying substitute spears in case of ours getting broken. Horses stamp or whining at intervals j shikaris and beaters squat under any possible shade j a low spasmodic hum of conversation, and the heat waves go flickering by over t.he rocks and among t.he bushes. At length wheels are heard, and the Rao Sahib comes driving up ; and all is stir and movement. The Rao converses with the leading shikari, and we mount and rid~ olf across the rocks towards the shallow nulla, beaters leading. The lat.ter spread out across the nuHa-bed j and the horsemen split up, some on this side some on that. The horses are agog for a coming run j they have played this game before. The beaters are not making much noise, sl'sh-ing and flogging the bushes with sticks. Suddenly there is a scuttle among the bushes ahead, and a large pig with four small ones breaks out some yards in front of me. I am starting in chdse, but the shikaris ca ll me back; that was only a sow and butches j the big boar has not come out yet. But

sim ultaneously vne"-sees the fine old chap standing fast in a bush, in the vcry line of beaters. A stone is cast, and with a gnnph, gnnph , grmph, he charges out-worst luck on the side away from me, nearly knocking over some beaters on his headlong way; right through the band of horsemen on that side and awav into the bushes scattered over the rocks. The horse men turn and are after him, whil e l urge my gee over the nasty sharp rocks of th e nulla. The Raja of Rut.lan is first after him and Piggy has not gone far before a spear penetrates his tough bristly old skin. But he is off again among stunted trees, pursued by the clattering hoofs. As he dodges round a tree, he sees the Raja's horse co ming lip on the othe r side. He goes for him at <1n angle of +5°, inte nd ing to slay before he be slain. But the Raja has lowered his spear, and drives it home. Sir Pig is not yet done; he gallops on endeavourin g still t.o gai n that horse, while the Raja gallops 011 too alongside, the fixed spear keeping them apart, and so for 30 yards th ey ride, over th e road and into the bushes beyond. But Piggy is now done j he falls and rises not again. A fme old chap, rising some six years with powerful strong tushes. Aft.er a discourse on his merits, the field rides off again to beat a large bushy enclosure, where a yo un ger pig is known to be. The jungle there ic; beaten in vain j and the riders a re just going to break off, when out charge six piglings with a large r one in the centre. Off go the horsemen i but the pack hide a minute in some brushwood, turn and make back for the enclosure j they


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

a, nd he dodges in and out of this when close pressed; aneI as tI1e horse s weary of this up and down work, he gallops, somewhat tired, along further and f~lr~l~er ahead, till h~ is lost among the dechv1ttcs

f "Ilr.,n,ble over its walls and" sah1.tem ,. t thuga

IlIltlllll," as others have don~ be ore. em \lr did when I was in the lVhddl e Thud. But some mounted attendants are

I"Hide the enclosure and with a hoot and ft them . vVe nders yell th ey are ~ or w come out on the

II

know. that

therl~v\I~\~:,

bq

and folds of the hills. !

'But it was a nice run ; and he w~s and we canter ! younC'r; he will be a better prize whel.1 hIS

::~Li\;:j:~~~~~:~~~;~;,~t~'~i~~;~s\:il;~~kpr~~ I ::~~heeO~C~~"~'~~~;~~ ~t~~; p~~~e~u;'~f;~

now ~ for a aood ride. for the like measure of success. 0 I d¡ t. 1 . f k liKS must be makin g for t lOse lstan You fellows might try a cyc e pIgS IC' II lIs. Myself and another are soon on cut towards Harbledown. if ) 'OU.can get a th tracks of the bigger fel~ow, though sport.ing pig, and on~' that w111 stick to the II(" has a long start. But he 15 cra fty a~lc1 roads. knows his nullas. O~e long deep nt~ ~ J. H .S. III1IS down from the lulls acroSS the plal11 ,

0" pre . HI ... Oll t ,

I

, \ innin with S and another consonant. . The)' therefore prefix ' \1,1ssulm:tn s e:tnt man:t~Cll a wo.rel "leg. ") g y :tm not Smith bUl h;.mito-Salub. nn " I

(ns

it1

j>1g . '

.

,

CORRESPONDENCE. .b r cOJlllected 'lvillt tile opinions oj tIlth- COl'respon. N, ll. _ The Editors duti" e /0 (l ccept ally reSjl~"SI I Ik~' i;en, ,;ot necessarily lor pull/icalioll, bllt as a dents. Name ami arl1rtsS JIlust a w/.:'s .llvohJe arlain njerlioll. /. ellers should /J( <Juatal1tee of good (alth. pu sol/a I ItS 1t1l I ~/Jri((t1J Oil one side of tIll, paper oni)'.

Ii ."

\ a chevron argent between three keys of ~h e last (m1]etl/) j' three starS ~f th? field. I1fay, 1907¡ Can any reader of the Cauluanau give any reaso n for the difference. of the m~tals, I)!I,AR SIRS, or state wh ich of the two 1S correct. The Arms of Archbishop Parker, as Yours, etc., di splayed on. the central window in the E. S. CUTCHEON . Schoolroom are, - gules. on. a chevron (Eon .\: V e have verified Corrcsl~mdcnt:s nrgent between three keys or, three stars statement from the shield$; of our the Arehhlshop$; LB uf the' field. Hasted in his History of the Chapter H ouse.] ({cnl, Vol. Il., gives t.hem as,-gules, on

'1'0 the Editors 0/

."

"THE CANTU A RIAN.


THE

To the Edt/ors l!,f

CANTUARIAN.

"THE CANTUA RYAN,"

To the Ed,"/ors

0/ "THE

CANTeARIAN ."

DEAR SIRS,

I venture to raise again the subject of O.K.S. Colours, not with any hope of an immediate change, but si mply to voice the general dissatisfaction with those at present in (potential) usc, and to state the almost unanimous opinion of Oxford an cl Cambridge O.K.S., and of such others as I have been able to consult.

The objection to the present hatribbon is two-fold. It is most inartistic, and it in no way rese mble s an Old Boys' Colours. The Committee must surely have visited an out-of-the-way place in Donegal . where a coastguard station sports an almost exactly similar pattern.

If a census of O.K.S. opinion was to be taken, by far the greater number would be found to favour the introduction of a third colour. This would be in accordance with the usual custom of other Schools. and would enable O.K.S. to wear a distinctive instead of a uni que ribbon. Th~ difficulties, which beset the Committee owing to their havin g decid ed to confine the colours to blue and white, must in evitably offer an insuperable obstacle to any improvement. If it is und erstood that O.K.S. do desire a third colour, we feel sure' that a suitabl e ribbon can be designed.

1 am, etc.,

O.K.S., OXON. [EDD.-Ahhough we a rc in full 3grecillent wilh our Correspondenl's lett cr, we feci that his delay in writing must add great difficulties to any change.

DEAR S IR S,

I hope I am not taking too mlich upon myself in making the following remar ks with regard to the King's School Boat Club. The dOllble victory of the School against Tonhridgc last year seems to be an event in the history of the Boat Club which should bring its growing importance before the minds of those connected with it, either in the preser.t or in the past, directly or indirectly. It is thus a fitting opportunity for those in authority to make an appeal for funds whereby to improve the equipment of the Boat Club. As the Boat Club now stands, it is considered by the majority as a mere accidental side-show ; an excuse and opportunity for slacking,-a charge which is to some extent justified. and would receive corroboration, no doubt, from one more eloq uent than I, famou s for his philosoph)' and skill in the feedin g of boilers. If an effort were made to rai se the necessa ry funds to improve the Boat-" hOllse, to get new Boats, &c., th e Boat Club would become a recognized part of the School just as Cricket, Football, and Athletics now are. The advantages that would accompany suc h an effort seem to be many. Rowing would come to be a se ri ous form of exercise, and could no longer be spoken of as an opportunity for slacki ng; it would come to be treated as it is at the other rowing schools and at


\

THE

71

CANTUARIAN'.

Hoping that I have not encroached Ih Universities. It would lead to a few too ' much upon your proverbially valuable more races against other schools, and so wo uld bring the King's School forward as ~ space, Tremain, rowi ng school, as well as a s~hodlr~;~:~f Yours, &c., 1~1Yl l1 S for the other recog",ze . \ AN O.res. Ilth lelics.

[EDD.-We strongly approve of our ~orres. pondent's suggestion, and thmk thal ~he B~.lt Cluh re would prof\~~~~~~J ~~ iro S~l~~~;ilt~:S \Il~nfi~!t way~ were . " ho 1 claim on the Sport~ Committee s unty.

,...

.

The history of the School does not how that it has been so far in Iaod)o' Wl1~~ . t I to other sport· an(1 tlotnmen a ' ,,00 that it wonld become so.

.

RIFLE SHOOTING ACCOUNTS , i\IAV, 1906-MAY, 1907·

RECEIPTS. ('It..

d

I(rom Establishment Fun Subsclipt~o?s (twO Terms) 'ila lc of Ammllmtlon, &c. .. . . .. 11(1),5'

HI,1ance, deficit

PAY~IENTS .

£ s. d. 7 19 0 22

-'

I I

I

5 9

6

5

10

£ s. d. . 5 6 6 Butt, &c. in G),mnasmm .. . 5 11 0 Two U.S.A . Air Rifles, fitted .. . 4 1 0 Two M. O. Min. Rifles .. 220 Telescope 3 15 0 Score Books 10 13 6, Ammllnition, Targets Sergeant .Instructor ... ..' ... II 0 6 I 5 6 Affiliated Fee (Lent Term) to C. R.C. 080 Rifle Cases o 11 9 Dis. Targe~ Apparatt1s .. , o 4 6 Repairs 03 0 PO!itage I I Sundries DR .

5.

£46 15 9

c. io,'(l\mined :md found correcl, A. J. GALPIN, MaJ', 1I01h, 1907·

W.

DELL.

I


,.

THE CANTUARIA N.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. \~'e beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt oft~e fOllowing contemporaries;Allry1llan ( ,). Blue (' ),

Bmdjield

S~!Jool Chromc/~I .Bl1gl!/Oll Collfge 1I1aga-

zme! Bromsgroma1l, Car/lntSl'rl1t (2), Chol'Il:elta ?l, C?llllt.y Gmllemoll (5), CuJhberllall, Eagle, Elrzaoetlla?l ( 2), Epso1llia1l, Felslediall

( 2). Felle.rlfw, Glma/molld School Ch"om'cle Ke//~J' .Collc,£?f. Clzrom'cle, King's Schooi MagaZl!1 1! Parramalla. Lallcimr Co/lege JJ'{agaz11lf. (,3 ).. Leodlellsian, i:>e.;ls Forlmgh!!y (5). L t(y, Malvermcw, Olavt'a?l Oustl .(5), !e:cn'/c, Plylllolhttm. PorlmlUs: Rod/elan" ~hl,.burm(m.

NOTICES. We beg to acknowl edge with than ks, ~h e receipt of t he following subscnptlOns ;_

B. L . Hooper, Esq. (3/6), O. B. Parsons.' E sq. (3/ 6), W. A. Fetherstone, Esq . (3/ 6 ,', C. M. Morris, Esq. (3/6).

Gibb~ and Sons, Printers, Pal ace SHeet, Canterhu ry.


\

THE VOL . VII .

CANTUARIAN. JULY,

Iq 07 .

No. 4-.

EDITORIAL. 'Ve had hungered and thirsted fo r material fo r our editorial; dreamed of it, nnd, giving it up as useless, had settled down to write one wh ich quickly left th e conventional path and wandered at loose on theo ri es of life and living . But behold! In the midst of our despair, appeared to us a feast to de light th e eyes, dispel our Ill isory, and provide copy unlimi ted. The Dover match , and a brilliant School rocord: 201 not out by Gardner ! Let us not be accused of hyper-athleticism, that we so fa r forsake our editorial sedateness as almost to ape the headin gs of th e half-penny press. But it came very much as an oasis in th e desert. 1L not only redeemed our innin gs in the actual match, but redeemed in a great measure our whole season, which had not been quite 5 0 successful before as we might have hoped. The yearly promise of St. Swithin's Day is for fine weather this year i and by lhe irony or rate, St. Swithin's Day was the first day or th e Higher Certificate i':xaminatio n in which great heat is by no means comforti ng. It is a fair wind that blows nobody any harm. H oweve r, in other respects th e weather seems now to be 111 1 that could be desired. We should be right in reeling very badly treated ir the rest of the summer werc not finc . We cannot finish without mentionin g a histo ry of the School which is being written by Mr. Woodruff and Mr. Cape, named " Schola Regia Cantuariensis," a prospectus of whi ch is enclosed in our pages. It is easy to understand that the 8ubject is one of great difficulty, a nd entails much dilige nt searching through old


THE

74

CANTUARIAN.

~ook~ a,n d rnanu sc~i pts, especially by reason of the School's great age. At the same tuue It IS of great tn~et:est, not, only a~ throwiI:g light on life in early and rn edireval schools, ,but as descnbln ~ and lilustratmg the hfe and customs of our own particnlar

School, 1ts g rowth, and 1ts develo pment.

We are quite sure that the diligence and

ablhty of the writers will leave nothing to be desired.

3n !lDemoriam. .... THO MAS WILLIAM SIDEBOTHAM. .... We regret to announce the death of the Rev. Thomas Vlilliam Sidebotham, wh o died on March 15th, 1907. H e was bo rn in 1835 a nd edu cated as a King's Scholar at t he King's Sch ool.

H e t hen proceeded to H ert-

fo rd College. Oxford, where he graduated B.A. in r86 1 and M.A. in 1864_ H e was ordain ed D eacon in , 86 T and Priest. in 1862 by Bishop T ait.

H e was appointed to th e Curacy of Monken Hadley in Middlesex in 186 , whi ch he held till J 864, wher. h~ accepted the Curacy of Th erfi eld H erts., wh ic h he he ld till 1866. H~ h eld th e Chaplain cy of the H ospi tal of St. Peter, Port G uern sey, from 1869 to 1873. H ere he bega n his connection

with th e Diocese of Win chester whi ch he maintained, with th e exceptio n of One short interval ( he held the Curacy of Westo n- su pe r~ M a re fro m 1873 to 1874), till h is death.

In 1875 he' was

appointed by t he Archdeacon of Surrey (Bishop Utte rton) fi rst Vi car of St.

Thomas on the Bourn e, which was then cut a ll' from th e old parish of

Farn ham. H e raised the funds to build the Vicarage which till his time was non-existant. H e enlarged the small school- room --Church with an aisle and organ chamber an d made it into the perm anent Parish Church. At the time of his death he had succeeded in setti.ng on foot a scheme for building an enti rely new Church on a site near t he old one. I-lis extra parochial work lay chiefly in co nnection with t he \ÂĽ incheste r D iocesan Deaconess Home, in the fo unding of which he took a promi nent part, and of which he was Secretary ~or twenty rears. H e was also acti vely 1I1terested lJ) th e educational work of the Farnh am Distric t and for many years sat on the School Board. H e was buri ed l1uder th e shadow of the Church wh ic h he served for thirty-two years. T he se rvice was read by the Archdeacon of Surrey ; the Bishop of Dorking reading the lesson a nd t he J3ishop of \Vinchester gave th e final Blessing.

-rl---------------L--~----------~


THE

75

CANTUARI AN.

CRICKET. LIST

-- - - - - - - - -- - ----

- ,,. . 10 . . .,,'h. ... .,·'d.

1st XI.

'4· Rev. L. H. Evans' XI. ..... 16. Chan ham Asylum \ l Oll. 20. Wyc College 30 . S. Law rence" A. " 31. S. Law rence ... 'u• j't;llp. 4· R. M.L. I. ... 6. Hythe C. C. 'h, May

.,.,, .,'u.

..... . .,11m. ... ' 11.

II. II.

' II •

18. 24· 25· 29·

~

'u.

,,'ri.

s'1\1.

J~;Iy

S'M. " 'u.

...

.. " ... . 1 u. .. Vcd. . \ Ved.

\

.,'u. " .\! . 'I 'II.

:1'11.

I

Mr. A. Latter's XI. ..' Sulton Valence School ... .. ' Eastbournc College .. M.e.C ... '

n

9· /0 .

R . ~I. L. 1.

...

...

....

II.

lSI

Inn. :md I nn,

Beverley .. . Drawn .... t42 (J) Chartham . ' Won .... .. . 203 Beverle y .. Lost. .. . 129 Drawn . .'.. 94 (8) Beverley Drawn . ... 203, Beverley

..

..

... ...

179 Losl ... .. Beverley ... Drawn . ... 153 (6) H ythc

-

Aband'nd Beverley 275 Beverl ey .. ' Lost ..... 137 Beverle), ... Lost ....... Drawn . .. 252 *(5) Ensthournc 78 Lost ....... Beverl ey Walmer ... · Won ...... 215 (8)

..

-

.. .

Felstcd

Clergy of Kent ...

.. .

S. Edmund's School

...

.. .

Drawn . ... Beverley S. Edmund' s Aband'nd Beve rley .. . . Won .. .. .

296 37°(7)

...

.. .

Beverley

... ......

t6. 10} O. K.S. .. 31 28. 4· 6. 18. 19· 25· 27·

RUN S }o'O I\.

RE'iUJ.T.

...

Felslcd School

D over College

.,Vcd.j't:ly . 16. '\I.

Highgate School

2nd XI. l\l ay June

1·u. \ Vell. 'u.

FIXT U RES.

GROU ND.

OPI'ONENTS.

I)A'l'~.

OF

S. Edmund's Seh. 2nd X I.

S.A.C.

. ..

..

H arbledown C.C. Dover Col lege 2nd xr ...' S. Edmund's Seh. 2nd X I.

S.A.C. [-Iarbledown C. C. Dover College 2nd X I. ... S. L.'1.wrcnceCol\. 2nd X I.

Aband'nd

... ...............

Blore's Piece Beverle y .. . Harblcdown Beverle y S . Edmund's Blorc's Piece Blare's Piece Dover S . Lawre nce

\Von W on. .... Aband'nd Lost ....... Won ....... Vlon ....... Lost ....... Won .. ... . Aband'nd

174 95

50 (2) -.--

--

1St

200*(5)

77 (4) 23 8 205*(3 )

-

244 (7) -

214

-

65

-

154 (9) 62 196 (8) 97 95

-

-

--

-

-

302 (9) 1-5 8 169 (4) 379 (6) 81 (5) 73

-

-6

_.

Inn. 2nJ Inn.

215 (8) /05 135 (5)

-

-

9 201 196 (8) 97 '44(8)

RUNS AGA I NST.

77

-

-

-

-----

SUTTON VALENCE v. KING'S SC I-IOOL. T his match was played on the St. Lawrence ground , on Tuesday, June 18th; h'sultinO' in a victo ry for O llT opponents b)' 21 runs. S U ~Oll wo n the toss and elected to bal on a plumb wicket. Consideri ng the state of the wicket, runs came very slowly. One hOllr was take n to make si~ty. Later on, runs came quicker; t his was chiefly due to Gosling, who scored 34 III a verr sh?rt Lime. However, we got our opponents out fo r J 58, a very small score conslde n ng Ihe state of the wicket.


THE CANTUARIAN. At half-past three we st.:'lrted to bat and runs came very quickly 30 being scored within a quarter of an hour. After the first tw o wickets had falien Gardner and H <?well brought the ~core to 100, but wh en th ey were out a terrible collapse occurred. .chlefly from bad b~t~m g. No one else att~mpted t? play the bowling, so we were all out for 137, thus' gI VIng our opponents a n ctory wlllch th ey certainly dese rved . T he fielding lVas fairly good and th e bowling steady, but the batting was bad. SUTTON VALENCE. Ii', D. T homas, c Dunlop, b Merrelt J. H. Thornhill , b Merrett . .. E. W. Pritchard, Ibw, b Merrell ... W. R. Gosling, b Hassett ... C. }-1. Prockter, b Dalwigk D. G. S. Unnsan , c l\·f erretl, b Thomson B. M. Juke, b Thomson C. 1-1. Fischel, b Da\ wigk C. Williams, b Dalwigk E . D. Belham, run om W. J. Clinch, not out

28 15 2

34 26 7 o 12

Extras ...

Tolal

KING'S SCHOOL. L. J. Bassell, b Cli nch ... W. N. Kempe. b Clinch .. G. F. Howell, b Clinch ... H. Gardner, c Prockter, b Clinch .. C. J. N. Adams, c Urmson, b Clinch I-I. Parsons, b Williams.. ... R. E. R. Dalwigk, c Prockter, b Williams ... R. E. Martin , c Williams, b Clinch C. S. r.,·Ierre tt, c Juke, b Williams ... A. L. B. Thom son, b Clinch ... D . V. Dunlop, not out Ext ras

28 12

27 44

o 7

o 14 2

o o 3

Total

[37 BOWLING ANAI.VS IS : SUTTON VALKNCIL.

Dalwigk Thomson Merrell ... Dunlop ... Adams ... Bassett .. .

O.

M.

R.

2 3 4 2

W.

14' (

27 49 28 24 5

3 2 3

15 12

7 3 4

0 0

10

0 0 I


THE CANTUARIAN. KING'S

SCHOOL v. EASTBOURNE

77 COLLEGE.

Played at Eastbourne, on Monday, Ju ne 24th, res ulting in an eve n draw. The I'c'Cl'nlricities of th e railway servi ce render the Lime avai lable for play in th is match Yllry short, and since. on t his occasion, the batting on both sides was better t han the howling, a draw was' almost inevitable. It waS a wretc hed day, and a pitiless cold tld~~lc fell nearly all the time. Bassett, having won the toss. started the innings with I( 'mpe, who, however, was bowled almost at once, while Howell was caught at sli p. l\ lnrLin came in and helped Bassett to add over 100 for the third wicket. though he wns missed when th e score stood at 90. Bassett, who was out from a ball which got up very strai ght, played excellent cricket for 79 and gave no chance. Gardner and Ma rtin then added 86 for the next wicket, though the forme r was very lucky. He mude, howeyer, some fmc off¡ drives, whil e Martin played a ~apit al innings in spite of Home bad balioon strokes. If he can be persuaded that, as a rule, it is better to hit . IIlong the ground , he ough t to make a really good bat. Gage and Freeborn, each of whom was making his debul, quickly added 40 nills and then Bassett declared the Inni ngs closed with the sco re at 250 for 5, obtained in just over two hours. Eastbou rn e were left with about the same ti me in which to get the runs, but the brothers Tudor who came in first were slow, and took so' minutes to score the first ,5 6 runs. .Merrett and Dalwigk bowled steadily but failed to get a wicket, th ough I\ lc rrett missed a diffi cult chan ce off his ow n bowli ng. Dunlop was put on and got ,l wicket with a very long hop. Then Coxhcad pulled a ba ll from Martin on to his wicket. Martin bowled very erratic stuff but bowled the elder Tudor who had played n paLi...:nt innings of 47. Bourke, who baLted very well , and :VIaxwell the n put all runs I'apidly, the latter being badly missed by Howell at slip. At last Dalwigk was put on /lgai n and eventually got IVlaxwell caught by Bassett at square-leg, and stumps were then drawn . KI NG'S SCHOO L. L. J. Bassell, c Dennys, b T udor W. N. Kempe, b Coxhead G. F. H owell , c Foss, b Bourke R. E. Martin , c Tudor, b Bourke ii. Gardne r, c Lambert, b Bourke ... E. T. Gage, not on t C. F. Freeborn, not out R. E. R. DaJwigk } C. J. N. Adam s . C. S. Merrett did not bat. D. V. Dunlop Extras

Total (for 5 wickets)

79

o 6

59

51 19

[9

19


THE

C. L. Tudor, b Martin ...

CANTUARIAN.

EASTBOURNE COLLEGE. ".

47 28

l

G . Tudor, c MerrcH, b Dunlop ... M. E . Cox head, b Martin N. Maxwell, c Bassett, b Mcrrett ". B. G. Bourke, not out.~. l{,

~. ~~s~ennys

2

51 37

G. }i'. G. Schmieder d' I I b I E. N. Lambert l( no a. H . A. V. Maynard

T. H. Bowen Extras ... T outl (for 4 wickets) BOWLING

ANALYSI S.

EASTBOURNE COLLI':GI': .

Oalwigk l\f errett ... Martin Dunlop ... Adams

O.

M.

R.

w.

16 13

4

44

0

35 39

2

15

0

2

6

5 3

...

KING'S

SCH OOL

¡V .

0 0

I

22

M. C. C.

This match was played on the St. Lawrence ground on. Tuesday, June 25th. Our opponents brought down a very strlm g side; Board, \\Trathall, Newstead and a couple of good sli ps are quite good eno ug h to get out any 'school eleven . 'We won the toss and went in to bat on a beautiful wi cket. Nobody offered any resistance except Gardner and Freeborn, scoring 26 and 30 respectively. Gardner made his run s by clean hard hits: driving Wrathall to the boundary five times. Freeborn was very lucky, being twice missed all the boundary j however, his innings was very useful and very creditable, consideri ng it was on ly the second ti me he had played for the cleven . The rest did little, and we were all out for 77. Our opponents soon passed our small sco rc, but we managed to dismiss five for '97 . Then came a big stand of over 100 runs and not until 300 was on the board did the sixth wicket fall. The scoring was quite consistent except for Mr. MacHilton who played brilliantly for his 10+ . Ncwstead then joined Harris, and these two stayed together until stumps were drawn, bringing the total to 397.


THE

\ CANTUAIHAN .

79

K I NG'S SCHOOL.

r.

4

L. Bassett, c Smithers, b \Vrathall W. N . Kempe, c Newslcad, b Wrathall G. F. I-lowell , c Board, b Newstead R. E. Martin. b Wrathall H. Gardner, c lloard , b Wrathall . E. T. Gage, c Newstead, b Wrathall C. F. F reeborn, c Wrathall, b Newstead R E. R. Dalwigk, c and b Newstead C. T. N. Adams, c Wrathall, b Newstead C. S. Merrett. cHilton, b New5tead D. V. Dunlop, not out Extras

I

5

o

26 8 30 I

o

Total

M. C. C. 8

E. C. Metcalfe, c Bassetl, b Dalwigk W. W. A'deane, b Dalwigk W . Smithers, b Merrett ... G. Colman, lb w, b Merrett A. M. Hilton, b Oalwigk W. Dutnall, c and b Merrett C. E . H arris, not out C. G. Hulton, did not bat . Newstead, not out Wrathn 11, did not bat. Board, Extras

52 43 3 104

44

55 53

l

17 379

T otal (for 6 wickets) BOWLING ANALYSIS.

M. C. C. Dnlwigk Merrett ... Martin ... Bassett .. . Dunlop ... Adams ...

O.

M.

'0 22

0 2 0 2 0 0

5 12 9 5

R.

115 76 37 41 58 35

w. 3

3

0 0 0 0


80

THE

KING'S

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL v.

R. M. L. I.

Played on June 29th at Walmer and resulted in a vi ctory for the School, the first we have gained on their ground. The R .M.L.l.. who were without Capt. H. F. Montgomery. won th e toss. Their two first wickets fell very soon, when th e total had reached 5, and no one offered any real resistance to some good bowling by Merrett and Dalwigk until the arrival of Major ' ;Vra},. V\' ith the assistance of Taylor a short stand was made for the seventh wicket and SDIue vigorous hitting was seen. After his dismissal, however, th e last few wi ckets went down rapidly and our opponents were all out by lun ch time. The School started badly as Gage was -bowled soon after the start. Howell here joined Bassett and these two took the score to 139 before Howell was caught and bowled. He had never seemed quite at home with the bowling, but he made some nice strokes. Bassett was the next to leave after a good innings of 79 . Although never giving an actual chance. he had made one or two risky strokes, and had had some narrow escapes from being bowled. After two more wickets had fallen in rapid succession, Martin and Parsons remained together and carried th e score to 183 before Martin was dismissed for a harel-hit 34. Neither Merrett or Dalwigk gave much trouble, but Adams and Parsons stayed togeth er till the closure was applied at 4¡30. On going in again the R.M.L.I. lost fi ve wickets for 8 I run s, a total which would have been a great deal less but for a number of missed catches. Bassett, the bowler that sutTered most from the bad fielding. ought to have had at least three more wickets. This slackness in the field was a striking contrast to the fielding in th e first innings, which was extremely good. The two slips, Bassett and Howell , were exceptionally safe, making some very fine ¡catches. KING'S SC HOOL. L. J. Bassett, c Williams, b Taylor E. T. Gage, b Williams .. ' G. F. Howell, c and b Russell R. E. Martin, c T aylor, b Sutcliffe H. Gardner, b Russell C. F. Freeborn, b Taylor H. Parsons, not out ... ... C. S. Merrett, c Aireton, h Sutcliffe R. E. R. Dalwigk, b Kitchingham C. J. N. Adams, not O\l t .. D. V. Dunlop, did not b:l.t. Extms T otal (ror 8 wickets)

79 2

42 34 2 2

17 II

21 5


, THE

8r

CANTUARIAN . R.M.L.I. 2nd Innings. I did not bat. 4 c Gage, b Dunlop 2 c Dunlop, b Gardner 10 not out 4 b Bassett 2 b Dunlop 27 did not bat. 18 b )1errett

1st Innings. Sergt. Sutcliffe, c Bassett , b Dalwigk .. . Pte. Williams. c and b Merrett ... . 1,lcUl. Festing, c Freeborn, b Dalwlgk Rergt. Murphy. c Gage, b Merrett . .. . npl. Hutchison, c Howen, b Dalwlgk or pI. Russell, b Merrett .... ... Major Wray, c 'Bassett, b Oalwlgk Sergt . T aylor, b Merrett ". Pte. Aireton, b Merrett ... npt. Graham, c Bassett, b Merrett Pte. Kitchingham, not out .. Extras

16 II

~~

o o

: } did not bat. 2 73

Total

II

Extrns

81

Total (for 5 wicket s)

ROWLINe ANALYSIS.

R. M. L . I.

1st Innings.

o. I)alwigk Merrett Marlin

12

9'5 2

M. 4 0

R.

W.

32

4 6

36 3

0

2nd Innings.¡

Merrett Oalwigk Gardner Dunlop Bassett

o.

M.

2

0

3 4

W.

8

I

I

!O

0

0

15 16 21

2

6

3'4

R.

0

I

KING'S SCHOOL v. CLE RGY OF KENT. This match was played on the St. Lawrence Cricket Ground on Jdly 9~'dor~a ood 'fast wicket one of the first of the season . Bassett won the toss an sta e t e ~chool innings '~ith H owell. Run s ca~e frede lkfroll bot~, and 6~th:rs 3s~~~~ds.b!~:~ Bassett left for a well played 41. M.rtm an owe pu on an h Cl Howell was bowled by Lycett ; then things ap~eared ~ go ~ bet:ero;o;'v~l~e eJ~~' Gardner was bowled by Lycett before he ha ~orf dam d emp and clean bowled

ft

i~~~~~~~~Ob\I~~~i~htina~~e b~:~ndti~:g~advh~;en epl~~in~~e~~I:i~~lc~r:~~f;ta~r~~ ,~i~~

seventh Ol1 t for a most useful 8 I . Of the rest no one 0 ere mu . if . th e exception of Dalwigk who sc?red v~ry qui('kly making some clean-hit 0 -dnves. The innings closed for 296, D.lwlgk bemg not out 69¡ .' The Clergy started none too well, as theyhl<?st ~~e of t~Clr '~~~e~et~o;o:l1~~' \~~! Rashleigh and Evans came to the reSCl1e of t elf Sl( e, an a n o . d added befo're the fall of the next wicket. Rashleigh had made 97 by hIS uStlale~~u~e cricket when he mis-hit a ball and was caught by Merrett. hA pl~~s~~t/iS still of the 'match was the re-appearance of Mr. Hod~son; ~e s O\~e( us } n though able to make run s. The match was left drawn It; an mterestlO g P OSl 1~ it t d perhaps in favour of the School, th e Clergy havmg made 244 for 7 W1C e s an requiring another 53 runs.

VC?


8z

THE

CANT UARIAN.

K I NG'S G. F. H owe ll, h Lycett .. . . L. J. Bnssett, b Lycett ... ... R. E. Martin, c Osmaslon , b Hope H. Gardner, b Lyectt ... '" W . N. Kempe, b Lycett .. , E. T. Gage, c and h Joy .. . ~. 1", Freeborn , b Joy .. . h .. E . .R. Dnlwigk, not out A. L. B. T homson, b I-l ope C. S. Merren, b Joy ... D. V, Dun lop, c Joy, h Lycclt

Extms .....

SC H OOL.

33

41 8, o IZ

20 o 69 6 I

5 28

...

Total

296 CLERGY

OF

Rev. l-I. R. Bi~g. b Dunlop Rev, P. L.. Joy, c Howell, b Dl\nl~p B. H . .Matheson, b Dalwigk . Rev, A. S. Hop~, c and b Dun lop... . .. Rev. W. Rashlclgh, c Merrett, b Da lwigk Rev. R. A. Kent, c Gage, b Thomson Rev. L. H . Evans, b T homson .. Rev , R. C. H odgson, not Oll( ... Rev. N. A. Lycett } Rev. i\'l, Osmaston d id not bnl. Rev, W. I-I. ;\1aund rell Ex tms.. ... . ..

K ENT.

'9

23 2

10 97 S

46 30

n.

9 T otal (for 7 wickets) DOWLING ANALYSIS. CLERGY 01' K I~N'I'.

Dntwigk Merrett Dun lop T homson M:lrtin Hasset t

KI NG'S SCHOOL

O.

M.

R.

17 10 10 8 3

2

73 47 3z 42 15 27

â&#x20AC;¢

2'.

DOVER

I

0

0

0

3 2 0

0

COLLEGE

T.hiscmat~h ' 81S played on the St. Lawrence ground on July t he ' I6th ~~~:~~~ceo; ~I~~ i~~?nOgls by .:~6 1~uns and three wic kets . . B~ssett WO I; .

w. 2

an d resulted the toss and r . WI empe on a fast plumb Wicket T he start \ ' C Isastrousi Bassett bell1~ caught at cover through mistiming a leg. ball after h avt,~ Scorcc on Y 7 fUll S. Before any ad di tion had been macle to the SCOf~ H ~we ltl was


\

T HE

CANT l:1ARI AN.

bowled off his pads, and soon arter Kem pe was out to a simple catch at mid-on . J\ITartin was bowled by a ball that beat him all the way, and the score then stood at lO fo r fo.ur wickets. Gage and Gardner then made a short stand, unti l the for mer rC' ll to a catch in t he slips, whe n the total was 45 . Freeborn joined Gardner and together they completely changed the aspect of the game. Thes~ two ad ded 2 1 3 f uns i ll less tha n 75 minutes. Gardner, whose in nings of 20 1 not out constituted a School record, played brilliantly j he drove with tremendous po wer, both alo ng the ~ro l1n d nnd over the bowlers head, wh ile his strokes to leg were beauti ful. He ne ver looked like getting out, and never played a faulty stroke, until his score stood 'at ' 54, when he mis-hit a ball well above th ird man's hcad. Freeborn, who was rather olltshadowed by his partner, nevertheless played an excellent innings, scoring in his own pec uli ar Ntyle with great ,·igouT. His best stroke is a hard punch past extra cover off a short ball on the· off. and he llsed it with great effect. He was eventually bowled soo n aftcr the lunch interval, but Gardner and Dalwigk continued the fast scoring; the latte r hit vcry well, though in his dashi ng display, he of course too k many risks. As soon as Cardner had com pleted thl! double century, the inn ings was decla red closed. His inni ngs included one fiv c and 37 fo urs, of which he obtained 19 in his first century. He is to be hcartily congratulated on his splendid effo rt. Dover commenced their inn ings at 3.40, but lost Brandreth and J ones almost immediately. Munns an d Stafford, howe ver, stayed together an d scored pretty freely against the attack of rVIerrett, t hough Dalw igk was bowling well. Mu nns, except fo r two risky shots through the slips of which Howell was too slow to avail himself, had ~core d 40 by excellent cricket, when his off-stump was knoc ked out of the ground by a beaut)' from Dalwigk. After he left. D unlop got Stafford caught at slip by Bassett for a useful 67, an d Maclaren was ru n out by W·atson, who hit up 2<) in vigorous fas hion. until he was caught by Merrett off Dalwigk. Of the rest, Daviso n alone offered any resistance, scorin g 23, an d the innings closed for a total of 21 4 . T he sc hool thus win ning by a comfortable margi n. K ING'S

L. J. Bassett, c Malcolm, b Watson \\" N. Kempe, c Dav ison , b \¥nlson G. F . H owell. b Brandreth R. E. Martin, b Watson . .. H. Gardner, not Oll t E. T . Gage, e Brand reth, b Watson c. F. F reeborn , b Watson R. E. R. Dalwigk , c Haggard, h Watson C. S. Merrett, not out A. L. B. T homson} did not bat. D. V. Dunlop Extras

SC II OOL.

T otnl (for 7 wickets) · Innings decl:lred closed .

7 8 0 6 20 1 2

79

52 3 12


THE

CANTUARIAN.

DOVER COLLEGE. W. R. T. Brandreth, b Dalwigk .. . E. B. Stafford, c Bassett, b Dunlop .. . J. S. L. J ones, c Dunlop, b Dalwi...k R.

n.

C . l\'l lmns, b Dalwigk

n. w . Watson, c

o 67 2

~

40 29

Merrell b Oa\wigk

C. T. Machren, nlr. Ollt.:.

. ..

I

23

K. M. I-T. Davison, c Merrett , b Oalwigk R W. Dawes, Ibw, b Merrett A. J. R. lIaggard, b DaJwigk E. n. Wheeler, not out ... P. C. Munns. c Kempe, b Dunlop Extms ".

12 12

6 8 14

Total DOWLING ANALYSIS . Dov~:R,

o.

Oalwigk

20 '1

Merrclt Dunlop Thomson

10

7 7 5

Martin

M. 3 I 0

0

R.

IV.

75

6

41

29 38 18

2 0 0

SCHOLARS ELECTED JULY, 1907. J UNIORS .

H. D. TOlVnend. G. H . Claypole.

I

J. W. M. Maynard. C. T. Marshall.

PI{ORATlON ER S.

G. E. L.' Hargreaves. C. E. Denman. G. R. Dawbarn . J. T. Fleming-Sandes.

H . F. Cann ell. F . H. Fardell. C. W. Kidson. V. J. Austin.

J. C. Page.

ENTRANCE SCHOLAR S.

I

I

C. W. Kidson. D. H. G. Northcote. R. Juckes. HousF. G. R. Dawbarn. G. De Mattos.

H. F. Cann ell. F . H. Fardell. J. T . Fleming-Sandes.

SCHOLARS.

j

G. E. L. Hargreaves. V. J . Austin .


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THE

85

CANTUARIAN.

A PASTORAL. A wandering minstrel. In motley array, Came into the village One bright summer day. The sun was ablaze. The sky blue and fair, And he piped us a melody Rustic and rare. The maids in the village All listened intent, As he sang us a song Of Love and lament. As he sang. so I pictured. A youth and a maid \Vere sitting alone In the cool leafy shade. There was love in their touch, There was love in their look; And th e birds in their stillness Their sin ging forsook. The sun dipped its edge In a glory of gold; They parted at last For their time was all told,

Alas! on the morrow H e tarried in vain, H is sweetheart returned not To banish his pain. She is faith less" he groaned: But he felt in his heart That force and not faithl essnes~ Kept them apart. .c

,.

,yo

I awoke of a sudden, The musi c had stopped, And the wanderer's pipe From his fingers had dropped. H is eyes werc upraised, And the joy in his face Was shared¡ by the figure That ran to his place. The maid he had lost ""Vas fonnd once agai n. So ended his poem, Made :;weeter by pain, G.B . S. P.

BOAT RACES. Thursday, Jul y 4th, was the occasion of the whiff races and the O.K.S. Tace at I;'ordwich. The weather was dull, but the rain held ofr and everything went ofr very well. The event of the day was the O.K.S. race j this was won by the School in 3 min. 29 sees. by 13 sees j but it was a gooet race, a nd a closer on~ than we have ever


86

THE

CANTUARIAN.

harl before with the O.K.S. The School gained from the first. rowing rather a quicker stroke, and at the corn er was rather more than a length ahearl. The corner was ve ry well man ipulated by hath th e co xes, especially J ones. i. After the corner the distance between them appeared to remain morc constant, but the School actually gained about a length along the straight bit. The O. K. S. fonT all came fro m Oxford an el had had some little time to practise together ; the excellence of their style was most noticeable. and they seemed less exhausted by the race; but the faste r stroke adopted by the School fo ur proved too much for them. The wind was blowi ng very stron gly against the boats, an d t he water running rath er high. This accounts for the time taken: for a few days before, the school four, rowing 38 strokes to the minute, did the course in 2 min. 56 secs. , which is the fastest time ever made. It will be remembered that when we were beaten at Tonbriclgc, T onbridge rowed a much faste r stroke than the School. Th is has been taken vcry mil ch as a lesson by our boat, :md cnorts have been made, in conseq uence, to row a fas te r strok e, with results that are vcry promising. The C.K.S. and School Fours were as foll ows:Dow. 2.

3¡

Slr. Cox.

KS. H. F. Reynolds T. S. Nelson ... E. K. Barher ... L. P. Abbott.. . C. A. C. Jones

st . Ibs. 10 10

" "7

4

6 12 3

O. K.S. A. 'liV. S:Hson V. L. Armit age ... R. B. Winser C. H. Dudd H. deU. Smith ...

s!. Ihs. 10 0 12 1 13 5 12 0 6 13

The Senior and Tunior W'hitf Races were started before and finished after the O.K.S. race. . The actual order was thisJ UNIOR WHlPFS.

HEAT I.-S. Clayton beat R. C. de Pass. Some am usement was caused in thi s heat by the fact that de Pass fell in not long after the star. H avi ng no chance of winning he swalll acros!; th e river and went home. HEAT 2.- W. /\. F. Kerri ch beal L. G. L. Denn e. H. de H. Smith, ) B yes. C. L. Nightingale. SENIOR ¡W HIFFS.

HRAT I.-S. D. Turne r beat A. G. Lennon-Brown. HEAT 2.-H. P. Sparling blal F.. B. Nelson . I-lRAT 3.-H . G. Dalton beal V. C. Taylor.


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

O.1<..S. RACE. JUNIOR

WHIFFS.

HEAT 3.-C. L. Nightingale b,al W. A. F . Kerrich. HEAT 4.-II. de H. Smith beat S. Clayton. SENIOR WHIFFS. I-l EAl' 4.~B . G. Garibaldi v. H . F. Reynold,. absent and had to scratch. i-hAT 5.-S. D. Turner beal L. P. Abbott. HEAT 6.-H. P. Sparling beal E. K . Barber. HEAT 7.-1-1. G. Dalton beal T. S. Nelson.

B.

G. Garibaldi was unfortunately

J UNIO IC

· 1'LNAL.

-

C.L, N'ighti n 0~ale beal H. de i-I. Smith. SENiOR .

HEAT 8.-H. F. Reynolds beal S. D. Turner. HEAT 9.-H . G. Dalton beal H . P. Sparhn g. FINAL. _ H. G. Dalton beal H. F. Reynolds.

WHAT WAS HE DOING THE GREAT GOD PAN? Pan deus Arcadiae venit .. . in these four words Vcrgil has su mmed up f~,r us 1 "whys" and the "wherefores of ~I~~ present alarming outbreak of Backto the-land hysteria. Pan has ~o ~~ . . -d here we have the result 0 . IS 0\1'1 r .. ~ . ve l n-h coming. Sages and po Itlclan:) 1t1 0

. . st th e wholesale depopulation of <lgam .h t s) . small vi llages ( mostly Wit grca nam e , t he talk learnedly of th~ allu ren;t t;;nts of Ytown-life, and the mistaken Id~as which so many rustics have of prospent): in towns ; they support these remarks with sheaves of blue-boo ks and columns


88

THE

CANTUARIAN.

of stal1stlCS. . But is of no avail; no wound s to extract granite and such one really beheves them. They don't stuff, leaving th e festering sore o f du st, really. believe t~ernselves; only they try vaper, bottles, and scrap-iron io welter to beheve the gifted lady who wrotein the glory of a De vo nshire moor- land .. . Pan, Pdll is dead . .. sunse t. H e afflicted the race o f farmers; But. he isn't; and that is the whol e he made them c rass idiots ; they planted point. Pan deus Arcad iae venit . . . the same crop three yt:ars running in the exactly so ; he came and saw and same field, and were as improvid ent as (qui ckly) conquered , He came seekinO' jackals! H e afflicted all the company peace and he found instead turmoil and of holiday-makers; he mad e them to c~mfu s ion . Nymph s and H amadryad s. seek out all the sweetest spots in God's I'au ns an~ Satyrs we re worried past England, and, having sought them a nt, endurance III th eu wood land wanderings to demand g im-crack hotels and "bijOll n by harrows, mechanical reapers, and such boarding-houses. The railway c(J mp al~ i es blessings (?) of the 20th ce ntury. Other aided him manfully, witho ut hi s making membe rs of hi s g reat family too were the m ; dri ving mlle after mile of perput out, elves and pix ies and all their kin. man ent way through all that is beautiful How can gnomes da nce in the moonlight in the country-side; along which labo urs with a chance of tearing thei r wings on the locomotive leaving a trail o f gingera wire entanglement to keep cows off beer bottles and sand wich bags. young trees, or of catching thdr toes in Arli sts he amicted with a grievous a rabbit- gin? Complaints reached Pan persecut.ion- is not the early Victorian from all sides ; and the Great God age sy nonymo us with a ll that is healthiest reti red to his beech forests to th ink in Art ? One man he blessed; one things out a little. And he thought coterie he favour ed; t hem he allowed thlllgs o ut j and as a result despatched to see strai g ht, and to marvel at the dust influences to cloud the mind s of men. in their fellow-creatures eyes. He afflicted the race of builders; he made them jerry-builders; he jaundiced their imaginations and made them run up square boxes of revo lti ng hu e by the thousand and scare all the artistic from t he country-side, .. for," as they said, II the town is no uglie r and is more convenient." H e afflicted the race of land lords; he gave them a money-grubbing thirst j and they sold parcels of land to the jerry-builders, cut down their stately forests to sell to tim.ber-merchants, and wounded their moors with grievous

Pan worked quietly from his E ssex beech fo rests and accomplished all this, yes, and much more. Now the effects shew themselves. Already Dryads roam far and wide th roug h the country. sowing the seed of the Town in the hearts of men . The sylva n glades become sylvan glades again; merciful creepers cloak the galvanized-iron fungi and the red-brick villa growths i Pan's pipe is sometimes heard ; his face i<; sometimes seen. In a decade or two the country will again be Pan's and Pan will be the countrys.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

89

SCHOOL NEWS . WI.; congratu late th L: following on wi nnin g their Cricket Colours:-

Xl.After the Sutton Valence MatchR. E. Martin, C. S. Mer rett; After the J)over Match-C. F. Freeborn, D. V. I) unl op, H. Parsons. . nd Xl. After the Sutton Valence i\'I atch13. H. Matheson, A. C. Fluke; After lho Dover Malch-H. H. E. Gossett, '. G. Williamson, G. H. K. Burge, L. G . L . D en ne, C. A. 1\1. Richardson, R. F . Gordon.

I Iii

o){.~.;~

Vve heartily con gratulate. H . Gardn~ r o n breaking the School cncket recOl d with a magnificent innings of 201 not out Ilgainst Dover College. ",f'X.*

R. C. J erram has passed 2.oth in the I':xamination for Naval Clerkshtps.

**'

110

The King's Scholars officially attended the reception of the Concours Gy~nastlque and the Band of the Sme RegIment de Ligue on J uly znd at the West Gate.

OnJune 22nd, the Rev ~V. A. Wigram 111 the .Par:}, Library on the C hristian Commul1lty 111 Assy ria .

(O.K.S ) gave a lecture

Th e Senior Cricket Tutor-se t Shield has been WOIl by Mr. Bell'\ Tutor-set, under the captaincy of C . J. N . Adams. Th e Junior C ricket Tutor-set Shi~ld has been won by Mr. r..'fason's :\~tor-Set, under the captaincy of C . G . ·Wlilia mson.

The T en nis Doubles have been won by Barber and Freeborn. The T ennis Singles have been won by Burdett.

'We very much. regret t? allI10Unct,' that Mr. Baly is leavm g us tIllS term, and going out to farm in. .Alberta, C~nada . VVe , therefore , take thI S oppo:tn.l1lty of expressing our warmest appreclatlOll and g ratitude for all that he has don~ for .so many present and past. K. ~ . .\.\ e. WIsh him all possible success III IllS new hfe.

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. under this heading that H. C. Man!;in \¥e very much regret havin g omitted Public School Gymnastic CompetltlOn represented the School at the Aldershot of 1907 ·


THE

CANTUARIAN.

O. K. S.

Ilfarriage.

NEW S.

Lough borough by I tha~

b . \.y ~ cO l1 .ll. . raluiate H . L . DI'bb en 011 ellllg cle,crecl to the Squire University SC 10 j arshl p for Theology.

(0 .I'),.,S., ) son 0 f the late ' D'weC Baker ... 1. ~ • Eaton Baker, of the Cedars, 1'CI1terdell, Kent, to E rmcllcrarde G'ffi d daug~lter of .Mr. a nd Mrs. "Valter B~lr~~r' of FIeld House, Loughborough. •

.. O. F. I-Iuyshe has bet:n appointed as Assistant Master at \¥ootton School lIot far from Canterbury. I-Ie com mcllce~ his work nex t tcnn.

~a~er-Burde r. -On Ju ne 22nd

i!lC 1 agsh Church,

.

~CV. anon Potts, assisted by t};e Rev ~j' Mjojnck, Vicar of Nethe rfie ld: Eusl'lc~

E

OFFERTORIES- Summer Term, 1907.

IVlay

£ 5· 19·

June 9·

"

23·

"

21.

Aug.

1.

July

s. d. I 18

Cathedral Reparation Fund

°

J amaica Church Fund Police Court Mission, C.E .T. S. Archbishop':; Mission to th e Assy ri a n

~I~ri:;tians ~ .

3

3

5

3

9 6

2

S. P. C. Ch urch of England \·Yairs and Stray's Society (Canterbury Branch) Diocesan Education Society

+ 2

10

7


\

THE

"

CANTUARIAN.

ql

CORRE;SPONDENCE. V, II. _ 'l'Ite Editors decline to aaept aft)! rupomibility c",wuted witlt the o/JiltiotlS oj their Con'upon¡ dellts. Name aftd address 1#wl always be ~iven. 1l0t tUte!sari/y lor publication, Iml as II guarantee tif good faitlt. pu sonalities 1vill involve certab, njectioll. Letters should be wrz"ltt1~ 011 one side of the paper only.

'/ '0 tIle Edilot¡s of J)gAR S IRS,

(I

T HE CANTUARIAN."

thorough combination, so that every member of the team deserves some share of applause. May I also point out fo, the benef,t of those who do not seem to know it, that the wicket-keeper is one of the fteldsmen, ' and that he, just as mu ch as cover or third man, deserves applause for a smart bit of fielding.? Had not this matter become a general nuisance, and had not several members, both of the XV. and XI. complained of it as absurdly childish and irritating, I should not have trespassed upon so mu ch of your valuable space.

[ beg to bri ng to notice a very Koneral complaint, which nothing but I'ommon sense an d perhaps a few words .'nn hope to remedy. During the past y fir, a mania for clapping members of th e football and cricket teams has Kradually become prevalent, chiefly in the sphere of the lower school, though n t by any means totally confined to that quarter. The batsman who is sent back lO the pavilion for a faultless two, is greeted with loud applause Is he supposed to acknowledge this applause, as IIltended to cheer him up , or as ironical? 'With the usual apo logies fo r so doing. whicheve r way h e looks at it, he feels I remain, more inclined to hurl his bat strai ght at Yours truly, the empty and senseless heads of the RATIO. offenders. [EDu.- Thc excessive nature of this nuisance Again the batsman who sco res nothing n.nd in add ition misses two catches, meets needs no further comment, and we hope that this with just as much applause as he walks lelter will prove a speedy remedy]. Lhrough the schoolroom, as the man who [EDD.-For the benefit of E. S. Cutcheon and ~cores 79 . Exactly the same sort of thing occurs, when football is the game others whom it may interest we state that the arms of the term i though it is perhaps harder of Archbishop Parker in a shield in the Deanery correspond with those in the Schoolroom, having in this case to allot individual praise, when success depends so much upon a keys or.]


92

THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. We beg to ack nowledge with thanks, ~he receipt of the following subScriptiOns ;_ B. L. Hooper, Esq. ( 3/ 6), O. B. Par-

so/nbs.; Ecsq. (3/6). w, A. Fetherstone. Esq. ( 3 " "M. Morns, E'q (3/ 6) C H Budd, Esq. (7/-), G. V. 'Ormsby Es . ( 10/ 6), B. S. Collard, Esq . (7/-) 'M .q. Jon es (3/ b). ' aJo r

I

I

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. We beg to ackn owledge with thanks th e reCclpt of th e fOllowing cOJ1te mpor~ries : _

A~Ie;I1tia1l,

fl1 it((s.l/ur b' Cluf:wellt'a1J, .Dovorian, ElIzabethan mall , Felsledzfln, Glmai1l101ld Ch~

Blue, Bradfield Coll~"f rO'~/c~, K tlley College Chronicle Lll Bfomsgrov/a1l1 Cho/melian, C/iy ~::;CJ~/~~cJIOOI Magazine, Leodt'ensl~1t. Lg:; 1/ .t"f);. !..I' ( 2 )! IIfalver1Jiall, O/avian, PortcJlOol Magaz/ne ( 2), COUJ/()J all (6), C.O.S., Cuthbert/all, Car/h- ~/SI . 'l;11II~/Jl1a1l , Rad/dmz, Strand School agasl1Ic, Swan, Vigonn'an.

~~1JJ~e,

Gen///:n on .

Gibbs and Sons, Prin te rs, Palace St reet , Canterbury.


\

THE VOL. VII.

CANTUARIAN. NOVEMBER,

1907 .

NO¡5¡

EDITORIAL. It is only a t the commencement of a new year that we are brought face to face with th e advance of time. We are forced to look around us, and we realize at last Ihal the work of cha nge has been silently continued. The sad ness or a new year, which is always the result of this feeling of change. is increased for us by an even greater so rrow. O ne who has been a master at the School for as long as most of us hnvc lived here, has been taken from us. The death of Mr. Austen has deprived the School of one who has done all he coul d to bring it success, and who has won t he admiration of all, an d especially of those who had the privilege of knowing him well. It will be long before we have a friend of g reater worth. We cannot II ore do justice to what we feel, and we leave it to another to give expression to what We would wish to say. Change, too, we notice in the work of the School. The , younger rivals of the !'lassies have been steadily advancing during the last four years to take their proper p()s ition in the School. What would be the feelings of one who was educated here 1\ hundred years ago, were he to look upon a Sixth Form, of which but half the IIl 'mbers were claimed for the pursuit of classics, To him this would seem a d 'a r sign of degeneracy, and many of us call it worldliness rather than wisdom . The games of the School have continued to advance. The last two seasons IIr Football were the most successful ever experienced, and we may at least hope that Lhis year' s team wi ll equal their achievements since to surpass them wo uld be a 11I8k of exceptional difficulty. The last Cricket Season belied our expectations, and I~ remains for the next XI. to avenge its ill success. The task of sustaining the


THE

94

CANTUARIAN .

reputation of th,e School in all branches, of its work and play seems to gro w harder and harder. It IS OUT hope that the cotnmg year may not fall short of its predecesso rs.

. It is with mingled feelings that w~ have to ~ongrat111atc Canon Page Roberts on hIS PTeferment to the Deanery of SalIsbury, whIch was announced in our last issue. COlr!lIlg: to Canterburr some thirteen. years ago, in a sing ular manner he wo n the adl'!uratlOl1 and affection of succeSSIve ~enera~i ons of K.S., and his periods of resIdence, were always l ook~d for\Var~ to, '~lth delight by th em. By his thoughtfulness and the lIlterest h~ took III each ll1 Ch~ldual boy he will not easily be forgotten, and th e lectures winch. he recently gave III the Parry Library on " Macbeth," Lu ther, and th e Poet Keats \Viii ever be remembered by those who were privileged to hear them. Last year the hon? rary D.D. of Glasgo w was con ferred on him, and by the death of Canon Holland 111 January last, he became senior Ca non and Proctor for the C<l;thedral CI~apter at Convocation. The School attended his farewell sermo n. a por.tlOll of \V.hlch was specially addressed ~o them. On the morning following they. m~aded IllS garden and formed up on hIS lawn where they bade him farewcll by Stn glllg " Auld Lang Syne."

In memoriam. >1' GEORGE

ERNEST

VAUGIIAN

AUSTEN.

>1' It is with the deepest regret that we have to record Mr. Austen's death . He had been seriously ill th roughout t he summer term, though with si ngular courage he continued to do his reO"ular work at the School, and it was o::ly a few days before Speech Day that he wai obliged to give it up and go for treatment to Guy's Hospital in London . An operation was there performed upon him which was thought to have been ~ u ccessful, but on Tuesday. August 20th, Just as he seemed to be recovering from its ~ffects he died quite sudd enly. The earher acco unts from the Hospital had been very reassuring and the news,

therefore, came as a terrible shock to his friends. The body was conveyed to his hom e at 'W hitby, where the funeral se rvi ce, co nducted by his former H eadmaster, Dr. Fearon, took place in the presence of his relations and one or two intimate fr iends. Thongh not an O.K. S. him self, we feci that he will almost be regarded as such by those who knew him. \¼hen he came to Canterbury as a Master in Jan uary. 19°0, he was not a total stranger. as one or two of his ncar relatives had been members of the School, and duri ng the seven years that he was with us he assimilated to


\

THE

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CANTUARIAN.

95

hard worker. \¥ith the scholarsh ip class he took a peculiar trouble, and the knowledge that his ow n heart was in the work was a real encouragement to those whom he prepared for the University Examinations. Out of school hours he took the same keen interest in other branches of school life; he often took part in practise games and paper - chases and was always among the keenest of spectators at School matches. In character he was above all things modest. H e very rarely spoke about himself and scarcely ever alluded to his successes, except perhaps to e ncourage some plodding a nd nervOUS worker. Sound and thorough in his own method of teaching he had little sy mpathy with fnssy theories of education, thou gh he was alive to their humorous side, and it may truly be said of him that he despised shams of every kind . All will, we are sure, rem embe r him as a master who did his dllty silll.Ply, quietly. and with supreme modesty, while not a few will feel with deepest sorrow that they have lost a true friend.

a peculiar degree the spirit of the School and, as could be seen from occasional quiet remarks. a strong love for its traditions. His own school days were spent at \¥in chester, whence he gained in 1893 a Classical Scholarship into New College, Oxford. He there obtained a First Class in Classical lVl ocierations and a Second Class in the Final Schools. and was also Proximo Accessit for the Hertford University Scholarship in 1894· After doi ng some temporary work as a graduate at Oxford, he held for some time an important post at S. Elizabeth's College, Guernsey, before he sllcceeded Ml". Slater as Sixth Form Master at this School. While speaking of his scholastic record we should mention that while at Cante rbury he brought out, in collaboration with NIr.Edmonds, an edition of Theophrastus which was most highly commended by the educational journals. Those who were taught by him will al ways be thankful to have come under the direction of his so und and careful scholarship to which he added the strong sy mpathy of a thoroughly

>1' SHELTON

H. K.

LANGLEY.

>1'

-

\¥e reg ret to announce the death of Mr. S. H. K. Langley (O.K.S .• 190I- 1903), which occurred on Sunday, Sept. 29th, as the result of a motor bicycle accident. H e was a member

of Mr. Bell's house while at the School, and after leaving became an Assistant Cashier on the Staff of the DailY Mall. I-Ie was only 21 years of age at the time of his death .


96

THE

CANTUARIAN.

SPEECH DA Y. The Speech Day was held th is --T - hwas cele brated in the Cathedral at year a nd ursday, August 1St. Holy Communion held at which the preacher was 3eo. R~lV ~ a"!l' a Commemoration Service was Rector of North Wraxhal!, Wilts; late Fel!~w ' f anson, M.A., (O.K.s., , 8,p- 1847), A departure from the order f . o . nel College, Oxford. the meeting in, the Chaptp.r Ho~s~r~~edlllgs hith erto adopted Jay in the fac t that those present In the Chapter H ous~ I not co mm ence untt! two o'clock. Among DOVt'T ~Ild ¥r~. Walsh, Canon H iche n~ere th ~ Dean and Mrs. '¥ace, th e Bishop of The pnze dlstnbution was preceded b • ~he Maste r of Pembroke and Mrs. NIason. Mr. Mason deserves the sale praise ~ td cthspee.ches. for th e preparation of which Speeches were as fo llows ;__ n e Slllcere tharlks of the School. The

ii1

Ia

SC~OOL FOR ~CANDAL" Act v S Mrs. Candour ... . c. ii.. Lady Sneel'well " C ... Sheridall. <. B . J. N . Adam s. ... Ir enjamin Backbite .A. R. Be1Jars. Mr. Crabtree ... C. N. Smith. Sir Oliver Surface G. F. Howe ll. Sir Peter T eazle C. C. Williamson. 2.-Scene from I'LE Bo sceneG;"Ante.rOOIl·;·in Sir Pe';cr Tcazle'~' hous2' M. Webster. M J d' URGOJS ENTJLHO~ I ME" Act r. Sc.· . . I., I V. '''fo/flre. . our am '" L e Mait re de Musique G. Ii S. Pinse·~i. Le Maitre a Danser W. N. Kempe. L e Maitre d'Armes .. G. F. Howel l. Le Maitre de Philosophic ."." E. K. Barbe-.. U La . ... ,n qUais . " ." .. . ... ". C. G. Williamson. L autre lnquais... .. . " . . . C. B. Simeon M d' ... . h' . Our .am, late in life, is eagerly takin''' 'es ." . .". A. B. Emden. ~ m, a;; e thlllks, (or first.class society. His ~'arioson.s m mUSIc,. dancing, fencing and ph ilosophy to fit me I."n e, quarrel about the resp t' . u ~ IIl st ruClors 111 lht! arts all meet in h' h to paCify them and prevent blows~~~~t Ul~e\~lit~h o! :r~~lrlhofcssions and, though tiL J ourdai :~ d~~~s~J~t h~~~ 3·-Scene from rr EDWARD II " g t. Edward II. . ... Al'ar!O'we. Lancasler .. Warwick Elder Mortime~" Younger Mortimer .. Archbishop of Canterbury'" Gaveston ... Ken t 1. _ "

l


I

THE

CANTUARIAN.

97

!-iccnc from II THE FROGS" ... Aristophallts. Dionysus (the God) R. M. Gent. Xanlhias ( Ids slave ) C. J. N. Adams. G. M. Webster. Hercu les Charon A. R. Bellars. Dionysus has determined to go to the Lower World to bring back a good poet The little ItnUHlllIan, after getting himself up like Hercu les with a lion's skin and club, first goes with his slave IUHhins to visit Hercules, who has made the journey before , to enquire as to the way, etc. H ercules, hi fh' of laughter at the gel up of Dionysus, trip.s to frighten him with accounts of the voyage, the IlI ke5, the wild beasts, the depths 01 mud, etc., but Dionysus persists in going. The scene now , lliulijcs to the Lower World -Dionysus in the dark ness is duly rowed over the Styz by Charon , the 1" "II11M of the Lower World, who rcfuses 10 take Xa nthias, a slave, in his boat, and he the refore has to II!II (Hlr.d the lake to meet his master on the other side. After some adventures in rowi ng, Dionysus 11!llIls for, and rejoins Xanthias, and then, though pretending to be bra ve in the darkness, he carefully I I I~I 'J hilll5elf behind his slave at every appcarance of any fres h danger; but at last, on hearing sounds ,., merriment irt> the distance, lhey go off together quite happy.

Except for a departure from old cllstoms in the omission of the Latin Speech,

Ihu usual programme was provided j and though th ere was no "bright particular Ilir" a mong the perform ers, yet the acting was of a singularly even character and ,,'nchod th e high standard wh ich we have come to regard for many years past as uflcl itional. To th ose of us who were personally acquainted with the actors the most Mrik ing thing in the performance must have been the felicity with which the different lUrts had been allotted in a ll the fo ur scenes : everyone seemed to be the right man III the right place- a high but well merited compliment both to teacher and taught; t¡. J. Adams as Mrs. Cand ou r and G. F. Howell as Mr. Crabtree, being marked Instances of this. C. N . Smith as Sir B. Backbite was remarkably good in parts, but tiC'asionally lost touch with the character. In the French speech, G. H . S. Pinsdnt I hicfly distinguished himself, in tht: leading part, and th e whole piece went well, but Ihe style of the dialogue was a little too heavy and solid, and the articulation not 'I"ite rapid enough. There is probably no character harder to support in se rious I !luna than that of a sentimental weakling and Marlowe's Edward the Second must 110 difficult to impersonate COil amort. Emden met the difficulty with considerable tiuccess, but one could not help regretting that the character did not provide him with wore opportunity for the exercise of a man ly dignity in voice and bearing. He was c'xcellently supported by Simeon, Pinsent and Gent. That the last-named finds his IItlturai rOle in comedy was soon evidenced by his acting of Dionysus in the Lower World. If th e part was a little overdone and the sa me gesturc:s repeated a little too orten, th ese were slight blemishes OIl a really admirable piece or acting which fairly hrought down the House. The applause was no doubt intended to pay a co mpliment also to the grim sardonic humour of Charon, as interpreted by Bellars, and perhaps In some deg ree was intended for the Prince of comic playwright's himself. We can Hubmit, wht:n occasion demands, to the loss of th e more frigid fun of Flautus and Terence, but may it be long before our Speech Day programme fails to close with the ini mitable humour of Aristophanes.


98

THE

CANTUARIAN.

After the Speeches, the Headmaster gave a brief report on all branches of the School work during the year. He announced with gratitude the gifts of three O .K.S. during the last six months. He wisl'icd to thank most heartily Canon Marshall \Vild, who had founded prizes for Divinity j the Rev. Cyril Greaves, who had now permanently founded the French and German prizes which he has li p to now annually given, and the Rev. Francis Harrison who had given with the utmost generosity ÂŁ500 in order that the School Exhibition Fu nd might be strength ened.

In concl usion, he

read a telegram or greetings and congratulations from the Member for Canterbury and Mr. Kennerly Rumford, who werc on their way to Australia and had sent us their good wishes off from Suez. The Dean, after reading the List of Honours gained during th e year by past and present King's Scholars, said he thought they would agree that that was at all events a sufficiently long list of distinctions for a School of that size to have gained in the course of a year, and he mllst congratulate the Headmaster and his colleagues very cordially upon that testimony to the admirable work which they had bee n doing. Speaking on behalf of the governing body, he must join the Headmaster in returning hearty thanks to those O.K.S. who had so generously assisted the School during the past year. Every school or educational institution of that kind must depend for permanent success upon the support which it received from past generations. \:Vith respect to the actual studies of the School, he confessed that although he followed its progress pretty closely, by the kindne~s of the H eadmaster, he was surprised, and he thought that other persons familiar with education would be surprised, at the uniform success which had marked the School in various branches of learning. If it had distinguished itself mainl y in classical studies, in mathematical studies or in historical studies there would have bee n ample reason for satisfaction, but it seemed to be a singular feature of that School and an eminently satisfactory one, that it appeared to distinguish itself in all branches of learning alike. The Dean went on to remark that their general review of the work of the School that day must convince them of the thoroughly sound teaching and education which was given at the King's School in all directions. There was a great deal of anxiety and restlessness in the present day in regard to Adllcation. The Universities wert! threatened with commissions, and inspectors of education were being dispatched in various directions He did not know what designs might be en tertained, but, whatever they were, he did not believe that they would materially improve upon the instruction and education give n at a School like that. The Captain of the School then called for cheers for the Dean, the Canons, and others. The H eadmaster and Mrs. Galpin subsequently entertained a large company at a Garden Party in the Green Court of the Precincts.


T HE

I

CANTUARIAN .

Prizes adjudged during the year' 1906-1907. I "I))\llin's Prize (J11itc!tinso,z) I'IlLu hclllntics (IJlitchi1I.Solz) ... \ Iodern L.·\I\guages, French (IJlitcllillson) " " German (Greaves) ... N,llur:i\ Science ( Mitchimoll) 'h¥&icnl (BrouffhtOll )

I Uvin ily (Broughton) 1 ·, II~lish Literature (Streatfeild) t ' Inssical Composition (Dealt Fm'I'M) I'livntc Sludy (Edward Blore) Il\lin Prose ... I :!'cck Prose I,alin Verse ()(cck Verse ... ... ... ... ... . .. t;..:ography (Prize glven by f. Hamiher Heaton, Esq., Il[.P. for, Ca"terbury) ... ... ... ... ... r I·:nglish Essays (d#to) ... . N"lu ral Hislory Collections (Head lI1aster) 'hawing Shorthand

I

C. J. N. Adams. H , H . E. Gosset. I. R. Madge. J. W. !\L Maynard. G. H. S. Pinsent. C. J. N. Adams. C. J. N . Adams. J. S. Yales. C. }. N. Adams. C. N. Smith, i. C. J. N. Adams. W. N. Kempe. K. Moore. C. N. Smith, i. C. N. Smilh, i.

C. A. West. C.

H. W. K. Mowll, i.

FORM \'1'. Form (Chrislmas) " (Midsummer, Go,.doll)

" " Army " ,.

I

VI. Form ( Stml1ey) '.' Va. Form (Seneschal) Vb. Form (Smeschal) IVa. Form (Emden) ... IVb. Form (Emdm)... . .. I Va. to IIIc. Forms (Greaves) ...

VI. Form (Christmas)

Composition (Prose) ... CompOSil!On (Verse) .. Enghsh Essay ... Class (Christmas) (Midsummer) Geomet rical Drawing

N. Adams.

C. H. \Voodhouse. A. H. Warde, i .

I livinity, Va. Form (IIlannall Wild) " Vb. Form (Marsha ll Wild) " Va. and Vb. Forms (ElwJm) ... " IVa. and IVo. Forms (Elwyn) llislory, " " .. " "'rench,

J.

W. F. C. Palliser.

C. J. Galpin, i. C. J. Galpin, i. G. H . Claypole. C. J. N. Adams. A. R. Bellars. C. S. Emden, ii. T. E. M. Boullbee. C. A. West. R. de B. Sau nderson.

G. H. Cloypole.

PRIZES. C. J. N. Adams. P. G. E. Chave. C. }. Galpin, i.

D . I-I. Cowie (extra prize J. H. C. Ashenden, i. D. J. N. Lee. C. J. G.dpin, i. W. A. F. Kerrich. A . N. I. Lilly. 1-1. H. E . Gosset.


roo

THE

Vb. Form " " IVa, Form

I

,I

l

CANTUARIAN. C. T. Galpin, i. F . L. Goad. ii. C. S. Emden, ii. C. S. E mden, ii. B. C. Mowll, ii. G. H. Claypole. A. H . Crowther. H.. H . Litt le. R. J. Btardswort h, ii.

(Christmas) (Midsummer) English Essay (Christmas)

"

(!\Ilidsummer)

"

(Midsummer)

I Vb. Form (Christmas) " (Midsummer) lIla. Form (Christmas)

Illb. Form (Christmas) " (Midsummer)

A. G. Lennon·Brown.

D. P. Bent. T , P. Cane. K. T . Andrews.

IIIe, Form (Christmas) II (M idsummer)

HEAD

MASTER'S DIVINITY

PRIZES. R. B. Goad, i.

Army Class ... . IVa. Form .. . IV". Form .. .

C. S. Merrett, i. C. A. West . J C. W . Houghton, ii. 1 G. M. Emery. E. D. de Jongh. T. P. Cane.

IlIa. Form .. . 1116. Form .. IIIe. Form ".

LOWER SCHOOL PRIZES. Divinity... ... Mathematics (Christmas) .. . " (Easler) .. . .. . Natu ral Science (Mitehimo,,) .. . French History Dictation ...

...

Geography Music Drawing

j

l

A. E. Car penter. W . E. Guttentag. H. Gainsford. T. S. Cave, i. H. A. Keyser.

(Midsummer) Form (Christmas) " (Mid summer) lIe. Form (Christmas) " (Midsummer) I. Form (Chrisllnas) " (Midsummer) ... Divinity .. Mathematics (C hristm as) " (Midsummer)

E. D. de l ongh. G. A. C . Jones, i. R. 11. Goodsal!.

JUNIOR

II".

C. Battiscombe.

(Prise givm by f. Henniker Heatoll, E stj., M.P. for Canterbury .. ...

Ha. Form (Christmas "

E. D. de J ongh.

..

SCHOOL PRIZES. H. Spence. R. C. Crowley, iii. F. C. Gentry. I. S. Worters. p, S. Barber, ii, E. C. Bing. T, P. Wright, ii. F. L. Evans, ii. E. A. Latter, i. H . Spence. R. C. Crc..wley, iii.


I

THE

CANTUARIAN.

ror

II •. Form 1 '; I~" lI sh

(Prizes givtlt by f . Emery, Esq.)

Ih lhving: 1)1 lill ian

.. :

\ J\ll ie

H . Spence. I. S. Worters.

lIb. Form { lie, Form 1. Form

,,,

T. P. Wright, ii. M. D. James. H. Wright, i.

,,,

J.

R. Reeve.

G. A. Townend.

Anniversary Preacher. " ht' Rv.v . F. HARRISON , M.A, (O.K.S.• 1842-1847), Rector of North Wraxhall, Wilts; late Fellow and Dean of Oriel College, Ox ford, and Senior Mathematical Scholar of the University.

Exhibitioners elected July, 1907. G. H. S. PINSENT (Rose) i\'Iajor Mathematical Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge. C. J. N. ADAMS (Stanhope). W. N. KEMPE (Parker ), C. C. C., Cambridge.

The Gilbert Gift. C. N. SMITH, S1. John's College, Oxford .

The O.K.S. Gift. H. H . E. GOSSET, R. M.A., Woolwich.

The Waddington Gift. G. M. WIWSTER, Exhibitioner of Exeter College, Oxford.

Exhibitioners now at the Universities. F. C. BOVE NSC HEN (Rose) Scholar of <;orpus College, Oxford.

D. J. PRESTON (Rose) Scholar of Pe mbroke College, Cambridge.

J.

TWJo:LLS (Stanhope) Scholar of J esus College, Cambridge. A. GILLIIJRAND (Parker) Corpus Christ i College, Cambridge. E. A. Rop&& (Rose) Scholar of Q ueen's College. Oxford. R. H. BRINSLEy·RICHARDS (Rose) Scholar of Queen's College, Oxford . H. P. V. TOWN&ND (Bunce) Scholar of St. John 's College, Oxford. L . T. WATKINS (Parker) C. C. C., Cambridge.


102

THE

CANTUARIAN.

Scholars. Elected December, 1906. KING'S SCHOLARS. J UNIORS. C. Galpin. C. 1". M. Ryan .

PROBATIONERS.

r.·

R. E. Gordon .

P. ~B. Cotterill . R J. N. Norris.

A. H. Crowlher.

D. Hussey. ENTRANCE SCHOLARS.

R. E. Gordon. D. Hussey.

I

H. C. Powell. E. A. Squire.

H OUSE SCHOLAR.

J. W. D. Hyde.

Elected July, ' 9°7, E.

n.

KING'S SCHOLAR S. J UNIOR S. I-I. H. Tow ncnd.

SENIOR.

Hosking.

PROBATIONERS.

*J:J, *1". · C. · V. *G. C. · G.

G. H . Claypole.

J.

Vll. M. Maynard,

C. T. Marshall.

*J.

E. E. R. T.

L. Hargreaves. Denman. Dawbarn. Fleming-Sandcs.

ENTRANCE SCHOLAR S.

*J. C. Page.

.. C. W. Kidson. · B. H. G. Northcote. *R. Tuckes. . · G. R. Dawbarn .

•c.

F. Ca nnell. H. Fardell. W. Kidson. J. Austin.

E. de Matlos.

· E. D. Fishbomne.

*H. F. Cannell.

I

:J~ T. F~cming-Sandes.

1' . H. I·ardell .

HOUSE SCHOLARS.

I

· V. E. L. Hargreaves. *V.

J.

Austin.

*/oilled tlte School this T erm.

Academical and other Distinctions gained during the year, 1906-1907. G. I·I. S. PINSENT G. D. l\'IACLEAR G. 1\1. WEllSTl~ R

H.

H.

E.

...

GOSSK'f .. .

... !\1ajor Mathematic..,1 ScilOlarship, Trinity College, Cambridge. Open History Scholarship, Sl. John's College, Oxford . ... Open Classical Exh ibition, Exc!er College, Oxford . ... Passed 13th into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich

(Arlit)' Class).


\

THE

I R. C. G. H. 13.

10'. C.

Na vy Class ) . ill.1f Class ).

'GOULDEN Bov e N SCHl~N

II. A. JENKIN TWEI.LS .. . SOI'W I TH

S. S.

II. L. DIlJIJEN

'"

J-:. A.

...

C.

ROI'ER

F. NATION

II. C. PARI S

... . .. ... ...

• F. P. BATTERSBY K . G. THOMAS

1<. . T.

JENKIN

I).

PRESTON

J.

.

..

Matriculation, T echnical College, Fmsbury (Ettgm eermg Class). Scholar of Corpus College, Cambridge: 1st Class, Final Classical School of Literre Humaniores. Scholar of Pembroke College, Cambridge : 1st Class, Classical Tripos. B.A., Scholar of Jesus College, Cambridge: 2nd Class ill Part ii. of History Tripos. Scholar of J esus College, Cambridge: 2nd C1as~ Classical T ripos. Exhibitioner of Emmanuel College, Cambridge : 2nd Class .. . Moral Science Tripos. Ford Student, Trinity College, Oxford: SqulTe Urnverslty Scholarship in Theology. Scholar of Q ueen's College, Oxford : 2nd Class Classical Moderat ions. Passed 6th out of Woolwich into Royal Engineers. Passed 7th out of Woolwich into Royal Engineers. Passed 23rd out of Woolwich into Royal Artillery . Open History Exhibition , Peterhouse, Cambridge. J esus College, ' Cambridge: Mathematical. Exhibition. . Scholar of Pembroke College, Cambndge : Scholarship in· creased in value.

HigllCr Certificate Examination, lttly, I906. NINE DISTINCTIONS in Latin, Greek, Divinity and History,

A FR AG ME N T. FOUND

NEAR T HE

\ 1'1' . I~V aplJ~. 8t'p,11IJO ~ oVlnrep ,;0' €¢'IP,epts

,1."npo1Tovs El:M/Xe, TtltS 1TtiAat 1TOTE ,"/u';)/I €¢€TP.;;LS oint (17redh,uas iryw 1f'6tl'(i,uOl.tat 01) 17(;VT' €7T(;,€AOei lJ uu¢ws 1;.".0,' €r/t',..IVE.T' , 1jOiwv brEL 17POI'Ot, '"" , ~, Opa}'ll.TWil p,tI'1JI'UT E.AOOIJTH, 7TO;\.V '11/f1vO' ~aVTOtS IC'lJOOS duns £(10' Ss olJ.

..

3

.. ' Admission as Student, I nstitute of Civil Engineers (Ettg-inur.

D . }. PR !;'sTON

.I .

10

Naval Assistant Clerkship (Navy Class). .. . Cadelship, Royal Naval College, Osborne (1mlior Sch()()l

TERRAM llELLAR S

D. HORSllRUGH ...

C. H.

CANTUARIAN.

,

CHAPTER

HOUSE .

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THE CANTUARIAN.

10 4

Kwpwfhall 6q~ryOIJ'

Oil TOrS 'Ii ASap. ILUAU1()' aoeiv loofev, Bs rIVVUU" 01} CPWV~IJ T€ ,ad. r1xijp.' iEopotwO/:'tS 1TOAVII EV

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I

THE CANTUARIAN.

"7dTpa'11'" E{3pOV7U O'VII6ICVI«t 7011 {30p{30pOV' Aoa7' ltv()tS, 1;' 51 "E,u'lTov(1(tV oppwowv, ¢of31f ti,,¢p,E€ ",OVllTWV JpOp' , V'11'o1f7'~fas '11'€OO t' ,,70'1 OE '11'W I; "jpwlK.' 6S 70 KW,utKOV OInWS 6V1j)vA(l(1(f' /np.v)vw7(h?/ 7eXI/?} WdT' c'uJ.Tw,ual lIVT' tilCtlnj01] OO}tWII . {30Uldt V ttV71/XO'Ult7U TWII Kl(()'1]J.dvwv· 7out,h" ItE" OJ} 7tLYU" TWV 0' (~A:X,ltlll '11'6PL

105

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70 '11'UV ~vIlJ-rw-KaVTvuptKOV '11'UIIV Oea}ttt 70'U7' ~II KUt Mat7WVtKwUtTO".

CRICKET. KING'S SCHOOL v. O.K. S. The match against th e O .K .S. has on several occasions of late produced fast an d Interesting cricket and this yea r' s game in no way fell short. It was played on InIl' 30th and 3 ' st. Strahan won the toss, and with Anderson faced the bowling of halwigk and Merrett. The latter bowl ed with ...,"I. considerable swerve durin g his ",Irlier overs and succeeded in dismissing Anderso n, ] ohnston and Gramshaw with \h' sco re hardly in double figures. Parsons and Huyshe however made a short stand, II lId then Adams assisted Parsons to add 30 runs, but the ninth wicket fell with the fI t'ore at l oR . Lucas and Hayes put on a few runs and th en a heavy storm of rain ,h'lnycd play for half an hOllr. On resuming we were treated to a splendid display of hitti ng by both batsmen. Aided by the temporary slowness of t he ground H ayes ~ullcd and hooked with great vigour an d' with Lucas despatchi ng eve ry loose ball lind for half an hour they were abun dant) the pair put on IS O runs in 55 minutes and , /\rricd the score finally to 332 before Lucas played inside a ball from Martin. It was II nne display of hitting, especially after so poor a beginning by earlier batsmen. lIassett and Howell opened the School inni ngs to the bowling of Johnston and "Ilrll han. Runs came quickly from the beginning an d after Howell had fallen II victim to Huyshe. Martin assisted Bassett to carry t he score to 100. This brought 11 11 Adams at the pavilion end shortl y afterwards Bassett played we ll inside a ball whi ch broke in and was bowled. Gardner offen.~d a catch to Lucas in the slips, and 1111 his refusal to hold it, immediately ran himself out. Kempe did not give much tllmblc, but Dalwi gk and Parsons hit some weak bowling about until they both fell vlt'lims to J ohnsto n's rapid delive ries. The remaining wi cket gave little trouble and 1111' innings closed with the School 48 run s behind. The O.K.S. Second Innings was , IIlony remarkable for some fine cricket by And erso n, and a splendid in nin gs by the \'I loran of the side E lwyn. The latter's innings saved the side from a complete hf Pl\kdown, and the School were left to make 277 runs in some two and half hours.


106

THE

CANTUARIAN.

Bassett and Howell came in and I 'd d one bad mis-hit by Howell in th (~~l e ~o make the rlill S, and with the exception of gave any a~tl1aI chance. The re~tS~f~' ~v en ~ nly zo nll~s wer~ on the boa:d, neither \~eak bowhng, and the School team h~ .g ame resolved itself 11110 the pUnishment of vIctory by six wickets. 5 owed no merc}'. and won a weI! deserved 1St

O.K.S.

Innings.

2nd In nings. 2 c Rassell, h On lwigk ". ' 5 bMnnin ". o c Parsons, b Dalwigk o c I-lowell, b Dalwigk 5r c Dunlop, b DnJwigk 16 c Bassett, b I)unlop 4 c Th omson, b Merrett " . 12 c Merrett, b i\ l nrtin 93 c Bnssctt, h Oa lwigk " 4 not out '" ". 126 b Dun lop 19 Extr:lS

G. C. Straha n, c Kempe b Dnlwigk D. K. Anderson, c Bnsse'tt, b ~'Icrrett:.' : R. V. Johnston, Ibw, b Merrett I-I. Gramshnw, c Bassett, b :'i'Icrrctt ::: O. B. Parsons, c Dnlwigk b Dunlop ~. F. Huyshe, c Bassett, b Dalwigk ... : ev. R. F. Elwyn. b Dn lwigk T . S. Adams, sl T<:empc, b Dun lop W. Lucas, b i\'lartm F. C. Bovcnschen, b Dalwigk'

H. H. Hayes, not om

.. ,

Extras ,,,

Total

33 2

Martin ...

4

16 20 14 40 10 13 o 18 24

""

Total

228

BOWLING A NALYSIS. O. K. S.

1St Innings. Dalwigk Merrett Thomson Dunlop

,8 49

o.

M.

19 . 14 6 10 3'3

2 3

2nd Innings.

R. 122

w.

59 41 68 21

3

0

0 0

1st ·Inni nlts. G. F. Howell , c Huyshc, b J ohnston L. J. Bassett, b. Adams R. E . R . Martin, cLucas, b'Elwyn H. Gard ner, run out W. ~. Kempe, c Elwyn, b Strahan C. F. Freeborn, b J ohnston" ~. ~. R. Dalwigk, c IIuyshc, b John~;~n " . a rsons, c Stmhan, b Adams C. S. Merrett, not out A. L. B. Thomson, c Johnst~,~, b At!;',~s D. ~. Dunlop, st Huyshc, h Ada ms .. , Ext ras,,,

Dn lwigk Merrell Dunl op Thomson IHartin "

4 0

2 1

o.

M.

R.

14 7 9 4 2 '2

0 0

67 57 62 9

0 I

0

W.

5

0

2 0

II

KING'S SCHOOL.

...

2nd Innings. c Crarnshaw, b Hayes ... c Cmmshnw, b Johnston c J ohnston, b Hayes ... not out

20 64 82 4 12 37 39

not ou t '" ... c Cramshnw, b Johnston

101

}

~

I

I

96 57

37 55 16 10

d id not bat.

Extras

Total T otal (4 wickets)

9 ... 280


\

THE CANTUARIAN.

10 7

1======================================= CRICKET RETROSPECT, 1907.

The result of the season cannot be said to compare favo urably with those of Out of fifteen matches played, only four were won, five were lost, and six were drawn, whil e three School matches we re unfortunately aband oned owing to the prevalence o f various epidemics of an infectious nature amongst ourselves and our rivals. The outstand ing features have be~n the consistency with which Bassett "has "cored, and th e innings of Gardner against Dover College. The former's aggregate IIf 835 nlll S in sixtee n innings speaks for itself, and is, we believe, a record for the Schoo l, while Gardner's performance is likely to stand as th e record indi vidual score fo r ma ny a long day , esptjcially in view of the fact that it was made witho ut a chance IIlI cI at a time wh en things were looking very black for his side. As the averages will show, there has not been much wrong with the batting, but, liS usual, the bowling has been the weak point,-indeed , had anythin g gone wrong with Dalwigk, we tremble to th ink what would have happened. The cry for more howling, therefore, is more urgent than ever, and aspiring cricketers are once more I 'minded that if only they will study that branch of the noble game more assiduously th ey may command a place in the XL, especially if they can do anything a little different to the universal "right hand medium." The standard of fielding has been fairly high, but we ca nnot help thi nking that the catching ought to be safer than it is, th ough we know that practice in that II partment has been regular and systematic. Our g rateful thanks are due to Bassett for his Captaincy, and we are delighted that he should have signalized his year by such a striking personal success. Vve append some remarks on individuals. I.. J. BASSETT (Captain ). Very good bat. Has improved a great deal in defence, and in a year not favourabl e to batsmen has sco red with remarkab le consistency as his average shows, and makes his runs all round the wicket. Good (leld, but has quite lost his footing. (:. F. HOWELL. Has shown a sad falling-off from his form of last year. Startin g badly, he lost all confidence and seemed afraid to try and make any of his strokes. We hope to see him regai n his old fcrm next year. Very fair field. W. N, K E~Il)E . Has agai n kept wicket very well and will be much missed in that ca pacity. I-las not been so suc cessful with the bat as last year. . 1.. B. THOMSON. His bowlin g has fallen off considerably and he seems to have lost co ntrol of pitch, possibly through trying to bowl too fast. Very good ,field, havin g improved considerably. Poor bat. I Qo6.


108

THE

R. E . R.

DALWIGK.

CANT UARIAN.

Has borne the brunt of the attack, and done some very acod

ferfor"han c~s. h Keeps a beautiful length as a rul e and gets up pretty quickly

rom t e pite . Vigorous bat and has hit spendidly on several occasions. Improved in the field.

H.

GAR'~h~~'

Very free bat~ dri~ing with great power. Not a good starter but . onDee he gets gomg IS very dangerous. His innings of 101 not out agaldnsfit Idover College will be long remembered by those who saw it Ver)' goo e. .

R. E. MARTIN. Has. not belied the hopes formed of him last year.

Is mu ch stronger and hIts hard. vVatches th e ball well, but is too anxious as yet to scoTle off' every ball and is inclined to sky the ball. Good field Very( erratic . bow cr.

C. vV.

~.ERRE~T . . Steady bowler, but without much sti na in his bowlinO' Slow in the field. but rairly ~a fe.

Isappomtmg as a bat.

C. F.

Very

F~E~BOR~ . . yigoro~lS ba~, the reverse of orthodox. Has a good eye alld hits ar . an

IS

mcreasmg

number of strokes.

IllS

Clumsy in the field.

D. V. DU~LOP. Slow left-hand bowler. Bowled steadily when he found his length an was not afraId to pItch the ball well up. Fair field and poor bat. H . PAR~ONS. Fair bat and should improve with increased strength. Generall,v goo(1 1I1 the field. 1ST

Name.

L. J. Bassett .. 1. H. Gardner .. 3· C. F. Freeborn 4-. R. E. Martin .. 5· R. E. R. Dalwigk b. G. F. Howell 7. W. N. Kempe 8. A. L. B. Thomson 9· H. Parsons 10. C. S. Merrett " I!. D. V. DlInlop I.

Xl.

BATTING

No. of [nnings.

16 16 7 16 1416 1410 10 lZ

9

Times not out. I

3 1 3 ° ° 43 1

AVERAGES. Runs.

835 517 18.J 4-54 279 342 15 8 67 72 79 15

Highest Score.

Average.

55'66 39 '77 3b'60 3°'17 25'3 6 21 '38

1 18

20 Ii!79 81 69% 96 31

1 J'2 8

30~'<

I I ' '7 JO'29

31 27

1'18 2"4

5

• nOl out.

The following also batted :_ E. T. Gage, 5, ', 5 ',20, 12'75; C. J. Adams, II , I, 8 1, 15, 8"0 E. P. Collings, I, 0, 5, 5, 5'00 .

j


\

THE

CANTUARIAN .

r09

I

BOWLING Name,

Overs.

AVERAGES. Mnidens,

R. E, R. Oalwigk 243'1 37 16 • . C. S, Merrett. . 154-' 3 I. D. V. Dunlop 89 7 I . A. L. B. Thom,on 108 14! . R. E. Martin . . 4-8'5 3 h. L. J. Bassett.. 3 1 '4.J The following also bowled :-H. Gardner, 4, C. J. N. Adams, 34,2, 153, I. I.

Run s.

Wickets.

1°3 2 5844-3 8 5°0 183

51 15 1415

' 59 0,

IS,

T;

8 3 I-I. Parsons, 2,

Average.

19'85

0,

13'3 6 3 1 '19 33 ' 33 35'3 8 53'00 29,0 i

DEBA TING S OCIE TY. The first debate was held in the big Hchoolroom on Monday, October 28th, when A. B. Emdm moved ' that .. the I': nglishman of to-day is degenerate." A , B . E1lldm in proposing the motion d nounced the modern system unde r which th e majority of Englishmen had to live, as Iwing ruinous to the national physiquo. II\,., showed how th e villages had been dopopulated and the nation now depended on a street-bred population, That. while Ihe working classes of the nation arc laves to a condition of life which is mLi ng away brain and body, the higher I lasses and the rulers of the nation were hli nd to everything else save their own IITljoyment. C. J. N. Adams in reply, fulIlll ud the first requirement of the leader or 1\11 opposition, by denying as unwarrantable un<l untrue the wholesale indictment that hnd just been made, He certainly did lIot ooze with figures, and seemed to Ilt'om it un necessary to bring forward any

argume nts to prove the motion to be unfound ed . R, 111, Gml did not see anything co nclusive in. Adam's speec h to prevent his making a tirade on the physi cal degeneracy of the nation . His speech was hardly effective, except so far as a bombardment of six-syllable epithets is able to convince,an obstinate opposition, j. S. Ya les with a tone of vapid authority indignantly repudi ated the whole idea of English degeneracy. His bluster was such as to touch the heart of the jingoist, though his arguments were remarkably illogical. H. W. K. jlfuw/l then proceeded to draw a vivid picture of the Canterbury slum life of to-day. If he had had to describe the life of Canterbury slums in the Middle Ages, it is to be feared that . his stock of epithets would have soon run dry. His remarks concerning the decadence of English literature were un.~ fortunate, as he hit upolf the most brilliant


IIO

THE

CANTUARIAN.

of modern authors (whether English or foreign he was q uite indifferent) as examples of the ge niuses of the past. E. B. 1/oskz1lg th r n rose and ridiculed the smallest and most insignificant of the details mentioned in support of the motion .

H. n. Towlle!ld fo llowed by expressing his contempt for the inanities of high society in a mock-bored tone which was cerfainly reciprocated with g reat realism by the audience. C. J. Galpi1l with some what prosaic ardour upheld the arti stic a nd intellectual abilities of the mode rn Englishman. The debate was then thrown open to the audience. Among those who then spoke Kettelwell perhaps appealed most to the audience as he favoured them with his impressions of the speeches

made on both sides. No doubt his confiden tial criticisms made a pleasant interlude, but they were certainly beside th e poin t at' ¡ issue. Chave. Lee and Goad in measured terms protested agai nst the idea of English degeneracy. The mover of th e motion then closed the debate with a speech in which he emphasised the uselessness of the most ingeni ous inventions for the enrichme nt of the coun try a nd the cleverest contrivan ces for its defence, if two-thirds of the male population in the cities were virtually invalid!' an d the rural population was rapid ly decreasing. H e concluded his speech with allusions to the degene racy of Engl ish sport. The audience throughout the debate marked ly showed their disapproval at all attempts to convince them of the truth of the motion which was lost by 77 vo tes'to 16.

RIFLE SHOOTING. There are this term upwards of 145 boys in th e three Shooting Classes. Thi s means that all boys in the Senior School (e xce pt those who have just joined th e School this term, and, so me few whose furthe r attendance on the Ranges is, for various reasons, not insisted on) are und ergoi ng a useful co urse of instruction in Shooting . Speaking generally the standard of shooti ng is satisfactory though not very high. No one yet has succeeded in makin g a If possible," though 34 out of h. p. s. points 35. has more

than once been sco red. Bull's eyes, howeve r, arc not everyth ing. Good groupin g of shots is more desirable : groupin g on the bull's eye will co me later, when steadiness of aim and thorough control of the trigger hand have been acquired. The officers for this term are Townshend and Galpin. Yates, whose keen work last term I highly appreciate, has been obliged to gi ve up his shootin g duty. Since the last notice of our doi ngs in ~he Call/uarirlll, we have starte.d on a further field o f activity, in the shape of a Class


THE

CANTUARIAN .

Semaphore Signallin g un der the 11 hnrgc of 'Williamson . vVe have already I!lade some progress. though the number of learners is small at present. The Competition for the ChampionMhip begins again this term. The be..st lO practices, 15 at 25 yards an? IS at ::J.o rf\r(ls, during th e year. will deCI? e who IS th e best shot. H andsome pnzes. have hoen given by Mr. A. S. Kette~wel1 10 .the Pllst, and he has also promised pnzes ugnin for next July. 1 am very glad to announce that during the winter term of each year there

Inr

III

will be a Competition whicl~ will .includ~ not only Shooting but also S~ gnal1~n g and Distance Jud ging. The Pnze wIll be a medal. and I have received the kind conse nt of Colonel Dietz, Comman~ler of the 7th Dragoon Guards, to call It by the name of th e Black H orse Med~l. It was und er the auspices of the r~glm~nt. and with the help-generously gIven 1I1 m~ny ways of its officers that our s~~otm g was inaugurated, and I am partlcuiarly glad to feel that the memory ofthe 7th Dragoon Guards will be so happIly perpetuated.

C. W. B.

DIABOLO. The summer' sun was sinking fast, As through this ancie nt c.ity past, A youth who bore a mystl.c case, With this inscribed upon Its face, Diabolo. The case was long i the n~m~ implied, Some weird in ven ti on was ll1suleAnd like a melancholic bird, He'd oft repeat that unknown word, Diabolo. II Try not that !Yame" an old man said, /I For giddines~ will seiw yo ur head. " And cramp your hands an~ legs b~slde, But, loud that youthful VOIce rephed, Diabolo.

II

Beware the double sticks an(~ str~~g. Beware the gyring meteor-thmg, This was the last advice he heard. Still he replied that curious word, Diabolo. The watchman on his ni ghtly round, Founel him extended on the gr~und Stilt holding in his hand, the ~tlcks Belonging to that of box of tncks, Diabolo. There in the twili ght near the School, Benumbed, and speechless lay th at foolVlhen fro m the sky. serene and far, A cone fell, like a falling star, Diabolo! ! I


112

THE

CANTUARIAN.

FOOTBALL. LIST

OF

MATCI-IES.

bale.

GnJltnd. RlSJI'I'lr=""Fi",',;::r'"==Ir="A"g.,,,"';::··','n· . =",""1 - --1.---------1.---- ___ .2!!!!!.:. TriiS. Points. Goals. Trier. Points.

FIR S T

XV,

19°7· TII. ,Ocl. 8 Mr. A. Lat ter's xv ... . " ." Canterbury Lost..

Th., " 10 Ttl., .. 15 Th. , " 24 Tu., .. 22 \V.. " 30 Sat., Nov. 23 Th., 'V' J " Ttl. , .. T h. , "

7 13 19 21

Tu. , "

26

8 3 14 Canterbury Won. I 3 14 0 I 3 Canterbury W on . 8 2 46 0 0 0 Canterbury W on . 4 5 35 0 3 Wye . .... . W on. 4 4 32 0 3 SUlIon ..... Won. 2 I 13 0 3 I-Iythe ... .... ..... "" ...... . Canterbu ry........ . ......... ........ ................. .. ....... .. ..... .. Dover College ....... " ..... . Merchant Taylors' School . EastbnllTnc College .. .. Canterbury". .. . ........... .. \\lye College ................ .. Canterbury... ..... ........ . ......... ...... .. . ... .. .... .... .. E psom College ........... .. . Beckenham ................................... .. ....... ........ . Mr. Cock rem's xv ... ...... . Canterbury ........ .. ........ .. ............................ .. . .. ..... .. Dover College ............. . Dover ............... ...... ........... .... . .. .. . .. ............ .. O.I<.S, ..................... .. Canterbury ..................... " ...... ...... ...... .. Rcv,W. H. Maundrell's xv. Sutton Valence School 7th Dragoon Guards ..... . WyeCollege .. " ........ ... . Sutton Valence School , ..

~~:~~~~y~~r~ I:::::·::: ::::::::: :::::.::: ::::::::: ::: .. ::: ::.:::::: ::.::::::

Th. , " 28 Sat., .. 30 \V., Dec. 18 1908. Th. , Feb.1 3 Hampstead Wanderers . ... Cantc r uury ...... . " ,_, .. _.. . ............. ... . , ... . Sa!., " 15 f'Iythc ........ ............ .. ... I-I ylhc ... ....... ..... ...... .. . ... ............ " . ... . .

1907· Th., Oct. 3 1 Th.,Nov. 7 VI. , " 13 Sat., J' 30

T onbridge School 3rd xv .. Dover College 2nd xv ... ... Tonhridge School 3rd xv .. Dover College 2nd xv ......

Ilfatches Played, ..

i I

l

I

1st XV , 2nd "

SECOND XV, Canteroury L ost.. 0 0 0 2 4 22 Do\!er ............ .. ......... . Tonbridge ...... ..................... ................. .... .. . Can terbury ..... ............. .... .. .................... ....... ......... :

Won,

against,

Lost,

"

"


TI-lE

CANTUARIAN,

"3

MATCHES,

KING'S

SCHOOL v, MR,

LATTER'S

XV,

This match was played on Blare's Piece on October 8th, and resulted in a win ror Mr, Latter' s XV. by '4 points to 8. This was th e first time that the School had played together, and considerin g this the forward s packed well. The tack ling throughout was good, Reynolds being the most prominent. Tri t:s we re scored by Bassett 2, Gardner, I, Miller, I. The School team , was as follows :B. Crowley (back) ; R. M, Gent, L. 1, Bassett, C. F. Battiscombe. B. H, Matheson (three-quarters) ; H , Gardner, M, D, Jephso n (hal ves); H . F, Reynolds, ", K. Barber, G, E. Miller, .E, W. Hughes, C. B. Simeon, C. F. Freeborn, V. C. Taylor, T, S, Nelson (forwards),

KING'S SC HOOL

v, REV,

W.

H.

MAUNDRELL'S

XV,

This match was played all. Blore's Piece on Thursday, October loth, and resulted Ai half-time the score W'iS equal, each side having registered a try, but neith er was con verted. Bassett sco red for the school. After half-time, as a res ult of a brilliant piece of passing by Gard ner and Basse tt. the latter scored again, but failed to convert. The next try was scored by Miller, owing to the fact that 3 school fo rwards were left unmarked. Next Gardner, after a really brilliant run through half-a-dozen opponents crossed the line and converted his try by a good kick. The forwards played a much better game than in the previous match. In individual play Bassett and Gardner were by far the best, though so me vc ry good tackles were brought off by Reynolds and Battiscombe. Matheson also was seen to advantage especially at the beginni ng of the game, when on several occasions he was very smart in gathering the ball; his tackli ng was also good .

in a win for the School by 14- poin ts to 3.

The School team was as follows :B. Crowley (back); R, M. Gent, L. J. Bassett, C, F, Battiscombe, B. H, Matheson (three-quarters); H , Gardner, M, D, Jephson (halves); H, F. Reynolds, !C. K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E, W. Hughes, C, B, Simeon, C, F, Freeborn, V. C, Taylor, T, S, Nelson (forwards),


TI-IE

" 4 KING'S

CAl TUARIAN.

SCHOOL v. SUTTON

VALENCE.

This, match was played on Blare's Piece on the J 5th of October, and resulted in an, easy vlc~ory for the School. Sutton Vale nce were playing seven in their serum. th is formatlOl1 rather spoilt our pack at first, but they got used to it after the first half" and then played a fine ~ame. getting possession much more frequently. T he pass1l1g of the backs was, qUite g?ocl the ball frequently going right down the line. Gard ner, as usual, was qUite on IllS game, making openi.ngs for the three-quarters who backed him up well; Basssett being the best of the four. The tries were scored by Gardner 3, Bassett 3. Matheson 2, Gent and \;Yilliam so n I each. The place~kicks were tak~ n by Gardner and Bassett who kicked four apiece. T he School team was as foll ows ;-

B. Crowley (back); T. P. Finn, L. J . Bassctt, R. M. Gent, B. 1-1. Matheson (th ree-q narters); H. Gardner, M. D. [ephson .(halvcs); C. G. Williamson, H. F. Reynolds. E. K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E. W. Hughcs, C. B. Simeon , C. F. Freeborn, V. C. Taylor (forwards).

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUlVl DUCES. G. H.

s. PINSENT.-King's

Scholar; Entered th e School, Sept. 19°2; VI. Form, SeI?t. 19°4; Mo~itor, Sept. 1905 i Captain, Sept. 19°6- 19°7 ; EdItor of Call1uanall, Sept., 1905 i President of Debating Society, Sept. 1906; Sports' CommIttee, Sept, 1906; School Exhibition Ig07; Major Mathematical Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge: 19°7·

G. IV1. WEBSTER.-King 's Scholar; Entered th e Schoo l, Jan, IQOZ; VI. Form, Jan . 1905 j Monit~rJ Sept., 1905,; I-Iollse Monitor. May, 1907 j Hon. Sec. of the D e batmg SOCIety, Sept. 1906; vVaddin o-wn Gift 1907' Hasker Exhibitioner of Exeter College, Oxford. co ' ,

C. N. SMITH.-Entered the School, Sept. 1897; VI. Form, Sept. 19°5; lIIonitor, Jan. 19°7; Sports' Colours, 19°7; Gilbert Gift, 1907.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

" 5

W. N. KEMPE.-Ente red the School, Sept, 1<)02; VI. Form. Jan., 1906 j Monito r, Sept., 1906; Cricket Xl., 1905-07 j Parker Exhibitioner of Corpus

Christi College, Cambridge. L. P. AIlBo'l"l'.-Entered the School, Sept. 19°2; VI. Form, Sept. 19°6; Monitor, Sept. 19°6; Football XV., ' 904-07; Captain of Football, '906-°7 ; Rowing Colours, 1904-07 j Captain of Boats, 1905-07; Sports' Colours, 19°6- 07 j Captain of Games, 1<)06-07; Sports' Committee, Sept. 1905. E. T . GAGE .-Entered the School. May, 1<)02; VI. Form, Sept. Jan . 19°7; Football XV., '905- 07,

1906 j

Monitor,

I. R. MADGE.-Entered the School, Jan. ' 9°3; VI. Form, Sept. 1906; Football XV., 1906-°7

j

Sports' Colours, 1906.

H. M. J. BURDETT.-Entered the School, May, 19°2; VI. Form, Sept. 1906; Football XV., 1905-7. H. H . E. GossET.-Entered the School, Sept. 19°2; VI. Form, Sept. 19°6; Football XV., 1906-7; Gymnasium Pair, '907; O.K.S. Gift. G. SPICKERNELL.-Entered the School, Jan. 19°4 ; Sports' Colours, 1907. A. L. B. THoMsoN.-Entered the School, May, Football XV.

' 9°2;

Cricket XI., 1905- 7;

C. L. DRuITT.-Entered the School, Sept. 19°2; Rowing Colours, 1905. R. E. R. DALWIGK.- E ntered the School, May, 19° 1 ; Cricket XI., 1905-7.


116

THE

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL NEWS.

We offer the hearties t congratu lati ons of th e School to Mr. Godfrey on his e ngageme,nt t? be marrie d. \Ve are very glad th at It Will not be necessa ry for him to break his long conn ection with th e school. as he proposes to live in Canterbury and continue hi s work here. The marriao-e will take place at the beginnin rr of Christmas Holidays. 0

the

We heartily welcome Mr. F. S. Porter and Mr. H. Poole who have joined us as masters this term. Mr. Porter, scholar of University College. Oxford , obtained a 1St class in Classical Mode ra tion s, a nd a 2nd class in Final Schools, and also won the Chancellor' s prize for Latin verse last year. Mr. Poole, Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, obtained a 2nd class in Mathematical Tripos, has come to take the place of Mr. Ba ly who left at th e end of last term fo r Canada.

In the Oxford and Cambridge Higher Certificate Examin ation ten mem bers of the school obtained certifi cates. C.]. N. Adams, G. F . Howell, C. N. Smith, C. B. Simeon, A. R. Bellars, R. M. Gent,

J.

S. Yates, W. N. Kempe, E. B. Hosking, H. C. Ashenden.

".'<-';" 'We heartily congratulate R. M. C ent, K. Barber, E B. Hosking and B: Crowl ey on being made monitors thi s term.

E.

The fo llowing wcre promoted into th e Sixth Form at the end of last term :-C. J. Galpin, D. H . Cowie, H. C. Ashend cn, B. Crowley, R. W. H. Moline.

The foll owing bee n elected on the R. M. Gent, E . B. Mowll , C. J. Galpin,

ne w members have Debating Socie ty :_ H os kin g , H. W. K. D. H. Townend.

The foll owing is an interestin g extract from th e .Dall:)I 1'elegraph of August 1 ath, 1907 , writte n by Nrr. J oseph Benn ett, the well known l11usical critic, who was good enough to write a criticism of our school concert last year: - Last Christmas, at th e Kin g's School, Canterbury, I heard s~l11 e thirty. or forty boys so pranos sing WIth a delicacy of style and beauty of tone wh ic h might have kept , and probably did keep, more than one connoisseur from catching his train home.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

"7

THE SCHOOL. Captain:

C.

J.

N. ADAMS.

G. F. HOWELL . L. J. BASSETT. G. F. HOWELL.

Captain of Cricket Captain of Football Captain of Games IVloNlTOR S :

C. J. N. Adams, G. F. Howell, C. B. Simeon, C. G. ~illiam son,. J. S. Yates, A. B. Emden, A. R. Bellars, R. M. Ge nt, E. K. Barb er, E. .B. H osklllg, B. Crowley. EDITORS OF THE" CANTUARIAN."

C.

J. N . Adams,

A. B. Emden, R. M. Gent.

SECRETARY TO THE" CANTUARIAN."

H. W. K. Mowll. SPORTS' COMMITTEE .

G. F . Howell, L.

J.

Bassett, C. J. N. Adams, H. Gardner, C. G. Williamson, T . S. Nelson, H. F. Reynolds.

O. K. S. NEWS. Marn'age.-On Wedn csday, ]unc 19th, the Parish Church, Leyayre, Frederick Buckingham Kingdon. third son of C. B. Kingdon, of Woodlands and Melton Mowbray, and Stamford Hill, Ponghill, ('o rnwall, to Elspeth Curphy Farrant, yo un gest daughter of the late E. C. I arrant, of Bella, Killingham, Leyayre. IlL

F, C. Bovenscheu has passed 25th in the India Civil Service Examination. "";'f:X'

O. B. Parsons played for th e Oxford Freshmen in Football and Hockey. H e has also been playing Hockey for the University.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

I. R. IVradge won the 2 mile race in the Harvard Freshmen's Sports. .;.;. %

The Rev. J. L. Fawsett is O"oing out to. ~alcutta to join the Universities' i\'Ilsslon lhcre .

%

. D. G. Fraser has been playing for RIchmond and the Surrey Colts. The 0.K.8. match will be played on Dec. 18th. All who wish to p.,Iay m~st send their names to L. P. Abbott Esq .• ];xeler College. Oxford. •

'~'ed n csday.

H. H . E. Gosset has played for R.M.A. Woolwich.

V A LETE. E. w. G,oad. P. H. Nixon. R. C. Jerran> 1I E. A. !-lo rn. A. W. Raymond. ~; h . . ~1oney, A. Travers, C. Battisc~mbc' O. W. Bea rdmore. S. Clayton, h. J. I ravers. •

CAMBRIDGE Dear School, One who in time past wrote to you from here, was able to complain that there \\' ? TC so ma ny of us to give account of, h? (~ld not know wh ere to begin . Alas! that

It IS

not so no\\',

Be warned in time

and do not listep to those insidious per~ sons, who, seeklllg LO gain you as proselytes, tell you to ' avoid ye the other place,'

LETTER.

meaning thereby this haunt of learning. However we are glad to welcome four new- comers to our numba. Pinsent wisely unbc:guilcd by the Valuation list; came lip carly to furnish. \<\Thile waiting ~or the rest of the University to arrive. he lIlv~nt~ d a new kind of picture frame, w}llch l ~ fast being imitated, and which bids fair to put Diaholo and Limericks


\

THE ill the shade.

Thomas also made a brisk hl~ginning, and varies (so they say) the Illonotony of rowing by representing Pt.'tcrhouse at rugger, soccer and hockey. \( mpe combines rowing and rugger: ( jage confuses all his out-door energies to row ing. Of those that werc with us lu:fore, \<\Tatki ns upholds the honour of the S 'hool and of his Coll ege as Corpus Ro win g Secretary. I-I e rejoices that his (' liege is almost immune from' rabbits," whi ch useful an imals, it would seem, are II L properly app reciated by rowing secIllta ries. J, Deighton has been attempting 10 bring into existence a Cambridge Town Rugger Club and asserts that he does not )'ll L despair. I n the meantime he and J)i;.WI1 play in Trinity T eams. Of H oward only the voice has been heard so far. llamilton is said to find th e beginnin g of Ih~. Football Season unusually severe and 1\ is whispered that he borrowed a hockey Jltic k recently. F . M. Deighton and T elfer Jll:\ lC that they are running and no one 1,1Il produce evidence to the contrary.

Sopwith has forsaken lVloral science, and is reading Modern languages. vVhat can it mean? R. T. Jenkin has taken up rugger. Richardson is keeping another term with us before developing into a bachelor¡ and presumably is busied by the ri ver. H . A. l enkin is with us still, and plays golf for the present. \Ve have been threatened with the loss of our patriarch, the Rev. H. T. Nl owll, but, although we have not seen hi m., our fears are for Ihe present stilled by th e sight of his name on the President Members' list. Of course it is understoud throughout that we arc all worki ng very hare\. \Ve join in wi5hing the School a rcally successful term in every way, and look forward to welcoming a large company of seekers for Scholarships in December. Ever yours. O.K.S. CANTAB .

CANADIAN LETTER , ~l Y

Ilq

CANTUARIAN.

dear Editors. We are just sending you the follow111M' as a fir5t supplement to the Cantuari an , per promise. we hope to be able to pod more or less of a series of such in IIII' future. It will consist mostly of hints 1'1 others who may be travelling in this 111 1 eLion, I should think that as we re-

No. 1.

present about 20% of the O.K.S. out here, that we might entitle it our Canad ian Letter, No. L Two of us Clayton and myself left August 2nd. Our firs t experience going 2nd Class on the ship was on getting aboard. where we all were herded about like a Hock of sheep. Firstly. each passenger


120

THE

CANTUARIAN.

was suddenly seized by two men, one captured one's left hand by the wrist, while th e other man knocked our hats on to the left side of our head s and stared at our eyes. then we were pushed on past a row of waiters, each one shovi-ng us on ulltil we clJtered th e dining saloon where we form ed up in a lon g and apparently endless single line j after a weary one step per minute kind of advan ce we reached the head of a tabl e where was seated th e Chief Steward who gave us a slip of paper. This was to tell us whether we were to have our meals at th e 1st or 2nd shift as well as which places we were to occupy. We fortunately dn::w tst shift and good seats near the door I First shift mean s Breakfast,7 ¡30 a.m . Dinner,12 . Supper, 6 p.m. Besides th ese meals one gets Bovril about 10.30 and tea at 4. th e latter a regular scramble and which we seldom failed to attend with good results.

left us, and we continued to our port of disembarkation, Montreal, without incident: H ints for the voyage. Cold or Hot Baths every mornin g, no extra, arrange with Bath-room Steward and give him $!=2/at end of the voyage ; other tips are, Bedroom Steward $0.50=2/-. three Waiters at meals $0.50=2/-. These are the usual tips to give, more is quite unnecessa ry, although a certain class of passengers may do so. On landing, you wait for your luggage in an enormous covered place. Your luggage is dumped down into a partition bearin g the initial of your name, there you open it and the Customs man looks, feels a nd chalks it, thereby passing YOli through. If you are a settler, have " Settl ers Effects " written in large letters two inches big on each package or trunk, and here you have your luggage checked to its final destination and you receive a numbered card (take great care of it) a nd you !:iee your effects no more until the end One more herding for ticke ts and all of th e rail journey, and even then it may not Ollr troubles were over. A desc ription. of arrive until some time after YOll do (I forgot th e voyage is superfluou s. all being much to mention that before you look for your alike. We passed through fogs which luggage, it is ad visable to get your paper delayed us somewhat, had a fair gale for ticket, whi ch you received in England, 36 hours (very good for the fish ) saw changed at a stall in the luggage shed. Do Whales. Porpoises, Seals, as well as 13 this before the crowd has di sembarked Icebergs at once, had rain and sun shine â&#x20AC;˘ . and you will gain a lot of time ). hail, sleet and a sample of snow. From the entrance of th e Straits of Belle Isle If you are travelling Colonist Class, between Labrador and N. Newfoundland you will buy provisions for as many days to Montreal we had first class weath er, as your journey is likely to last. For and magnifi ce nt scenery. temperature instan ce get bread, butter, tea, coffee or rising from snow-storm range to swt:1tering cocoa, a k<:; Ule, cup, kn ife, fork, spoo n, heat. Historical Quebec sud denl y bursts sugar, salt a lld meat. You ca n boil your into vi ew as one round s th e final bend in water on th e train, water and fire being the River St. Lawrence just opposite to provided free. Blankets and soap are also the Montmorency Falls on th e left Bank. necessa ry as you sleep eithe r on the seats At this port our 73 7 stee rage passengers or in a bUlik above the'seats. Get with a


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

I"

party you may have become acq?ainted with oil board the boat and you WIll have a very jolly time of it. All must change train s at Winnipeg. We travelled straIght throu gh to Abernethy where we found Du nlop and Hawkes, stayed there for ten day s and then all came away together. Twenty-four mil es with all our luggage, over moderate roads to Inclian Head, and then on to here the end of ('Iur railway journ ey, and the commencement of our lHmt for our future home and hoped-for olony.

Westminster Bridge and flowing some five to eight mil e!' per hour, its banks ri sing to a couple of hundred feet covered with pines and other timber. Th~ ~own itself is composed of fine bmldlllgs, Electric Light everywhere. Electric Cars ca minO', and shops that would put to 0 shame man y a London one, roads wide and . ... well a fe w days back a man had th e following notice printed and posted in the town; it speaks well for the state of the roads; "No bathing or duckshootin g allowed in th ese lakes."

The last z oo mil es of our journey from Calgary here is guaranteed to turn nny milk into butter before it has finished its Sf hours run. We are now just on .5,500 miles from London and eight hours h hind in time. We have not 50 far seen ~hc country pictured in bookl ets, the l~nd Kmiling wi th limitless stretches of wav1l1g Kolden corn. but rather the first '.000 IIlilcs, lakes, rocks and vast forests, next ' ,000 mil es th e hr famed prairie, but II t the billard-table without a ri se or 11\11. True, here and there, there are fair "trctches of such, but on th e whole it is hilly, undulatin g and broken up with I/lV ln eS and streams of water, and plenty ,l brush-wood. The next ',000 miles, 'h ~t part, bleak grassy slopes rolling on, !' vcr on, rising and falling like a troubled 111'('(10, latter part becoming gradually tlltlre wooned and ri ch in soil, until here WI nre in the City of Edmonton perch ed nil the North Bank of the River SaskatcheWllIl, a river wider than th e Thames at

The result is that the Town Council are pushing on wood-pa ving as fast as ever they can. We are shortly starting on the final pa rt of our journey, which is sure to be full of excitement and incidents, when we hope to send you another insta lme nt. . \ÂĽe all wish you a pleasant and successful term, and mind you beat Dove r. H. B. P, S.-You must all ow me t'J take this opportunity of th ankin g all those who so very th oughtfully and kindly gave me souvenirs with which to remember the very many happy days which I spent whilst connected with the School. You II Parrots" mind you keep up our football repu tati on and give it to Dover in a nice friendly but decisive way. Vale! H.B.


THE

122

CANTUARIAN.

SPORTS' FUND- STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. SEPT E:\rBE R,

RECEII'TS.

f, Bnlnnce in hand, Sept. 1906

..

Boys SubscriptionsMichaelmns Term, 1906 Lent Terlll, 1907 .. T rinity T erm, 1901 Masters' Donation!'>

Sllbscripdol~~

.: :: Mr. T. W. Young (renlof Blore's Piece) S hop Profits .. Sale of Fixture Cal ds

C«Iltu(l.rifm

So 5

d.

I 906-SEPTRMBER ,

£,

'3

,. d.,

0

6, '7 6 63 0 0

,

185 7 '3

6

"0

7

'5

",

74

0

EXPRNDITURE.

f, ,. d

Cricket.

Ken! C.C.C. (rent of Beverley) Peru (wages and goods) Marsh (work on grounds) Chambers (repairs to mowing machine).. .. . HogUen (catering) .. .. Umpire and Scorer (fares, &c,) Insurance vf Professional

50

,\

f, s. d.

0

0 0

5

3

'7

6

67

0 2 10 o 10

3

0 2

6

- --

0

3 " 7

1907 .

Footba.11.

KCIiI R.I~ .U. " 010 Cullen (rcnt of field) .. .. .. 7 10 1-1. O. Auslen{rentofOld Beverley) IS 0 Bunce (footballs, &c). .. .. "If: VOnl1lZ So:. Briggs(hul forDid Beverley) 5 10 Amos (hurdles (or Old Beverley) 3 12

133

7

5

6 0 0 3 0 0

37 0 9

Cricket and Football (combined). Austen (wages and help) Lilley (roiling, &c.) . . ' R,ltes & Taxes (more's Piece) Burton (Trails) Cns & Water Co. Righi of way.. 511100n Expenses

Athletic SPOl'tS.

Lee & Wlgfull (Prizes) 1I iappin & Webb (Prizes) 1I1urrin (work on g round).. .. Goulden, Crow, & Austen (Prizes) C:lrri:lge or Prizes

39 3 22

I

General.

0

5 0 6 II 4 6

0

2

0

2

0

3 0 0 8~ 4

d

,

5 7 " 3, "'0 0 , ,6 6 0

,

'5

6

Cantual'lan. Gibbs

11;

'.

0

19 II

'5 6

0

, 9 0 o 9 10

Gibbs (geneml Printing) (Jentry .. .. .. 2 17 6 Aldershot E xpenses.. .. Checlue books & Receipt books . . 0 5 ' School Shop, Stamps, Stationery, &c. I I 7 d· o , • TWyUlan 0.0 0 Philpot .. o , 0 fo'agg

Ba lance, Sopt. 1907. At Bank

.. .. .. .. Petty Cash in hands of Treasurer ..

£320

Audited and found correct, October z,ld, 1907. A. J. GALPIN.

II

2

6

10

2 II ;

7 10.7

ALGERNON

I)

Q

~

k3ie

1

I O~

LATTER, !lOll .

Tnfls,,,'tr.


\

THE

12

CANTUARIAN.

3

RIFLE SHOOTING ACCOUNTS. SUM MER

£

(111,1 .

Hllhscri ptions (Easter T erm) ~.l l c or Ammllnit ion, Targets, Seorc Dooks 1I.\lnncc, deficit...

14

5. d 2 6

7 3 2

£23

3

1~

Deficit last Term Ammunition and Air Pellets Targcts Sco re Books Air Rifle ... Barker, Altcndance Affi liation to C. R.C. Signnlling Outfit... Postage Prin ting... ... Slings and Sw ivels Rcp:lirs Su ndries

J. GALPI N.

S.

d.

5 9

JO

~

,

7

0 11

1

5

0 0

1 0 0 4 0 4 0 12 0 12

0 0

£23

C.

6

2 0 2 3 6 1 5 6 0 13 9

8 7,

E"amined and found correct,

A.

0

£

iJv.

w.

BELL.

3 0, I

8 7.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES.

We beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following subscriptions ;-

H. M. james, Esq. ( 10/6), R. H. Brinsley-Richards, Esq. ( 3/6). Rev. W. G. Mosse ( 10/6), C. T. Donaldson, Esq. ( 14/- ), G. Hawkes, Esq. ( 3i 6), W. B. Y. Loveland, E sq. (3/6), R. C. Jerram, Esq., R.N. (3/6), Rev. L. G. Mason ( 3/6), F . S. Porter, Esq. (3/6), E. P. Guest, Esq ., ( 3/6), G. F. J. Rosenberg, Esq. (3/ 6 ), A. Latter, Esq . (3/6), P. Godfrey, E sq . (3/6), Rev. L. H. Evans (3/6). C. W. Bell, Esq. (J/6), L. E. Reay, Esq. (3/6),

M. Ware, Esq. (3/ 6), H . .J. Cape, Esq. (3/6), Rev. W. H. Maundrell (3/6), W. G. Price, Esq. ( ro/6), H. Poole, Esq. (3/6), Rev. R. G. Hodgson (7/- ), Mrs. Galpin ( 10/- ), A. K. Mowll, Esq. (3/6), Rev. R. S. Moxon (3/6), Rev. G. C. E. Ryley ( 14/- ), J. S. L. Hall, Esq. (14/-) ' W. H . Ho rsley, Esq. ( Io/b), G. F. Heys, Esq. (3/6), R. H. Charles, Esq. (17 /6), E. P. Ri chardson, Esq. ( 14/-), S. Page, E sq. (ZI /- ), The Dean of Salisbury (zo/-), A. de B. Hamilton, Esq. (3/6), C. A. C. Parsons, Esq. (3 /6), H. L. Dibben, Esq. (3/6), V. Phelips, Esq. (7/-) .

OUR CONTEMPORARIES.

We beg to acknowledge with thanks the re ceipt o Cthe followin g contemporaries:Bro1llsgrov/all, Eagle. Hyvern, Leys Forlllig M/.J', IJfa lvenlitl1l, Epsollli(w, Buriall,

Easlbourmcw, Ouse/ (4),

K elley

College

Cll rouic/t , P(;/fllOlh iall, Cotm/.y Gentleman,

(4 ). Laue/lIg College l11agazl1u, Carthuszan , Porlculhs. Cu/},berll'alI .

Brigh/oll College

lJ!lagaz/1Je, Elizabethan, M agazine.

T011bridge ScI!ool

Gibbs and Sonf';, Print ers, Palace St reet, Canterhury.


THE VOL. VII.

CANTUARIAN. DECEMBER,

Ig07.

No.6.

EDITORIAL. The weather changes, and we do likewise : Time moves on, and we do likewise: Time has CI an inaudible foot": Time has a forelock . .... , .. .. platitudes, painfully ponderous and palpably prudish (we hope the six p'S willllot pass unnoticed; they jll O n sign of modern culture). Here lies the Theme and its Themis. Daring are lhoy who launch forth on new lines, but more daring are they who stand by old ones. 'I'll Theme-we refer to the one editorial theme-is now scoffed at: its merits are no Illnger appreciated. Even though 'this veteran source of inspiration be enriched with .lIch select metaphors as those of the kaleidoscope and the chameleon, it is only ridiculed, while plaintive hints about the sterility of the editorial brain are sneered II I as being too obvious. There must be somewhere a deplorable want of respect for III t which is old and true. So serious a matter merits. we think, a little delicate lIJilsideration. It is a melancholy fact that the editorial Theme, so full of years, so lu ll of sweet simplicity and truthfulness should find no favour with its critics. Wn, for our part, fail to see that there can be anything more weighty or more whole-


THE

126

CANTUARIAN.

some than a truism, sound and solid, with a few bald facts as a chaste ornament. Nevertheless it is very clear to us that to-day the truth, the whole truth, is not appreciated unlc!\s it is bedauhed with epigram , pomaded with simile, and draped with an abundance of tawdry ve rbiage. Then the lovers of this 4< ncwfangelnesse " will simper aestheticall y over their gaudy creation. It is not until a home-truth has been besmeared and upholstered in this manner and thoroughly disgnised, that it is considered good and delectable by its admirers. Vandals, Vandals ...............• But here comes the fall. After their eyes have been dazed by all th is tinsel, they will blurt out that these pampered paradoxes (or home-truths in fancy dress) are too good to be true. Another example of mo nstrous ingratitude. The paradox they say is too good to be true, the platitude too true to be good. And so the wheel revolves. \Vhich are preferable, then, statements that arc too good to be t rue, or too true to be good? Painted lies or plain truths ? 'vVe do not hesitate ; we are strong; we are obsti nate, ye Vandals . .• •. . .. . . .....•. The weather changes, and we do likewise i Times moves on and we do likewise. Time ... . . . ... ..• . the circle is completed.

THE at

ARCHBISHOP'S

VISIT.

The annual visit of His Grace the Archbishop took place on November 29th, noon, in the Big Schoolroom.

12

The Dean, in presenting the School to the Archbishop, enumerated the various distinctions gained by the School at the Universities and in the Army Examination. He then referred to the very satisfactory report of the Examiners sent by the Board of ~ducati(;m to inspect the School last June, and quoted from the report the following conclusions _" Although now in the thirteenth century of its t"xistence, the school is still in the vigour of youth , its position in the Cathedral precincts has not led to any stereotyping of formal education i the governing body has so utilised the connection of the school with the Cathedral, that this connection, far from proving an obstacle to its growth, has led to the formation of an independent and useful organisation adapting itself without reluctance to the educational developments required by the times. T he impression left on the minds of the inspectors is that of a highly efficient school with teaching of a high order, excellent organisation, and ad mirable tone. Moreove r, it is not too large for each. boy to be treated as an individual, and not merely as a member of a class. As a consequence, there is a high standard of individuality among the boys, and work and play alike seem to go with a s ~ing that denotes happi ness as well as vigour . . ... . , . But the school is fortunate in its Headmaster, who with in ten years has almost doubled its numbers j and under whose care th e sc hool has reached a high level of all-round efficiency."


THE

CANTUARIAN.

12

7

The Archbishop said it was to him a very genuine pleasure and satisfaction to be there that day. He had been reminded that it was t wo years since he had the privilege of visiting that School in that formal sense. Last year when he desi red to have been t here he was detai ned elsewhe re upon work connected with legislation. There was, he was quite certain, an increasing sense among thoughtful men, that a school like that, of a distinctive character, havin g a stamp of its own upon it, and not cut to pattern like any other schools, had an inestimable value in their . country's life, not only for the sake of those who were t hemselves takin g part in th e school life, but for the good of the country as a whole. The very last thing which he wanted to see, the very last thing that the most thoughtful studen ts of educati onal problems wanted to see at present in E nglish life was that their schools should be uniform in thei r system and arrangements. uniform in the nature of the precise instruction that went on within their school walls. T here was no type of school of a disti nctive character which he was more anxious should be maintained, developed, and used to the very best possible advantage, than that distinctive type which was HO splendidly set forth for every man to see and to understand, in the history of the last, the present life and the future hopes of the King's School, Canterbury. H e )clieved intensely in the peculiar character which belonged to a school situated as that was in the precincts of the greatest of thei r historic cathedrals. If they had got hig trad itions let them feel that that laid upon them a trust which they were bound to uphold and make strong, living. and active, in the life of to-day. The Headmaster then thanked the Archbishop for his g reat kindness in coming \hure that day an~ for the add ress which he had given them. !-lis Grace asked that a holiday might be granted the School during the summer Imill. T he proceedings concluded with hearty cheers being given for the Archbishop ri nd Mrs. Davidso n and the Dean and Mrs. Wace.

I

O. K. S.

DINNER.

The Annual Dinner will take place at The Monico Restaurant, Piccadilly " irclIs, Vii., on Wednesday, J anuary 15th, 1908, at 7.1 5 p.m . T he Ver), Rev. the Dean of Salisb ury has kindly consented to take the chair, and II i hoped that he will be supported by large numbers of those who perhaps know hllll better by the name of Canon Page Roberts. The attendance last year was itllllt' r than it has been for some time, and O.K.S. are urged to make a point of Ull1 nding if they possibly can, and to arrange with t heir contemporaries to meet 11111111 there, so that the gathering may be a successful and representative one. All who are gifted with musical talenls are requested to bring songs with them.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

FOOTBALL. LIST

OF

MATCHES. Far,

Artlinst.

D tl lt, Op/)(11Itnfs. GrtJHlId. RUHII., ,,=-,--=c:-ru:=+='hCT;i;;:TJ;;;;;,,1 1-----I __________ I_____ I __ '-COIlIS'I.I!:!!.!.:.. Points. Goals. Tn'I:S. Points.

FIR S T 1907·

II II II

II

Tu., Oct. 8 Th., .. 10 Tu.) .. 15 Tu., .. 22 : Th., " 24 W. o " 30 Th., Nov. 7 W., Tu .• Th.,

" " "

13 19 21

Sat" " 23 Tu. , " 26 Th., " 28 Sat., .. 30 W., Dec. 18

Mr. A. Latter's xv.. .. Rev. \\T. H. Maundrell's xv. Sutton Valence School ... WyeCollege . ... ....... . .... , 7th Dmgoon Guards ., ...... Sutton Valence School ... Dover College ............... Merchant Taylors' School . Eastbourne College... ... .. Wye College .................. Hythe, . . ...... .... . ... Epsom Co ll e~e ............. Mr. Cockrem s xv ...... Dover College ....... .... ... O.K.S .... ............ ........

Canterbury Canterbury Canterbury Wye ...... Canterbury Sutton. .... Canterbury Bellingham Canterbu ry Cante rbury Canterbury Beckenham Canterbury Dover Canterbu ry

XV.

Lost.. 1 I Won. I 3 Won. 7 2 Won . 4 4 Won . 4 5 Won . 2 1 WOll , 9+ 1P. 2 Won . 2 I Lost.. 0 I \\'on. 2 2 Won . 0 4 Lost.. 1 0 Lost.. I 0 Won . 4 3 ......... , ............. ..

8

,

'4

0

41

0

, , o I

32

0 0 0

,

3

, ,

3 3

o

0 0 If

35 '3 55

3 , 14

0

'3 ,63

o

0

2

'

0 0 I+Ip.

'2

5

5

3

29

I

2

3 6

2

15

4

27

,

0

3

0

5

' 908.

Th., Feb. 13 Hampstead Wanderers . ... Canterbury." ................ .... .... ," .. . " ...................... ... ". Sat., " 15 I-Iythe . ....................... , H ythe ... .. . ......... "." ... , .................... , .. ........ ............ .

I'

1907·

Th .• Oct. Th.,Nov. W. , Sat. ,

.

"

T onhridge School 3Td x v. · Dover College 2nd xv ... .. · Tonhridge School 3rd xv. · Dover College 2nd xv ... .. ·

lIfalclus Played,

"

XV.

SECOND

31 7 '3 30

"

1st XV, 2nd "

Canterbury Lost .. Won. Dover T onbridge L ost .. Can terbu ry W OII •

0

0

2

3

3

9

0

0

0

5

2

5

0

0

3'

3

0 30

0

0

Points, for,

WOIt,

.

'9

0 0 0

;

"

"

"

;

II

MATCHES. KING'S SCHOOL v. WYE COLLEGE. This match was played at Wyc o'n October :z:znd. The School was very mediocre in the first half both the fo rwards and backs playing far below form . The scntm failed to get p~ssession and was lacking in dash, wh ile the three-quarters could not


THE

CANTUARIAN.

hold their passes. After play had varied' from one goal line to the other, Matheson broke away and struggled over to obtain the first try for the School. At half-time we were leading by three points t~ nil, after having by no means the best of the. game. Upon resuming, a great change came over the team and the play developed lllto a contl11UOUS attack by the School. The forwards held a heavier pack excellently ; Barber, Reynolds and Miller contri butin g much to the success. Behind, Matheson played a g reat game and scored three more tries. two of them, the result of good passlllg dow n the line, and the other a very fine individ ual effort. He was well supported by th e rest of the th ree-q uarters, who kept their places better and ~ok thelr passes for th e mos t part we ll. Other tries were sco red by Bassett (z), Jardner (2). Wye scorcd from a rush in th e second half. The final score was + goals and 4 tries to one try. The School team was as fo llows :_ B. Crowley (bac k) ; C. P. Finn, L. J. Bassett, R. M. Gent, B. l-I. Matheson (three-quarters); H. Gardner, M. D. Jephson (halves); C. G. Williamson, H. F . Rey!,olds, E. K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. B. Simeo n, V. C. Taylor, C. I' . Freeborn, (forwards). KING'S SC HOOL 1J. 7TH DRAGOONS_ Played on BIOl¡e's Piece, October 24th. The School team was thoroughly on its ga me an d .held the soldiers at all points. Th e forwards are to be congratulated on manreuvenn g a scrum heavier than itself, and gai ning possession almost every time. .~I~e three-q l1art~rs took and gave their passes well and the tackl ing was quite good. I. nes were obtamed by Bassett (3), Gent (3), Gardner (z), and Matheson . Score, School- 4 goals,S tries to I try. The School team was as follows :_ C. F. Battiscombe (back) ; E. P. Finn. L. J. Bassett, R. M. Gent, B. H. Matheson (three-qnarters) ; H . Gardner. M. D. Jephson (halves) ; E. G. Williamson, H. F. Reynolds, E. K. Barber, G. E . Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. B. Simeon, C. F. Freeborn, V. C. Taylor (forwards). KING'S SC HOOL v. SUTTON VALENCE SCHOOL. Played at Sutton Valence on October 30th. The School were lamentably slack II the. first half, the forlVards being considerably hampered by the New Zealand InrmatlOn adopted by Our opponents. The th ree-quarters coul d not hold their passes IllId ~dams at half was terribly weak. They played a fine bustling game and led at IIldf-tllne by 3 points to ni l.

J-l~ weve.r, on resumi ng, our three-quarters got going and Bassett and Matheson Ijl'orcd

III

qUIck succession, all the tries being the result of good passing among the


THE

CANTUARIAN.

School backs. We fell off again. however, and did not add to the score which stood at J 3 poin ts to three, when time was called. The School team was as follows ;C. F. Battiscombe (back); E. P. Fin n, L. J. Bassett, R. M. Gent, B. H. Matheson (three-qnarlers); II. Gardner, C. J. N. Adams (halves); C. G. Will iamson, H . F . Reynolds, E. K. Barber, G. E . Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. B. Simeon, V. C. Taylor, C. Freeborn (forwards). KING'S SC HOOL v. DOVER COLLEGE. This was played on Cullen's Ground, November 7th. The team arc to be congratulated on running up a record score agai nst thei r opponents. \Ve ,lost ~he toss an d took the kick. a piece of good judgm ent on Rassett's part, even If unIntentional. From the start we raced away; a serum on thei r line. and the ball came out to the School three-quarters. A bad pass to Bassett went behind him where Gent, lying back, gathered it at top speed and scored close in; the try was converted . Bassett took up the runnin g and scored agai n, this time failing to add the extra points. Gardner was then conspi cuous for excellent runs and judicious passing; he was backed up wonderfully well by Bassett and these two both scored in quick successio n. The former proceeded to drop a very neat goal, placing us further ahead . The passi ng among our three-quarters was very much superior to that of the Dover backs, and Gardner repeatedly wound up brilliant ntns with a pass to one or other of the School three-quarters, generally Bassett, enabling us by half time to establish a lead of 30 points. Upon resum ing the School at once pressed, but coul d not score. Time an d again Bassett and Gardner passed forward, rathcr, passed straight. l1p ~)ll the g,?al li.ne, but for whi ch our score would have benefited by at least four seemmg certam tnes. At last to vary the monotony Dover broke away, went past T aylor, who had done the little he had to do in excellfmt style, a nd looked all over scorers. but Matheso n came up from behiud, out-paced their man and brought him down brilliantly a few yards outside our line; this, however, was their last and only burst, and we raised our total to 55 before the whistle went. First and foremost Bassett and Gardner stood out, their combined and individual play surpassed all their former efforts and they were re warded by being responsible for six of the tries between them, and Gardner added to his laurels with a dropped goal which arc none too common in the School football. Adams had improved at half greatly. The School team was as follows ;V. C. Taylor (back); B. I-I .. Matheson, L. J. Bassett, R. M. Gent, H. Parsons (three-quarters); H. Gardner, C. J. N . Adams (hal ves) ; C. G. Williamson, H. F. R eynolds, E . K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E. W. I-Inghes, C. B. Simeon, V. C. Taylor, C. F . Freeborn (forwards).


THE

CANTUARIAN .

KING'S SCHOOL v. MERCHANT TAYLORS' SCHOOL. Played at Bellingham on Wednesday, November 13th, and resulted in a win for us by one goal and three tries (14 points) to nil. The ground was in good condition, but there was a strong wind nearly straight down the ground. We faced the wind in the first half, and after a few scrummages, good rUlls by Gardne r and Gent were di scounted by a cross-kick which the wind carried back and which enabled l\1.erch~nt Taylors'. to press, but Reynolds secured the ball, an (~ ~ fine bout of passlllg, 111 whIch SIX or seve n took part, ended in i\'fa~hes,?n gaming an excellent try. On resumi ng Gent made two good runs, but agalll tned to punt over the full-bac k' s head , a manceuvre for which the wind was too ~:ro ll g. ~fter good work by Gardner .and Parsons, ~nd two pe~alties against us for f~ot-up, ~o m e more passing ended 1ll Hughes sconng a try. fh e same player was agdl.n conspIC UOUS f,?r ~n excellent rUll and then Bassett made a great sprint, handing 01T III style and filli Shlllg up with a try. Then Merchant Taylors' pressed, but Crowl ey tackled well and the whistle went for hal f-time. . After th~ interval our opponents played up mu ch mare vigorously, though now fac~n g the wmd. and fop a long tim e we were hard pressed-indeed they got over on<:e but were held up by Matheson. Adams a nd Crowley also did some excelle nt sa vlllg, and then a long run by Gardner brought relief. Then good passing by Bassett, Gent and Parsons enabled the latter to sco re and Gardner kicked a good goal. The only other incident of note was a good run by Cheeseman who looked vcry dangerous, and also a beautiful cross-kick by Gardner, which, however bounced badly for .Matheson who just failed to get in. ' For us, the backs all play~d very well and some of the passing was brilliant. Doth .Adams at hal f ~n? Crowley at back-they were playing for J ephson and Battlscombe wh o were lnJured-perfonned well. Gardner had a hand in nearly every ll1o:~ment a nd was well b~cked up by his three-quarters. Of the forwards Hughes was 111 great form, a.nd MIller, ReynOld s and Barber all did well, but in the second ha lf the forwards faIled to get possession very frequelltly and that accounted for the r~~t. that with the wind we only scored once. For Merchant Taylors' Cheeseman ~H; ked very well a ~l d often looked dangerous, but their three-quarters wer~ handi ­ t.:ilpped by the action of the half standing back, who always elected to run across the field. It was very gratifyin.g to find no less than tcn O.K.S. spectators, who, assisted in small degree by a Illmute person claiming relationship with one of the players c'heered on the team to victory. ' The School team was as follows ;_ B. C. Crowley (back); B. H. Matheson, L. J. Bassett, R. ~f. Gent, H. Parsons three-quarters); H. Gardner, C. J. N. Adams (halves) ; C. G. Williamson, II. F . \ ~ ynoldsJ ~. K. Barber, G. E . .Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. B. Simeon, C. F. Freeborn, . A. M. Richardson (forwards). 110


13 2

THE

CANTUARIAN.

KING'S SCHOOL v. WYE COLLEGE. PIa cd at Canterbury, on Thursday, NOV . 2 I St. It was ~:)Ur first game after t!~: loss of bassett and we missed him tremendously. It was 'pIteous to see the th~~ds quarters muddling their passes, losing thr ir PhoSitio~,a.n~~ev~~~ ~~ed~~t· aJ~~I:~~::lves

~~:~f,EJt~~~A~!.:i~J:;~:::i~~i1:~~:~=t ~:~R~~~~~e~t~~;:;:£~:Jr~~lt~?,~:~: ~2'~~r,1 ~~:~a~:l~~l'~~Y\~~ i!tetl~: t;u~ H~ w~:e g~~~~. sa~~ri~s

were scored by Gardner (2), Gent (I), Matheson ( I). Score-School, 2 goals, z tnes ; Wye, I try. The School team was as follows : . V C Ta lor (back)' B. H. Matheson, R. M. Gent, H. Parsons, C. F. J3atllscomb.- (thre';quarters);' C. J. N. Adams, }l, Gardner (halves) ; H. F. Reynol~, E. K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. B. Simeon, C. F. Freeborn, C. A. . Richardson, T. S. Nelson (forwards). KING'S SCHOOL v. HYTHE F. C. . This match was played on Cullen's Ground on N,ovember 23 rd , ~:u~;e~v~~ a win for the School by IZ points to 6. The passmg of the SCil.OOh Id ~he ball e decidedly good in the first half of the game., but :hey we;ell.ull.r:rabi dfl 0 Matheson during the second half on account of the !al1l., wInch was a l1l. o ~~a sc1oo1 forwards

an1

;~~!~e\;~~t J~rr~~r~h~s t,~t g~~l}~ ~u;e~h~l~,~~~~,~f~e; ;~~ ~~~~nentse told towards the end. Gent, Gardner and Parsons also scored . The School team was as follows ;H C. F . Battiscombe (back); B. H. Matheson, R. M. Gent, D 'tt f~!O;'~lds: Parsons (three-q uarters); H. Gardner, C. J' N · SAdams (taICes+~ylo~ C FreeE. K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E. VI. Hughes, C . B . 11nCOIl, . ' ,.. born, C. A. M. Richardson (forwards). _ __

.if

KING'S SCHOOL v. EPSOM COLLEGE. PIa ed at Beckenham on Nov. 26th, on the Ground of the Bcekenha~ F.C., t~ whom ,;e are again indebted for their grea~ kindness in len:Hng us th~~~;Jo~;~~\: The weather was miserable, the ground bClIlg very swet, .wInle t~~o~tent COUl~ty straight down the ground. Mr. George Harnett. ecretary 0 R.F.U., very kindly refereed. Itt . tl r team began to press a mos a Epsom who were a good d ea I h eaVler lall ou I If f e the score once but the game was very even for most of the first half, and at. 1a. - 1m once ~vhen was ~ne goal against us. We ought to have scored on two occaSlOns,

t

'I

J


THE

CANTUARIAN .

133

Gent, after a good run, might have got in himself but elected to pass, and again when Dunlop had only to give the ball to Parsons to enable him to score. 'We then had to face the wind, and though we often got into their half, the long ki cking of their back constantly brought relief. From a serum under our posts the ball was passed out to the opposing half, who dropped a pretty goal. A good rlln by Gardner. and neat passing between him and Ge nt, enabled the latter to get behind, and he converted his own try. But the superiority of the Epsom forwards was now telling, and they pressed for the remainder of the game and scored two more un~ converted tries. thus winning a good game by fifteen points to five. A s mentioned above, Ollr forwards were not good enough. They did not often get possession and were much slower than Epsom in breaking up. Gardner and Gent did a lot of work and did it well, and rvlatheson made some good bursts, but the gro und was far too slippery to suit him. Battiscornbe at full back was quite off his game. He fail ed to gather the ball and rarely kicked, while he was very slow in turnin g on the greasy turf. vVe suffered, of co urse. terribly from the abst': nce of Bassett. while \ÂĽilliamson and Jephson were also away, but there can be no doubt that on the day the best team won. The School team was as follows:C. F. Battiscombe (back); B. H. Matheson, R. M. Gent, D. V. Dunlop, H. Parsons (three-quarters); H. Gardner, C. J. N. Adams (halves); H. F. Reynolds, E. K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. B. Simeon, V. C. Taylor, C. F. Freeborn, C. A. M. RIchardson (forwards).

--

KING'S SCHOOL v. MR. COCKREM'S XV. This match was played on Cullen's Ground on the 28th November, and resulted in a win for Mr. Cockrem's team by 33 points to 5. The forwards were slow in getting round. and Freeborn seemed unable to mark his man out of touch. After half-time Gent scored a good try which was converted by Gardner. In the last few minutes the School were pressing. the olher side being handicapped by the loss of Slringer, who had been playing a brilliant game. The School team was as follows;C. F. Battiscombe (back) ; B. H . Matheson, R. M. Gent, D. V, Dunlop, H. Parsons (three-quarters) ; H. Gardner, C. J. N. Adams (halves); H. F. Reynolds, K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. ,B. Simeon, V. C. Taylor, C. F. Freeborn, C. A. M. Richardson (forwards). '

I,.

KING'S SCHOOL v. DOVER COLLEGE. Played at Dover, on . Nov. 30th . The School was without Bassett, Williamson, Mntheson and Simeon, who were away from various causes, but in spite of being thus hnndicapped. we were never in danger of losing.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

Soon after the start Gardner got away from a serum in mid-field, broke t hrough their three-quarters and passed to Gent who had backed him up ; their three-quarters, however, were now coming up fast, and several yards from t he line caught Gent .who passed back to Gardner, enabli ng him to fun in behind the p ost~: the kick fa tled. Play then remained in their 25 until Ga rdner again scored and agam the try was not converted. Gainsford scored again after a really fille TUIl half the. length of t he field, and he made full use of his pace. Gardner converted , and 'at half-time the score stood at I I points to nil in our favo ur. We started again by scoring through Gardner who slipped round on the bli nd side of the se ru m and went over unopposed, himself adding the extra points. Directly afterwards Gent broke away fro m touch and after a long run was hemme~ in by their th ree-quarters coming across and was tackled, but Gardner raced up ?ehll1d, secu'red the ball somehow from the mass and by handing off sturdily and by vIgorous wriggling, got over to score his fourth try. Gent converled. Then after .some good passing down the line Gainsford scored again but nothing came of the klck at goaL Soon after Gardner got in agai n in the left hand corner, bringing the School total to 27 . Dover had scored in the fi rst half from a fo rward ru sh. It ,,,as a good gam~, and we must feel indebted to Gardner for his magnificent play i indeed, we heard It . from an excellent authority that it was the best game he has played. Dun lop's defence was good but he lacked powers of passing. Gainsford was extremely good on the left wing and his first try was very good indeed. T he School team was as follows ;V. C. Taylor (back); H . Gai nsford, R. M. Gent, D. V. D unlop, H. Parsons (three-q uarters) ; H . Gard ner, C. J. N. Adams (halves) ; H. F. Reynolds, E. K. Barber, G. E . Miller, E. W. Hughos, C. A. M. Richardson, C. F. Freeborn, T. S. Nelson, T. W. S. Price (forwards). KING'S SCHOOL V, . EASTBOURNE. After being abandoned once and put off twice, this match was eventually played on Cullen's Ground, on Dec. 5th. Eastbourne kicked off and pressed from the vcr)' start; the School fo rwards were lamentably slow and lifeless in all their work. After about a quarter-ofoan-hour Eastbourne scored rather far alit on the right, and the fact that they had not done so before was due to the tackling and saving of the threes, especially of Gent. The kick-at goal was a failure. The School played better after t his, and a run by Matheson very nearly opened our score. We continued to p ress, and after some loose work in the Eastbourne 25, Gent took a pass somewhere in the hollow of his back and failed to score merely by inches. At this point the whistle blew for half-time, leaving Eastbourne ahead by three points. Un resuming the game, the School attacked for several min utes, but the play was constantly changing its sphere, and Eastbourne soo n scored again, this time converting. The forwards now played a much better game and Matheson was enabled


THE

CANTUARIAN.

135

to Score ~n the. corner. The ~ick fai led. The game was a good one to watch, and several tImes It seemed as If the School would score again, but the Eastbourne de~ence was too good . A rush by our oppone nts ended in another try for them, \~hICh settled the game, ~or time was given almost immediately afterwards. leaving Eastbourne ~ollege the vIc~ors by. I I points to 3. Bassett managed to play in this match, but dId not show hIS old for~ , as was natural. ] ephson also played in the absence of Adams, but too many of IllS passes seemed to be O'iven without refere nce 0 to his partner's position. The School team was as follows :_ V. C. Taylor (back); B. H . Matheson, L. J. Bassett, R. M. Gent, H. Parsons (three-quarters); H. Gardner, M. D. Jephson (halves ) ; C. G. Williamson, E. K. Barber, G. E . Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. A. M. Richardson, C. F. Freeborn, J . W. S. Pnce. G. W. K. Burge (forwards).

PENNY

R EADINGS.

Both Entertainments were well up to our standard. Of late more piano nu mbers have be~n included in our programmes. There are many boys here who play well. and, as the audiences were able to judge for themselves, there arc some n ho show promise of exceptional excellence, and it is well that they should be heard. L.]. Bassett's songs were well Hung. In games he has won more distinction than falls to the lot of most boys, and in this, the higher side of our flc hoollife he has made himself a cultivated Illllsician with a good knowledge of orc hestral and operatic music, and it is with very great regret that we have to tuke leave of one who has done so much lor our music. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26th. PROGRA:'>fME:

Folk Songs (Ch.) {( a) 'IOl aythyloofinll~in c" (b) II Dundee" S colclt. l. Piano Solo ...... 4< Waltz" ....... .. . .. J . Strauss. J.

J.

M . COURTN~Y.

J

3· Recitalion ................................ ......... ..

J. S. YA·!·ES. 4· Song ... " Our L.ady of lhe Snows" .. l-Vaiford C. F. FREEBORN. Davies.

5· Chorus ... .... . .. Habanera" . ..... Percy Godfrey. 6. Piano Solo ... " Prelude," Holberg Suite ... Grieg. C. N. RYAN.

7. Recitalion ......... . ............. .. .. . REV. L. H. EVANS. 8. Piano Solo ...... ·'Bourrce" ...... w. AfacJarrm. C. L. N IGHTINGALE. 9· Chorus .... ..... " The ~fil\" ..... . .. .... German.. 10.

I I.

Song ...... "Long ago in Alcala " ..... Jlfessager. L. J. BASSETT. Piano 5010 ...• 1 Impromptu," No. 4 ... Schuberl.

E. F. 12.

HOUSDEN.

Folk Song {Ch. ) ... " Shein" ........... ... Scotclt.

13· Piano Solo.. "Air and Varialions" ... PercJ' E. K. BARBER. Gollrey.

14. Folk Song {Ch.) .. . HEn Roulant Ma Boule " ... CaJladian.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16th. PROGRA~l:Im :

Flk S ngs { 'al"RUmOn" .......... ........... . 1. o(Ch.t (ti) ::E1 Comt,c Arn~n" SPanish. (c) E1 ROssignol .............. . 2. Pianoforte Duct.. " Bilder Aus Oem Slidell" .. ' l\'l l{, GOOl-'REY,

C.

J.

Scharwmka.

J.

9. Piano Solo "Polonaise NO·3. op. 40" Chol'ill. C. A. M. RICHARDSON. 10. Song" ...... .. ,', ..... ................................. . MR. GOUFREV.

Reading .. .. .. ........

.. ... .......... ... .......... .

A. B. EMDEN.

N . ADA)IS.

R. C. G. HA NCOCK. 5. Song "The Powder Monkey" Michael Watso1t . MR. MAUNORELL.

6. Pianoforte Duct . ... i\'I arch frolll Tanhaiiser ..

C. L.

" .. . .

C. F, FREgBORN.

I (.

4. Piano Solo ..... I, Vaudevilles n, .. Perc), God/n)'.

MR. GODFRI<:V,

H7mgarza1t.

8. Song .... ....... The Capstan Bar· r .... . ......

GALl'IN.

3. Rending ...... ....... .. ... ..... ,... , C.

7. Folk Song"," Lonely sits the bird alone"." ,"

Wagller. iXIGHTINGi\U:.

12.

Song ..... I will give you the Keys of Heaven" C. \ lIl, KIDSON .

13. Pianoforte DuCl "Coronalion March ..... Percy l\h . GODF[lI~Y, E. I{, BARlHm . Godj1·ey. 14. Song ...... " Legend of lhe Whale" .. .. Audrtm. L. J. BASSETT. IS. FolkSong ... "AGipsy.Waltz Song" .....

SCHOOL NEWS. vVe congratulate the following on their successes :C. J. N. Adams . . Open Classical Exhibitio n at St. Joh n' s College, Oxford. C. B. Simeon Ford Studentship at Trinity College, Oxford . A. B. Emden Open Scholarship for History at Lincoln College, Oxford. H . Townshend.. Open Mathematical Exhibi tion atTrinity College,Cambridge. T. S. Nelson Open Scholarshi p fo r Natural Science at University College, Oxford. % .;.,

#.

\Ve very much regret to ann ounce that the Rev. W. H. Maundrell is leaving

us this term. He has been appoin ted to a Navy Chap lain ~h ip and sails in D.ecember for the Chil~a Station. We take thIS opportunity of expressing our. gratitude and appreciation for the keen mterest he has taken in the games an~ the work of both th e Senior and the J Ulllor School. -I(.

'X.

%

We congratulate the followmg on obtai ning th eir colours :, st XV.- G. E. Miller, B. H. Mathe· son, E, vV. Hughes, C. B. Simeon, V. C. T aylor, H. Parsons, C. J. N. Adams, C. A. M. Richardson, C. F. Freeborn. 2nd XV.-B. C. Crowley, D. H. Cowie, J. W. S. Price, H. Gainsford, D. V. Dunlop, A. C. Fluke, G. H. Burge, R. C. Cumberbatch, C. S. Merrett, W. F. Kerrich. .;:.

';"

A lecture very "kindly delivered by the Rev. F. A. Rogers on Friday, Novem ~


THE

CANTUARIAN.

ber 1St, gave a very vivid idea of the work of the Rail way Missionaries in South Africa and showed that th e life they lived between Cape T ow n and the Victoria Falls was far fro m tame. On Monday, November 11th, the Rev. T . \\'ood once more gave the School o n ~ of his very interes ting lectu,res-this time on "the \Vonders of an Insect's ¡Body."

A

'3 7

We have to thank Mr. Vamah who kindly lectured to the School in Bedouin costum e on U IV[odern Jeru salem." He made special reference to St. Geo rge's School, the only public school in Palestine. ;(...... *. On Dec. 7th a Swedish Drill Competition was held in the GymnaSIum, Out of a possible 75-Trehane, 65 j Austin, 60 .

PLAYFUL GUIDE TO LISBON.

vVe will take it that you want to get nn idea (probably erroneous in any case) of the outstanding features of Lisbon, An author would supply you with t urgid col umns of praise, an artist with a high ly 'oloured testimonial, a pillce-nezed female globe-trotter with "a fe;culent flux" of Baedeker gush, all delightful and mis¡ I 'ading no doubt. But to obtain a really lldequate exordium you must go to the ordinary mortal who has gone do \~ n to Ihe sea in a shi p and braved the tunndous Itl rrors of the Bay. In such wise you will j,(tlL the fi rst impressions of the one of. all III en who sees Lisbon through th e roslCst Klusses. How the soldiers of Xenophon ever "houted (JaA.CtrJ'(1CL (JaXCl(H1(t wi th such gusto ,,, quite incomprehensible to YOli as you l.\kc your first look at Lisbon-this from III tuai experience. . You stagger on deck, banging your hrnd en route, and pillowed on the . Illward's manly bosom gaze on a beerI "loured flood and a white city rising in

tiers out of it. Nl al-de-mer and acres of heaving blue have impressed themselves on your dizzy senses to such an extent that even Poplar or East Ham would be a pleasant change, how mu ch more so then Lisbon. The two buildings you will probably notice first are both a sickly yellow, one the Customs' House, the other the mausoleum of Portugal's dead kings (they are stuffed or embalmed or some thing unique, your guide will tell yo u). Also wind-mills will thrust themselves upon you, in fact you will be lucky if you escape an absolute obsession of wind-mills. They flaunt themselves all round you, and inviting you to count them, make your head reel. Near the Customs' House is the place where you will probably have lunch, an ugly buildi ng with a draughty dining-room, but they make good omelettes. You may notice the Convent of San Geronimo (the orthography is not a u the n ti~), it has a spire with a bulb in the mlddle, also a large church higher up the hill, oth erwise


THE

CANTUARIAN.

the town will seem a panorama of white square houses.

five hundred or thereabouts. Truly a wondrous ordination of Providence.

You land. And now one of the two un ique charms of Lisbo n, one whi ch lingers even longer than the feeling of relief at seeing land agai n, is borne UPO] you, its all-embracing, welcoming smell. Tangier shares this attribute with Lisbon, th ou~h in the African port the odo ur which issues Qut to meet you from a beautiful white-washed water- gate is of such appalling virulence as to render its attentions unattractive. The smell which " cheers, but not inebriates " in Lisbon is merely the adjunct of the fish-market and as such may be imagined by doubling the flavour of Lowestoft and adding a dash of southern colour. The fish-market is distinctly pleasing and th e fish -girls wal k beautifully with large flat trays of fish on their heads. The boatmen and dockers of Lisbon also are a delight because of the never-ending variety of the blue patches on th eir azure breeches, which run through the whole garment of colours from peacock to cobalt and back again by wa}, of ultramarine and sapphire. The other unique charm of Lisbon is that to the stranger it is a city of mill ionaires. And it is thus. For some reasons best know n to themselves, the Portbguese have chosen as their commercial factor a (happily) unique coin the ve/s, the twentieth part of a penny! You land-change a sovereign and are possessed of anythi ng from one to five th01.1Sand ... . veis. You buy flower5 and fruit in vast quantities, post-cards and bull-fight fans, and are still possessed of thousands! The other end of the stick is when the mod est lunch yo u presently eat costs you one thousand

And now for a few things that may strike YO li as funny, weird, singu l~r or exlraord inaq'. For instance many ot the elde rlv PortuO'euse ladies g row full beards and 1110ustaches (they mostly shed their teeth as th ey sprout these). also there are bul1ock-carts whose drivers are all portly and side-whi5kered. and the wagons creak abominably. Nearly everything is drawn. dragged or carried by mules whose backs are like a newly-ploughed field mostlythe Portuguese are not considerate. to anima ls as a general rule. Another tiung, the peaches though they look much like ours are as hard as English apples though quite ripe ; also you will probably see advertisements of Singer's sewing machines which look at once homely and outlandish lettered in the Portugesc tongue. And so on. and so on, cul minating in the disappointment that n.ot a sellon'la(a little local colo ur) wears natlOnal dress. And lastly a word to the wise (mal~ing a very patchwork quilt of impressions). never wear new boots when sight-seeing in Lisbon as the streets of the city are almost all (s hockin gly badly) CO bbled, instead wcar old ones and patroI1lse the American-built, American-owned, Portuguese-d riven electric trams; a co.mbination of hustle and di latoriness whIch strangely well typifies in all its methods the city of Lisbon and all her SOllS. Lisbon the stayer of the water-weary. the delig ht of the stranger, and the ample compensation for the heaving attentions of the Bay.


\

T HE

CANT UARIAN.

139

RIFLE S H OOTING. The results of the I< Black Horse " Medals olTered for Classes I. and II., and ror Class III. are as follows : III Classes 1. and II. (olliof 16 compeHlors) .

Highest possible sco re ! Tow nshe nd I. Cowie 3. Yates 4. Foster .. 5. Hancock 6 (Baker I . \ Freeborn I

t

l

177

' 59 '35

'3' '2 9 '23

71, Class Ill. (oltlof 8 cO'llp,lilort ). Highest possible sco re l Denne i r. l Trehane I 3. Haskew

158

143

' 38

4. Nightingale '3 2 5. Sidebotham 1 12q 6. Sargent .. 125 7. Seabrooke "5 In Classes I. and II . the Medal was divided between Townshend and Cowie; in Class 111., in a fllrth er competition, Trehane beat Den ne by 26 to 25 out ot a possib le 28. Owing to the inconvenience of using the St. Stephen'S Outdoor Range during winter, th e Canttrbury Rifle Club has constructed an indoor range, which gives a firi ng di sta nce of 25 yards, in a large unu sed warehuuse in th e town. All difficulties of weather, which before interfered with the School shooti ng, have thus been obviated. The outdoor range will probably be llsed again towards the end of next term.

O. K. S. NE WS. Col. F. L. Stevenson, or the Army \ Indi cal Corps. was mad e C.B. in lthe 11.1 of the King's Birthday Honours. '-"'~;

The Lords of Admiralty have been pleased to elect E. G. H. Bellars to the Meyrick Hicks Exhibilion of ÂŁ34 at the Royal Naval College, Osborne. .;.,,~->:.

The Rev. R. M. Tuke has been t"poi nted Acting Prece ntor and Minor I l\I\on of Manchester Cathedral.

II. H. E. Gossett has been given his 1<1 XV. Colours at R. M. A., Woolwich.

\Ve must apologise to H. G. Paris. The detai ls of his passing out of \'Voolwich were given inco rrectly in ou r last num ber. T he sentence sho ul d have stated that he passed 21St out of vVoolwich into the Royal Garrison Artillery. Be is now at the School of Gunn ery, Shoeburyness.


THE CANTUARIAN.

OXFORD LETTER. Dear School. Before we pass to

OliT

own deeds

of valour, we would like to try and

express something of the gratitude which we feel to the Warden of Rad ley for th e extreme kindn ess shew n to Oxford a .K.S. last term. Dr. Field has al ways

bC:::Cll a warm friend to his old School, and in the sumptuous at fresco dinner at Sandford last June, his generosity shewed itself to the fulL It was very delightful to have the Headmaster among us, seeming almost as young in spi rit as any O.1<.S. The proceedings were quite informal. Dr. Field gave ll S the toast of the School, to which Mr. Galpin replied. Then Bovenschen proposed the health of our host. 'W hen we think what a number of othe r interests Dr. Field has, both as Warden of Radley and as a leading man in Oxford public life, we cannot feel too grateful to him for giving up a whole evenin g to our e ntertainm ent. Our first meeting of this term was held in Sarson's rooms. Chiefly owing to a sudden change of date, the attendance was not quite as good as we had hoped for, especially as we have quite a record number of O.K.S. up here. However, seventeen out of the thirty turned up. Sarson, who is Secretary of the Lincoln Boat Club and frequently runs down the tow-path in the belief that he is a coach, did the honours. Towllend stood behind the table and delivered an oration on nothing in particular. Finding

himself not fully appreciated, he retired. H e was unlucky in meetmg wl~h ~n accident in the footer-field earlier 111 the term. But last week he turned out to coac h the St. John's" togger." The crcw wrathfully declared that he is the only man who has taken th~m th.e whole way without a rest, so we Imagme that some of the old vigour must . have returned, that anyone who knew 111m as a referee in Lower games at School must well remember. We hope he will row i.n his eight next summer. E. A. Roper IS urging upon us startling O:lCS, Colo1!rs, devised by some colour-blInd enthuslast of "the olher place." Still \~e do hope that so mething satisfactory wIll co~e of this new proposal. By means of bnbery and corruption-how else can he .have done it ?- Roper has been made Presldent of the Queen's College Sports' Club. Brinsley-Richards alone has done anything worthy of note. He rants at the Union with some success. In fact he introduced a motion disapproving of" Selfgovernment for India." He was I~otly opposed by various Brahmans and RaJ~hs. He combines with fiery oratory an aspIration after a quarter-bl ue. At least he has run frequently for the Hare and Hounds " A" team, and once for the first ten. Our Keble conti ngent is large r than ever. Burdett plays rugger and so does O. B. Parsons. Parsons sl!emed once 111 dang~r of gettin g a half-blue for hockey but IS now content to play for ~he Colleg~. Horn, the pianist. is ShU much 111


THE

\ CANTUARIAN.

request. Strahan plays ru gger without trying too hard to hurt other people or himself. He has given up the study of¡ the Classics a nd taken. to Geography. C. M. Ricketts has proved his old-time integri ty and has been appointed treasure r of the Kebl e Games' Club. N. E. Smith is rowing; Olive carried off most of the prizes in the Keble Sports. A. G. Hoper's rowdin ess has to be forcibly restrained. Since his lively gaiety at the O.K.S. dinner last term, Scott has sunk into an honourable retirement. He has changed his rooms for the third time in four terms and has bought Moore's motor-bike. H e started life this term as a fast iVIerton three-quarter. but lately has taken to golf with considerable success. Spafford is a bus)' student of law, but plays hockey for Univ. Bax does likewise for Oriel when they are hard up for men. When Corpus (Cambridge) Rllgger team, with Gage, Kempe and Hamilton in the van, came ove r to play Oriel, Budd snatched a moment from the laboratory to represent his College. Masse has given up his mania for dissecting everybody he meets, but still works harder than any Trojan. Dibben perform s the oflice of Secretary not much worse than IllS pTl'!decessors. C. N. Smith run s Kometimes. Maclear won the two mile race for S. J ohn's in record bad time. Jo'rcwer is still a member of the S. John's Archcry Club, which exists chiefly for

the sake of a gorgeous green blazer. Chaning-Pearce upholds the honour of the School at Worcester. Abbott has been gi ven his cap as back for the Exeter Rugger team. He and Webstcr row in a "togger." Armitage was rowing for Balliol first togger, but has rece ntly developed a heart by overwork I Hence a dilemma. The doc tor told him to cut down his wo rking day to six hours, but how cut down three, to make six? J. R. Parsons has returned to us, jovial as eve r. On all state occasions T. S. Adams carries the Chancello r's train . H e nearly went up to vVindsor to carry it before the Kaiser, but found court dress rather an 'Winser gave the expensive luxury. seco nd 0.]( S. Meeting, which would have been a great success, if more people had co me. Vie were very glad to welcome Simeon, Yates and C. J. N. Adams. \Ve wish them every sue'cess. \Ve have been visited this term by 1\'[angin and Macki nll on . Of T. W. H eale and E. E. W . . Carrington we can only say that they are old .. parrots" who seem to have forgotten their noble origin. Hearty co ngratulations on th e double victory over Dover. May both sides bring a full team at the O.K.S. Match and may the School get well beate n. Patriotically yours, O.K.S. OXON.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

.LIBRARY. The Librarian has to acknowledge with thanks the receipt Ie

<I

or---

The Life and Letters of Queen Victoria." by A. C. Benson and Viscount Esher ; kindly presented by B. E. Money. E sq. Tuscan Artists, " by Albinia Wherry; kindly prese nted by G. H. S. Pinsent. Esq .

"Modern \ÂĽarfare," by Ubique; and "Military Operations, " by General Sir Charles Hamley; kindly presented by Lieut. \~T . F. Helmore. Rousseall's

IC

Le Contrat Social"; kindly presented by H . L. Dibben, Esq.

CO RRE SPONDEN CEo /II. B.-Tlu Editors decline to accept any respomibility connected ~/Jitlt til t o{)im'oltS oj their Correspoll' dutls. Name and address must always be g,:ven, 1I0t lIect ssari/y lor publica/iot:, bitt as a

gum-aUIet of good la~¡tJt. PeJ sOJlalities will involve certaiu ,'ejectioll. '1.uritten Oil olle side of the pape?' only .

, To tIle Eddors of

II

THE CANTUARIAN."

DEAR SII<S.

As I-Ion . Sec. of the O.K.S. Dinner. may I appeal to those O.1<.S who live in or near London to do something which will, I think, tend to make the Dinner more successful? My suggestion is that not only should th ey come th emselves in greater numbers than ever, but that they

Letters should 01

should, when possible, offer hospitality in the shape of " bed and breakfast" on that occasion to some friend who lives at a distance from town. So many O.K.S. have told me that they would gladly come, but that the additional expenses of hotel bills, etc., are too great a tax upon them. Yours truly, ALGERNON LATTER.


\

THE 7 0 the Editors of

U

CANTUARIAN:

THE CANTUARIAN.

IJ

DEAR SIRS,

Noll' that th e School football has been steadily improving for the last three years, wou ld it not be advisable to try to arrange matches with such Schools as 5t. Paul's and Dulwich. During the last two years we could have given them good games. Our football reputation is not very great, though it really should have a reputation. By having fixtures with sllch Schools as I have mentioned we should soon become better known. Trusting you have space for this letter I am, Yours sincerely,

often occurred to me and to others. Why cannot you devote two pages or perhaps one in your Maga7.ine for recording the doings of the junior School? In many School Magazines you come across a page or two reserved for the YOlmger mem bers of the School. and I see no reason why this should not be the case in your Magazine unless it be that it is contraT\' to th e customs and as such is distasteful to your conservative if somewhat tardy minds. I know there are many who would like to see this suggestion acted upon. and. if the Juniors edited their own pages, it would perhaps add a little amusement to an otherwise rather dull but well-meaning institution.

" PROGRESSIVE."

Yours, etc., AN OLD PARROT.

(We entirely concur ...... Eoo.]

To the Editors of

4(

THE CANTUARIAN.

IJ

OEAR SIRS.

May I trespass on your valuable space

in order to make a suggestion which has

'43

(We deplore the ulterior senti ments that prompt this piece of correspondence. We really do not see our way to supply our Correspondent (we hope he stands alone), with an I I amusement II column edited by well-meaning nnd unsuspect¡ ing Parrots. Surely such taf; tes are ca tered for hy othe r sorts of papers.-Eno.]

NOTICES. We beg to acknowledge with iVIrs. Walsh (3/ 6). J. Goodacre. Esq. (3/6). Ihanks the receipt of th e following H. A. Jenkin. Esq . (10/6). Mrs. Corson M llbscriptions ;(3/6). H . S. Smith. Esq. ( 10/6). F . B. Rev. H. M. Harke ( 17/6). S. E. Kingdon. Esq. ( '7/ 6). B. E. Money. Esq. I)uprey. Esq. (7/-). R. Hedger. Esq. ( 10/6). (3/6). For the late S. H. L. Langley. Esq. (' . L. Druitt. Esq. ( 3/b). Rev. j. L. Fawsett ( 10/6). E. M. Tuke. E sq. (3/6). H. M. (7/- ) W. St. C. Lucas. Esq .â&#x20AC;˘ ( 14/-). ' Cockrem, Esq., R.N. (14/-). R. Watson,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Esq. (3/6). J . W. Taylor. Esq. (3/6). Rev. Dr. Moore (316). F. M. Furley. Esq. (3/6). E. E. Ostler. Esq. (6/6). W. Webb. Esq. (10/6), T . Whitehead Reid. Esq.. M.D. ( 10/6). R. Owen, Esq. (2' /- ), J. R. Tulloch. Esq. ( 10/6), Bishop Mitchinson (2[ /-), J. P. Ryl ey, Esq. (7/- ), Rev. H. H. H. Boys (3/6), Sir George Collard ( [0/6). C. F. Preston Battersby, Esq. (21 /-), H. E . Morice. Esq . (7/-). J . Frewer. Esq . (" /-)' J. Sharman, Esq. (3/6). Gibbs and Sons ( 3i 6), A. J. Trousdell , Esq. (3/6), E. Ellam. Esq. (3/6), Rev. A. M. Foster

I

(7/-). R. J . Castley. Esq. ([7/6). W. Telfer. Esq. (3/6). Rev. H. L. Cook (2'/- ). R. E. Brinsley-Richards. Esq. (7/- ), A. L. Paris. Esq. ( '7/6). H. G. Dalton, Esq. (3/6). Lieut. C. Winthrop-Swithinbank, R.N. ( 10/ 6), W. Temple. Esq. (5/6), F. R. Hawkes. Esq. (3/6), A. D. D. Spafford, Esq. (7/-). Very Rev. C. L. Dundas ( 10/6). Miss Wilkinson (3/6), J . Dixon, Esq. (7/-), W. S. Skinn er. Esq. ( 3/ 6). L. N. Scorer, Esq . (3/6 ), B. S. Collard. Esq . ( 10/ 6), H. C. Baker. Esq. (3/6), L. T. Watkins, Esq. (3/6). Rev. H. J.Mowll (3/6).

OUR CONTEMPORARIES.

We beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following contemporaries :AlleY1J1all ( z), Blue (2), Cartlmsi(w, (2), Clzigwell/all. Cholmeleian, COlmly Gmlleman (7). Dovoria?l, Eastbourma1l, ENzabe/han (2). Epsollian, Felsledian, Fellerian, Glmallllond College C/zromCie, (2), King's

School Parrmnalla, Lancil1g College Magazillt (2), Leo(Ut1lsian, L eys Forl1liglzt/y (4), /Wlllver1llrl1l, O/avian, Plymolhiml , Radleia1l (2) , R eplolliall (z), S/u'rbur1zitl't, SI, Edward's SellOot CIl10mde ( 2), Strand School 111agazille, SuI/on Valence $chooll11agaz/lIe, 1 ollbridgian, Vigormfw.

Gibbs and Sons, Printe rs, Palace St reet, Can terbllTY.


.\

THE VOL . VII.

CANTUARIAN. MARCH,

Iqo8.

NO·7·

EDITORIAL. Science is coming: "the noise of battle hurtles in the air."

Classics have

struggled to hold the heights. struggled for a further life in a paradise of solitary greatness. But the time has gone, gone like an unsubstantial pageant (we live in an age of pageants and the word mu st out I) i th ere is a great gulf fixed between us lind our fonner state i a sigh and a backward glance bespeaks the slu ggard, and now we and our (conservative, if somewhat tardy minds' join in the mad race of progress, Ktarted by th is in satiable science e ver thirsting for novelty. We are few, we shall soon be fewer, we Classic lovers of 170 I(aAoZl-the truly lair'i bu t never dio we think that disciples of science would stand where we stood,

Ihat we should go to beg of them .

Nay. can the paths trodden by the footsteps


THE CANTUARIAN. of ages be broken up ? Can the faith, the life of centuries vanish like a dream? Are we to give up the haun ts of music to the jarring formulre of Algebra? Surely ours' is the true science, thei rs' a mere slave of mammon. So far they lead in the stm gglc, they eve n sm il ~ com placently, in blasphemo us contempt of the parable which te lls of a certain tortoise an d a conceited hare : courage, Ye Muses, fascinators for all tim e, more than an ec ho of a vanished world. The School has asserted itself in eve ry branch: in Classics and History, in Math ematics and Science, the Universities have acknowledged th e merit of OliT representatives. vVe have gained our first Science Scholarship, and in spite of jealousy, we hope it is the first of many to come in the near future. The XV. has proved its powers in spite of eve ry obstacle, and we can congratulate it upon a season of success and broken reco rds : th e loss of the captain during the latter half of the term was never quite overco me : in his misfortunes ,," c would offer him the sympathy of all. Is it Nemesis that directs such happenings, "Or is it that some force too ste rn too strong Bears earth and heaven, and men and gods along" ?

It is with very sincere regret that we anno unce the comin g departure of the Hev. L . G. Maso n at the end of the present term . Mr. iVIason, who was also educated at this School, and was a Classical Scholar of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, came here as a Master after his University career, and has held that post for 36 years. During that time he has see n many ge nerations of boys pass through the School, and many O.K.S .. will feel that they are losing a great friend a nd one whom they always look oul for on their return to th e School. For many years now Mr. Mason has superintended the speeches given by the Sixth form on our Speech Day, and the high standard of acting, whi ch always has been maintained, has been in a very great measure due to his splendid coaching, and untiring efforts to make th e speeches a success. All those who have acted unde r him know well how much they enjoyed th e training for the speeches and how valuable his teaching has been. The departure of NIr. }\IIason will be a great loss to th e School in every way, and we will all feel it. \Ve hope that his health may soon be improved by the rest that he has so well earned, and that he may soon be restored to complete health.


THE CANTUARIAN.

FOOTBALL. KING'S

SCHOOL v.

O.K.S.

This match was played on Dec. 18th a nd res ulted in a victory for the O.K.S. by zz points (2 goals, 4 tri es) to 14. (2 goals ( I pen.), 2 tries). The School team was not at its full strength, lacking the services of Reynolds and Simeon in the serum. Bassett was once again in the three-quarter line, but our backs did not combine as well as in the earlier matches, and showed want of practice in playing together. The Old Boys' team was very h.wavy forward, and strong behind the scrum. The O. K.S. kicked off, and. after some serums in the centre of th e field. in which our opponents llsed thei r weight and for the most part g?t posses.sion of the ball, Hamilton opened up the game but a mull.ed pass resulted 111 th e faIlure of the movement. Our oppo ne nts the n took the ball lIlto our 25 and from a long throw out of touch Covell gat hered the ball successfully and scored. Abbott converted. hartly afterwards Hart-Davies scored aga in for the O:K.S. by a brilliant run and t.he kick this time was un successful. The School then ca r n ed the ball down the field With a ru sh; a sc rum was form ed j the ball was heeled smartly and after some excellent passing Bassett scored . The O.K.S. registe red two more tries shortly afte r half-time and one of them was converted. Anotht' r rush foll owed by the School forwards and our opponents were pe nalized for off-side within their 25 and Gardner kicked a good goal. After !jolTIe un even play in mid-field , some passing among our opponents' back~ result~d in a nother try by Strahan. The O.K. S. still pressed and eve ntually HamIlton tncked the School backs and scored unopposed. Some fin e passing by Bassett and Gardner Look the ball right dow n the fie ld and t.h e res ult was a t ry by Basse tt j and Gardner 'onverted. Once again the School sc rum heeled smartly; Adams passed out to Ga rdner and th e ball reached Matheson who ran some distance and then passed to Bassett who scored a .brilliant try; Gent was unsuccessful with the kick. This was the I.st try befo re the close of play. Of our opponents Hamilton was by far the most conspicuous and was well backed up by Hart-Davies and Covell. The School forwards had much too heavy


THE

",.8

CANTUARIAN.

a serum against them and the tackling of the whole team was far below its former standard. KIIIg'S S chool :-V. C. Taylor (back) ; B. I-I. Matheson, L. J. Bassett, R. M. Gent, H. Parsons (three-quarterS) ; H . Gardner, C. J . N. Adams (halves); C. G. Williamson, E. K. Barber, G. E. Miller, E. W. Hughes, C. A. M. Richardson, C. F. Freeborn, J. W. S. Price, T. S. Nelson (iorwards).

O.K.S. :-L. P. Abbott (back); G. C. Strahan, G. C. Covell, I. B. Hart-Davies, J. L. Tomlin (three-q uarters); A. de B. H amil ton, 1-1. H. E. Gosset (halves); R. B. Winser, E . T. Gage, A. L. B. "hamson, G. B. Cockrem, H . E. Green, E. C. Green, J . Deighton, R. Watson (fo rwards).

KING'S

SCHOOL

v.

HAMPSTEAD

WANDERERS.

This match was played on Cullen's grou nd on Feb. 13th, and resulted in a win for the visitors by 2 z points to 1 6 . Both sides played sixteen men i their forwards were a heavy lot, and ours played a much better game than usual, getting possession more frequently. The bes t feature of the first half was a brilliant Tun by Gardner ri ght down the field, which resulted in a try. The score at half-time was lIto 8 agai nst us. Early in the second half we got the lead, but they drew eq ual with us by a fine goal from a mark. In the last ten minutes they sco red again twice. Yet on the play of the game we almost deserved to win. The following each sco red a try: Gardner, Matheson, Hughes and Dunlop. The School team was as follows :V. C. Taylor (back); B. H. Matheson, D. V. Dunlop, M. D. Jephson, H. Parsons (three-quarters); W. A. F. Kerrich, H . Gardner, C. J. N. Adams (halves); C. G. Williamson, H. F . Reynolds, E. W. Hugh es, C. H. Simeon, C. F, Freeborn, T . S. Nelson, J. S. W. Price, A. C. Fluke (forwards).

KING'S

SCHOOL v.

HYTI-lE

F .C.

Played at Hythe. Saturday, Feb. 15th. For the 3rd consecutive time this match was played on a sodde n ground, amidst rain and hail. There ,,¡as also a strong wind blowing across the ground. Our opponents kicked off and the play was for some


THE

CANTUARIA,N.

149

time in mid-field, but the H ythe forward s who were playing one short, gradually drove the School into their ow n 2j'; but for the finâ&#x201A;Ź. tackling of the backs our opponents would have scored. After twenty minutes play, however, the ball came out at the side of our opponents' sc rum and enabled the scrum half to run round and sco re about It yards from t he touch line. The kick failed . Then the School forwards, by a series of rushes. managed to drive our opponents back to their own 25 and wert? h'oldinO' their own there when hal f-time was called . On ODe or two occasions the . School might possibly have scored, had the three-quarters managed to grasp the sticky ball. In the second half there were more good rushes by the School forwards into our opponents 25. but the H yth e forwards gradually pushed the School back again, al~d a second try was registered for B ythe in a manner similar,to th e: first. The. kick ~galll fai led . I n th e course of th e game, owin g to the strong wlI1d, several well-llltentlOned ki cks from both sides instead of finding touch, rolled behind the goal line. On the whole the School played well out of tou ch and in th e loose, but ~hey were too slow in comin g round again after a serum had been turned. The tacklIng throughout was good. The School team was as fo llows :V. C. T aylor (back) ; B. H. Malheson, D. V. Dunlop, M. D. Jephson, H. Parsons (three-quarters); H. Gardner, C. J . N. Adams (halves ) ; C. G. Wllhamson, H. F . Reynolds, E. \V. Hughes. C. D, Simeon, C. F. Freeborn, J. S. V,/, Price. T. S. Nelson, A. C. Fluke (forwards).

F OOTBA LL

RETROSPE CT,

Matches played, 17 i Points for, 318 i

Won,

10;

1907 - 8 .

Lost,7¡

Against, 138.

Such is the sl~ason's record, and until misfortune in many shapes dogged our $teps towards the end of November, there was every promise of, the record being very much better. The first match, against a scratch XV., ended adversely, but from that


THE

'SO point till Novembf:r

21St,

CANTUARIAN.

we won nine matches straig ht off, and during that period

we can safely say that the team showed itself Lo be the best we have had. Then, unhappily, Bassett was called away by his father's illn ess, and various other members of the team were unable to play, with the result that th e side became sadly disorganized and only won one more match. It was unfortunate, but so the fortune of war fr~q~lently is. The accounts of matches have already appeared in these pages, so It 15 only necessary to add a few genera l remarks.

The scoring capacity of the side has been a noteworthy fcature for we have crossed our opponents' lines no less than seventy-six ti mes while our' own line has bee~ ~r?s~ed only thirty-n ine times . The success o f th e a'ttack was largely due to the 1l1.ltlatJ~n of Gardner, who was a~mirab ly bac ked up by all the three-quarters. whose passmg and resourcefulness ~t .tlmes. reached a hig h level. It is also only fail' to tht:. forwards to say that they Jomed lJl th e open game very well. Williamson, Barber, Hughes and Miller being generally in evidence. There was also a satisfactory willingness to take risks in an attack, thoug h, stran gely enough, as the season advanced the tendency to become mechanical was rath er more marked. There can be no doubt that in football, as in other things, th ere is plenty of truth in the adage H Nothing venture, nothing have," and the cross-kick or th e far-flung pass is often successful because of the unexpectedness of it. .The ~ackling in most of the matches was di stin ctly good, and it is needless to partlculanze. The forwards we,re not very skilful at getting possession in the SCrulll, nor were! they very sma rt at gomg away with the ball after wheeling but apart from that they

did their part alright.

'

To Bass~tt we owe o ur t~anks onc,e more for hi s able captaincy, and to him and the r~st of hiS team. we owe It that ~ lugh standard of hard straight running, of good tacklm g, and of vigorous aggressive football has bee n set which we trust their successors will aspire to and surpass. ' We append a few remarks on individual members of the team,

Back. V. C. TAYLoR.-Origi nally a forward, his sound tac kling led to his trial at back. and h? f~l11y justifi~d his ~osition. ~e is slow in turning and must improve his klckmg, but Ius tacklIng and savlIlg are admirable. Three-quarter Backs.

L.

I

J

BASSETT (Capt.)-A very sound centre. Takes his passes well, tackles well,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

and makes good openings. Makes up a good deal for want of pace by going his hardest and by handing 01T well . Showed plenty of resource and combined excellently with Gardner.

R. M. GENT.-Played this year in the centre, though perhaps the wing is his right place. Very much improved in tackling, and in attack often did the unexpected with excellent results. to knock on rather too often.

n.

Inclined to

II

snatch" at his passes and so

Always goes hard and makes Fields very well and can tackle. Should study the art of cross-kicking.

H . MATHESON.-A rapidly improving player.

ground, and is beginnin g to learn to hand off and to swerve.

H, PARSONS. -Has improved a great deal and should be very useful next year.

Fields very well. and generally tackles well, but has periods of high tackling. His kicking wants improvement.

Half Backs. H. GARDNER.- Has improved wonderfully and was the pivot on which all . the movements of the backs worked.

Picks up in any position and goes stralght

and hard; he was frequently through the defence before they realized what was happening. Kicks and tackles admirably.

. J.

N. ADAMs.-Performed the less showy task of the scrum-half very well.

Very

slow in the early part of the season , he became much smarter and worked

on a good und erstanding with Gardner.

Useful dribbler and saves pluckily.

Forwards.

C. G. W,LL,AMSON (Captain after Xmas).-Useful heavy forward, much improved in the open though still rather clumsy with hi s feet.

II. F. REYNOLDS. -Very good forward. works hard, tackles magnificently, and has kept the forwards well togother.

Jo:. K. BARBER.-Very good for ward, especially clever out of touch. Much improved in the open .

,. 'E. MILLER.-Very hard working forward, always on the ball.

Tackles and follows

up well, and does good work in the open.

I':. W. HUGHEs.-Good sturdy forward with some pace. Plays very hard and follows up well.


IS'

THE

CANTUARIAN.

C. B. SIMEoN.-Usefu! forward but rather wanting in dash. Apt to ki ck too hard in the open.

Improved in tackling.

C. A. M. RrcHARDsON.-Vigorous forward who plays a hard but rather bEnd game. T ackles well. C. F. FREEBORN.-Strong but clumsy. Does more shoving that he used to do, but is still very slow in coming round.

O. K. S.

DINNER.

the doings of the School. The H eadmaster replied and told his audi ence what had bee n happening in the School during the past year. The last toast was that of (, The Chairman ," proposed in happy terms by Mr. R)'ley. In respo nding to this, the Dean showed in a most felicitous speech, how dee p is hi s affection for the School, After dinner the Chairman gave the and how warm a corner he has kept loyal toasts which were received with in his heart for the memories of his enthusiasm, and Mr. H . E. Morice then connection with it. Mr. B. H. Latter, the Rev. P. Malden proposed the toast of "Floreat Schola Regia JJ in a speech which, while full of and Captain Knapp kindly entertained quiet humour, was typical of the real the company with some excellent songs interest which O.K.S. continue to take in during the course of the evening.

This annual ('vent took place on Wednesday, Jan. 15th, at The Monico Restaurant, Piccadilly Circus. The chair was most ably filled by that very good friend of the School, Dr. Page Roberts, Dean of Salisbury. There were just fifty present, representative of many ge nerations. from th e early CI fifties " of last century down to the present day.


\

THE ' CANTUARIAN.

VALETE. G. H . Mercer, H. Gainsford, T. H . Mowll, H. G. Dalton, A. G. Lennon-Brown, C. H. Clemetson, G. H. 1(. Burge, R. C. de Pass, T. P. Finn.

SCHOOL NEWS. We congratulate the following on their succ~sses:J. S. Yates.-Open Classical Exhibition at H ertford College, Oxford . H . P. Sparling.-Open Mathematical Scholarship at Queen's College, Cambridge. R. W. H. Moline. -Open Mathematical Exhibition at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.

",,*

We congratulate H. W. K. Mowll and H . Gardner all being made Monitors this term, and J. W. IVI. Maynard, D. J. N. Lee, J. W. S. Price, C. F. M. N. R)'an, H. F. Reynolds, T. S. Nelson, W. A. F. Kerrich and E. B. Nelson on their promotion into the Sixth Form. -x.

*

"

'We offer a hearty welcome to Mr. Everett who has come to fill Mr. Maundrell's place.

A brass Tablet has been put up by the Masters in the big School-room to the memory of the late Mr. Austen. It bears the inscription : -

:til

fIl)cmOCl) of

GEORGE E. V. AUSTEN, BORN APRIL 30TH, 1874. DIED AUGUST 20TH, 1907. ASSISTANT MASTER 1900- J 907 .

Crux Nostra. Corolla. At the fonr corners of the plate the Arms of the King's School, Winchester College, New College, Oxford, and of Mr. Austen's family are placed.

" .. "

On Thursday, Feb. 13th, the Rev. E . L. A. H ertslet (o.res. 1891-7) very kindly gave the School a most interest~ jug Lecture on "Glastonbury Abbey," illustrated by so me very fine slides, which was much enjoyed by all.


THE

154

CANTUARIAN.

On Tuesday, Feb. 11 th, the Fives Matches against St. Augustine's College took place. The School fi rst pair (G. F. Howell and H. Gardner) lost the match in the St. Augustine's Court by one game to two ( I o-game. Game- 14 game ball-game). The second pair (C. J. N. Adams and E . P. Collings) were successfu l

in the School Court by two games to 1l1t (game-love game- I).

The first compu lsory Paper Chase was run on Friday, Jan . 31st. The hares,

C. L. Nightingale and S. D. Turner, after laying a false track in the town, took the course over the hills to Fordwich and across country to the Dover Road on the way home. The first hounds home were C. J. N. Adams, G. O. Norton, A. H . Warde and F. L. Goad. ->:. .J:. %

own court the first pair were successful by two games to none. The Under , 6

The second Paper Chase was run on Monday, Mar. 2nd . the hares being V. Arnold (O,K.S.) and G, O. Norton. A ve ry good course was lai d through Harbledown across to Chartham and

pair (E. P. Collings and R. C. G. Hancock) played up at St. Edmund's School with th e same result.

I (3) were ( I) S, D. Turner, ( z) C. B. Simeon, F. L. Goad, (4) H. L. H. Cremer.

Against St. Edmund's School in our

SCHOLARS

home from there. The first hounds home

ELECTED,

JUlliors. R. E. L. Beard, worth C. W. Kidson F . L. Goad

DECEMBER, 1907. Probaliomrs.. E . F. Smart K. Lawson 'Will iams

R. G. Crosse H . W. Kerr A, Sargent G. W. A. Todd H . G. Kain S. W. Wayte


\

THE

155

CANTUARIAN:

ENTRANCE SCHOLARS.

Mr. Evans' House.

School House. E. J. Hodgson H. Spence

A. B. Forsyth R. C. Crowley

K. Lawson Williams

H. G. Kain HOUSE SCHOLA RS.

G. W. A. T odd

H. W. Kerr

O. K. S. NEW S. The Rev. W. H. Mallndrell has been appointed Chaplain to the AmpltilnJe and to the jJ]omlloulh on recommissioning.

*'

K. C, Strahan has been appointed Locomotive Superintendent of the Ceylon Railways, and sai ls on March 7th .

oK,

"

On Dec. 2'Znd, A.

J.

Fenn was

ordained Deacon by the Bishop of St. David's.

We heartily congratulate A. L. B. Thomson on passing into Sandhurst.

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. A. B.

E~IDEN.-Entered

the School, May, 19 0 3;. V 1Sth Ft<orm, 6JanD" ' 90b9;07~o~pt~r~ Sept., 1906; Editor?f Canluanall, ep ., Igo - ec., I ,

Hi<tory Scholar of Lmcoln College. Oxford. It K. BARBER.-En tered the School, Jan., ' go l ; Vlth Form, Sept., 19°.6 ; Monitor, Sept., Ig07; Football XV., 1<)06-7, 1<)07-8; RowlIlg Colours, 1906, 19°7 ·


THE

CANTUARJAN.

P. G. E. CHAvE.-King's Scholar; Entered the School, Sept., ' 904; VIth Form, J an. , '907 . H. C. ASHENDEN .-Entered the School, Jan. , I904; VIth Form, Sept., 1907¡

L.

J. BASSETT.-Enlered

the School, May, , 897 ; 1St XI., ' 903-4-5-6; Captain, '907; Football XV., '904-5-6; Captain, '907; Fives' Pair, [906; Sports' Committee, Sept., '905 ; Sports' Colours, IQo6-7.

G. E. M[LLER .-Entered the School, Sept., 'q03; Football XV., '9°7,

CAMBRIDGE D ear School, " History repeats itself" and this is certainly th e most uneventful term in the year, just as it was at Sc hoo l. All the same we arc requested for a letter, coupled ~vith an intimation to be jolly quick about It, as the Cal1/uariau 'was in a hurry to come om! . To suggest I t More haste," etc., wo uld bnng down coals of fire on OllT head so we proceet! to co mply with just about as much matter at our disposal as-Well, I am afraid we mustn't let out secrets. In our last lette r no mention was made of the loss we sustained in the departure of Rev. H. J . Mowll, who has been here almost from time immemorial. It is singular that, since he left inc urable diseases have never been di~cussed at O .K.S. Meelings. Our oldest member-

LETTER.

H. A. Jenkin - is coaching youth s for scholarshi ps at K. S., and on strict enq uiries we lea rn that they do know what "Floreat Schoia Regia II means whi ch shews hi s coach in g is not in vain: T e lfer asserts that I~fe. isn't worth living, and as to whether It IS a lovt: affair o r th e proximity of hi s Trip we cannot say. F. 1\1. Deighton has only bee n known to keep one 12 this term j he works all one day a nd none the next, and a ffects an l.mdisg nised ~ ont e mpt for Aesop. H all11lton has ObvIOusly taken a Nazirite vow, and is wo rkin g hard. The last time we saw Sopwith, he was attired in "a thing of shreds and patches H which he cal.led.a gow n; he is doing an 18 month s' Tnp 11l a year, and he is in more of a ~urrv t han ever, althou gh he still finds ttme to grace one of the "Emma " boats. Dickson has deserted the river for tennis, but may be see n most afternoons


., THE

CANTUARJAN.

'5 7

exercIsing a small black spaniel¡-the the School pre fers "the other place"; combination being known as .. Rouge et however we observe with pleasure that Noir.JJ R . T. Jenki n has got gout from Mr. Rosenberg is doin g hi s best to swell too many Shakespeare meetings ; whi le our numbers. Watkins, who is secretary of the Corpus We were very glad to see several Boat Club, is o nly-seen rowing ¡when it's Oxford O .K.S. the other day, and hear really warm. Of Howard nothing has more are co ming over to compete-and, been seen or heard, and it is too much we hope, to get well beaten - in athletic of a responsibility to g uarantee that he is endeavours. working. This, however, does not apply Th e subject of new 0.K.5. Colours to J. D eighton, who is burdened by the thought of exams ad iuft1lilttNl, and who seems to have fallen through for the moment; our last suggestions received a lives, eats, and sleeps in the Labs. very unfavourable criticism from Oxford, Of our Freshers, Pinsent may be and since, in addition, they turned out seen rowing in one of the innumerable to be th e colours of so me microscopical Trinity boats, which he is positive is club in the Fiji Islands, they have been going up in accordance with the rules dropped. W'hy don't some of you fellows of A.P. H e claims to be a mystic, wears still at School rack your brains for ideas. a red tie, and as secretary of the Trinity yo u have such unlimited time at your Fabian Society is endeavollTi ng to get disposal. The colou rs mustn't be too ;\Ii~s PankhursL dow n. Kempe is play ing loud or th ey will frighten ou r Oxford hockey for Corpus: Gage. we are sorry friends, nor must th ey be too funereal or to sa", has been overworking badly, and th ey will not go down he re. Thonias contin ues to up hold the glory H eartiest congratulations to all those of the School in Peterhou se. wh o hav e gained Scholarsh ips, and the We are a small body, and, although best of luck in the Dover Sports. ingenious members may utter truisms in consolation. we have not yet donned the Yours, etc., ph ilosopher's cloak and it is still very O.K.S. CANT AD. clisappointi ng to see the way in which


15 8

THE

CANTUARIAN.

CANADIAN LETTER,

Green Court, Lac St. Anne, Alt., N.W.T .. 29, n, '07. Dear School. . Since O UT first deadly dull article, thmgs have moved along here at a terrific pace. Vague indefinite items of School news have scintillated this way, and upon those rumours we congratulate you all lI pon kee ping up the reputatio n of . the School. But the result of all the Dover matches is still as an unopened book to us. Well, to co ntinue, we set out on the

~n al stage of Our j ?urn ey 011 Aug . 30th,

a democrat, a four-wh eeled wagon with two seats. six of us in ali, OUT four selves, an American doctOf, and our guide In

and driver.

The roads were little more

than tracks, full up with mud-h oles, and you had to cling o n tight in o rder not to be pitched head most out. Our journ ey took us on for seve n days throug h scenery varying from de nse bush to thinly covered willow lands, th e roads g rowing ever worse and worse. \Nh en possible we stopped at stopping-p laces, othe rwise we slept in a te nt. At las t we attained so far un sur veyed lands or rath er land which was being actually surveyed. They left Our last camping-place th e day after we

No.2.

ar~ived and we du ly followed, bei ng the tll1rd party over the new ly- cut road . This was made in the usual manner j men go ahead with axes and cut a path through the trees, following as a rule the "line of leas t resistance/' th e result be ing that it winds in an d out, taking right-angle turns just wide enough for a wagon to pass along with care ful driv ing, and the stump of th e cut down tree be ing just low enC:>llgh for an ordinary wagon to pass over Without the axles or hub s hitting. V'; e followed this and had to c ut down m.ore trees to make our way along. F1I1alJy we reached the new camping ground of the Sll rveyo r and pitched our tent within one hundred yards of th em, looked around and settled on taking th e land where we were. This is not what is called" hom e-steading," but" squatting," the fo nn er is taking up lands already surveyed, the latter un surveyed. Next day Dunlop and I stayed there to hold the land and place a few logs one o n top of the othe r, to fulfil the letter but not the spiri t of the law. so as to give us the claim of first squatters, and the other two, Phi l Hawkes and Clayton, return ed to Edmonton, 130 miles away, to buy a tean~, wago n and supplies. These they obtallled and started on the return journey. Rai ns in the meanwhile had fallen. Various obstacles face a traveller in these


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

159

parts : I st, sloughs (pronounced slews) j got withi n four feet of the other side 2nd, mud holes: 3rd, muskegs ; 4th , tree (about 25 feet wide) when crack, bang, stumps. Now the first is like an Irish head first I went into the icy-cold water, bog; the 2nd, holes, or as we should clothes and all, Dunlop laughing hard, call them ruts, axle deep full of mud and . I at the tim e failed to see the joke, the water; 3rd mu skegs, I kn ow no parallel log luckily falli ng the other way thus giving to them in England. They are a mossy m.e another life ; fine tabl eau, intere sting growth, some two feet thick or so, full photo of it for the magic lante rn, which of water, like a sponge, and offerin g no I hope to shew some of YOll one of th ese foothold to th e horses o r oxen a s the <.: ase days. During the absence of th e two we may be ; into these yo u flounder, with luck subsisted on next to no thing un til finally you may pull through, otherwise you our supplies ran clean Ollt. \Ve caught stick, have to get out, sinking yourself fi sh to help us out. Talk ab out fishing, maybe up to th e knees, unl oad your the old country isn't in it with our fishing wagon, carryin g the contents over to firm and the foll owing we bot h vouch for as ground, so metimes a hundred yards or the absolute tru th . I went down the bank more, (jolly, carrying a 100 lb. sack of t¡o get water and saw a fish (p ike) in there. flour on your back over these ni ce-lookin g I called Dunlop who broug ht the rod a nd but treacherous-foo ted places, adva ncing line. Bait non e, hook with what is called two steps and slipping back one) a nd th en a spoon bait and a red and white feather. you make your team drag the e mpty This he dropped into the wate r in front wagon alongside your belongings, reload, of the fish's mou th and drew it slow ly start off again, and go throu g h the same away. It followed and got sc ratched by process Over and over again until you the hook, this we did four times, the same reach your journ ey's end . Such was th e pan tomine being repeated each time; pleasing task whi ch confronted the two then apparently irritated he went for it wh o had returned for suppli es. They and swallowed th e wh ole thing and returned th'ree weeks and one day after Dunlop yorked it on to the back water leaving us, all in tact and cheerful, with abo ut two feet deep. Fish weighed about u cow to boot. Vie two in the meantime 7 lb., we fried it and had a first rate mea l. amused ourselves in building so-called Such is our first sample of Canadian shacks (o r log houses) only for appearance fi shing. Pike eat rare well. Anyhow we survived until the othe rs returned. sake, and chopping down trees. A river run s through 'Our land so one day we started to build a bridge. 'We had got two logs spanned a cross and had bro ught a third, I had one end of thi s nne balanced on my back whilst Dunlop had the other e nd. I was trying to cross !he two logs already in positioIl, sliding nlong knees on one, hands on the other,

Our lan d co nsists of 6j6 acres, a rive r about eig ht yards wide running through three-parts of it. The main trail also traverses our domains. Some 250 acres of fairly clear land, plenty of trees, poplar and spruce, pine and tamarack, mu skeg, and good hay, a small la ke;: (about one acre), and several springs, high and 101Y


160

THE

CANTUARIAN.

land, picturesque with the outposts of the Rockies in the distance. Our hOllse is situated on the slope of a slight rise and We Clit and faces south, good view. hauled logs for about three-quarters of a

whom I could send you news. I write now, rather for in rormation for myself than because I have anything to say of interes t to most of you at Canterbury. I read Mr. Baly's letter with much mile ,,,,¡jth which to build, log's 27 and inte rest. By the way, R. vV. Marshall and 2+ feet long, notched the ends and build myself we re sorry to miss them at Indian up outer house, got seven big 30 feet logs, I-l ead on their way th rough, but their one foot in diam eter, for th e suppurt of lette r did not arrive in time. the . roof, placed along these from top M r. Daly says that he and his three to side tamarack poles about 2 in. to companio ns represent about 20 %of the 4in. thick, covered these with hay and then threw clay on the top, putting O.K.S. out he re, which means, I suppose the stove pipe up first. Then filled (I never knew mu ch of mathematics) that up all the cracks between the logs, some all told there are about 20 O.K.S. in as big as your head, with moss, the Canada. Who are they? I can think of big holes with wood as well, and the n the following onl)': Mr. Bal)" Dunlop,. packed the spaces between the logs with Clayton, and Phil Hawkes, in the Edmonclay, lined the inside walls and roof with ton District; H . M. Cooper, of the Bank tarred paper and cheese cloths on top; of Commerce at Vancouver; \~'. G. Campthere are two windows, two feet sq uare, bell, of the same Bank at \Valke rton, Ont.; and a door. Size of building inside, E. MacGahan , of the Bank of Montreal at Vancouver; G. Lee- Warner of Innisfail, 25 feet by 22! feet, height 1 0 feet, on Alta; R. W.Marshall, of Qu'appelle, Sask; mud floor. B. St. 'W. Saunders, who was in the We hope to give an 'account of what Sovereign Bank at Perth, Ont., a year or we are doi ng in our next. two ago, and I believe there is an O.K.S. H. B. who was engaged in dredging operations up the Fraser River in B. C. some time P. O. Govan, ago, but I must apologize for having forSask, gotton his name. This makes 12, counting Canada. m \'self. ,"Vhat of the othe rs? I wish there D ecember 2611t, 1907. was some way in which we could know Tlte Edilors of "THE CANTUARIAN." of the whereabouts of the rest of us who are in the Dominion. Dear Sirs,As I have got so far I may as well Since I left the School I have never yet made an attempt to write to th e tell you concerning of my own lot in life Canluaria1l, as my doings have always at the present moment. The f town' of been rather prosaic and of little or no Govan did not exist one year ago. It lies interest to the majority of the School and in the Last Mountain. Valley on the O.K.S and I have but seldom had the Kirkella Branch of the C.P.R., about good luck to run across other O.K.S. of 70 miles North of R egina. We call it a


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

'town'! It has about J 50 inhabitants all told-on ly 23 of the fair sex. It is dumped right in the middle of the prairie with not a tree for IS miles round. The only object in life here is to work and keep warm. We have practically no settled form s of recreation. An open· air skating rink is half-bui lt, but it was blown down in the blizzard last night and one half of one side is at present at large on the prairie. vVe have two mails a week, but they don't always come and a freight train is supposed to come up every day-and doesn't. The railroad only got in here in Tune and so, all things considered, we have not done badly so fa r. I think Christmas Day is always calculated to give sojourners in foreign lands a pretty fair dose of the hump, and certainly yesterday proved no exception. Some of the hotels in t his country try to keep us from dreaming of the past, by pu tting up free meals and drinks on that day, but yesterday there was a blizzard blowing at 60 miles an hour, wh ich prevented one from seeing more than six yards olltside the wil~dow j and so I was content to stoke my fire and picture the old days again in the rings of smoke curling up from my pipe. Sorry to have trespassed so much on your ti me and space. Good luck to the dear old School! Yours truly, E. H. L. JOHNSTON. P.S.-I hope Mr. Baly will let the

161

writer know wh ere he and his companions eventually settle, either direct (for preference) or through the Canluariall. P.P.S.-I believe it is customar), for O.K.S. in Canada to give some advice to those who may settle here in future. I am sorry I cannot com ply with the custOIll, except by quoting 'Don't ask questions and you won't be deceived'! Most of this deception is quite unintentional, as it is impossible to picture Canada, to the eye of the average English school-boy, as it really is. I say ' Come and see fo r yourself,' and then no one is to blame if you are disappointe~1 !

P. O. Govan, Sask, Canada. Jaml(llJI lolll, 1908.

The Ed£lors of

H

THE CANTUARIAN."

Dear Sirs,In the letter I wrote you about a week ago I forgot to memion the two Browns and Graham who are in \·Vinn ipeg. A. C. Brown in the Dominion Bank th ere and the other one in the U nio n Bank, and I don't know what Graham is now doing. Kindly incl ude them in the list 1 gave )'o u. Faithfully yours, E. H . L. J OHNSTON. P.S.-Also J. H. Rammell who was at Karnloopes, B.C., some time ago.


THE

16.

CANTUARIAN.

CORRESPONDENCE. N. B.-TIte Editors declim /0 accept any nspomibility connuted wi/It tIlt opiniom oj their Corresptm ¡ dults. Name and address must a/ways be givut, 1101 necessarily lor jJltolicatiolt, bitt as a

,guarantee of good faith . Personalftie: will involve certain 1'ejection. Letters should be written OJ: olle side of (he paper only.

To Ilu Editors

0/

"THE CANTUARIAN,"

SIRS,

The Pink Book would be mu ch improved if it contained th e names an d doin gs of not on ly O. K.S . su bsc ribers to th e fund, but o f all O.K.S. showing their subsc ription s, if any, in brackets. At present, for want of a co mpl ete registe r, many U.K..S. have lost touch with the School and many' may be livincr in one neighbourhood each unaware that th e othe r is an O.K.S. Should a reIV be made he reby to rev ive their interest in the School and subscribe! th e extra expense of th e proposed change wo ul d be repaid. O .K..S. s hou ld be asked by a notice in the Pink Book to se nd addresses and particulars of any others which the Bursar cannot trace . If thi s proposal is carr ied out I am willing to bet a small sum sub rosa th at ( I ) the subsc riptions to the fund wi ll in crease and (2) the good attendance at th e O.K.S. Dinner which Mr. Latter's energy has secured would be increased.

It is a need whi ch has been felt by many O. K.S. wh o, like m\'se lf, have to wander all over the wo rl d and I am sure tha~ your Indian correspondent, J. H. Smith wou ld, except for the bet, approve of my proposal. Yours, &c.,

C. A. KNAPP, Caplaiu, R oyal iTfunsier Fusiliers. LnmRlcK, F,b. Sill , 1908.

To Ille Editors of

"THE CANTUA RIA N."

DEAR SI RS ,

\oVould it not be possible, as the H arvey Society has o f late bee n rather lacking in lectllres and in keenness among the !llembers, to form a kind of Literary SoclCty an d to inco rporate it with the Harvey Soc iety . There are many who are interested in subjects of this nature, an d by thi s means there would be a wider selection


THE

CANTUARIAN.

for lectures and readings, and consequently the interest of the members would be much increased . At the same time it would greatly improve the knowledge of English writers and standard literature among those who attended. ' Vith the lI sual. apolo,ÂŁ'ies, I remalIl , Yours, &c., If

IDEA."

[As the Harvey Sociely ha s already included Lectures on Architecture and other subjects outside Natural Hi story in its programme, we think it would be glad to accept literary papers from the writer and his rriends.-EDD.]

To IIJe Edt/ors of

If

TH E

CANTUARIAN.

JJ

DRAR SIRS,

Mi ght I suggest, now the Schoo l Hou se has been so well provided with fire

escapes an d hoses, that practices should be held as soo n as co nveni ent after the com mencement of a fresh term.

If a fire occurred before there had bee n a practice, mu ch delay and con fusion wo uld be caused in consequence of the necessa ry changes in dormitories. Yours, &c.,

A. F. RAID.

NOTICES.

We beg to acknowledge with thanks th e receipt of the following subscriptions ;-

Rev. A. H. Barlee (3/6 ), P. S. F. Nairn, E sq. (" /-)' L. W. Smith, Esq . (7/- ), Rev. F. H . Hall (3/6), P. G. E . t have, Esq. (. / 6), Judge Carter ( 14/-) ' C. M. Ri cketts, E sq . (7/- ), Capt. W. H. Evans (3/6), W. A. Fetherstone, Esq . (J/6),

I Re v. A. J . Fenn (3/6), [ R. Madge. E sq.

(3/6). A. G. Blackford, Esq. (3/6), P. H enner)" Esq . (3/6), Dr. Mason (ÂŁ z), C. W. Carrington, Esq. ( 10/ 6), Lieut. N. A. Bittleston ( 10/ 6), F . H. Durnford, Esq. ( 10/ 6), Lieut. H . B. Cla rk (7/-), R. E. Everitt, Esq. (3/6), E. G. Teasdale, Esq. (3/6), L . H. Deane, E sq. (3/ 6), B. B. !:!'orsbrull'h , Esq . (3/6) , J. A. McCulloch, Esq. ( 10/6), S. U. Ball)" Esq. (3/6).


THE

CANTUARIAN.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES.

We beg to acknowlcdgewith thanks the S chool Magazille Parramatta , Lal1cillg receipt of the following contemporaries;- I School l1fagazillc, Leodiensiall. L eys FortAlleyniall, Blue, Bradfield College llighllJl (2), LiLy, l11alvemian, Olavian, Plj1molhiau, Radleian. R ep/ollian, SltirCll1wdcle, Carl/wsia1l, Chalme/eian, The bumian, SI. Edward's School Chronicle, C.O.S., County Gentlema n (6), iJovoriall, SI. Lawrence College 111agazille, Swan, Eagle. Elizabethan (2), Epsomz'an, Exolliall, TOllbritigeiall, Wyverll. Fe/sled/an, Kelly College Cll1ollicle, K ing's

I

Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Pnlacc St reet, Canterbury.


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â&#x20AC;˘

THE VOL. VII .

CANTUARIAN. APRIL,

I

goS.

No . 8.

EDITORIAL. So little have we to reco rd that it seems a fmitless labour to bring out a second !lumber for this term, and an impossible task to compose an editorial out of the meagre materials at han(\. We mi ght, it is true, veil the poverty of our matf'nal in enigmatical phrases and parabolic examples, such as has been the custom in editorials for some tim e past. But we have been told of late that such writing requires a liberal ed ucation to digest it, and although we arc sure that all who read our efforts, have obtallled a liberal ed ucation, yet we would spa re their minds for once, and in a few plain remarks tou ch on what we have done or on what we ought to have done, if the weather and its kindred ills had not stood in our way. The Easter te rm from time immemorial has ever been reputed the dull est in th e year, and the present term has fully justified its reputation. The Tutor Sets during the first pa rt of the term aroused our enthusiasm for a while, but since Football retired into oblivion , this flam e of interest, unnatural at this time, has sunk do wn ngain, and we have gone 0 11 our way g loomy and apathetic. 'While in this frame


166

tHE

CANtUARIAN.

of mind we fall feeble prey to the snare of Prize Competitions-by th is we do not refe r to the Limerick cu mpetitions of m odern periodicals-but to our vain struggles with prize essays and other inventions of ingenious examiners. We have, as is usual, been full of bitter complai nts against the weather. Rain and consequent greasy mud hindered, and in some measure spoiled, what is at its best a doubtful JOY-OUT dai ly wanderings ronnd Blare's Piece to which we give the hi gh soundin g name of training. The weather also compelled us to postpone the Sports for a day, and then granted us one very fin e day only to disappoint us by raini ng the days afler. Illness at Dover College has un fo rtun ately put a n end to o~r hopes of meeti ng our old rivals this year in Sports, and we sympathize with them 111 falling victims to th e scourge of measles. To take the place of th e Dover Sports, a Cross-country contest is being arranged with a team of O.K.S., and before this num be r comes out, will probably have been rUll. All iove r-s of th e Cathedral will be most glad to hear that the scaffolding is being taken down from the Bell Harry Tower, a fact which shows that the task of restoration has made great progress. But now the Western T owers, deprived of their pi nnac les, which are conside red unsafe, are an ever prescnt remin der that there is still a great amount of work necessary. We hope that money wi ll soon be forthco ming. so that all signs of scaffolding may soon be removed from the Cathedral.

TUTOR .SETS,

FOOTBALL.

These were played off in the early part of term and resul ted in a victory for Mr. Cape's Set which got through. undefeated . Though perhaps rath er favoured by for tune on one or two occasions, they nevertheless thoroughly deserved their success, if only for the plucky way in wh ich the smail cl,; membe rs of the side played. Mr. Evans', quite the best side on paper, hardly fulfilled expectations and hart to be content with s!;:cond place, which they only secured from Mr. Mason's and 1VIr. Rear'S Sets by th eir superior scoring-power, as all three sides finished with three wins to their credit. As usual the co ntest furnished some very exciting matches, notably t hat between Mr. Cape's and Mr. Masou's which the former won only by more accurate goa l. kicking. The most surprising match perhaps was that between Mr. R ea}"s and


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THE

CANTUARIAN.

Mr. Evans', in which the forme r with a much weaker team snatched a victory by a few points. All colours worked hard fo r thei r respective Sets and it is needless to particularise. or those who have not yet obtained colours of any sort, Ju ckes, Garibaldi, Ashenden, H Ollsden and Beardsworth, i., were the most prominent and should be userul in a year or two. 'We were pleased to see that several "attempts were made to drop goals, and though they did not meet with success in every case, it is to be hoped that a little more atte ntion will be paid to this method of scoring than has been paid in previous years. Appended is a tab le of points :-

,." '. ,. " ~ " ~~

;;:;;:

;;:~

);I..,

47

29

223

..:

....~•

~

.

{;

..:'(;!

>.

"~

..:~ );Iu

;;:~

17

45

-l\'fr.-Mason's - - - - - - --- - - - - - - - x 0 60 II 0 = 92 0 ._---- - - - - - - - - - - - - Mr. Evans' 21 x 21 66 0 8 = 116 ------ - - - - - - -- - - --- -Mr. Bell's .. 26 x 6 6 0 = 43 5 ----- - - - --- - - - - - - --Mr. La! ter's x 6 0 0 6 = 15 3 ------ -------- ---Mr. Cape's x 21 = 110 15 23 42 9 -------Mr. Rcay's x = 66 6 11 20 0 29 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --- - 81 FINAL RESULT Tutor·Set.

I.

2.

Cajlaill.

Played. lYon.

Lost.

- -- -- ----- - - - - - I\ lr. Cape's Gardner .. 0 5 5 2 Mr. Evan's Reynolds .. 5 3

:'dr. Mason's Williamson

Mr. Rcay's

Taylor

Mr. Bell's .

Adams

6.

Mr. Latter's Fluke

.. ... ...

Points. For.

ArsJ.

110

17

=93

116

29

=87

3

2

92

47

=45

5

3

2

66

45

=2 1

5

I

4

43

81

= -3 8

5

0

5

15

223

5

= - 208


168

THE

CANTUARIAN.

ATHLETIC SPORTS. The two days originally fi xed for the Sports were Monday and Tuesday, March 23r? a nd 24th, but the evil influe nce of Jupiter Pluvi us has been against us. Neve r dUrin g rece nt years has the inclemency of the weath er interfered so mu ch with th e reg l1 lar training for the Sports and in addi tion to thi s we ha ve suffered rath er more t han we uSllally expect fro m the colds, influenza, chills. ctc. , wh ic h a re naturally associated wi th th is period of the yea r. In this res pect, however, we may claim to be rather morc fo rtunate tha n our friends and oppone nts, Dove r College. An Athleti c contest had been arran ged for Tuesday, Ma rch 3 J st, against Dover, bu t our adversari es fell to an epide mic of measles and were co mpe lled to ca ncel the engage men t. This was very un fortunate as the F ootba ll Captain had succeeded in gettin g the Tutor Set Competition so well fo rwa rd as to leave ample time for trai ning , a nd it will be seen from t he res ults given below th at this year even with the short tim e at our disposal we should have bee n abl p. to put a strong team in the fi eld . The first day ori ginall y selected for our own Spor ts proved impossible as the Beverley ground was a lmost under water, bu t Tuesday was a bright warm day anel the g round rE'covert!d ra pidly. Murri n, who is now in charge of th e Beve rlt!y ground took g reat trouble over the preparation of th e trac k and, consequently, t hough the turf was still so heavy as to mili tate against fas t tim es, it was, except fo r a bad patch by the Ladies' Pavil ion in ve ry fair o rder a nd co ndi tion . T here was little or no w'ind to in terfe re with th e runn ers. T he good weather of Tuesday proved howeve r to be only a brie f interval in the heavy spell th rough wh ich we are passing, and so far up to the ti me of going to press, it has been found impossible to hold the seco nd day's Spo rts, a nd t his report must the refore if necessa ry be incomplete. Vve shoul d like to take thi s opportunity of expressing Ollr tha nks to Howell a nd Ga rdner fo r the troub le whi ch t hey have taken not only in makin g the necessary arrange ments for the Sports on the Bp.verl ey but also in th e supervision of trial heats, e tc., ru n on I3Io re's Piece. Perhaps eve n more we should exp ress our indebtedness to H oski ng fo r un dertaki ng th e labo riou s and usually rath er thankl ess office of Sta rting Stewa rd. on whi ch chi efly depends the sl1cc(::ss of a Sports' Meeti ng .

Seve ral indiv idual events seem worthy of special mention. I n the long jump Gard ner, by clearing 19ft. 6i¡in., achi eved a fin e perform ance a nd one cannot but feel th at unde r ma rc favo ura ble circumstances, the reco rd of 19rt. l oin. made by R. J. Castl ey fiftee n years ago might have been in danger. Dunlop's HQ ua rter" in 571- secs. is al so a very c redi tabl e perform ance co nside rin g th e hea vy state of the g roun d. T he most exciting race of the day was th e Open Half-mi le which fu rn ished a ve ry close st ru ggle between Turner a nd Matheson, in which Turner's pace j ust brought him home. Und oubtedly, though, thc best relati ve pe rformances were see n


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CANTUARIA N.

Ib 9

in th e " Und~r Sixteen" events. T he ease with which Cremer2 wo n his races and the excellent Judgment that he di splayed mark hi m as perhaps the most promising nlllJ\e~ th at we have had for many years. and if he co ntin ues to improve he should ha ve, 111 years .t o come, an a ltogether exceptional caree r on t he path . Of minor events, t he JUlllor School Long J ump of I sft . lin . by T omkins deserves notice. T h.e m<;>st pleasi ng feature of thi s' year' s Sports was the large number of every e.vent. Athletic Sports are, after all, only a means to an end and It IS far more satisfactory to see a large field J of crocks ' all strivin g th eir best than to see records cut in a contest betwee n a mere handful of good ru nne rs. com~ e~ltors 1I1

j

C

' ¥ e ]~ust express our thanks to th e . followin g for their kindness in givin g pri zes : T he Laches of Canterbury. Mrs. Ga lp1l1, Mrs. F a rra r. Mrs. H odgso nJ Mrs. Bell.

The Head Master and ASSIstant Masters, Rev. R. G. H odgso n, Dr. Blore, T he Rev. G. C. E. Ry ley. L ONG J U MP (OPE N).

H AL F MILE (OPEN) .

S. T urner 3· C. J. N. Adams 2. B. I-I. Matheson Length, 19 ft. 6, ins. T ime. 2 min. r6t secs. Some very good jum ping was witnessed in this was the best race of the day. Matheson This event. Gardner won hy exactly a foot. went oul with the lead foll owed by Nighti ngale and T urner. At the Pavilion Night ingale and 220 YA RDS (JU NIOR SC HOOL). Tu rner came up no(1 the orde r at the end of the J. Snatt, ii. fir st lap was T urner, Ni ghtingale, Matheson 3. Baker, it 2 . F rench separated only by inches. This order continued till half-way throughout the second lap when Time, 3It secs. Matheson took the lead. Turner challenged at Pavil ion and his extra turn of speed just the Q UA RT ER M I LE (U N DER 16). brought him in by inches in fronl of Matheson, both compet itors beiog run out. Adams fi nished I. H . L. H. Cremer, ii'l 3. G. Byron len yard s behind Matheson. 2 . H.. C. Cumberbatch J.

H. Ga rdner

2. D. V. Dunlop

I.

Q UARTER

Time, 631 secs. After a very level st:'lrt , Cumberbatch drew away fo!lowed by Cremer, 'Yest and Byron. At the scori ng box Cremer made his eRort and cnme clear away. Finishing very st rongly, he won with case by fiv e yards ; three yards separated second and third.

HIGH J UM P (U N DER 16).

L ONG J UMP (JUN IOR S CHOOL).

I. Tomkins Lengt h, 15 ft. A good jum p.

2. Latter, ii. I

in.

MILE ( UN DE R 14).

C. F. Wood 1 3. J. T. Flem ing·Sandes R. Crowley. iii. T ime, 74 secs. Wood led all the way and won a poor race by six yards. Fl eming-Sandes ten yards behind CrOWley. J. 2.

C. H . T rehane 2 . E. F. H ousden H eight, 4 ft. 7 in. T rchalle can do much better than this, but the condi tions were all against him. J.


THE CANTUARIAN .

D. V. Dunlop 2. E. W. Hughes An excellent race. Dunlop and H ughes both got away well . T he fin al race should furnish an exciting struggle as each heat "";IS run in the sa me lime, 3,-d Heat .'

I.

lIt sees.

HUNDRED YARDS (UNDER 16).

nl Heat:

1. 2.

;md Heat.'

I. 2.

3rd Head:

I.

C. H . Trehnne

2.

V.

R. C. Cumbe rbatch G. H. Claypo\c Time, 121 sees. H. L. H. Cremer, ii. E . D. Fishbourne Time, T24 sees.

J.

Austin. Time,

1. 2.

QUARn:R MILE (OI'EN).

I

D. V. Dunlop 3· S. T urner 2. H . Gardner Ti me, 57! sees. Dunlop shot out from the start and soon had a six yards lead. H e was fo llowed by Simeon and Gardner. At the Ladies' Pavil ion Gardner caught Simeon hut fa iled to r.alch the leader. D'.lIliop increaSl!d his lead nil along the far side and at the Scoring Box was twenty yards ill front but \~ as be"illning to fail. Gardner was full of runnmg and made a st rong effort, but Dun lop's lead was too great and he won by six yards. Four yards sepamted second and third . Both D nnlop and Gardner ran very pluckily. I.

220 V ARDS HANDICAP. I.

2. 1 12-S

sees.

:md Heal:

I. 2.

H UNDRED YARDS (JUNIOR SCHOOL).

ISI Heal : 2nd Jrd 411: SIlt

Heal.' Heal.' Heat.' H eal:

I. I. I. I. I.

Snatt, ii. 2 • •Cave, ii. French. 2. Baker, i i, Dalton. 2. Barber, i. Gore. 2. L'ttter. ii. Collings. 2 . Cunningham.

.. . H UNDR ED YARDS (UNm:R 14). I.

G. F. Wood 2. R. Crowley, iii . Time, 13! sees. 120 Y ARDS I-1ANI)JCAI'.

ISI Heat ,'

I.

C. C. Reay (17 yards)

2. G. R. Dawb.trn (23 yards) 2nd Heat: I. R. H . Edwards (17-! yards) 2. R. J. Deardsworlh, ii. (24~ yards)

grd Heat:

l. H. S. Wacher (15 yards) 2. H . D. Townend, i. (S~ yards)

St.l'

A. P. Methuen (27 yards) S. . Maic1en (28; yards) 511, Heal.' t . V. S. Morley (10 ya rds) 2. R. G. Hancock (15; yards) 61/1 Heal: I. G. O. R. Cremer, i. (15 yards) 2. W. E. L . Baker, i. (11 yards) 411t H eal:

H UNDRED YARDS (OI>RN).

n l Heat.' I. C. C, Williamson 2. C. B. Simcon A level start. Williamson won by 2~ yards. 2nd Heat.' I. H. Gardner 2. H. F. Reynolds Ga rd ner got away badly but wns pulling up.

J. 2.

n.

C. Mowll, ii. (32 yards) C. S. Merrett (6 yards) ':Von anyhow . E. F. Housden (25; yards) F. H. Fardell (36 yards) A very close race. G. H.. Dawbarn (51 yards) J. T. Fleming·Sandes (49 yards) Anot her runaway win.

H ALF M I Ll': (UN DER 16) .

iLl 3· C. A. West H. S. Wacher 4. G. Byron . Wacher led nil th rough the fi rst lap and the order of entering the second lap was 'Vacher, Cremer, Cumberbatch, . 'West. 13y the Ladies' Pavilion Cremer had reduced Wacher's lead to eight ya rd!; and '.vest had come \IP into third place. By the chestnut tree "Vacher leJ by only four yards. Cremcr began to sprint by the scoring box and, fini shing vcry strongly, won as he liked by 15 yards. Four ynrds between second and third, half a yard betwcen third and fourth. T he time, 2 mins. 26 sees., is ve ry creditable for a boy only just over fonrtcen . l.

2.

\-I . L. H. Cremer,


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THE

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CANTUARIAN.

t7t

GYMNASTICS. Two Competitions took place on Friday, the 20th. T he first for anybody under years was won by Gottwaltz with 47! marKS out of a possible 60: H ousden was 2nd With 45 . qottwaltz and H ousden worked neatly in the com petition : both of them, more especially the latter should join 'the first division next year. J~

.The competition was very un satisractory rrom a point of view of th e number of entnes, as there we re only five to compete. T his does not speak well for the fu ture standard of the school gym nas tics. Co nsiderable diffic ul ty has been experi enced this year to keep the eight togethe r, both because or ill ness a nd also that some wh o are perfectly able to do the harde r exercises would not and did not shew any keenness at all. The re co uld be nobo~y. keener on the Scho ol i'~ every way tha n Sergeant Will iamso n, he has spent hours glVlllg us extra voluntary lIlstruction, and there should really be more response to his efforts. The New Boys' we:e represented by seven of their number. a ridicul ously small DeI:'ree won. With 4zk .mar.k~, Dawba:n being 2nd with 40. Future gym. mOnItors nllgh~ consider the adVisabIlIty of makmg these competitions com pulso ry fo r any whom the ll1str~ctors recommend .. There seems to be a fashion of getting off as much gym. as possIble among a cerlall1 class of people, by use of excuses which if unassailable do not add to the credit of the fabricators . entr~.

Our thal~ks are due to Reynolds and Hughes for the excelle nt way in which they set the exerCises. The drill on F riday mornings has improved wonderfully under the influence of Mr. Bell, whose presence is distinctly conducive to attention on the part of the various companies. There wi ll be a voluntary gym. class next ter m for those who are fairly proficient, but not necessa rily only for t he first divisio n. Any wh o have hopes however distant of getting into the eight a re asked to appear on Saturdays during t he Summer T erm at half-past five . The Open Gym. Competition was decided on F riday, th e 28th of Ma rch. Colonel Onslo w once more came to judge and addressed the School after the Co~npelition. He spoke highly of the Swedi sh drill now introduced into the SchOOl, winch develops the 'whole bojy uniformly. He congratulated the pai r on the excellent form they showed, and thought t hey would in no way fall below the usual high standard of our representatives at Aldershot. Hug-hes was first with l oot marks out


THE

CANTUARIAN.

of a possible T 10, Re)'nolds second with 1 00, a result which judging from the applause enti rely coi ncid ed with the opi nion of the School. We append the marks of the various competitors. Parallel Bars.

H orizontal Bar.

RQPc.

Vaulting Horse.

Lad· Rings. Max: der. 110

------- - - - ._- - - - - --- --- - - - --- --- ----Hughes, i. .. . 8 10 8, 10 9, 8! 9.- -_.9 9. =100; 9 9 --_. ------------Reynolds ... 10 8 8. =100 9 9. 9 9. 9 9 9! 9 -Gent -- - - - _._- - - -- - - - - ---- --- - - - --- --- ---.. , 8 = 96• 8 8, IO 9 7. 8. 9 9 9. 9! ----Kcrrich - - - - ----------------... 7. 8 8. 9 9 = 9O! 7 9 7 9. 7. 9 -_. ._- - - --- --- ---- ------------Warde, i. ... 5. 6 8. 9 = 85 7. 9 9. -_. -6- -7- -9 - -8- ---Cowie - - - - - -. ----- ----------... 5 8 8, 8 8. 8. 6! 7. = 82 41 8 9 ------ -- --- - - - --- -------Orme ... .. . 6 I.

II.

I.

II.

I.

II.

I.

II.

III.

I.

t---- I.

T otals.

7.

=

_._-

9

3

9

8

7

8.

6.

9

5

78!

STEEPLE-CHASE. The Under 16 Steeple-chase was fun on Tuesday. March l oth. There had been a lot of rain on the previous days so that the funning was rather heavy, but the afternoon itself was cloudy, but free from much rain. There was a good entry of seventeen, of whom a large number finished. 'Va cher led off, followed by Cremer': and Housden, and this was the ord er in whi ch th ey crossed the road at the top of St. Thomas' hill. Cremer'l was then about 20 yd s behind but was gradually gaining on Wacher. \¥h en the dykes were reach ed, Cremer~ had passed ,"Vacher, and Beardsworth was running close to Housden. Cremer'l sec ured a good lead and won easily from Wacher in th e time of 29 mins. l i t secs. This is a very good time, considering the winner has anothe r year und e r sixteen, and he should do very we ll in future . Beardsworth was 3rd and 'Housden 4th. The Open Steeple-chase was run on the foll owing Saturday. The entry was a record one, and showed th e interest taken in the event this year. Adams led off with Matheson second and th e top of the hill was reac hed ill this order. Through the wood Turner and Nightingale gained a lot of ground and before St. Thomas' Hill was reached, had obtained a lead of about 20 yds. Adams and Reay were running equal third. On reaching th e water jumps Night ingale led, followed closely by


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173

Turner. with Fardell not far behind, who had come up very stron gly, during the last part of the run. At the last dyke Turner just succeeded in passi ng Nightingale, and thus won a very close race. Fardell finished a few yards be hind, Reay ,... as 4th, Norton 5th, an d Adams 6t h . The time of 29 mins. 36 secs. \Vas a few seconds worse than last year, and this differen ce is easily accounted by th e fact that the course had to be slightly lengthened owing to an irate far mer and a pug nacious bull.

SCHOOL NEWS. We heartily congratulate R. W. H. Moline on being elected to an open Mathematical Scholarship at Magdale n College. Cambridge.

Vie heartily congratulate the Rev. R. S. Moxon on his app roaching marriage on April nnc!.

.;:. % %

An inte resti ng Lecture was very kindly given to the School on Tuesday, March 17th, by W. W. Hinde-Smith, Esq., on <c The work of Dr. Barnardo." The Lecture, whi ch was illustrated by some very good slides was very much appreciatf'd by the School, and gave a very good idea of the magnificent work of Dr. Barnardo during his lifetime, and sho wC'd us how well th e work was being continued by his successors .

A Cross-Country race is to be run with an O.K.s. team on Thursday. April 2nd. The teams will consist of eight mem bers asid e. The Dover Sports with Dover College have been dropped for this year, owing to an outbreak of measles at Dover College. The Public School Gymnastic Competition is to be held at A Idershot on Friday, April 31'd . The School will be represented by E. W. Hu ghes and H. F. Reynolds. The Confirmation for the School was held in the Cathedral by the Bishop of Dove r on Thursday, March z6th.

%*-1(;

"1;..".';;'

The House Committee are havi ng the names of the mem bers of Football and Cricket teams placed below their Photos in the Old HalL ';'\'1-';'<

The Open Fives Ties (singles) were won by H. Gardner, and th e Under Sixteen by E. P. Collings. A new Competition for new Boys was won by K. E. Hawkins.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

MUSIC. The Xmas Concert took place on Dec. 17th of last year. The programme was on the usual lines and the singing well up to our standard in tone, attack and phrasing. The orchestra of 3S consisted of local players and a contingent from th e excellent R.A. band at Dover, and though it incl uded 24 players of such calibrt as some of th ose in last 'year's orchestra, the music was exceedingly well played, notably the Overture. The piano playing showed that a very high standard has been attained; a Bechstein grand piano was provided both in the Xmas and Easter Concerts, so the players had, deservedly, an occasion, for once in a way, of using a piano which could respond to demand s of lo uch and temperament. Some of the singers in the Easter concert showed promise and, Mr. Coltham kindly carne to sing to us, He has a natural tenor voice of good quality and has moreover temperament, so should have a successful career berore him. The Iolanthe Trio was extremely well sung by the boys who und ertook it. It should be noted that our choice or Folk-music does not in th e least impl y any antiq uarian interest whatever; it is taken ror the stud y of rhythm and melody and the little pieces are g rouped together to give some idea of form and orches tral colouri ng. It is very pleasant to find so many seniors now takin g active interest in the music, and I am glad that C. J. Adams who has done so much for it during his stay at the school shoul d have had two such excellent

concerts during his last year as H ead of the School and music committee, PERCY GODFREY.

Th e following is the Programme:I.

CAROL ... •• The Winter's Night" ... Bishop 1I1ilckimon.

2. VAU))HVILl.I~ "L'Espicgle" ...

Percy Godfrey,

3. FOLK SONGS (Ch. and Grch.) ....... ... Scotch , (a) "Oh lay thy loofin mine" ( b) "Dundee" (c) <I Shela" 4. PIANO ~OLO "Spring Song" Op. 43. No.6 ...

Grieg,

5. RU STI C SUITK (No.2, 3, for O rch .) .. Dr. H. C, Perrin. 6. FANTASIA for violin and piano ........ Russian. (Violin: Mr. C. Gann).

7. TIIREK I'OLK SONGS (Chorus & Orchestra) ... Spmds!, Catalan. (a) "Ramon" (b) <lEi Comte Arnau" ( c) " El RossignoL"

8. S PA NISII SUITE (Ch . & Orch.) Percy Go1Fey, (aj <C Habane ra" 0) Il Scv illana." (Writtcn for Dover Festh'al, May 4th, 1907)·

9. DANSE DKS BACCHANTES (Orchest ra) ..... , ... " l: hil cmon ct Baucis l l COlmod, 1815- 1893. 10. FOI. K SONG (Chorus and Orchestra) ......... .. " Lonely sits the: bird above" Hungan'all, II. O"lmTURI~

., Me rr)' '"Vives of Windsor )l ..... .

Nicolai, 1810-1849.


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12, FOLK SONG "Waltz Melody " ............ Gipsy,

13. PIANO SOl.O (Prelude) "Helberg Suite" Grieg, 1843 -1907. 14. TH REE FOl.K SONGS (a) Il E n roulant ma BOllle" Canadian.

'75

IS. THREK \¥Al.TZES (O rchcstra) 7o/tmmSlnltlss. (a) Wein Weib 11 Gesang, Nos. i, ii. (b) IlMorgenblatter "

0) Il V' la Bon Venl"

16. T wo FOLK SONGS (Ch. , T " T " 13., B., and Qrch,) ... .... flahan, (aJ .. F air art thou)l

( c) "La Canadiennc"

(b) "O'('r the lofty mou ntains" .. . /3earllais.

PENNY READING. SATURDAY,

FEBI{ VARY

P IANO SOI.O.... , ..... Pierrette" .. .. .. .. Cham/1Iade.

e. J.

SONG ........ "The easlle of Dromore" ...... irish. L. 1\'1. HOPKIN S. FOLK-SONG ...... "Air du Prix)l ............ French.

e. J.

SONG .........•. Strawbe rry Fair" . w. K.lOSON ,

... En.t?l£sh .

FOI.K-SO:SG .... A Czech Courting"

...... Czech.

SONG ... "Drink, Puppy, Drink" WII),le-J1fe1ville,

J. S.

YATES,

I " ...... Chopin ,

PIANO SOLO ,. Ballade No.2 " ...... Percy Godfrey. MR, GODFRIW.

REAOING .. SONG .. ,.

1908 .

e.

GALPIN.

PIANO SOLO .. Waltz, op. 69, No. E, F. H OUSDI!N.

29th,

ADAMS.

SONG

.. An old Ga rden" ... Hope Temple . F. FREEBORN,

e.

CHORUS ... .. .. 1 War Song of Druids" ...... Btllmi.

MR. COLTHA;\!, TRIO, T" T"

n, ... from

.. Iol:\Ilthe" ..... , S1IlIiv Mt,

C. NIGHTINGALE,

R. G. HANCOCK,

C. F. FRElWORN.

PIANO SOLO "Polonaise in A. op. 40, No.2"

Chopin.

C. A. M. RICHAROSON, SONG .. ...... "The Happy Farmer" ... R. ll ANCOCK.

PIANO OUl':T .. 3rd Movement Symph. Path ., No.6 (arr. ) MI{. W. T, H A RVEY,

TsclmikO'lfJski, MR . P~RCY GODFREY.


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CANTUARIAN.

HARVEY SOCIETY . On February 1St, W. F. C . Palliser read a paper on "The Life. History of some British Beetles.1I H cgave a defini tion of a Beetl e, and described by means of sketches some of the commoner species, a,nd the paper concluded with an explanatIOn of some of the most practical ways of collecti ng specimens.

On March 7th, a paper on " Photographic Enlarging," was read by R . S. Haskew. After describing by mea ns of lantern slides, th e different kinds of Enlargi~g Aparatlls, the paper explained the vanous processes for obtaining an e nlarged picture, and [or the after-treatment of prints, such as Toning and Re,.

O. K. S. \\'e offer Oll r heartiest congratulations to F. C . Bovenschen on being appointed to a I st Division Cle rkship in the War Office.

G. F. Olive secured the second place in the Hurdle Race in th e Oxford Sports. f-] e also represented Oxford in Gymnastics.

....â&#x20AC;˘

Harrison has been playing foo tball

tO llching. A method of making an enlargement with no other apparatus tha n a box- for m hand camera, was also desc ribed .

On March 2 1St, the President read a paper on " The Formation of Coal." He gave a diag ram of the various geological period s. and proceeded to show how the Coal-fields had bee n laid dow n by water. He poi nted out that the best coal is that laid down in the Carboniferous Period. and showed by a map the distribution of coal in England, stati ng that a Coal-field probably extend ed under the c halk through th e whole of East Anglia continuous with the Belgian Coal-fields. The paper was illustrated with lantern slides.

NEWS. for th e Harleq uin s, and L. Harlequ ins H A.'J

....*"

J. Bassett

for

H. H. E. Gosset a nd C. W. D unhill were mem bers of the Gym. eight for R. M. A., Woolwich, and R. M . C., Sandh urst.

..

% 1.!

H . H. E. Gosset tied for the first place in the Long Ju mp, and was second III the Half Mile Hurdle Race in the Sports at R. M. A., Woolwich.


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177

OXFORD LETTER . Dear School, 'Vhen we came down a few days ago, Oxford was, if we remember correctly, decently atti red as usual in a grey rivermist. ' Ve left her with this, with a few sullen gentlemen in H subfusc >I coats a nc;l white bows, with her Vacation inhabitants. and no doubt many other pe rsons of importance. The past term is not yet a clear picture in our mind, but we can say that for most of us it has bee n a very" se rious" ter m, witho ut flippant gaiety or "teas " that last ti ll six o'clock. Visions of strenuous boati ng-men ambling-a little "carthorsedly U as land-l ubbers will say-¡ ro un d Christ Church meado\vs from 7 to 7.30 a.m., of the same men shive ring in the afternoon at February wind s and the honey-sweet voice of the ,I coach" on the bank j of anxio us scholars discussing the Greek stage during their dai ly walk, o r reading up a few last notes on their dolorous way to the Schools - these come dimly before us and give us a consciollsness of virtue . When we think of the tobaccojar that stood neglected for three weeks, of the untouched cigarettes, of o ur early hours, and o ur texts scored with black and red and gree n ink-lines, then pride is irresis tible . Cynics may tell us that training is only living for th ree weeks the healthy life we lived at School, and that if we did some hard work in the term of our " Schools JJ it is only because we had

been id le before, but then cynics were made for a summer te rm. .. Rowand read seems a O'ood watchword for a Lent T e rm J but of course others-O.K.S. among them too-have ~ee n Just as busy over divers Cup-TIes, football, hockey, athl eti cs, and strolls down I I The High II with toy te rrie rs, whi le a rapid walk round Oxford in the evt:ning would reveal activities far too numerous to mention here. You might loo k in at the Union and hear the well-prepa red quips and epi,rrams of the earlier speakers that pass forO,. the Oxford manner ,/ of debate, or the earnest pleadings of the real enthusiasts who can wait to I c p. m ., and later to defend their cause before empty benches and emptying gallery; or drop in at a small cluo-meeting where sou nds may be the death-knell of Liberation as a creed o r a last dirge over I. the old Conservati ves." ti ll through den se clouds of tobacco¡ smoke the helpless vote of censure rises in a hund red forms on a Governm ent that will not hear. You would see somewhere too the g rim red tie and hea r the warni ng .. \Voe , woe for England JJ if she disrega rds he r poor. If you have not yet heard it; go and hear Philip Snowden who all but charmed the Union i nto Socialism this last te rm. Look. ye prophets J for anothe r II Oxford Moveme nt" I If politics weary you, c hoose some more quiet circle where discussion is deeper if less fluent and heat the theology and philosophy of the next JI


'7 8

THE

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generation prophesied, or listen to papers on poets and n.ovelists of whom you have never even heard. If you want amllsement without menta l strain, go to a close college club. A stroll in the Oxford slums mi ght bring you to a small house where Ballial undergraduates try to humanise town boys, work that may alter in years to come the traditional relations of Towll to Gown. In these surroundings mo st of us eat and slee p with a right good will, and work and th ink according to O Uf tastes, while twice a term we meet to discllss School News, which arrives punctually th ree wee ks lalt.::r. Ollr first meeting this term was held with appropriate deco rum in two adjacent rooms at Keble College, and our courteous host, N. E. Smith, kept the peace by frequeht embassies between the hostile camps. The second meeting, in Budd's rooms, was in its earlier stage honoured by Bishop Mitchinson's presence; its later part was L:ombined with a kind of II Mid-Mods II frolic, perhaps on the analogy of the Mi-Careme abroad. As to individuals, ou r fourth-year men arc worki ng for Final Schools and are seen but rarely save at O.K.S. Meetings and on Sundays when four or five of them take a lon g O.K.S. walk in co mpany. Vve can not chron icle all di stin ction s, but may congratul ate Olive on finish ing second in the Hurdles at the 'Varsity Sports, and hope that he will stay up another year to win hi s Blue. Budd, we hea r, won some laurels at the Oriel Sports, and Maclear fini shed second fo r his College in the Two Miles at a Cambridge meeting ; (two finished). In the Torp ids,

throughout which gales blew the boats across t.h e river and anxious coxswains almost o ut of their minds, N. E. Smith stroked K eble 1., Abbott and Webster rowed in Exeter I. and II., E. A. Roper in Queen's, Armitage in BaIliol I. All these helped in the triumphs of their respecti ve boats and were not to blame for "accidents." Richards, Townend, Dibbcll, Scott, and A. G. Roper have been hermits owing to 'Schools,' though we seem to have heard Townend and also Sarso n wh ispe ri ng th rough a megapho ne on the tow-path . Strahan spent hi s Christmas with a football tea m in France, and has some curious recollections. Our K eble contingent, which now includes Burdctt, H orn, and O. B. Parsons, is still a potent forcc in the artistic, athktic, and social life o f that college. The rest of us likewi!;c li ve at peace with each other, and with the Proctors. Credit no tales, dear Sc hool, to the co ntrary. Accept our congratulations on your rkh harvest of Scholarships and Exhibitions, and Ollr best wishes to the coming race of scholars and to this season's cricket team. \Vc are very so rry to heal' that lVI r. Maso n' s long work as a master is coming to an end and share with you and all his friends the hope that his health will soo n b~ quite restored. That the thought that an O.K.S. has come back fresh from College and has given thirty-six years of his life to her services, makes us more proud than ever of th e School and the affection that she can inspire . Yours,

O.K.S. OXON.


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'79

CANTUARIAN .

CORRESPONDENCE.

tv. B.-TIle Editors decline to accept any resp01l..Iibi/ity colt/ucled ~uitll the o/JiltiollS oj tlUi1' Corres/o n ' dUltS. Name alld address must always be given, Itot necessaril;l lor puMicaliolt, but as a gttat-antee 0/ good fat¡th. Persona/itic; tuill involve certailt 1¡cjecliolt. Letters should be ~/JriUm OIL

olle side 01' tIle paper Ollly.

To Ilu Editors of "THE

CANTUAKlAN."

DEAR SIRS,

To the Edilors of "THE

CANTUAJUAN."

D E:AR SIRS,

\:Vhy should not the winner of the Open Steeple-chase receive Open Spo rts Colours? The only possible argument against snch a concession is that he does not represent the School against another School: but in some years as in the present one our I nter-School Sports have fallen through and th ere has been no reason to aive colours to a ny-body : however all c~lours have been given in such cases; then \)'hy can no t our Cross-country run ne rs have the same di stinction? It is not that I am a Steepie-chaser myself, but rather that I . am ~n admirer of their prowess that I wn te thiS letter. Hoping that the suggestion will be favourably received by the Sports' Committee. I remain, Yours sincerely,

FAIR PLAY. [The maHer has been referred to the Sporls' Committee.-EDD.

It has been noticed of late that the interest of the School in Fives seems to be wan.ing, a nd there are nOw not very many who play at all regularly. As the game is a very good one, this lack of interest is very deplorable. The calise of this trouble lies, I think, in the fact that, the Fives' Cap is not a sufficie ntly coveted object. If onl}1 match es co uld be arranged with D ove r College and o ne or two other Schools, we think this feeling would be changed, and there would be a larger number to fight for the places in the Fives' pair. I remain, Yours truly,

F. rYES.


.80

THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES.

We

beg

to

acknowl edge

th anks th e recei pt subscription s ;-

of the

with

foll owing

C. M. Morris, Esq . ( ) /6), E. W. Moore, Esq . (7/-), G. F . Paget, Esq. ( IO/-), H. Mangin, Esq . ()/6), F. H. Vaughan, Esq. ( 10/6). E . H . L. Johnston , E sq. (4/-), W. H. Horsley, Esq. ( )/6), N. E. Bressey, Esq. (7/-), Rev. Canon R.

L. OW ey, D.D. ( . 0/6), B. J. B. Boothby, Esq. (zr/-), C. W. C. Redman, Esq. ()/6), T . R. Wi lcox, Esq. ( lo/6), Mrs. Blore (7/- ), Major Jones ( ) / 6), W. S. Skinner, E sq. ()/6), A. B. R. Wallis, Esq. ( lo/6), F . Cremer, Esq. (3/6), F. S. Whalley, Esq. (7/-), Re,'. G. N. Finn ()/6), J. H. D. Watson, Esq. (7/-), A. W. Rich ardson, Esq. (7/-), Rev. L. H . Finn ( .0/6), C. W. G. Walker, Esq . { I 4/-), Rev. E. JansonSmi th ( lo/6), J. H. Smith, Esq. (7/--).

OUR CONTEMPORARIES.

\Ve beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the followin g contc mporaries :AlIeYllian, Blue (2), .Broms{[rovia1z, Cad/lUs/an, City of London School l11agas/nt , COllnty Genlleman (5). Cuillber/iall , E lizabethan, EpsollliaJl, Felsledian ( 2). Fellesiall, Glenn/mom! Chrom'de, K elly

College ell/ollide, L ancing College 'JTlagaziJlc, L eOtliensia n. L tys Forllliglt/(;1 (4 ), Ilia/vernian, Ousd (4). P!Y1Jlolll1cw , R epSf. A'{/ward's SellOot Chronicle, Stralld Sc/u)()l tJ1agazl'1u, Th e C.O.s" Tonbridgeian.

tOlliall,

Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Palace Streel, Canterbury.


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THE VOL . VII.

CANTUARIAN. JU NE,

IgoS.

NO¡9¡

EDITORIAL. The jackdaws of th e Cathed ral T owe r are oppressed by the solitude of their surroundin gs. No delightful bickering with a fretful workman, no solid scaffolding to rest the old and feeble; once again the tower is bare and uninteresting to them, even the old stones, haunts of succulent insects, have been replaced by ne w and barren blocks serving no purpose; four years of plenty have passed, and four years of famine are before them, until the new work is seasoned with spiders. that jackdaw delicacy, grateful and comforting . To li S below the completed work is welcome, m arr~ d only by regret for what was before, th e older work and consequently the better i ho wever, anyt hing is better to a maze of scaffolding, hence our gratitude to the powe rs which brought it down. The flag from Australia has come at last, an d has felt the power of a sturdy English breeze. The ceremony was quite inspirin g, and the flag, after a preliminary tangle, waved in the most approved style over the School, amid the cheers . . . . . . Hail to th e Boat Club! they came, they rowed, th ey were conquered, the chosen fours of Tonbridge ; two exce llent races and a double victory should make us all watennen. The boats won on th eir merits, and the joy of victory was doubled by the very sporting way in which the vanquished accepted their reverse, Did we say that all of us shou ld become watermen ? Pardon 1 it was an exaggeration of the

I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

moment ! Gardner, the record breaker, decided that his little effort of '201. not out J of last year had stood long enough, it is now increased to 202; he must be weary of congratulations but they are our only way of showi ng the admiration we feel. 'Back to the land I then, and we must now combine cricket with the rowing, while football is in retirement. With this all too inadequate review of the special doings of the School, the Editorial Staff present the Canluaritw to its reaci ers, without one word of apolo gy, without one blush of shame for a tardy appearance and retire to a rest hardly earned, and very thoroughly deserved . It is with very si ncere feelings of regret that we announce the co ming retiremen t of the Rev. R. G, Hodgso n at the end of the present term from the H eadmastership of the Junior School. H e came to the School as Mathematical Master forty years ago and accepted the H eadmastership of the Junior, when it was first founded. During all this time he has been the School's greatest friend and benefactor. He was the first to organise the regular games of the School and all through his time here he has taken the greatest interest in the &,thletic side of the School life. It is to Mr. Hodgson that we owe our cricket nets on the Gree'n Court, for it was he who had it properly turfed and prepared, and many are the other gifts which the School owes to his bounty. But it is those o f us who have passed th rough <C The Parrots" who have more especially experienced the exceptional kindn ess of Mr. and Mrs. Hodgson, and the debt we owe to them for all they have done for us, is incalculable. We cannot sufficiently express our gratitude for the many benefits we have received from them, and we feel very deeply th e loss the School is to sustain by their retirement. Our only consolation is that it is not ill-health but length' of years that has led Mr. Hodgson to retire. We are very glad that he and Mrs. Hodgson are still to live in Canterbury, and we wish them all health and happiness in the rest which such a life of work for the School has morc than deserved.

TH E P R ESE NT AT I ON OF THE F LAG FROll'l KING'S SCHOOL, PARRA lI'l ATTA . On Friday, 'May nnd, the day on which the School celebrated Empire Day, an interesting ceremony took place in the Mint Yard. Mr. H ennike r I-leaton, the Member for Canterbury, presented to the School the flag whi ch had been handed to him on his recent tour in Australia to

present to us by King's School, Parramatta, our daughter School in New South Wales, founded by Bishop Broughton, ono of the noblest of O.K.S. Mr. H eaton was accompanied by the Hon. J. H. Carruthers, ex Prime Minister of New South Wales. There were also present


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The Dean and Mrs. Wace, the Bishop of Dover and Mrs. Walsh, Mrs. and Miss Heaton. the Archdeacon of Maidstone and ~1rs. Spooner. Cllnon and Mrs. Danks, Canon and Mrs. Stuart, Alderman Sir George Collard and others.

they, with the members of the Commonwealth of Australia, belonged to one Empire; but the family was an older and more sacred institution even than the State, and it struck a more tend er chord when they remembered that that flag came to them from the daughter school.

In a few preliminary remarks the H eadmaster said the ceremony for which they were met that day was a simple one in itself, and vet it was of very deep interest and significance. It was not merely that they were abo ut to receive, as Englishmen, a flag as a symbol of th eir unity with their fellow countrymen over the seas, under one King, and one Empire -that was a great and inspiring thought in itself, and he did not expect that those whom they had the pleasure of hearing that dar would forget to do it justice, T heir gathering there that day had something more in it than that. The gift they were abo ut to receive came to them from a school 16,000 miles away-a school with a framework like their own, bearing the same title, the King's School. as they did, and havi ng the same shield as they had, and, above all, a school founded by a great and good man wh o was educated on the vel y grou nd were they were now standing. William Grant Broughton entered th e King's School in 1]97, and he left the School in ,B04' Now, after a little more than a hundred yea rs the school in Parramatta, N.S.vV., which he founded seventy-five years ago, sent to them gifts and greetin gs-the daughter school to her mother school- and it was this to his mind which leant a special significance, one might say a unique interest, to that ceremony that day. It stirred their patriotism when they remembered that

Mr. H enniker Heaton, before formally handing over the flag, said that ~ few months ago he revisited in Austrah,a .the scenes of his younger days, and he VISited one of the oldest towns in Australia, called Parramatta, He was entertained ro),ally by the headmaster and th e staff of the King's School, Parra matta, and he found that the work of the King's School there was a set example in every day of th eir lives of the Kin g's School at Canterbury. H e found there that they had in their great dining hall all the portraits they could collect of the King's School, Canterbury. Ther had a portrait in oils of the first Bishop of Australia, Bishop Broughton, who founded the ~{ing' s School in Parramatta on the basls, and arte r the example of, the King's School in Canterbury. \ÂĽh cn he visited it the other day. they had a great celebration in orde r to welcome him and to present him with that flag, and they authorised him to say that if any Canterbury King's Scholar went there he would have board and lodging free. He th ought that was a very kind and generous thing. H e might say that the only difference in that school was that every boy in the King's School, Parramatta, was a voluntee r in full uniform, they believing to that extent in disciplin~, and in training themselves to defend theu own King of England and their country against all foreigners. In his concluding


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observations Mr. Heaton said that he had offered a prize for the best essay on the King's School, Parramatta, and he now offered a prize of three guineas to th e boys of the King's School, Canterbury, for the best essay upon Canterbury and their own King's School: This essay would be sent to the King's School boys, Parramatta. Mr. I-I eaton then handed the flag to the Dean, as the head of the Governing Body of the School, and it was subsequently hoisted on the flag staif amidst cheers. The Dean expressed his pleasure in accepting the flag which Mr. H eaton had so kindly brought to them, and which, he said, had been presented to the school with such g racio us expressio ns of feeling and regard from the King's School, Parramatta. It was a very welcome thing to them that that flag, the flag of the Empire, did, as the Headmaster had said, mark the uni on which subsisted and which they all prayed and believed would always sub sist between the Mother Country and that great Colony of Australia, which was worthily represented there, not only by Mr. H enniker I-leaton, but also by a di stinguished stateslI1an of New SOllth Wales, whose voice had already been hea rd in Canterbury. It was one thing for th e Mother Country and he r Colonies to be united under one king and one flag, and to be combined in one great Empire in faci ng the whol e world and exercisin g a be neficent influence throughout it, but t here was another thing which was essential if that union was to be real and binding, and that was that the principles and ideals

which had made the Mother Country what she was and had ' founded ' the Colonies as they we re, shoul d be maintained in full vigour throughout all parts of that dominion. If there were, un happily, to grow up any failure-any failure of sympathy, any failure of uni~y in ideals, in religion, in morals or Il) political ideas between the Mother Cou ntry and her Colonies, the union betwee n them could not be so solid, co ul d not hope to be so permanent, as they all desired it might be. And what to his mind added great value to that ce remony, and the gift of that flag, was th e ass uran ce which was given to them that th e principles represented by ~h e Kin g's School, Canterbury, were be1l1g maintai ned and propagated amo ng the youth of Australia . . He ventured to say that that King's School in Cante rbury stood for eve rything that was, and had been, most precious in the life of Eng land, from the days when Canterbury Cathedral was founded. It stood for the religion of England, for the moral ideals, for the political ideals of England, and it was their pride to believe that every boy who was trained in the King's School, Canterbury, had his whole heart and mind filled with the best and noblest of E ng land's ideals. Now they had the assura nce that, by the foresight of the first great bishop wh o went out to Australia, those great English ideals which the School in Canterbury represented were represented and would be permanently rep resented. at the heart of Austral ia. That, to his mind, was a circumstance of incalculable value and promise. He was also very much interested in one other thing which Mr.

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H eato n mentioned, that there was one thing which distinguished thl! King' s School, Parramatta, from the King's School, Canterbury, and that was that every boy was a member of a voluntary Carlet Corps. H e, the Dean, would not hesitate to express the hope that the day was not far distant when every boy and young man. ill .En~land wOll.ld be a member of th e 1 ern tonal Force m some way or other, and would enj oy the tr~in­ ing, and that mil.itary d.ise.ipl.ine ~VlllCh, he believed, co ntall1eci wlthlfl ltseif some of the highest moral training that a nation could possibly have. particu~ar

The I-Ion. J. I-I. Carruthers next delivered a spl!cc h in which he referred to the fact that many of the great men who had helped to build up Australia, and were at the present tim e taking part in the 'Government of Australia, had bern educated at the King's School, Parramatta. The Rev. A. J. Galpin proposed a vote of thanks to IVIr. Heaton for so kindly bringi ng the flag to them, and to the Dean for receiving it and also to the H an J. H . Carruthe:s for ~tten~in g. ~e expressed his intentIon ot reclproc~1.tUlg the gift of the flag by sendi ng one to Australia. At the conclusion of th e proceedings three cheers were given "For our fellow countrymen beyond the seas;" "For the King's School, Parramatta," and .. For Mr. Henniker Heaton and our other visitors."

The following is the account of King's School, Parramatta, sent us by one of th e boys :-Over seventy-five ye~rs have pass~d since the idea of fou ndm g a school 111 Australia. upon the system of t~e Great English Public Schools, was earned out. At that time William Grant Broughton held the office of Archdeacon, Australia then belonging to the Diocese of Calcutta, and he, seeing the grand future of the State n.:coO"nized that it would be O nece;sary to found a school in .which to train Australia's boys. Accord1l1g1y he started a movement for founding a school at Parramatta. In those days Parramatta was the most fashionable town in the colony, as the Governor's cou ntry residence, surrounded by a beauti~ul park, was situated in it. Many of the arIstocracy had their residences there. Old Parramalta has altered a good deal since the early days when it was inhabite~ by only 3,600. of whom 1,100 \~'ere COI~VI<:ts, who did most of the labour In the distrIct, and only a few landmarks still remain. The proposal, moved by Archdeacon Broll~h­ ton. was taken up in England, and With the help of many English. gentlemen and especially King William IV. and th e Duke of vVellington. eno ugh money was forthcoming to build a school. The sc holars, who had been te mporarily residing in George St., in 1832 moved across the river and took possession of their new school which was called ., The King's Schoo1." Soon after its opening there were a hundred boys on t~le roll, a fact which shows the energy of Its first headmaster, the Rev.R. Forrest, M.A.,


v 186

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und er whom the school grew rapidly. Unfortunately he had to resign in 1839 on account of hi s failing health. Archdeacon Broughton's idea was to have two schools, one at Sydney for day-boys, and one at Parramatta for boarders and dayboys. The school in Sydney lapsed and the position of headmaster, which became vacant was never filled up, but the school at Parramatta prospered under its stern headmaster, l\II r. Forrest. The school itself was composed at first of only four rooms, two above and two below, until year by year it grew in to its present state of grandeur. When the school was first founded, there werc 110 Universities at all in New South \ÂĽales, and therefore, many gentlemen finished off their education here. Although the school started in 1832 and is still thriving, it has not prospered the whole time. It has had its ups and downs like every other great institution and, in fact, in 1864 it was closed for five years. Mr. Armitage, who was the headmaster, went home to England to study for a mathematical degree and, while he was away sent out his resignation, and as nobody suitable could be found to fi ll the important position, it was closed in 1864. During this interregnum the roof fell in and the floors rotted and when it was agai n in habited, both goats and cattle were driven out of the buildi ng. The Rev. George Fairfowl MacArthur, after great persuasion on the part of the Council, which had been formed from the earliest times of members of the clergy and laity, left l\1acquaric Fields, where he had a large school, and arrived in Parramatta with his cadets in 1869 . It took

all his private means, with ve ry little help from the Council, to renovate the school, and all through his headmastership he was co nstantly adding improvements. In the Upper School one end was curtained oJr and consecrated for a Chapel; services were reg ul arly held there and the boys on ly attended All Saints' Church occasionally. In this Church there is now a window dedicated to Mr. Forrest. The introduction of his cadets \vas at first met with great opposition. but the stron ger man carried his point. The origi nal un iform was exactly the same as it is now, except that the coat was blue and the trousers grey. The present flag of th e King's School is of Cambridge blue, with the School Arms of white in the centre; the original was white with a cross of Oxford blue and the Greek letters in the centre. 1n the sports the boys progn~ssed exceedingly well and made a name for themselves in cricket and still more in th e football field. During this era the first Athletic Sports meeting was held in the Parramatta Park and a tennis and bowling g ree n made behind the school, chiefly throu gh the exertions of Mr. VV. R. Burkitt, to whose energy and int~rest the boys owed all th eir Sllccess in the field. From 1886 to 1906 there have been th ree head masters who have been more or less successful, namely, the Rev. St. J ohn Grey, the Rev. Edward Harris, D.D., nnd th e Rev. A. H. Champion, M.A., and then wh en the school was for the second lime placed und er the control of an old boy, th e Rev. P. Stacey Waddy, M.A. The school holds a record in having two

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old boys for Headmasters, and the first of these was 1'1r. MacArthur; and this fact also sho ws the feeling that exists between the old boys and their old school. l\II r. vVaddy is not only himself an old boy but the son, brother. and nephew of old boys, workirw the school on the old traditions, and ha~ already made a name for himself, and time will shew that he is one of the most progressive Headmasters the school has ever known. The first thing one would notice would be the high positions old boys have attained in the State. The H an. C. G. Wade, ICC. , the present Premier of New South 'Wales, AttorneyGeneral and IvIinister for Justice, is all old boy and was at one time th e best threequarter in the world. Sir Francis Sutton, the President of the Legislative Assembly, is another old boy ; not less than five are or have been court judges ; in Sydney a great many of the prominent barristers are old boys. Ours were the first Old Boys to start an "Old Boys' Union " in Australia, which has lately presented to the school a scholarship, open only to sons of old boys. At the present time nearly one quarter of the boys at the school are so ns or grandsons of old boys. There are also five other scholarships, namely - the Broughton and Forrest, holders of which are entitled to proceed to Oxford or Cambridge, the Broughton, the IVlacArth ur entrance, and the Burton A, B, and C., there is also the Burton itself. Although the school has so many old boys in high positions in the city. it is really the squatters' school. Many of the boys come from the bush and when they have finished their education go back into

the bush and do great se rvice to a new country like Australia by opening up the back country. Tht: ~(jng' s School is .the first school in Austraha to hold techmcal classes, which were introduced by Mr. Waddy. Only boys in their last year and over eighteen, who are g0lllg on the land, are allowed to attend them. Some of the best lecturers in Sydney are employe~ to teach wool-classing" and land-surveYlllg wo rk. Veterinary classes are held, and a kr..o,vledge of the laws of the land given. The School has turned out many men wh o have fought in the South African \,yar and some of whom died for their country. T o these, a tablet, surmounted by lance and rifle, has been erecte~, on which is inscribed the names of Slxtyeight boys wh o went to the war, and in the chapel a tablet erected to those who came not back but now lie buried under South African soil. There are also two beautiful stained-glass windows, erected to the memory of Lieutenant G. B. Forster, who died fighting in the war. Since the carly days the school buildings have been greatly added to, the most important and beautiful of which is the chapel, for which ML MacArthur collected a large sum of money and which was finished in Mr. Grev's time. There are also the late dini'ng-hall with dormitories above. an armoury, museum and laboratory, the gymnasium, and a hospital removed from the school a short distance. It may be noticed that nearly all the school's H eadmasters were Oxford or Cam bridge men, with the exception of 1\1r. i'VIacArthur. who had never been out or the colony. The school itself was incorporated in 1893.


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CAN TU A RIENSIS:

REGIA

I-IISTORY

OF

CANTERBURY

Compiled and Edited by C. T<'.. Woodruff, IVI.A., . (O.K.S ., 1868-1875), Hon. Libranan to th e Dean and Chapte r of Canterbury, Ex-editor of the transactions of the Kent Archreologicai Society. and H. J. Cape, M.A., B.Sc., F.R.H.S., AssIstant-Master in the King's School. The foll owin g is a review from the ](mll'sh Gazelle and Canterbury Press of the above book on the School which is shortly to be published :The books already published about the life and. antiqui,ties of Canterbury are many and mterestlIlg. but one which is ab~ut to appear will have a special value of lts own, and the names of the joint authors are sufficient guarantee for accuracy of research and excellence of style. The labour of sorting and siftillO' the vast mass of n~aterial got together a cost of much t1l11C and trouble must have been very g reat. The work of deciphering and collating ancient docum ents is onc which demand s special knowledO"e and much patie nce, and when, as in the present case, the period of research is so extensive- from the time of Ethelbert to Victoria-some idea may be formed of the amount of time and tedious labour necessary for the production of such a work as the volume in question . Most of the other books on Canterbury, from

at

SCHOOL.

Somner to the latest pamphlets, cover much th e same g ro.und, the hi story of the Cathedral and the Cit)', but in this case the authors have becn ab le to wo rk on a distinct line of their own and to presen t a great. quantity of facts relating to the in ti.mate life of the School during the vanou s periods of its existence, which will have an interest to many readers outside Canterbury and the School itself. The latter part of the book contains appreciations of the work of the last four headmasters by various contributors, and an at:count of the school in its present state, a genero us space being allotted to the at.hletic side of school life, but the real inte rest of the book will be found in the first. two sec tions, which concern t.hem selves with the history of the school and its life. Few boys pass their school time in such interesting surroundings as art::: associated with the ancient King's School of t.his cit.y. Th eir buildings, partly within and parUy without the l\Ionastic Precincts, th ei r sc hool chapel a nd services in the Cathedral itself, their junior school and tennis courts in the Precincts of the old Archbishop's Palace - associate their school with the history of the Christ Church Monastery and Cathedral. On


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18 9

their way to the playing fields at St. have a record of its own life and doings, Stephen's, their path takes them by the and the authors of this work, while giving old Queningate, just within the site of due importance to antiquarian research, the Nort.hgate j keeping within the city have succeeded in presentin g a vivid walls they have the Staplegate on their picture of the life and ways of boys and ri g ht, where was Ethelbert's Palace j a maste rs of the various periods. Apprelittle further on where the old bridge, ciations of the reigns of the last four with its three pointed arches, crowned headmasters will doubtless appeal to the the Stom, they look over the gardens und charmed circle of the elect, but by boys and ruins of the Rlackfrairs Monastery. and ordinary mortals the doings or misAnother way, from the Junior School doings of the gods of an elder day will down the Rush Market (Orange Street) be read with a chastened joy; was not takes t.hem by where stood a small gate This rebuked for drunkenness and riotous of the same monastery. and past the conduct? That for slackness? and in the Binnewith (island) reaching St. Peter's case of a Third, did not a blessed saint Street, at the spot were stood th e princi- ari se fro m his warm tomb in the depth of pal gate of the Blackfrairs, taken down winter expressly to intervene on behalf in 1792. Their steeple-chase course of the much affiicted scholars? This, by crosses th e old Tinway of British times, t.he way, is the one true and only miracl e late r on to be better known as the which the School has for its very own. Pilgrim's way ¡of medireval days. and on Thp. section dealing with the School their way to the St. Lawrence, they go up . speeches is of g reat interest, programmes Broad Street, outside the City wall still being given, and also excerpts from very standi ng, passing St. Augustine's, the early plays performed, and a present ancient rival of the Christchurch monks, generation will learn with fearsome awe past where the old Burgate and St. t.hat a headmaster was once rebuked for George's Gate used to stand, up Oaten writing improper plays for speech days, H ill. the site formerly of one of the four in conseque nce of which no play was in City gallows, past Holme H ouse, now fut.ure allowed to be performed without one of the School houses, which stands having first passed under the censorship ncar th e site of St. Sepulcre's Nunn ery or the Dean and Chapter or the Cathewhere the Mad Maid of Kent was de - dral. In a future editio n. the autho rs tained, and by the site of St. Lawrence might satisfy a consuming, if indiscreet, hospital near the entrance to the Cricket curiosity as to whether the dubious plays Ground . Fordwich, too. where the boys were read aloud to the Dean and Chapter, row. in addition to its many historical and in solemn conclave, or wheth er th e senio r local associations, was the scelle of a long call on in residence was deputed to taste and bitter struggle between the monks of of the forbidden fruit on their behalf. The question of the different sites of the Christchurch and St. Augustine's. School has been carefully gone into, an A sc hool with such surroundings and ext.remely interesting point being made long-continued existence, deserves to as to the position in its early exist.ence.


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T here is very much in the book whi ch calls for comm ent and quotation, but reference can only now be made to the excellent and exhaustive treatm ent of the various games and customs in vogue during differe nt peri ods. An athletic co ntest, for instance, in ea rly tim es took place on Barh am Downs between the School a nd some other not identified, and cock fights were a privileged custo m on special feas t daYR. It will suffice to assure all interested in the School and City that th e book is one likely to command the in terest of all classes of readers. It is well illustra ted , and the authors are to be co ng ratul ated on th is th e latest, and, not the least

excellen t, of the many co ntributions to Canterbury lore. During its long career the School, like ot her institutions, has had its ups and downs. At one time attai ning almost to the dignity of a University. it survived th e Danes, Puritan s, a nd other plagues, only to fi nd itself reduced to a mere handful of schola rs, and now once more, duri ng the present regime, it has risen from the position of an obscure coun try gra mmar school to take its place worthily among the pub lic schools of E ngland, and thus it is to the present H eadmaster (the Rev. A. J. Galpin) th at th e book is duly a nd appro priately dedi cated. j

ATHLETIC SP OR TS. We were singularly unfortun ate this year in con nection with our sports. Our opponents, Dover College, were compelled to scratch the usual fi xture as the resul t of a n epidemic of measles amongst th e~r ranks. Moreover the climatic condi tio ns were most inclement. As a res ul t of the bad weather, very fe w days could be uti ~ is.ed fo r. trainin g and th ere was considerable di ffic ulty in holding the sports at all. Ongmally It had been ar ranged th at the second dais co ntests shoul d be decided on Tuesday, March 24th, bu t from day to day postponement of the Sports was necessary until at last we were co mpell ed to hold them on Monday, March 30th. T his was a matter of necessity and not of choice. T he day was not very su'i ta ble for the ground was sti ll heavy, and, altho ugh th ere was no ~tual rain, yet th e circumstances were depressing. There was a fairly large attenda nce on the St. Lawrence Ground a nd. un der the cOl~d i tions of weather, some good perform a nces were accomplished. although (except in the ' Open Hu nd red ') the finishes we re not as close as might have been desired. The most noticeable feature was the outstanding excellence of three boys, H . Gardner, S. D. Turner a nd H. L. H. Cremer.


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Of t hese Gardner won the Hundred Yards and 'Weight' was second in the q uarter]VIile and a member of the 'Win ning Tutor T eam, Turner won with comparative ease th e th ree ' di stance ' races an d ran a good seco nd to Arnold in the cross-country match against the O.K. ,S. Cremer ii. won with ease t he ' .un.der Si~tee~' di stance races and accomplished an even better perfor~~nce , fimshIn g t~ lrd ~n the race against the O.K. S. The fact that both Creme r II . end T rehane WIll stIll be under sixtee n next year promises we ll for our success in futu re years. The following were the chi ef results :I. - H IGH JUMl' (OPEN). 1.

c. r. . Will iamson

I R. M. Gent Height,S fl. o~ in. A very creditable perfo rmance.

II UNDRED YARDS (UNDER 16).

I R. C. Cumberbatch Time, I I ~ sees. I n this race Cumberbatch was singula rly unfortunate. T he quartette in the fina l heat we re dismissed to a very level start and at the half¡ distance Cumberbatch was slightly learling and looked all ove r a winner. Here, however, probably owing to the heaviness of the ground , he st rained himself badly and was compelled to pull up .and finish at a trot so that ultimately Trehane won easily by fi ve yards. I.

c. H. Trehane

H UNDRE D Y ARDS (J UN IOR SCHOOL). 2 . F rench 3- Ba'ker Time, J3! sees. Snatt got away well and finish ing strongly, won fairly easily. Baker was left at the post.

I.

Snatt

Lo NG

Jum> ( UNDER

16).

G. Byron Length of jump, IS ft. I in. 2. E. F. Housden Length of jump, ' 4 ft. 8f in. Very poor jnmping. 1.

H UN DRED YA RDS (O PE N).

I

H. Gardner D. V. Dunlop C. G. Williamson Time, I I i secs. T his was the closest fin ish of the day. At the pistol Gardner got away with a slight lead , Dunlop

I. 2.

just in front of Williamson. H ughes got off rather badly. Gardner increased his lead to the halfdistance where he showed nearly two yards in front. From (orty yards to seventy (as is usual in boys' races) all (our runners were slow but both Gardner and Williamson finished very st rongly. At the tape a ba re yard separated them and there was a about the same distance between second and third . T he time, lit sees. was qu ite creditable under the ci rcumstances. HIGH JUMP (J UNIOR SCHOOL). I.

Collings

2.

Latter

H eight, 4 ft. 2 in. 1 2Q Y ARDS H ANDIC AP.

Semifillal :I st /feat ." I. R. H. Ed wards 2. H. D. T ow nend 3. G. R. Dawbarn T ime, 13 sees. ;md Reat : I. St. J. A. P. Methuen 2 . G. O. R. Cremer, ii. 3. V. S. lIdorley Time, 12 ~ sees. Final H eat ; -1. St. J. A. P. Methuen 2 . R. H. Edwards Time, 12! sees. T he back-marker, H. D. Townend , i., ran very well and got into third place but he waS overweighted. Time very fast considering the day. S I X H UND RED Y AR DS HA NDICAP.

C. S. Merrett (3 5 yards) H . O. Fardell (15 yards) 3. L. G. L. Denne (10 yards) Time, I min. 28 secs. I. 2.


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HU RD LES (OPEN ).

t.

H. F . Reynolds

2.

R. M. Gent

3· W. A. F. Kcrrich Only the placed three ran. Ancr a break. awny. Reynolds And Kcrrich gol away well at the second attempt but Gent was slow off the mark . At the third hurdl e Reynolds was clea r of Gent who led Kcrrich by two yards. The rest of the mce was a procession . Reynolds won by eight yards. same between second and third. Time , 19! sees. HURDLES (UNDER 16).

I. C. H. Trehane

2. H. A. K eyser Time,

2J.f sees.

PUTTING TH E W EIGHT. I.

H. Gardner

G. Williamson L ength, 30 ft. 8~ in. 2.

only sixteen fac ed the starter, so that it was possible this year to arrange them in a single line. H ousden led through the first lap (72! sees.) but then retired leav ing Nightingale leader. Nighti ngale kep[ this position th roughout the second lap though Turner was slow ly drawing up. At the half-mile (which W:1.S compl eted' in 2 min. 37 secs.) the order was Nightingale, T urner, Harke r, Matheson, Ada ms. I n the third lap at the Ladies' Pavilion , Turn er took the lead or which, however, he was quickly dispossessed by Adams. Time, ror th ree laps, 4 min. I sec. At the Ladies' Pav ilion Adams held a two yards' lead rrom Turner with Matheson the same distance behind Turner. At the chestnut tree J\<lams sprinted hard with Turner in pursuil. T urn er caught him at the last corner and won by four yards, Matheson twelve yards behind Adams. All Ihre~ finished very pluckily. CONSO LATIO N RA CE (QUARTER MILE).

Won by G . O. R. Cremer, i.

CO NSOI.ATIO N RACE (J UN IOR SCHOOL). 1.

220 YAR DS HA NDIC AP.

Final Heat:

I. G. R. Dawbarn (51 yards) 2. J. T. Fleming·Sandes (49 yards) 3· E. F. Housden (25~ yards).

Dawbar,n won as he liked bu t th ere was excellent racmg for places between Fleming.Sandes, H ousden, Fardell and l\'Ierrell with the result shown. QUARTER MILE (J UN IOR SCHOOl.). J.

T omkins

2.

Snatt

A good race.

3. French Time, 72 secs.

220 YAR I)S (JUN IOR SCHOOl. UNDP.R II). I. Dean I. Champion O N E MI1.I~ (OI'KN). I. 2.

S. D. Turn er C. J. N . Adams

I

3. R H. Matheson 4. J. W. S. Price

Time, 5 mim. 13t sees. There was nn excellent entry of forty·one but

Time, 73 sees.

Cave

C layton Time, 16fsecs.

2.

TUTOR RA CE (ONE MILE) .

l\h. CAn's-(D. V . Dunlop, G. Byron, R. M. Gent and H. Gardn ..:l') . 2. MR . REAV'S-(W. A. F. Kerrich, S. D. Turner, V, S. Morleyand B. G. Garibaldi). J. MR. Ev¥s. 4. MR. BI'.LI.'s. I.

At the pistol Dunlop went :'tway very rast, at the L adies' Pavilion he held a lead or eight yards from Il ughes :tnd Kerrich. By the Scoring-Box he had increased Ihis to twelve and, finishing \'ery fast , he sen t Byron off on the second j ou rney with :'t lead or fifteen yards, followed by Cremer and K eyser. By the Ladies' Pa"ilion Byron had increased his lead 10 25 yards and here Cremer w:ts call~ ht by i\torl ey. Byron was running: well along the r:tr llide and at the chestnut t ree he was fOrly.rive yards in rron t. Here, however, he began to lire hilt he finished most pluckily so that Gent commenced his ronnd with a start or 35 yards. Gen t who was impressed for the race a t th e last


THE

\ CANTUARIAN. The Tutor Set Shield was also won by Mr. Cap~'s Tutor Set by a margin of 99 .I~ints.

moment, found the distance rather long ror a runner not trained for it but he also ran with the utm ost pluck and was able to add ten yards to the lead berore he passed the handkerchier to Gardner. Gardner, thererore, started with a lead of 45 yards and was rollowed by Garibaldi, Adams, Matheson. Running very st rongly, Gardner increased this lead all the way and ultimately won by 70 yards from Garibaldi while Matheson just o\'e rtook Adams. The race, as usual, created rar greater enthusiasm than any other.

We append a tabulated list of points :--;-. Open. Under J6. Under I.

2. 3· 4·

6.

Mr. Mr. Nrc. Mr. Mr. Mr.

Cape's R eay's Evans' Mason's Latter's Bell's

150 82 58 46

44 12 13 21 30 3

28

24

14.

Grand Total.

193 94 71 . 54' 54' 3~ '

, '.'-

,

.~ .... 'J';

THE RIVER.

.,

....

For the Easter races held on March 31st there were originally eight crew~ in training, four Senior and four Junior fours. The bad weather interfered w.itlr practice, several of the juniors were unabl e to row and it was only possible to put on two crews. Of these, Smith's crew had bee n together regularly and secured an easy win . In the Seniors, T aylor's had been least interfered with and were most toge:hei. The following were the results ;SENIOR FOURS.

Heat I.

st. lb. lb. 6 Keyser, ii. Nelson, ii. 9 9 5 Beardsworth, i. Z Sparling, a 9 9 12 Garibaldi q Fardell II v. 9 13 3 Str. Nightingale Taylor 10 10 6 9 Cox. Hinds Goad .. 5 5 7 5 Taylor rowing a longer and slower stroke were mu ch better together and won by a short length. Heat II. st. lb. st. lb. Bow Ryan 9 Denne 9 Z Turner. . q 9 Houghton 9 13 3 Cottrell, i. 10 8 v. Ju ckes 10 0 Str. Nelson, i. 10 q I, Reynolds 10 9 Cox. Jones, i. 7 10 Depree 6 6 A bad crab on the bow side stopped Nelson by the corner and at least two lengths were lost. They made a big effort to recover, and gradually overhauling the other crew, won on the post. Heat III.Taylor beat Nelson by about (wo lengths. st.

Bow

ll

0;

l

12


THE

CANTUARIAN. JUNIORS.

(Bow) Latter; 2. Cannell; 3. Orme; (Str.) Smith; (Cox.) Depree. (Bow) Denman; 2. Fishbourne; 3. Morris; (Str.) Collings; (Cox.) Sargent. Won easily by Smith's crew, who were bettcr together and better steered.

I. !.

The races against Tonbridge were held on June 4th, at Fordwich. That between the first crew was a fine struggle all the way. There was very little difference when both were clear of the first corner. From this point we crept up slowly. rowing at about thirty-eight to th e minute. and at the cliff were about half a length to the good. At the finish of the Easter course they had increased to three quarters, but here Tonbridge spurted finely, fo r a moment, looked like going away. They never got on terms, however, and an answering spurt by Nelson brought us in at the finish. about three quarters of a length ahead. Tonbridge 2nd were handi capped by changes in the crew in the last few days. In consequence they had not been able to get properly together. This was specially felt round the long corner, and we gained considerably; at the point of half-way down the straight, we were only a quarter of a length behind, a gain of about 21 lengths. Tonbridge drew away a little at the end but we had the race well in hand and won by about zt lengths. We had back station in each race. The first crew were well together and swung straight, but at times were short, though in this they were much bett~r than the:h~ had been in practice. Their beginning was not so hard as that of some nervou s cre ws but they made the boat travel much better between the strokes. The second were rough but very hardworking and there ought to be some good material to fill up vacancies in the first for next year. It was unfortunate that Taylor was unabl e to row for us this term. The following formed the crews: KING'S SCHOOL 1ST.

Bow

T ONDRIDGE I ST.

S. D. Turner

2

H. F. Reynolds

3 Str. Cox.

B. G. Garibaldi T. S. Nelson (Capt.) G. A. C. Jones Won by

E. von Pistorius

t

C. C. Chittenden (Capt.) R . L. Rayner J. Pegg A. C. Brown length.

2ND CREW.

Bow 2

3 Str. Cox.

W. A. Kerrich H. P. Sparling A. F. Cottrell C. L. Nightingale M. O. Depree

2ND CREW.

L. Lowe

J.

Kidd R. S. Allen I-I. F. Claudet G. S. Drew


<

THE

\

CANTUARIAN.

CRICKET.

LIST DATE.

OPPONENTS.

OF I

FIXTURES.

G ROUND.

Result

RUNS FOR.

RUNS AGAINST.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - - - , - - - - - - 1- - - - 1 Tu. j\'Iay 12. Th. " 14. Tu. 19. Th.

"

21.

Sat. " 23. Th. " 26. Tu . J une 2. Tu. " 9. Tu. " 16. Wed. " 17. Sat. " 20. Tu. " 23. Wed." 24. Tu. " 30. Wed. July I. Fri . " Sat. " 4 Tu. " 7. Tu. " 28} Wed." 29

3}

Th. May 21.

1st XI.

1St I nn.

:md I nn.

Felsted School ... Eastbourne College

O.K.S.

Deverley

R.M . L. I. M.C.C...

.,

Sutton Valence School ... Wye College Dover College ...

2nd XI. Harbledown C.c. S. Edmund's Sch. 2nd XI. Harbledown C. C.

S.A.C. . ,.

Th.

S. A.C ... '

18.

2nd Inn.

Beverl ey ... Drawn 219 152 (8 w) Chartham ... Drawn 257(4w)· 70 (2 w) Beverley .. Drawn 265(7w)92 (9 w) Beverley .. Drawn 127 (2 \.,.) 191 Beverley ... Lost... 71 Il3 (4 w) Beverley ... Won.. 261 180 Beverley ... Lost... 60 78 (4 w) 312 181 90 (3 w) Beverley ... Won .. 297 (6 w) Beverley ... Drawn 320 (2 w) S. Ednlund's ..... .. ............. .. ............................ .. "Valmer ................... .. ..... " .............................. . Beverley ." ........ . ........... " ................................ .. Sutton ...................................... .. ............. .. . Beverley .......... . ..... .................... ... .. ...... ... ......... . ........ .... ............ ... ...... .. . . .. .... " ........... . Dover Felsted Beverley ...

Tu . June 2. Th. tl 4· Tu. " 9. Tu. 16. Wed." 24. Tu. " 30. Wed July I.

ut Inn.

Mr. A. Latter's XI. Chartham Asylum R ev. L. H. Evans' XI. S. Lawrence" A.II S. Lawrence S. Lawrence H..M.L.1. Highgate School Hythe C.C . ... S. Edmund's School

...

Dover College 2nd XL ... S. Edmund's Sch. 2nd XI. S. Lawrence Call. 2nd XI. Dover College 2nd XI. ...

Harbledown Drawn 11 2 28 (I w) Beverley ... Won.. 93 63 (4 w) 57 40 (3 w) Bl are's Piece Lost... 49 65 Beverley ... Lost... 61 35 (I w) 132 Dover .. ' Drawn 174 138 (4 w) Blare's Piece Lost... 66 140 S. Edmund's Won " 138 70 (2 w) 65 Beverley ....... .. .. .. ...................... _ ........ . Beverley ......... .. .. .................... _

'"Innings declared lclosed.


THE CANTUARIAN.

MATCHES.

KING'S SCHOOL v. MR. LATTER'S XI. This match was played on the St. Lawrence ground on May I zth, and resulted in .a draw. The School WO Il the toss and elected to bat first. Parso ns and Fluke opened the innings, but with only four run s on the board Parsons was caught at the wicket. Martin and Fluke then made a short stand and SO wen t up before Fluke was bowled. Gardner only survived one ball (a wide), and Martin was bowled soon after for a useful 29. Adams an d Freeborn then mastered the bowling, and by free cricket carried the score to 139. when Freeborn skied one to extra cover and was out to a good catch. H e had played delightfully unorthodox cricket and hit nine fours during his short stay at the wickets. Adams a nd Merrett continued the fast sco ring, the former making some excelleut shots on the leg side. After his dep~rture the innings soon carne to an end and Mr. Latte r's team was left with 219 to get. Capt. Murray bowled extremely well, taking eight wi, kets in all , of which seven were clean bowled .. Me Hilton and Rashleigh made a good start, bu t after they were separated no one except Mr. Latter made many. With Mr. Latter out, the School seemed to have an excellent chance of victory, but Mr. Guest's and J\I[urrin's defence was too strong, and all our efforts to separate them were unavailin g . Dunlop Was quite the best of the School bowlers, and it is to be hoped that he will bowl as well in future. KING'S SCHOOL. H. Parsons, c Rashleigh, b Hilton ..' A. C. Fluke, b Murray ... R . E. Martin, b Murray H. Gardner, b Murray ... C. J. N. Adams, b Murrny G. F. Freeborn, c Murray, b Campbell B. H. Matheson, b Murray .. , C. S. Merrett, not out '" D. V. Ounlop, b Murray E. P. COllings, cHilton , b Murray L. G. L. Denne, b Murray ... Extras: byes, 8; leg¡ byes, 5 j wide, Total

3

23

29 o 44 43

5 31 4

13 I;

no¡ balls.

8 16

2 ...

219


.\

THE MR.

CANTUARIAN.

197

LATTER'S X!.

F. S. Porter, b Merrett Rev. W . Rashleigh, b Dunlop A. McHilton, b Dunlop A. ffrench Blake, h Dunlop .. , Capt. Murray, c Merrett, b Dunlop A. Latter, c and b Dunlop R. Everitt, b Collings .. , Murrin, not out Rev. H. T aylor, b Dunlop E. P. Guest, not out Capt. Campbell, did not bat Extras: leg-byes, I j wides, I ...

2

34

24 6

is 23 4

23 5 14 2

Total

...

152

BOWLING ANALYSIS:

· MR. LATTER'S XI.

Merretl Dunlop ." Collings

O.

M.

R.

7

o

33

2

91 26

15

.. 8 Dunlop bowled a wide.

W. I

§

KING'S SCHOOL v. CHARTHAM ASYLUM. Thi s match, played at Chartha m, was considerably interfered with by rain, as there was no play possible after lunch till late in the afternoon. Before lunch, however, Fluke quickly hit up a fine century, givi ng only one chance at 99, and Ada ms, though slower, played well for 74. Soon after the resumption the innings was declared, and there was about an hour left for play. There was no chance of getting OUT opponents OUl, especially as Dunlop was hurt and unable to bowl. KING'S SCHOOL. H. Parsons, b Tait A. C. Fluke, not out ... R. E. Martin, c Hills, b Tai t C. J. N. Adams, b Davey H, Gardner, c Tait, b Dungey C. F. F"cbom } B. H. Matheson C. S. Merrett did not bat D. V. Dunlop E. P. Collings L. G. L. Denne Extras: leg·byes, 2 j wides,

o 149 I

74 27

I j

no·brLlls, 3

6 ... *247

Total *Innings declared closed.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CHARTHAM ASYLUM. Dr. Hodgson , not Ollt .. . H . Faggc, c Merrett, b Collings _, Dr. Everett. b Collings... . C. Chandler, not out ... H. Hilis Dr. Topham

1

30 26 3 10

..

Dr. Tall Dr. Wilding did not bal Rev. Holt ," P. Davey " G. Dungey Extras: no-balls, I . Total (2 wickets) BOWLING A NALYSIS : CHARTHAr>l

ASVLU.1.

Dunlop Merrett Collings

Denne

KING'S

o.

Y.

. R.

4

o

24

§

.. 0

3

... " 6 Collings bowled one no¡ ball.

SCHOOL

v.

MR.

LATTER'S

w.

10

o o

17 18

o

2

XI.

Played on the Beverley on May 19th. Mr. Latter, in the absence of the Rev. L. H. Evans, very kindly brought an eleven to oppose the School. Howell, who won the toss, went in to bat with Fluke to th e bowling of Captain Campbell and McHilton. The scoring opened briskly, but at 37 Howell was bowled by Campbell. Martin left shortly after, and with Adams in the score reached 67. when Fluke was caught in the slips for an att ractive innings of 30. Gardner, the next comer, hit about merrily, making some fine off-drives and scoring four 4'S in one over of Mr. Latter's. Getting most of the bowling, he soo n passed Adams' score and was the next to leave with 56 to his credit. Eight runs later Adams was out to a catch at mid-on. Though rather unsteady at first, he played a useful innings for his side. Of the rest of the side, Freeborn and Merrett hit about with great vigour, and Howell was able to declare with the score at 265 for 7 wi ckets. The most noticeable feature of the innings was the consistent -scoring of the whole side. The scratch team opened badly, as Major Blore, Twyman, and Capt. Hirst all lost their wickets with only four runs on the board. Me Hilton stayed for a time, but


"

THE

199'

CANTUARIAN.

he and Murrin were the only batsmen to do anything with the bowling. Mr. P,:>rter and H arris, however, managed to play out time~ and we had to be content WIth a draw very much in our favour. Score and analYSIS:KING'S SCHOOL.

23

,0

G. F. Howell, b Campbell ... A. C. Fluke, cHilton, b Campbell R. E. Martin, c Everitt. b Hilton .. , C. J. N. Adams, c Blare, h Latter .. . H. Gardner, b Murrin ... .. . C. F . Freeborn, cLatter, b Hilton H. Parsons, b Taylor C. S. Merrett, not out D. V. Dunlop, not out .. . E . P. Collings }did not bat. L . G. L . Denne II Extras ; byes, 1 ; leg-byes, 3; wides, I ; no-ba s, 3.. ¡

I

4r

56 45

26 26 9 8

Total (7 wickets) *Innings declared closed.

MR.

LATTER'S XI.

o 3 o

Major Blare, b Merrett ... G. Twyman, c Martin, b Merrett Capt. Hirst, c Merrett, b Dunlop .... A. M. I-IiI ton, c Freeborn, b Colhngs Rev. H. Taylor, c Freeborn b Dunlop J. Mu rrin, c Fluke, b Collings ... C. G. Harris, not out ... Capt. Campbell, c Dunlop, b Collings R. E . Everitt, b Denne F . S. Porter, not out A. Latter, b Denne ... ." . Extras: byes, II ; leg-byes, 1 ; wldes, 2

3~ 17 6 2

o 6 4

14

92

Total (9 wickets) ANALYSIS: MR. LATTER'S X I.

BOWLING

Merrett Dunlop Denne Collings

O.

M.

9 8

3 3 I 2

7

6

Dunlop b~'~lcd two wides.

R. 30 20 13 15

W. 2 2 2

3


THE

zoo

KING'S

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL v.

ST.

LAWRENCE

A.

This m~tch was played on the St. Lawrence Ground on May 21 st, and resulted in a draw owing to rain. St. Lawrence A, who won the toss, sent in Twyman and Huyshe to bat. In his second over, Merrett secured Twyman's wicket and with only four runs on' the boal'd Huyshe was caught at mid-on off a poor stroke. Skinr.er, the next conier, madC::~ stand against the bowling and played a very useful innings for his side, .being especially strong on the leg-side. After the fall of the seventh wicket -rain necessitated a sho rt delay, but its effect was very noticeable, when play again began, as the bowlers with a slippery ball were unable to get rid of the remaining batsmen so cheaply. Clinch played a very good innings of 51 not out, making som'e' fine strOKes on the off. TKe School's innings was opened by H owell and Fluke, and run s came at a good rate. Clinch was th e bowler most severely punished. At 64. Fluke was bowled by Skinner after a bright innings of 25. His off· drives were once again in evidence. Howell and Martin continued the good beginning and brought the score to 92 before Howell was .caught at ,the wi cket. He had played very well for 5+, driving with great power and making use of his effective strokes on the leg. 'With Gardner in, the sco re mounted rapidly and it looked Hs if the School Were going to get the needful run S, when rain cqming OIl: agai n put an end, to play, robbing us once more of a victory •which seemed in sight. .. ST. G. Twyinan, c and b Merrell O. F. Huyshe. c COll ings, b Dunlop Skinner, Ibw, b Denn e ... Murrin, c Merrell, b Ounlop . C. G. l'Iarris, run out ... R. Rhodes, c Adams, b Denne \1Il. H. Bass, b Collings Clinch, not out IN . Goodban, run Ollt '" T. A. Bo~y e n, b Merrett .. . W. C. I'lohnes, b ~ l er rett Extrns : byes, 21 ; leg·hyes, I .. . Total

LAWRENCE A.

o o

47

6 2

5 2

51 30

12

14 22

191


T HE

G. A. R. H.

CANTUARIAN.

201

KING'S SCHOOL. F. Howell, c Huyshe, b Harris , .. C. Fluke, b Skinner .. , E. Martin, not out ... Gardner, not out

54 25

23 19

C. J. N. Adams)

C. F. Freeborn H . Parsons C. S. Merrett did not bat D. V. Dunlop E. P. Collings L. G. L. Denne Extras: byes, 4; leg¡ byes, 2 ...

6

Total

127 BOWLING ANAJ,YSIS, : ST. LAWRKNCE

Merrett , Dunlop Denne Collings

A. O. 12 7 7 7

M.

R.

w.

I

71 40 32 26

3 2 2

2 0 I

I

KING'S SCHOOL v. ST. LAWRENCE. Played on the St. Lawrence Ground on May 23rd. After keeping us in suspense all the morning with intermittent sho wers, the weather cleared up sufficiently to allow a start in the afcernoon at a quarter 'to three. Howell won the toss and went out to bat pa rtnered by Fluke. On a wkket that was slow but not really difficult, the School batting collapsed badly before the bowling of Clinch and Skinner. Howell, by some attractive Cricket made , 26, but fell to a catch in the slips off Clinch, the score then being 50 for five wickets. Of th e last six batsmen, Freeborn was the only one to score, hitting the bowling about wj th his cllstomary vigour, punishing Clinch very severely in one over. \Vickets fell fast and Freeborn was the last to leave owing to a catch in the long-field. IVIr. Latter and Dutnall opened the St. Lawrence innings, but the latter in attempting an impossible run was easily run ont, when the score had reached only four. 'With A. M. Hilton in, the sco re rose slowly but surely. Merrett had two maidens in his first four overs, and Dunlop three. At 49, Mr. Latter was out to a very good catch by Fluke in the out-field . Major Blore next joined Me Hilton, and the School total was passed before the fall of the third wicket. At the close of play McHilton was one short of his So. H e had played a rather slow but very useful innings


• 0.

THE CANTUARIAN .

and had hard luck in just missing his half- century. The School bowling and fieldino\V,e re both good, but the two out-fi eld catches bv Fluke a nd Gardner were vcr)' smart pieces of work. ~ G. A. R. I-I.

"

KING'S SCHOOL.

F. H owell, c Hilton , b Clinch .. , C. Fluke, c Skinner, b Clinch ... .. , E. Ma rlin, b Skinner Gardner, b Skinner.. . ." C. J: ~. Adams, c l-Iarris, b Clinch C. to. l' rccborn, c Ncamc, b Clinch 1-1. Parsons, b Skinner ... '" C. S. Merrelt, c and b Skinner .. . D, V. Dunlop, b Skinner E . P. Collings, b Clinch L. G. L. Denne, not out

Extras ...

26 4

o II

3

'7 o o o o o o

...

Total

71

ST.

A. L atter, c Fluke, b Merrett W . Dutnall, run out ... A. M. Hilton, not out.. . .. Major Rlore, st Freeborn, b Dunlop G. Neame, c Gardner, b Dunlop ." C. G. Harris, not out ."

Capt. camPbell} S. Tucker Rev. Rash lcigh did not bat Skinner Clinch Extras: byes, 3; wides,

LAWRENCE. 31 3

49

15

~

2

5

Total (4 wickets)

II3 BOWLING ANALYSIS: ST. LAWRENCK.

MerreH Dunlop Denne Collings

...

...

...

...

o.

M.

R.

IZ 12

2

'7

6

7

Merrett bowled two wides.

4 0 0

40 18

23

w.

0 0

KING'S SCHOOL v. ST. LAWRENCE. This match on t!l~ Bcverley on May 26th against St. Law rence, was attended b very favourable conditions, ~nd cnded in a wi n for tl.1C School by 81 runs. Winnini the toss St. Lawrence went In, A. M. Hilton and Major Blare opening the innings to


THE CANTUARIAN .

20 3

the bowl ing of Merrett and Dunlop. At the lunch interval the score was 70 for two wickets, A~ M. Hilton being caught at cover point by Martin, and Major Bla re being dismissed by Denne. After lunch th e innings ~"as continued by B. H. Matheson and J. Dean, both playing a steady game. The School was, however, very lucky in getting rid of MI. Latter who was well caught by Howell in the slips. St. Lawrence were a ll out for 180 runs, nobody else except Capt. Campbell maki ng a long stand. Merrett who bowled extremely well took four wickets, while Collings, Denne and F luke took t wo each. The School innings was opened by H owell and F luke to the bowling of Skin ner a nd Clinch. Howell played extremely well, and was bo wl ed by Skinner when he had made a brilliant 43 which included some magnificent off-drives. Adams and Gardner made 34 and 32 respectively, the centu ry going up w hile they Ivere batting. Martin played well making a very creditable 66, an d was well backed up by Merrett wh o hit with great freedom, and only just failed to make his 50. ST.

LAWRENCE.

A. M. Hilton, c Martin, b Merrett Major BIore, b Denne .... J. Dean, c Merrett , b Collings B. H. Matheson, c Ad;tms, b Merrett A. Latter, c H owell, b Collings Capt. Campbell, c Denne, b Merrett Murrin, b Merrett .. . C. G. H arris, not out .. . Skinner, b Denne W. Holmes, b Fluke .. . Clinch, c Freeborn, b Fluke Extras: byes, 6; leg· byes, 2 .. Total

20

'5 23

17

5 44 o

13 17

7 I

8 180

KING'S SCHOOL. A. C. Fluke, c Blore, b Skinner ... G. F . Howell, b Campbell ... C. J. N. Adams, c and b Skinner ... H . Gardner, b Murrin ... R. E. Martin, b Murrin C. F. Freeborn, cLatter, b Clinch H . Parsons, cHilton, b Skinner C. S. Merrett, c Clinch , b Latter D. V. Dunlop, b Latter E. P. Collings, h Mu rrin L. G. L. Denne, not out Extras: byes, 2; leg·byes, 3 .. , Total

6

43 34 32

66 .

47

7 5

13

5

261


20 4

TH'E CANTUARIAN:

BOWLING ANALYSIS:

ST. Merrett Dunlop Denne Collings Fluke

LAWRENCH. O.

M.

R.

W.

IS

4 2 2 2

52 32 48 38 2

4 0 2 2 2

10 17 II

4

KING'S SCHOOL v. R.M.L.L ¡ This match, played on the Beverl ey on Tuesday, June 2nd, resulted in an easy victory for our opponents. The School once again secured first innings but did not make good use of their opportunity. On a wicke t that was a little soft but by no means difficult, the eleven were dismissed for 60 "runs, the lowest score this season. Their collapse was du~. not so ,much to ' t,he difficult nature of the bowling, as to their inability to time the ball properly and to th e:: extrao rd inary num ber of poor strokes. Fluke began well by hitting eight run s off Sutcliffe's first over, but he was caught at third man off' Capt. Shine's third ball. H o welt did Il ot survive long, an d Adams was caught at slip off a poor stroke. Nfatheson made two good leg-shots but his wicket soon fell to a' catch at point, and we were' soon alf' ollt for 6'0, very small total. The Royal Marines did not find mu ch to trouble th em in our bowling and scored Lieut. Festing, when hi s score was about 30, gave an easy catch in the slips to Adams which was not accepted. Capt, Shine played beautifully for his runs, hittin g all rounel the wicket with great freedom and using splendid judgment in placi ng his hits. Capt, Montgomery, who came in at the fall of the sixth wicket, was not in as goo~~ form as he usually is aga inst us, and although he made his half-century he ne ver see med very comfortable and was at fault in timing the ball. 12 1 for th e first wicket.

Denne was the most successful bowle r for th e School. The fielding of the team was for the most part very poor.' Two or three catches went begging, and the ground fi elding was..very slack. The School second innings was an.,impl'ovement on the first, but with the exception of Howell, no one played the bowling successfully.


THE CANTUARIAN: 2nd Innings. KING'S SCHOOL. 1st Innings. 8 not out G. F . Howell, c Frampton, b Shine .... 8 run out A. C. Fluke, c Festing, b Shine . 6 C. J. N. Adams, c Shine, b Sutcliffe 1 c Williams, b Hutchinson H . Gardner, c Frampton, b Sutcliffe 6 not out R. E. Marlin, c Shine, b Sutcliffe 10 B. H, Matheson, c Andrews, b Shine .. , o c and b Hutchinson H, Parsons, b Shine ." .. , 4 c Montgomery, b Hutchinson S. Merrett, c Frampton, b Sutcliffe", 0, V, Dunlop, not out .. , .. , 4 o E. P. Collings, c ~'fontgome ry, b Shine L, G. L. Denne, c ~1ontgom e ry, b Shine 4 Extras: byes, 5 Extras: byes, 7 ; leg-byes, 1 ; wides, 1 9

21 8 19 2

'3 10

c.

Total

60

.. ,

5

Total",

78

R:M. L.r.

II4 39

Capt. Shine, b Collings Lieut. Festing, c and b Denne Capt. Shewell, c Gardner, b Dunlop Capt. l\'Ion tgomery, not out Sergt, Sutcliffe, b Denne Maj. Hutchinson, b Denne ... Pte. Williams, c Adams, b Collings Pte. Frampton, b Denne . , Sergt. ' Murphy, b Dunlop Pte. Chaplin, run ou t .. , Pte, Andrews, run out , .. Extras: byes, 10; wideSt 2

~~

8 0 7 0 7 8 24 12

312

Total ANALYStS: R'.M.L.r.

BOWLING

o. Merrett Dunlop Collings F luke Denne

IS IS II

3 II

Dunlop bow led two wi{ks.

M.

0 0

R.

82 86 42 34 58

w. 0 2 2 0 4


THE CANTUARIAN.

·06

SECOND XI. MATCHES.

KING' S SCHOOL

(.nd XL) v.

HARDLEDOWN.

Played at Harbledown on May 21 St, KING'S SCHOOL. C. A. M. Richardson, b Campbell .. . R. L . Gottwaltz, b H. E. G reen .. . B. H. Matheson. b Campbell R. E . Gordon, b Campbell G. Byron, not out ' .. W. S. Barrol, b MacHilton ... .., C. G. Williamson, c G. C. Green, b Campbell R. Juckes, b H. E. G reen ' .. .. H . L . H . Cremer, c H. E. Green, b Campbell A. N. 1. Lilly, b Campbell .. . . .. H. C. Powell, c and b H. E . Green Extras ...

5

II

o o

52 II

10

o 8

o o 15

Total

112

HARBLEDOWN.

A. McHiiton, b Barroll C. Goble, not out F. Wallace, not out Extras, byes, 2

17

6 3 2

Total (I wicket) BOWLING ANALYSIS: HARBLEDOWN.

Darroll

Lilly

o.

M.

R.

5

I 2

15

5

II

W. I

o


THE CANTUARIAN.

KING'S SCHOOL

(.nd XI. ) v.

ST. EDMUND'S SCHOOL

(.nd XL)

Played on the Beverley on June 2nd. KING'S

1st Innings.

R. W. H. Moline, c Shaw, b Napier W. E. L. Baker, b Roberts ... R. L. Gotlwaltz, nm out C. A. M. Richardson, b Roberts R. E. Gordon, b R oberts G. Byron, b Napier .. . .. . W . S. Barrol, c Darby, b Roberts .. . C. G. Williamson, c I-I. L. Williams, b Jones. R. Juckcs, b I-I. L. Williams 1-1. L. I-I. Cremer, not out A. N . L Lilly; b H_ L. Williams Extras ,, ' .

2nd Innings. SCHOOL. c Shaw, b Cooper 16 17 b Cooper 12 0 0

0 4 23 12 2 0

7

Total

21 0

c Williams, b Cooper not out

0 20

Extras

13

T otal (5 wickets)

I

SCHOOL. not out

6 0 7 2

lbw, b Gordon

EDMUND'S

0

c and b 1-1. M. Williams run out

93

ST. 1st Innings. W. E . S. Napier, b Barroll H. M. Geary, b Crcmcr D. D. Williams, c Bryon , b Barroll W. E. C. Darby, b Barroll H. M. Williams, c anrl b Cremer H. E . Cooper, b Cremer J. M. Roberts, b Gordon ... J. G. Shaw, c Richardson, b Cremer A. P. Walker, c and b Cremer B. O. J ones, not out J. P. D. Clarke, run out Extras ....

â&#x20AC;¢

63

2nd Innings.

5 5

8 c Juckes, b Baker 14 0

12

c Richardson, b Lilly

10

0

z 16

57

Total

8

.. Ext ras T otal (3 wickets)

40

BOWLING ANALYS IS : 1St

Barroll Cremer ... Gordon

ST. EDMUND'S SCHOOL.

Innings.

o. 7 9 2

M.

R.

W.

2 2 0

17 21 3

2

\ L;lIy ... 5 Gordon ,,' Baker ... I

2nd Innings.

o. 5 3 1'4

M.

R.

0

IS

0

13 6

w. I

I


208

THE

KING'S SCHOOL

Played

Oil

CANTUARIAN.

(2nd XL) v.

HARDLEDOWN.

B1ore's Piece on Jun e 4th.

KING'S E. L. Baker, b Featherstone ... " R. L. Gottwaltz, b Kingsford B. H. Matheson , run out ... R. H. W. Moline, c Goble, b Kingsford R. E. Gordon, c Goble, b H. E. Green G. Byron, b.Featherstone ... R. Juckcs, b Kingsford .. . '" C. G. Williamson, c Goble, b H. E. C. A. M. Richardson, b I-I. E, Green T-I. L. Cremer, b Featherstone W. g, Barroll , not out .. , Extras ...

SCHOO L.

w.

IO

o 4 o 8 3 10

o

o 4

5 5

Total

49 H ARBLEDOWN.

G. Goble, b Barroll A. Mason, b Cremer ... F. Wallace, c Baker, b Barroll H . E. Green, b Barroll F. Featherstone, b Baker C. David, c Matheson, b Gordon .' A. Milchlez, b Baker .. . .. G. C. Green, not out '" C. S. Merrett, nm out A. Sayer, b Cremer , ... P. H. Kingsford, b Baker Extras ...

4 I

7 I~ 4 o

15 3 4

o 6

T otal

65 BOWLING ANALYSIS:

HA RB LRDOWN.

Barroll Cremer Baker Gordon GOllwaltt

o.

M.

R.

7 9 6

2 2

17 17 16

4

o

4

5

w. 3 2

3 I

o


THE

CANTUARIAN .

209

SCHOOL NEWS. The Editors and Compilers of Schola Regia Cantua riensis " wish to express officially their reg r~t for the delay wh ich has occurred in th e publicati on of the boo k. The collating of the materials has involved a considerabl e am ount of research, but th e presen t delay is due to causes entirely out of the control of the E dito rs. CI

Owing to ill¡ health the Rev. L. [-I. Evans has not returned this term, bu t is having a term's rest. Vve hope, however, that he will soo n be restored to good health and will return next ter m quite recovered from his illness. During his abse nce NT r. Latte r is ta kin g charge of his house . 'We offer a hearty welcome to Mr. G. A. Purton and Mr. vv. N. Goss, who have joined us as Masters t his term. Mr. Pnrto n, Scholar of Christ's College. Cam bridge, comes to us from S. J ohn 's, Leatherhcad, where he had charge of the Sixth Form. Mr. Goss, Schola r of Queen's College. Oxford, was a Master at H ymer's School, Hull , before accepting thi s post. % .;;,

*'

In a Cross-Country Race against an

O.K.S. team at the end of last term the School were successfu l, in spi te of a fin e perform ance by V. Arnold (O.K S.) wh o wo n the race in the record time of 28 minu tes . S. D. Tu rne r. who was second, was also in fron t of the previous record . After th ese two th e orde r was as follows: Jrd, W. Telfer (O.K. S) ; 4th, C. L. Nightingale (K. S.); 5th, H. L. H. Cremer (I<.S.) ; 6th. D. O . Fa rdell (K S.) ; 7th, T . P. Finn (O.K S.) ; 8th, C. J . N. Adams (1<. S.) ; 9th , G. O. Nurton (K.S.); l oth, C. C. Real" In t he Al ders hot Gymn asium Competitio n the School pair (H. F. Rey nolds and R. ill. Gen t) were placed 15 th. Owing to an accident to his thumb E . \,V. H llghes, who was to be our first strin g, was unab le to ent er the Competition. The 6th Annua l Day Boys' Steeplechase was ru n o n F riday, Apri l 3rd . The re were ' 5 who sta rted, a number which would have been larger bu t for th e School Steeplechase v. O.K. S. th e day before. The e vent was won by I vey whose time of 30 mi ns. 46 sees. made him easy wi nner wi th a se ven minu tes ' handi cap. The visitors' prize was won by Gari baldi. T he prizes we re kin dly gi\'en away by Mrs. Silas Williamson.


210

THE

CANTUARIAN.

We take this opportunity of expressing our thanks to Miss Raze for the gift of three interesting water colours of the Cathedral by her fath er, Mr. Raze, who was once the drawin g master of the school. The paintings have been hun g in th e Old Library. This year th e Anniversary Preacher for our Speech Day, t he 194th on our list of Annive rsary Preach ers, datin g from

VIRTUTE FUNCTI

' 7' 4, is to be The Most Reverend Dr. Saumarez Smith, Lord Archbishop of Sydney, a nd Primate of Australia. Dr. Saumarez Smith was a Scholar anrl Fellow of Trinity Coil., Cam ., and was co nsecrated Bishop of Sydney in 1890 : his See was raised to an Archbishopric in 1897. It is interesting to note that the first Bis hop of Sydn ey was Dr. Broughton, wh o left the School in J 804 and became Bishop in 1836, and Metropolitan of Australasia in 1848.

MORE PATRUM DUCES.

B. CROWLEy,-Entered th e School, Sept., '902; Vlth Form, Jan., Iqo7 ; Monitor. Sept., ' 9°7 , E . W. HUGHES. - E ntered the School, May, Gym. Pair, 1908.

1<)02 j

Football XV., 1907 -

VALETE.

M. D. J ephson, V. S. Morley, D. P. Bent.

8j


THE

CANTUA1UAN.

2Il

O. K. S. NEWS.

We heartily congratulate R. H. Brinsley-Ric hards, H. P. V. T own encl and A. G. Roper on being in the first class in H onour Moderation List at Ox:ford, a nd H. L.Dibben and F. G. L. Sco tt on being in the second class.

The O.K. S. Supper will take place on Tuesday, Ju ly 29th. The Captam of the School (C. J. N. Adams) requests all wh o wish to atte nd to send him their names.

*" *'

\;Ye heartily congratulate W. T elfer on his place in the Cambrid ge Mathematical T ripos of l4th \:Vran gler, an d F. M. Deighton on being Senior Optime.

~

The O .K.S. Match v. th e School takes placeon Tuesdayand \;Yed nesday, Ju ly 28th and 29th. All wh o wish to play should apply to L. J . Bassett, E sq ., '7', Sloane Street, Belgravia L ondon, as soon as possible. J

CANTERBURY PILGRIMS C. C., 1 9 0 8 . All O .K.S. who wish to play in the An nual Matches after Speech Day are requested to apply as soo n as possible to th e Rev. R. F. Elwyn, F elsted School, E ssex. The Match on Friday, July 31St, ,viii be against Hothfield Place, and th e game for Saturday. Aug. 1 st, will be against Shorncliffe Garrison .

*"â&#x20AC;˘*"

We heartily congratulate Capt. W. O. Boothby, R .N., who escorted His Majesty th e Kin g with his ship the 111"illotau'Y to Reval, on being made a member of the Victori an Order and on bei ng decorated by th e Czar with the 2nd Class of th e Order of St. Anne set in dia monds .

..

.;.:. *" R . H. Brinsley-Richards has been elected on to the Commit tee of the Union Society at Oxford .


212

THE . CANTUARIAN.

LETTER.

June 6th. [ 908 . My dear School, I take th is earliest opportunity of writing to you collectively to thank you most cordially fo r your handso me parting present to me at the end of last T erm, and also for your kind permissio n to me to purchase; therewi th some things which will be really useful to me now and in the fut ure. Fo r I have now become il sort of creature who has no fixed abode, but wanders about from place to place on the earth wi th all its goods and chattels with it, in fact, like a snail with its home on its back. But, takin g business first, [ feel that I ought fi rst to give you an account of my ste wardship. I wanted then to buy ( 1) a first-rate travelling rug to replace myoid one, and (2) other really useful things, such as a fishing apron, &c., which will for long be of great usc, and remind me always of you all ane! your kind gift. "Veil, I have not yet bee n able to actually handle and enjoy the ru g, because I found, from many visits to many stores in Londoll, that the sort or rll g which I particularly want, viz., a Scotch Maude, or plaidie as we should te rm it, is not, now-a-days, to be had except by special orde r. Thus it is that I have not been able to get one yet, but one of approved

pattern is now being specially made for me and I hope to have it in a few weeks. IVly fishi ng skirt has proved most useful in some cold and wet weather. Next, I found that there would be a good surplus left of your gift, and so I devoted this to buying a really good fishin g reel and line, and a few other similar thin gs which I wanted, as some thin gs of myoid fishing tackle were worn out and unreliable. That is all-and I hope that the way in whi ch I have spent your gift wi ll meet your general approval as well as it does my own comfort and real wants. And now to pass on and tell you a little about my doings since I saw YOll last. Of cou rse I had to stay on a. few days at K .S.C., after you all went away on Apr il 3rd, in orde r to complete arrangeme nts for my exodus, preparato r ~ to my wanderings and eventual attack on the promised salmonland ! These done, I started for my Suffolk haunts, where I can on ly say that I passed a very comfortable and qui et time : for there we had the same April and Easter weather as everyone else, constant bitter N.E. winds, var ied with rain, sleet, hai l and SIlO\\'. As you may guess, I could not get otIt-oi-doors mu ch then, lest I sho uld


THE CANTUARIAN. meet an d be collared by myoId bronchitis foe of Canterbury! During my stay in Suffolk, there were only one or two really fine (lays, and on one of them I was delighted to have a visit from our 1\1r. Latter! I thought it real good of him-as the Americans would say-to ride some thirty miif'!s from the other side of nowhere to come and see me. Of course he co ul d not stay long with such a ride back in prospect, but long enough to take a few interesting snapshots, which I dare say he will shew to any of you, if you care to . see them, as I hope myself to do some' day. U nfortunately I forgot to shew him my room, in wh ich I had put up so me of myoId belollgings flOm K.S.c. (so as to make it look and seem more homelike), and amongst them a very good print of the Chapter H ouse (drawn, by the way, by L. L . Raze, the School Drawi ng Master when I first went to K.S.C. in 1861), which was to me a most acceptable parting prese nt front our good mu tual friend Mr. Rosenberg. Shortly after Mr. Latter's visit, and just after the beginning of Term, I too left Suffolk in a more prosaic fashion, by rail, to London, en route for the promised salmon land in Ireland! I t ce rtainly seemed somewhat strange to rue to be th us starting on a fresh holiday instead of returning to School bells and Church bells and work as usual, but I cannot honestly say that I felt sorry fo r the change! My journey to Ireland was uneventful save for a roughis h crossing, which did not bother me as it did some, and I got here on May 6th. I spent my first few days

21

3

in getting my things straight, and in putting up a few pictures, etc., e.g., one of the Cathedral, and so on, and thus did not start fishing until May 11th. The next day I caught a salmon, a rea l delight after no fishing for two years ! Then followed bad weather, when I did not dare to go out for fear of myoid fo e, B. l But on the next possible day I went and lost a good fish through my ow n carelessness in not sorting my tackle properly before starting l However, I made up for this somew hat on Ascension Day (when I hope that you all also enjoyed yourselves) by landing, with the aid of sorne of the tac kle purchased by your gift, a fine sal mon of about 20 lbs. He made a grand rush, and ran out abo ut 90 yards of my line. Time prevents me describing my feelings at catching such a mm avis, if I may use such a strange term of a fish! But really it was a great bit of luck, for such heavy fish are seldom caught here at this time of year, and this fish is the seco nd in weight of all caught this season. How much more therefore, as Euclid so graphically expresses it, have I to be thankful to you all for the sound tackle which you so kindly provided! On the following Saturday I got another fish of 1 0 lbs., but since then the weather has befm sultry and thundery, useless for fishi ng, still, like Oliver Twist, I am hoping for and asking for more fish next week. There are other anglers here, but so far I have been the most lucky, and many other guests, some interesting scientific men (whom it is always a pleasure to meet) ; and we have also had some strange birds, notably a specimen of the


, 214

THE

CANTUARIAN.

great globe-trotter bicyclist. By his own accounts of his own doings, and gra nd acquaintances and possessions (including a ÂŁ1,000 bull-dog) hc proved him self quite a first-class champi on in--. However, a little of him went a long way. like his luggage, which seemed to consist of a small macintosh and a bicycle pump. Thus I still find something to interest and am use me, and I am not yet tired of my leisure, I call assure YOll , a nd I find lots to do in all sorts of ways ; stilt I often catch myse lr thinking wh at I should be doing fl OW if I were back at K.S.C. The Thermos flask, which Mr. and

Mrs. Galpin gave me, is very useful j and Lha splendid Zeiss binoculars, the Maste rs' present to me, are an endless joy. Dllt YO ll must, by thi s time, have heard enough of this barn-rloor stuff about me and my doings, so I will end the rambling yarn, and say good-bye to YOll all for the present. Perhaps I shall ~a\'e to go to Ramsgate in early July, and If so maybe I shall run over and see you some day. Anyhow, meantime, as always, all best wishes to you all for success in work and games, for heal th and happiness from your ever sincere friend, L. G. M .

BHING REPLIES TO LIMERICK.

SCHOOL, May I take it, with out arrogance, that our dear old friend. C. A. Knapp, coupled my name with his lette r from Lim erick wh ich appt.:ared in yo ur last issue ?-may I ri se to reply? A. Latter also came into the epistle, but I must leave him to answer for him self. One had in old days to be ve ry chary of dealing with C. A. Knapp, and had to think three times before g ranting an)' ans wer to his fusillades, else one was apt to have to go away with the uncomfortable impression that one's tibia had been prolonged. DEAR

One half expects C.A. to be pulling one's leg when he dates his letter from Limerick. and describes himself as a lVlunstcr Fusilier. He always was a bit of a fu silier, and he may have been 11lll!lstc r too i--:-but - well, to speak out plamly. C.A., If you are not pull ing Our legs, I .am rare glad to know that your leg. aCC ident has not resulted in your havlllg to forego your profession. I have not heard of you for so many years that I have rreq uently wondered what you were lip to. 'When are you for India? Hurry up.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

C.A. makes a delicate rap at my quondam and present knuckles. I'll ~it him back. Many of your readers WIll readily recall how on turning into the Upper Dormitory in the yea rs of grace J 890 and 189 1, they frequently found a holy poker man , sably clad, read)' to conduct them decorously to their stall ; how frequently a surpliced {pyjamas had'nt come in then), hooded (a black railway rug, lined red, did for hood), and bestoled (footbali stockings) Canon rose on the pulpit of his bed, and Canon C- dm-ned or Canon R-wl-ns- ned us till the monitor could no longer feign deafness or prayer j how frequently the episode of the S.E.R. Express, and the spling chicken, was narrated in touching verse to a spell-bound audience-

21

5

and to be invited to Speech _Days. Knapp's suggestion is a drastic remedy. viz.: to cover non-subscribers with confusion, shame, "sorrow a nd woe, " so that the said feelings may drive them to penitence and stumping up. Knapp is practical, but I doubt if our Han. Bursar would <~llo w the sacred ness of hi ~ register to be infringed by the add ition of names of backsliders and runagates.

I have often wondered at the woeful paucity of names of Registrees; and have mentally put it down to the fact that it was no easy matter (i n old days) for the Hon. Bursar to get hold of the Virtute Functi. In 189 1, the then Bursar, E. G. Spiers, asked me on Speech Day-just before the lunch eo n, if I would keep my name on . I said yes, an d he asked me I I 'Ow did I get my medal, Sir j well perhaps who else was leaving. He was only able it aint for me to be down at K.S.C. a short time, and To boast about my bravery, if bravery it be ..... . to hunt up all the leavers, unknown by U We was speedin along like lightnin on the sight to him, was no easy matter. It would S. E. R. Express j We W{lS late: was makin uJ) time: speed? have been better if Ol1e of the Masters two miles an hour or less,' &c. could have been asked to take up the matte r some time before the end of the I could quote it nearly all still i thus does term, for when a fellow is packin g up to Knapp' s voice float through the other of go off home, h~ ~ oes n't by 11atur~ think centuries. But let us get to our muttons. of Pink Books, It IS eno ugh for hIm that Pe rhaps an objection to the Pink he has been at res.c., and that he will Book being utilized as an O.K.S. directory for eve r afte r be an O.K.S. So I presume may be raised by th e authorities-that the the deficiency in names of registrees may Pink Book is an official docume nt, and be largely due to this difficulty-a diffi the proposed directory is hardly an official culty which if it has not been overcome matter. Those who desire to keep thei r yet might easily be overcome. And I names on the books an d thereby assist venture to suggest it to our H on. Bursar the O.K.S. Fund are entitled to some if he won't take it as cheek. privileges over those who do not care to But anyhow many O.K.S. are gone now do so; those privileges, as far as I know, whom it may be very difficult to get hold consist in being entitled to receive the of for the o.res. Fund, and their names Pink Book free, to be registered therein, having been once taken off the books,


Z 16

THE . CANTUARIAN.

th ere may be official d iffi cul ties in gettin g them pu t o n-what with questions of ar rea rs or penalties fo r latc registration. There rema in two other sche mes : one, the R egiste r of which se veral of us have already written, the other is the Calt-

!uart"an . The Register, if ever to be accomplish ed, mu st emanate from the centre of K.S. li fe, and would invol ve a good deal of ex p ense and hard labouT, and i t must be made wort h the whil e of the compi lers.

z', e., the Registe r must be mad e tu co ver (By the way, wh e n may we If there are too many diffic ulties in its way (a nd of th is Mr. Galpin wi ll be the best judge). I should suggest that the Cantt/ar/au builds on e up . If the. Can/liar/an would its ex p en ses .

ex pect th e Hi stor), of K.S. C. ?)

begi n to publish names, dates, occupations (lnd addresses of O.K.S.-¡sa)' 50 a number-one would have somethin g to build up the rest on. If an O.K.S. does n't take in the Calltuariall he is fit for treasons. stratage ms and spoils, and as no O.K. S. can be fit for suc h thi ngs, it follows Ihat O.K.S. a ll take it in. I think this is a syllogis m in Barbara-o r is it Ccle rent-(a pologies to Mr. \.varn er, of Ch. Ch .- I have forgotte n).

Yon'll be getting sleep)" so I'll chan ge the music. What you sa}' about Mr. Mason is sad news. I won't say it wi ll be like H am let wit hout Hamlc:t-but it will be. One cannot think of K.S.C. wit hout also thinkin g of Mr . .Mason, a nd we all out here echo yo ur wishes. l sup pose you ex pec t notes on I ndia n O.K. S. 1 am rid ing a bicycle withou t a chain. I hear th at H. V. Cobb-who m you may have seen last year - is now Resident in Western Rajputana. The othe rs arc grinding away in depths of India. fI llsbands, I believe. has left Ahm eda bad for Klandesh. anot he r distric t of Bombay. But I am shortly sending out pos tca rd s to as many as I have heard of in the past--to see if I ca n hu nt up fresh details. I myself am still in Cutch, and its jolly hot now- 103° in my veranda at 4- p.m . yesterday, and a football match at 4.30-alack-not rugger-b ut the tame kind. Yours ever, J. H. SMITH. Our COlll1l0rifm list conta ins on ly abou l 200 names of O. K .S ., but if the Bursar would ue wil ling: 10 tet us have his list, we wou ld be willing: to publish list s of names and addresses.- [EDD.]


THE

CANTUARIAN.

INDIAN NOTES . D EA R EDITORS ,

I hope another fanfare from the Indian trumpet won't inflate your number too much. If it is likely to do so, yo u can easily let out a little of the gas by judicious pinpricks. The fact is that I have adopted the aggressive and demanded of all O.K.S. traceable out here, some notes relative to themselves. If I were to publish in ipsissima ve rba the notes thus received, you would think the O.K.S. the most unassuming and modest of mortals-which of course we are. We are only proud of one thing, and that is that we are O.K.S. If all of us were to write our memories of our school-days, we should be abl e to give you a very fair idea of the school history under four H eads. But the notes sent in chiefly fUn into this style If I sometim es row/' "I sometim es play ho ckey." However, there is news of a little trouble on the Bord er, and I see that Henderson's regiment (the l'vlunsters) is in the Reserve Brigade. So we may get a V.C. again soon. And other regiments with other O.K.S. may be sucked up towards the centre of disturbance-in which cases no doubt V.C.'s will be multiplied. I have forty-three names of O.K.S. down on my list, but I cannot be sure that all are still in India. To all of

these I have written for ne ws of th emselves, a nd so far none of the postcards sent out have been dead~l ettc red back, but I doubt if those addressed to the jungles of Mysore - where th e coffee blossoms gro w-will find their billet. To get to details. So far (April z8th) I have heard of the following :A. L. Paris. Lt. R.E., is in command of a Company of Sappcrs a nd Miners at Kishee, hard by Poo na. He is Sec retary of the Poona Boat Club, and goes in for hockey an d rowing. H e pines for war, bloodshed, bombshells and co untermines - (This I read between the lines). He writes that O.K.S. meetings are frequent in Poona, as he often run s up aga inst F. M. Gadney. Canterbury is further represented by "an elder brother of all the H eales." I feel sure Pa ris must have been taught by Dr. Field; how well I renlember his Miltonia n illustration of the Greek" Best of all the others" construction-¡ ,4 And fairest of her daughters, Eve." F. M. Gadney is in Poona. as afore ~ said. He doesn't say to what heights of PoJicedom he has obtained. His notes on himself consist in the hope that I am goin O' strong; and in the fact that he caught a glimpse of H. Johnson in Bombay. But not being engaged in


.18

THE

CANTUARIAN.

criminally investigating H. John son. he

let him slip. .

R. F. Nation, Lt. of the 39th Garhwal

Rifles, is at Lansdowne, somewhere on the Frontier, I believe. He tells me that in his Regiment arc two morc O.K.S. _ Major \V. H. Wardell (whom I remember as 2nd in command at K.S .C. when 1 was a shrimp in the Lower Third) and E. R. P. Berryman. Three O.K.S. in one Indian Army Regiment is not so bad.

C. C. T . Eastgate writes from Calcutta. He is electrifying the whole of Indiathou gh he doesn't say so. He has seen G. F. Paget. H. M. James, and A. N. Bredin, of the Leinsters . G. A. Clarke is a Lieutenant in the 12th Pioneers at ]hansi, and mentions

C. W. G. Walker. of the 37th Dogras, at Nowgong, and E. P. Berryman

of the

39th Garhwal Rifles (see above). ' F. R. Hawkes is Assistant Traffic

~uper~ntende nt of the N.\V. Railway and IS statIoned at Karachi. fit and well.

I-Ie says he is

. G. F . Paget says he is a most uninteresting person and has noth in g to He wrot e to yo u once from record. Man ila, but since then has removed to Calcutta, to the firm of Macleod and Co., who are big agents for tea, coa l, jute, &c. H e doesn't find it very enLranci nO" work but it is better than many othe r~ . H~ fo und a Cole aboard the P. & O. " Persia" -an O.K.S. I fan cy this l11ust be a

quondam fnlI back of some fame.

Mr.

~van s \~:a~ .givin.g him a pretty big lesson lTl lam biCS the only time I remember meeti ng poor Cole. Perhaps the rhythm of a P. & O. screw may teach

him iambics better (no offence to Mr. Evans). H. J. T rueman has at last shown himself, and of th e above-named -with the exceptio n of Jam es and Gadney-he

is the only O.K.S. of my own date.

He

is Trueman Secundus "as was," and is now Captai n in the 43rd Erinpura Regiment. and engaged at present in a Tran sport Training Class at Mhow. He hopes to see you nex t year and hit a few balls over the old chestnut tree, under which we ll sed to eat white-hearts in old days. He h~s heard lately from 'VV. M. Carter, who IS n~)\\' administerin g justice (?) at

Entebbe In B. E.A .

He tells me that

TruelllaJ.1 Priml~s, of the Manchester Reg iment, IS ASSistant Supe rintendent of Gymnasia at Aldershot, but you should have told me this. .~ Kai, and" (which is the on ly stepplllg s.to ne that Mr. Campbell used to gIve us 111 our Greek tran slation in the

lI!iddle Third) that is all, but I daresay I Il g et a few more notes in soon from other parts, in which case I may be able to bring about the re-acquaintance of other old friends in your July number. So, long, yours ever, Bh ing, Cutch, Ap . â&#x20AC;˘ 8111, 1908.

J . H . SMITH.


' T HE

CANT UARIAN.

119

THE LIBRARY.

The Librarian would like to draw the attention of those who are about to leave at the end of this term, to the excellent custom which has now prevailed for many years of presenting "leaving" books to the School Library. It would be a great pity if so valuable a

method of increasing our Library were

allowed to fall into desuetude.

The

Librarian also wishes to express his thanks

to D. F. Corson, Esq. (O.K.S.), for his genero us gift of five valuable books to the Library.

O! Si Sic oJlmes.

NOTICES .

We

beg

thanks the

to

acknowledge

with

receipt of the following

subscriptions :-

G. W. Godwin, Esq. ( 10/6), T. S. Adams, E sq. (5 /6), Mrs. Evens (7/-), G. B. Cockrem, Esq. (3/6), Mrs. Fielding ( 10/6), G. S. Prest, Esq. (21 /-), J . R. Parsons, Esq. ( 21 /-), G. C. R. Cooke, Esq. ( 14/-), Mrs. Hichens (3/6), R. W. Mannering. Esq. (7/- ), E. W. Hughes, Esq. (3/6), S. U. Bailey, .Esq, (3/6), H. S. S.

Parker. Esq. (7/- ), Rev. R. M. Tuke (10/6), P. J. Vintner, Esq. (21/-),. w. G. Duval, Esq. (10/6), Rev. Canon Stuart (3/ 6), Rev. R. F. Elwyn (10/6), G. w. R. Simpson, Esq. (3/b), R. T. Jenkin, Esq. (3/ 6), Rev. E. L. A. Hertslet ( 10/6). All who have not yet sent in their subscriptions for the current year are

req uested to do so before the end of Ju ly. so that no outstanding subscriptions may be due at the . com lT! ~ n ce m~nt of the coming (School year.


120

T HE

CANT UARIAN.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES.

We beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following contemporaries:Alley",i", (z). Bltte (z). Briglt/o" College. Bromsgrovian, Bur/an, Carllws/an, (z.), Clligwellian (2), CholmelirUl (2), Cul;, berlz'an ( 2), Eagle, Easibourllllw, Elz'zabe/han (2), Epsomz'an, EX01UtW, Felsledlan

(2), Fellesi(w, Glmalmolld Chronz"cle, ./olmiatl. Kt/(y College (,). Lallcillg College lI1"agazillt (3), Leodiensiall (2), Leys ForllIiglt/(y (3). Li(y. Olavia" (.). Por/mllis (z). R ep/onian, Sf. Edward's School Chrotlicle (2), SI. Lawrmce College, Sldrburmcl1I,

TOllbnageian , Vigonzt'an, fJYvern .

Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Palace Street, Canterbury.


THE VlII .. VII .

CANTUA RIAN. JULY.

IqoS.

No.

10 .

EDITORIAL.

The Editorial brain is wearied and worn out by strenuous effort in the Certificate But another call has been made upon it, a call that refuses to be dhlltIHnrc!cc! and in one final outburst it enters upon th is last task with a defi nite object III vli\\\', namely to leave, if possible, a favourable impressio n.

1lfl\l ll hla tion.

'I'wo of the proud possessors of this versati le brain are using it in the capacity of n"" IlIInflll editors for the last time, but they leave behind them a colleague whose I " I',uiticH a nd abilities are too well known to need further com ment. They are fully '1\\1 1111 that the little good they may have done has been but too fully out-weighed by ~ hll ' I ~ c 'o Tl1in~s , yet judF!'e them by their intcntions, and you wi ll not fi nd them wanting. In looki ng back on the past term, they see the good results which every branch "I IIt 'liviLY has brought about. Firstl y and chiefly the publication of the certificate Ituuk 18 ex pected to confer literary honour and glory on many members of the Vlth ,ulIl Uppe r Vth . The Cricket season with all its fluctuations of success and defeat has


THE

222

CANTUARIAN .

been, however, as pleasant as usual, whi le those of the number of the (Jt EV 'Hii\,Et who at one time mocked, and criticised unmercifully, were the very first to offer their congratulations on the victory over Eastbourne College. Upon the range the exceedingly high stallc!ard o f excellence which at least half-a-dozen boys have reach ed speaks for itself, an d this success must be a real so urce of self-gratification to the shooting officers whose task of supervision is no sinecure. But these arc not the only incidents of interest, others, though perh aps of less importance, have played their part. Rumour whi ch seems inseparable from School has been most energetic. The fact that of the l\!fasters one at least is retiring and another taking his place has led to the rumour that many of the rest are on the point of getting married. I-low far this is tru e, time alone wi ll prove, but the advisability of their showing sllch ente rprise is thoroughly ensured by the complete success which has attended the efforts of their older (?) colleagues in this direction. In the sphere of diseases. rumoured mumps proved but inoffensive bumps, while German measles turned out to be nettle-rash. Such is the review of the term that is now endin g. As regards the te rm to come, if the success of a Football XV. depends upon the skill and efficiency of the Captain and Vice-Captain, a pro'"perol1 s season is ensured. But the region s of anti cipation and of retrospect have been fully traversed . I n the name of all who are leavi ng, and in their own, the Editors bid th e School farewell, wishi ng it good l uck in work and sport for all time.

CRICKET . MATCHES.

KING'S

SCHOOL

v. HIGHGATE

SC HOOL.

Played on th e ~t. Law rence ground on June 9th, and resulted in an easy victory for the School. Highgate won the toss and sent ill Barton and Kay to the bowling o~ Merrett and Dunlop. Runs came slowly, neith er batsman playi ng the bowling WIth great confid ence. Barton ::ient two catches just out of reach of slip, but Kay


THE

CANTUARIAN.

223

WII ~ lhe first to leave from a catch off Dunlop's bowling.

At 33 Barton w~s dismissed Buck, who came.111 at the fall III til (U'st wicket, continu ed to play steadily and was the fifth to leave WIth 93 on the IUlflrd. Of the re st, Mackay was the only batsman to offer any real resistance to t~e lit ,wlill g. and our oppone nts were all out for 181. The School was rather ~nlucky 111 lIot dis missing the side for a smaller total. There were a great many" uppIsh shots wlil ' h went just out of reach of the fielders. Dunlop bowled well throughout the Inni ngs. "I'he School batting was opened by Howell and Fluke. T he scoring was at first /llI lIll c what slow. but Fluke brightened up after th e first few overs and scored .well all lOIUld the wicket. He was th e first to leave after a stand of 75 run s. Martm came III lo partner Howell , who was playin g very sound cricket, and these two carried tl~e " rOI' t¡ to within four of our opponents' total before they were separa~ed . H o~vel1, 111 jtll lllTlpting to drive a ball on his leg-stum p, s0nt a hard catch to nl1~-ol.l w.l11ch was !lnltl. [-l is innings was invaluable. Though at first a little slow hiS ll1I1Ings was hI IV()r tedious, as he played fine cricket during the whole time. Adams, the next 1IIIII c r, made th e winning hit with a single to leg, and after the necessary runs had IH 'O Il obtained, he and rvTartin began to hit the ti red bowling all round the field. t ",02 Martin was caught at third ma n after a brilliant innings ?f 65 . He h~d 11!11\H'd to ad d 130 n lllS during his stay at the wickets, and did not give a chance u ll hl\ JCga n to hit. Adams, aided by a littl e good fortun e, continued to score fast off 11111 tired bowli I1CT, and with th e assistance o f Gardner and Pa rsons brought the score np to 297 , whenoHowE'1I applied the closure, so as to give Highgate a second inuings. This victory in our first School match was very welcome and thoroughly des.e rved . Tll tl good bowling of D unlop, and the splendid cricket played by H~)\vell , Martlll. and IIJllk " were the chief factors in our success. The fielding of the SIde was good as a whole, Martin, as usual fieldi ng brilliantly at cover. IIlId Antonovitch, the new com~r, did not survive long.

)I

1st Innings. " . I I. Uurton, c Merrett, b Dunlop \V, C. Kay, c Collings, b Dunlop t ', I". Huck , b Merrett .\ . t\rHonovilch, b Denne .. A, N, I.ushi ngton, b Dunlop I I. 1(, J\ofackay, b Collings. I . , aslon, c Denne, b Dunlop II , V. Bmy, b Dunlop I Ir, Drew, not out ... p , C, Mc Kaw , c Howell, b Dunlop ... II , I). Browne, b Fluke I':ltlrns: byes, 9; leg byes, 3 Total

...

HIGHGAT E SC HOOL. 2nu I nnings. '4 c Adams, b Dunlop 12 b Martin 47 not out ... o st. F reeborn, b Dunl op . 9

2r

8 r9

27

... 34 '7

3

'3 7

'3

12 ... 18 1

rs

leg¡byes, 13; wides, 2 Total . .

.. .

90


THE

224

CANTUARIAN .

K ING'S SC HOOL. A. C. Fluke, c Buck, h Caslon G. F. Howell, c LIIshington, b Drew R. E. Martin, c Antonovitch. b Drew C. J. N. Adams, not out H. Gnrdncr, c Buck, b Caslon C. F. Freeborn, b Caslon H. Parsons, b Mackay ... C. S. i\'rerrctt, } D. V. Dll~lop. did not hat. E. P. Collings,

44 69

65

69 27 o II

L. G. L. Denne, Extras: byes, 7 ; leg¡ byes, 4; no¡ ball,

12

I. ..

T otal

297 B OWLING ANALYSIS:

1St

Innings. O.

Merrett Dunlop Denne Collings Fluke

8 22 13

9 '1

HIGHGATE SCHOOl"

M. 0

R.

W.

27 40 48 24 o

I 6

Martin Fluke 3 Collings I Dun lop . 4 Me rrett .. . Parsons .. . Merrett and Dunlop each bowled I wide

2nd I nnings.

o. 5 2

4

5'3 3

M. 0 0 0 0 0 0

R.

W.

7

I

II II

0 0

28 15 3

0 0

2

KING'S SCHOOL v. HYTHE. This match was played on t he St. Lawrence ground, and resulted in a draw. Howell won the toss and sent in Gardner and Fl uke to open the School innings at about 12.1 5. The wicket was fast and true, the li ght rather bad, Bot h batsmen were a little un certain to start with, Fluke especially mis- hitti ng and snicking a good many balls, though within the first few overs he made fo ur beauti ful hits to leg, Gardnf.r soon began to play thoroughly well, his on-driving being very fine, By the lunch interval the pair had scored IOO, Fluke 54 and Gardner 46, both still un separated, Soon afte r lunch Gard ner, at 48, drove a ball hard back to the bowle r Clinch, who did not accept the chance, and he immed iate ly co mpleted his half-century, All interest now beca me centred upon him , an d he gave ll S another proof of what a dal1gerous and brilliant bat he is when once set. I-li tti ng magnificently in the air over th e nearest boundary, an d driving powerfull y along the ground, he quickly reached his century. Clinch tried half-volleys, lon g-hops, good-length balls, fast and slow, but all alike were treated with equal precision and hit st raigh t over the tree af the top of the ground. ,,"Vhen the score had reached 1 90, Fl uke cut a ball into his wicket j we have seen him playa better innings, but h.e brought off some nice shots.


THE CANTUAR IAN .

225

I'IirHOnS joined Gardner wh o, aided by a little fort un e, still continued his fine hitting. 11\' 3.'10 he had co mpleted his second ce.: ntury. when he skied a ball to mid -on and WWI ca ught. The total was 32q for two wi ckets. Parsons' contribution was a very )lI tlLLy 35 not out i he at last found his true.: fo"rm. making some fine off-drives and Mood hits to leg. Gardner in his innings beat th~ previolls School r~cord of 20 f whlt; h he had himself established in -19°7 agai nst Dove r. Three chances in the hlli ff- field, between his first and second century, were but slight errors in such a tr ttrH' nifi cent display.

I lythe com menced their innings at 3.40 with Scoones and H ackney, neither of whum seemed sorely troubled wi th the bowli ng . The score mounted steadily, and t'ouncs brought off some fin e shots all rou nd the wicket. H e was bowled by a Ili I/Hlty from Dunlop. Leney and Small later on hit up a lot of runs, Leney scoring VIII>' fust, while his partner was tediolls. T he game, which ended in a draw, was IIl0r interesting as a spectacle than as a match. KING'S SC HOO L. A. C. Fluke, b Stainer .. I I. Gardner, c and b Charteris I I. Parsons, not out

. .. 80 ..

...

C. J. N. Adam,) R. E. Marlin

202

35

I I

G. 1~. I}owell C. 1<' l<reeborn ~ d'd 1 b t C. S. Merrett r I no a O. V. Dunlop E. P. Collings L. G. L. Denne) Extras: byes,s; leg¡ byes,

5; no.balls,

2 ..

12

Total

H YTHE C.C. II . E. Scoones, b Dunlop A. C. Hackney, c Marlin, b Dunlop E. H . Small, not out U. Leney, b Merrett ". A. Harding, b Dunlop ... C. Charteris, c Denne b Dunlop E. F. IIousden , b Dunlop Appleton, c Adams, b Dunlop I I. Stainer, not out ... A. N. L LillY} d'd t b t Clinch I no a . E xtras : byes, 9; leg-byes, I ; wide, 1 T otal

47 46 57 33 1

5

o 2

17 II

219


zzo

THE CANTUARIAN. B OWLING ANALYSIS : H VTHE C.C. O. IS

Dunlop ~1errett

M.

R.

I

70 45

17 15

Collings Denne Fluke

6

4

2

64

0 0

22

7

w. 6 0 0 0

KI NG'S SCHOOL v. ST. EDMUND'S SCHOOL. This match was played on the St. Edmund's Ground, Jun e 17th, a nd was won by the home side by 73 TUIlS. The School won the toss a nd went in to bat o n a wicket much too soft for quick scoring, and too soft to give the bowlers any assistance. No one looked like stopping long and the whole side was out for 74. Thei r fast lefthander bowled very finely and kept a beautiflll length, but neverlheless it was purely bad batting on the part of the School which caused such a low total. St. Ed mu nd's went in to bat on a wicket whi ch was drying fast. Lamentably bad batting was agai n seen, only one batsman e ven getting hold of the bO\rling, making 104 out of 1 50; he, however, was let off in th e slips at 10 to an absolu te H sitter." St. Edmund's were all out for 150 . The School bowling was good, the fi elding very bad . The School agai n went in with about two-and -a-ha lf hours left for play. The game, of co urse, was to hit off runs as qui ckly as possible and declare, for the wi cket was now ve ry tricky. The School showed their a bility in this direction making 20 I in an hour-and-threequarters. Gardner played a brilliant innings of I I l not out, and though well supported by the others, it was almost absolute ly due to him that Howell was abl e to declare at 5 . 20, leavi ng St. Ed mun d's an hour to bat. Den ne a nd Merrett bowl ed magnifi ce ntly, and the fielding wa~va s Uy improved j these two thi ngs, with th e help of a difficult wicket, saw 9 of our opponents' wickets down for 40 run s. when stumps were drawn. The last two men were in for ten minutes and successfully defied all the efforts of Denne. Collings, and Merrett. The excitement at the end was intense. It was a good sporli ng finish and nothin g better coul d have bee n desired, save, perhaps, th at we had won. Score and analysis :1St I nnings. KI NG'S SC H OOL. 2nd Inn ings. C. F. H owell, b Bonrchier 16 c Bell, b H utchinson A . C. Fluk e, b \Vnlker... 6 b Walker . R. E. l\'!nrtin, c Hughes¡ Davies, b \oVnlker 23 c Gca¡ry. h Bourchicr C. J. N . Adams, b Walker 7 h Duggan H. Gardner. b H utchinson a not out lor. Parsons, c and b Walker . . 3 not out C. F . Frceborn, c Bouchier, I-l utciiinson C. S. :Merrell, c Htltchin;;on, b Walker 3 D. V. Dunlop, b Hutchinson 0 did n.ot bat . E. P. Collings, b Walker 10 L. G. L. Denne. not out a E xtras : wides 2 Itxtras: byes,S; leg byes, I ; wides, 2

b

T otal

4} '

74

T otal

...

37 0 22 3 lIZ

19

8 201


THE

CANTUARIAN.

ST. EDMUND'S. 1st Inni ngs. 2nd Innings. II l l. ~ rn nmer, b Denne 100 C Dunlop, b Denne II II. C en ry, c Martin, b Merrett 7 b Dcnnc ... 6 c Dunlop, b Denne II I ~. Il oime, b Merrett ... 1 I, Il ui chinson , c Adams, b Merrett o b Merrell ... 4 c Freeborn, b MerreU I II. I)urmn n, b Denne I I C Freeborn , b l\< Ierrett II, h. C. Walker, b Collings ... o b Me rrell I I I. 11011, c and b Collings ... 1 ru n alll. .. W, I. ()"borne, c Adams, b Du nlop .. . 7 b iVJerrclt '\ fo:. lIu R.l.1es.Davies, c Merrett, b Collings .. . I I . O. l' lIlch, not out ... .. . S not out I I I. (:. Uourchier, c Dun lop, b Collings o not out ." ... 13 Extras .' bye, 1 ; wide, I ... 1¡;"lla5 : byes, 8 ; lcg byes, I ; no balls, 4 T otal

6 II

o 6

5

o

4 o 12 2 2

Total

157

49

RaWLIN G ANALYSI S : ST. EDMUND'S.

1st Innings.

o. ' ''Hll li

12

M. 2

~ li n ll ll

14

4

2nd I nnings. R. 31

W. 2

47 3 I nllh,,,.. 10'2 2 27 4 IIUIIIIII1 ". 5 0 39 I I) nne And Collings each bowled I no ball . Collings bowled 2 no balls.

Merrett Denne

o.

M.

2

R. 25

w.

10

9

5

22

3

Dcnne bowled

I

5

wide.

KING'S SCHOOL v. R.M. L.I. Thi s match was played on Jun e 20th, at \Vahner. and resulted in a victory to the It \ 1, 1.. 1. by 16 2 runs. Howell won the toss and opened the innings with Fluke. I 'III!. Montgomery started bowling with th e wind , which seemed to give added sting III dH dclivery, and very soon H owell was bowled while attempting to glide to leg a h,,11 01\ the leg-stump. Marti n, who came in next, was bo wl ed immediately by a ball II'! hld l hl'Oke the stump, and a little later F luke was cau ght. T he n Adams and Gardner II I lOH'cthc r and a short stand was mad e, Gardner starting his usual fast scoring 11! 1I /j H ~ immediately. Adams, however, was bowled after making z7, and of the II uudlldc r Dunlop was the only one to oHe r a ny resistance, so that at nine wickets llim II ( :nrdner was left with seve n to ma ke for his century. Unluckily, his was the "II kIll to fall, and the School were all out for , 8 J. Cn pl. Skine and Lieut. Festing opened the R,M.L. I. innings, and the form er was 111111 di smissed for seven. Capt. Montgome ry, who came in next, looked like making III IIMI bllt was caught in the deep field by Ga rdner. Then Capt. Hutchinson came in,


228

THE

CANTUARIAN.

and he and Capt. Mayhew put on Some I b match was lost to the School before f; 00 rU!ls efore they were separated, and the Lieut. Maxwell and Major vVray batted o~r wl~ke~s were down. Of the rema inde r the former was not out with 3 1 â&#x20AC;˘ we ,an W len the side were all out fo r 34 2 ,

Score and analysis: KING'S

SCHOOL.

A. C. Fluke, c Mayhew, b Hutchinson G. F . Howell, b Montgomery C. J. N, Adam~. b r-,'font gomery R. E . Martin, b Montgomery H. Gardner, b H utchinson 1-1. Parsons, c Kiteat, b H utchinso~" ... F. Freeborn, c Montgomery, b Hutchinson ", . S. Merrett, c Maxwell, b Montgomery '" D. V. Dunlop, b Hutchinson E. P. Collings, Ihw, b Hu tchi nson'" L. G. L. Denne, not out ... Extras : byes, 9; wides 2

3 10

27

o

8'

93 3 o 10

17 o 6 II

Total 180

R.M.L. r. Capt. Shine, c and b Merrett Licu t. Festing, b Denne ... Ca~t. Montgl?mery, e Gardn er, b Merrett Major H utclunson, st Freeborn, b Collings Capt. Mayhew, u Fluke P~e. Frampton, b Collings Lleut. Maxwell, not out Capt. Kiteat, b Collings Capt. Rooney, b Collings !)te. Sel l, run out Mnjor Wray, b Merrett::: ... Extras: byes, 15 ; leg-byes, 2 .. .

7

27 2I

114

58 IS 3I 7 13

4

26 17

Total 340

BOWLING ANALYSIS: R. M.L.I .

Merret t D en ne Collings Dunlop Fluke Martin Parsons

o. 13

M. 0 0

IS

I

2

0 0 0 0

12'4

4 4

5

R.

w.

78 71

3

83

4

20 21 32 I8

I

0 0 0 0


THE CANTUARI AN. KING'S

SCHOOL v. M.C.C.

PI<lyed on Tuesday, June 23rd . The M.e.C., which included Humphries, Bean, II lId verton, won the toss and opened their innings with Haig and Dean on a fast wic ke t. F rom the start the School bowling neve r looked difficult, and though the first wi cket fell at 50, runs afte rward s came at a great pace. Haig gave a magnificent tl l' play of batting until he was finally di smissed from a good deep-field catch by (:uT'd ner ; he had made 194 witho ut a cha nce. The innings was soon afterward s dnt'llired closed with the score at 357 for four wickets. The School fielding throughom was very smart, Martin, Gardner, and Dunlop being the best. vVe mad e a much hlllt r show in batting tha n last year, and though three wickets were down fo r 40, ':llT'dner and Freeborn brought the score to 1 0 8 before the former was caught in the .. 11 1)8 for 48, which incl uded no less than I I fours . H e took any amount of risks but WII.Ii the only one to play the bowling with con fid ence. The rest, except Parsons, did Hltle a nd we were all out for 13 0. On 0 1lT following on, Gardner gave a truly ma rve llous display of hitting, actually scorin g 9 l Out of 1 I 1 in a little over half!til-hour. Score and analysis : M.C.C.

J.

Dean. c Dunlop, b Collings N. H aig, c Gardner, b Denne ) lumphries, c Adams, b Merrett \Y. W. H. Deane, u D en ne Rev. C. B. Hulton, not out C. Hulton, did not bat R. A. Ramsay, not out ... G . Vcm on } B. l'I'fatheson d'd t b t Dean I no a Overton Extras: byes, 26 ; leg· byes 4 ...

21

194 IO

35

52 I7

30

Total 1st Innings.

, C. 1··luke, c C. B. Hulton , b Overton I I, I". I lowell, b Bean It. g. ~ t n rt in, b Bean II (: nrdner, c C. B. Hulton, b Bean I I. N. Adams, c Dean, b Bean II Jlnraons, not out ... I , 1-'. Freeborn, b Ramsay ... j • H. ~ I c rrc t t, st Humphries, b Ramsay II. V. Ounlop. b Bean ... I I'. olli ngs. st Humphries, b Bean I. Denne, c Bean, b Ramsay ... Extrns : wide

n.

Total

357 KING'S SC HOOL. 5

2nd Innings.

19

15 48

c Dean, b Hum phries not out..

10

91

2

22

13 c Dean, b Deane o not out .

6 4

I

4

o I 30

III


THE

13 0

CANTUARIAN.

BOWLING ANALYSIS: M , C.C.

Merrett D enne Collings Dunlop l\fnrtin Adams

KING'S

O. 22

M.

R.

W.

0

'4 ,8

3 3 0 0 0

104 68 65

2

7 2 2

SCHOOL v. SUTTON

VALENCE

37

38 15

I

0 0 0

SCHOOL.

This match was played at Sutton Valence on June 24th, and re sulted in a decisive win for the School. Ho well won the toss and took in Fluke to bat with him. The bowling was not diffi cult and both batsmen looked as if they were trying to play them selves in, when Howell was caught at point ofT a wretched ball. With the score 21 Martin joined Fluke, and the sco re mounted to 55 before Fluke was bowled by Blenkillsop, for a steady 17. Gardner and IVlartin then took the score to I g J before the former was bowled by Fischel just before lunch. His 45 included some fine hits though he was rathe r overshadowed by his partn e r who was doing what he liked with the bowling. Starling carefully, Martin had soon played himself in and he then scored finely all round the wicket. His hitting on the leg-side was very pretty. a nd in spite of the numero us field ers placed there he managed to send his hits out of reach every time. He steered t.he ball past second slip very cleverly and made frequent use of that lofty hit of his, wh ich takes th e ball over the on-boundary. After lunch he continued his innings wi th Adams and another stand was mad e until Adams was caught at sl~p j he ,. scratched away" for about half-an-hour and made 30. Pa rsons. Freeborn and Merrett were all out in a few minu tes, and then Dunlop helped Martin to put on 57. Martin was caugh t just after the co mpletion of his second century. He h.ad slowed down rather after 180; perhaps he wanted to give Dunlop a chan ce of showing that a bowle r can bat if he likes, and can make off-drives and if-shots as well as anyone. The innings was then declared a t an end, the score being 350 for eight wickets. Martin's 200 was a grand inn in gs, th e best he has played for the School. a nd we take this opportunity of co ng ratulat ing him heartily on his effort. Sutton Valence opened their batting wi th Thomas and Stiles. The start was disastrous for them ; Stiles was run out, H owe ll first missing him from a catch and the n throwing the ball smartly to Freeborn, wh o put his wicket down ; Thomas was well caught at point by Dllnlop. Gosling, B1e nkinsop ancl Tuke alone made any resistance, a nd the innings closed for 75. Denne bowled excellently, taking six for 28, while Collings finished off the innings with th.rce wickets for z. On followi ng on


THE

CANTUARIAN.

23'

II tto ll proved little better. After Du nl op an d Collings had each secured a wicket, I lowell put on his change-bowlers in the persons of Gardn e r and himself. ' Roars of lIul Jfhtcr greeted Gardner's first wi cket, and when Howell followed suit by clean howli ng Stiles, the fielde rs collapsed, Gardner contin ued to take wickets, eventually II lor 3 1. Howell was content to take 2. The innings closed for 1 00, the School IlIuHwinning by an innings and t 75. t

K ING'S SC HOOL. A. C. FInke, b Bl enkinsop ... C, F, H owell, c Sedgwick, b Clinch R. E. Martin, c and b Williams II. Gardner, b Fischel. . .. C. J. N. Adams, c Gosling, h Stiles If. Parsons, c F ishel, b Clinch C. F. Freeborn, b Clinch C. S . Merrett , Ibw, b Clinch D. V. Dunlop, nOl Ollt .. E. P. Collings }d'd t b t L. G. L. Denne I no a . Extras: byes, I I ; leg-byes, 4; wides, 1 ; no-balls, 1

17

IJ

200

45 30 3

o

4 21

17

350

Total

SUTTON 1St Innings. I ). Thomas, c Dunlop, b Denne W, II. S til es, n m Ollt W, It Gosling, b Denne ... II . W. Blcnkinsop, c i\ferrett , b Denne II. ~ I . ']'uke, c Dunlop, b Denne ... W, ), linch, L Collings I , Williams, b Denne I â&#x20AC;˘ II. Fischel, b Collings I . S. Sedgwick, not out A. II. Thomas, b Collings .. , I. J\llgcll, b Denne .. , ... , .. I¡:ltlrtls : byes, 9; leg-byes, 2 ; no-balls,

VALENCE.

I

4

4 21 12

15 o

2

o I

3 12

I

2nd Innings. b Gardner b I-lowell C and b Dunlop b Gardner c Dunlop, b Collings not out c Collings, b Gardner, c Adams, b Gardner b Gardner b Gardner b Howell Extras: byes, 4 ; wides, I ; no-ball s, I T otal

75

Total

12 5

7

0

I 33 0

22 0

5 9 6 100

BOWLI NO ANALYSIS:

1st Innings.

o. 1111111)<=

M1111 t lt " tlilings

R.

28

II

6 4

2nd I nnings.

SUTTON VALENCE .

M.

0

Collings bo\vled I no-ball :

w. 6

33

o

2

.. 3

M.

R.

w.

2

0

0

6

2

8 7

O.

Denne Collings Dunlop Gardner Howell .. , ll oweli'bowled

I

I

4 I 6 I 8 2 31 6 ... 8 2 42 2 \vide; Collings bowled I no-ball .


23 2

THE KI NG'S

CANTUARIAN .

SCHOOL v.

WYE

COLLEGE.

. Played on ~he Beverley, on Jun e 30th, and resulting in a draw, Owing to a Im s un ~ers~a n chng our opponen~s did not a rrive till z o'clock, and so even wi th very fast sconn g It \vo~lld ha,ve been dlffi~ult to get n definite result, a ncI whe n it was seeil that \Vye. had no llltentIOIl of ~ec~anng all inte rest in the game disappea red. Roberts and Damel, who opeIl~d ,the lllmngs for vVyo, sco red with such freedo m that the ce n~ury \~ent up well wlthll1 the honr before a wi cket fe ll. Immediately after COlTIpJetll1g hiS 50, however, Daniel succumbed to a long hop. and Roberts followed soo n after. N? one else offered much reSIstance to th e bowling and th e innings ended at 4·45,.leavlIlg us an hour and a quarte r in which to get t he runs. Of the School ~artlll was the onl y one who batted with a ny confid ence, scoring freely all rOllnd the Wicket, but ou r oppo nents had lost what chance they had of winning by not declaring. WYE COLLEGE. A. G. A. R. A. II, E.

F. H ood-Daniel, b Dunlop ... R. Rober!s, c Dunlop, b MerreH H. J. Hames, b Den ne Edwards, b Dun lop ... M. Dow nton, b NIerrett A. Clive, hit wkt. , b Dunlop C. Severne, Ibw., b Mcrrett .. , J. W, Stayner, c and b Collings ... A, n. Hedmayne, c Gardner, b Dunl op A . Dea ne· Freeman, c Parsons. b Collings F, A. Bell, not out... .. . Extras: byes, 5 j leg-b)'cs, 5 .. .

51 89 20

7 2

16 7

3§ 9

24 10

T otal

282 KING'S

SCHOOL.

G. F . Howel l, c H ood- Daniel, b Seve rne 1-1, Gardner, st . Downton, b Haines R. E, Martin, not out ... C. J. N, Adams, b lhines A. C. Flukc, 0 Roberts ...

~. J.ar.:~;~)orn C. S. Merrett

D. V. Dunlop

12

o

} did not bat

E. P. Collings L. G. L. Denne Extras: oyes, 9; leg- byes, 3; no-ba lls, T otal

17 39 41

I. H

13 1 22


THE

CANTUARIAN.

233

BOWLING ANALYSIS: 'WVE COLLEGEâ&#x20AC;˘ O.

Merrett Denne COllings .. , Dunlop

KING'S SCHOOL v.

[[ [[

11'4

IS

DOVER

M.

R.

W.

0 0 0

79 70 46 76

3 I

2

4

COLLEGE.

This match was played at Dover and resulted in a draw. H owell won the toss IInci took in Ga rd ner with him to open th e in nings. 'With the score at 14, Gard ner, hilling across a straight one, was bowled by ' ÂĽatson, while a few overs later Howell ~UL himself out in exac tly the same meth od off Munns. A sta ncl was then made with "' Iarti n a nd Adams ; Martin played very well indeed, hitting all round the wicket until h., played a ball rather unluckily into square-leg's hands. Adams, after a shaky start, hro uglll otT some fine shots, he swept the ball very often rou nd to leg, and made a lot uf run s off a late cut. He had his share of luck, however, for he was missed no less Ihlln th ree times, twice from by no means hard chances. Fluke, who helped him to put on 90 run s, also played very well ; in fact it was the best inn ings of the day, and WI' have n ~ver seen him play better. H e repeated ly made a fme slashing dri ve, which I'tlrried the ball at a tremendous pace to the boundary, and he cut and hit to leg Nl'lillly wel l. T ogeth er with Pa rso ns, he put on 13 ' rUll S before he was bowled by Watson for an excellent 1 ' 3. Parsons hi t in grand style, taking every risk with entire au(,' ess ; in fac t his reaching his half-century was quite one flf the most pleasing 11',llllres of the match. Collings, Merrett and Dunlop all hi t vi goro usly, and the IlIlli ngs closed for 404. The School had taken th ree hours to com plete the rull S, and Iwo hours and three -quarters remained to get the opposing team out. Uf bowling , however, can only be described by the ep tthet-disgusting . We llilinnged to get 'Wheeler run out, while H aggard and Stafford threw away th eir \\ II 'k 'ls t hrough no fault of Dunlop'S. Maclaren made some fi ne off-d rives until he It II a victi m to Merrett's wi les, and after the fall of his wicket we never looked like Hllui ng another. Three more, howeve r, fe ll. a nd then Munns and Foote successfully 11lll1ud our feeble efforts to dismiss them. The close of th e game at 6. 15 found them NIIII unbeate n, and so a draw resull~d, Dover's score standing at 1<)0 for 7 wickets. I'hl l fact that our bowling was bad does 1I0t, however, detract in any way from the nmdtorioll s di splay of t he later Dover batsmen. They played wi th certainty and dl ,t il'l ion, a nd we we re glad to join in applaudi ng Foote, who obtained his colo urs as n it'H ult of his innings.


THE CANTUARIAN .

234

KING'S SCHOOL. G. F. H owell, b Munns

17 9 33

H . Gard ner, b Watson .0 . R. E. Martin, c Maclaren , b'Valson C. J. N . Adams, c F oote, b Munns A. C. Fluke, b \Vatson ... I-I. Pa rsons, c Watsoll, b r-.-f unn s F. Freehorn, b W atson C. S. r-.l errett, b 1\1 lInns ... D. V. Dunlop, c Stafford, b Munns E. P. Collings, not out... . .. L. G. L. Den ne, c Mason, b Watson Extras : byes, 10; wides, I; no- balls, 5

78 ...

113

58 o

c.

27

30

18

5

16

Total

DOVER E. B. Wheeler, run out... ". A. J. R. I-l aggard, c ;\1 nrtin, b Dunlop

COLLEGE. 2 10

G. B. Stafford. c Adams, h Dunlop C. T . Maclaren , Ibw, b l'l'Jerrctl .0. J. G. Stevens, c Dunlop, b Collings V. B. V carsley, b Collings P . G. Munn s, not out _, E. L. Mason, c Adams, h iII'I errell .. R. C. B. F oote, not out

14

17 33 12

60 2

24

SG· A,;, ~tTall}did not bat. . 'va son

Extras: byes, S j leg-byes, 6

j

wides,

16

2

Total

19o BOWLING ANALYSIS :

DOVER COLLEC l~ .

o.

M.

R.

w.

Denne

16

2

0

Dunlop ...

10

2

53

'3

3 5

Merrett ... Collings ... Gardner ...

KI NG'S SCHOOL v.

17

4

FELSTED

2

40 44

2 2 2

9

0

27

SCI-IOOL.

Played at Felsted on Friday and Saturday, July 3rd and 4th. Although a two day fixture, this match is always decided on the first innings, as play on both days


THE CANTUARIAN.

235

is curtailed owing to the times of the trai ns for our arrival and departure. On the first day WP. began th e match at 2 . 30 and had four hours' play. Howell won the toss and decided to take first innings on a fiery wicket. The weath er was superb, though the great heat of the sun was rather oppressive. Fluke and Gardner went in to bat (t nd made a good start. Gardner enjoyed his usual good fortun e ; he was missed in the slips off a rising ball of Jewell's, and again in the long-field off Routledge, b ut he made some fine sh ots though never really comfortable with th e bowling. Fluke, th ongh slower, played a good innings, but he was the first to leave owing to a catch nt the wicket. Martin, who came in. at the first wicket, played ve::ry good cricket, but (;a rdn er did not stay long with him, being caught by Payne at extra cover. The next partnership add ed 3 0 runs, Martin doing most of th e scoring. Adams was soo n {,R lI ght in the slips off the fast bowler. Parsons did not survive long, though in his ahort stay made two nice strbkes. Freeborn, the next comer, was in his old for m nga in and hit about merrily. His partnership with Martin realised 4-5 runs. Here a ('hange in the bowling was made, which proved very opportune for our opponents. nI ac kmore was put on in th e place of J ewell. W'ith the first ball of his second over he bowled Martin, whose innings had been invaluable. Merrett fell to his next bal l. I lOwell, the next comer, called Freeborn for a very short run, and as Freeborn was not backing up, he had no chance of getting in, and was easily run out. It was a j.( rcat pity to throwaway a wicket when we were in sllch need of runs. H owell played through an over from Macmillan, but was caught in Blackmore's next over. Collings survived one ball, but was caught th e next, and Denne was bowled by the Ilrli t ball he had. It was a very bad break down and th ere was nothing to account lur il.

Page and Morris ope ned the Felsted inni ngs, and runs came steadily. With Morris was run out. H is Rhare of the score was a well played 27 . 'Ill is was the only wicket we secured that day. Page and Jewell found nothing to Iwubl e th em in our bowling and at close of play had obtained r 37 without being Im llnrated by some fine cricket. In th e evening and during the night rain fell and lI\lidc the wicket a little difficult.

1,\ on the board

T he match was resumed at 10 . 30 the next morning. Page scored a single off I hmn c, but Jewell off th e next ball was Ollt to a wonderful left-hand catch by Howell. I )mlllc, who was bowling much better th an the day before, secured a wicket in his Iwx t over. In spite of good bowling and fielding, Ollr total was passed with only four \\ 1,'kc lS down. Shortly afterwards Adams missed Crosse in the slips, but he did not ,.Ike mu ch advantage of the let-off. Dunlop took the ball from Denne at this Juncture, and bowling very slow, good length balls, took fo ur of the last five wickets. " ,nong them was Page whose fi ne innings of H6 was closed by a catch at cover. H is t ticket was ve ry sO\lnd all through . The whole side were out for 2Z 3. The second innings does not require much comment.

Fluke played steadily for


THE

CANTUARIAN.

4 8 not ont, while others hit rather recklessly. Collings helped him to add over 60 runs by some attractive cricket and we were enabled to declare at 15 T for 8 wickets. . OUf ,?pponen~s in the,second innin gs sho uld not have made as many rUllS as they dl,d, Morns was Bllssed tWIce, first by D enne at mid-off, and then by Adams in the sh~s, both of them easy catches. H owell failed to hold a low catch fro m J ewell, wh~ch, thOl~gh ,somewhat hard, was not nearly such a difficult catch. as the one with whIch he dIsmIssed the same batsman in the first inn ings. The School fielding in the first innings was on the whole quite good.

On the

Felsted sid~, Page's wicket-keeping was quite a feat ure of the match . I n conclusion we shoul d lIke to express our hea rty thanks to all at Felsted for th e crood time which they gave us, and for their very ki nd hospitality. 0 1st Innings. KING'S H. Gardner, c Payne, b Routledge A. C. Fluke, c Page, b Routledge R. E. Martin, b Blackmoor C. J . N. Adams, c Morris, b Jewell H. Parsons, c Page, b Jewell C. F. Freeborn, run out .. . C. S. Merrett, c Page, b Blackmoor ... G. F . H owell, c Hamilton , b lllackmoor D. V. Dunlop, not out... ... E. P. Collings, c ;.\forris, h Blackmoor L. G. L. Denne, b Blackmoor ... Extras: byes, 4; wid es, 2; no· balls, 2 T otal

.. . 1st Innings.

FELSTED

2nd I nnings.

50 c Jewell, b Blackmoor

3

30 not ou t 46 c ROllt ledge, b Blackmoor 9 c Page , b Payne .. 13 c Payne, b Blackmoor 10 c ,Tewell, b Payne 4 c Il eal h, b Payne 2 c J ewe ll, b Payne o c sllb. h 3lackmoor o not out o diel not bat 8 Extras: byes, 10; leg· byes, I

188

L. S. M. Page, c }fartin, b Dunlop E. ' :V. lid orris, run out .. ' J. E. J ewell, c Howell, b Denne ... C. de L. Hamilton, c Dunlop, b Denne R. H. Heath, c Gardner, b Denne ... K. i\ L B. Crosse, c Mcrrctt, b Collings .. . A. H. Ba~man, lbw, b Dunlop D. ~1acnullan, st Freeborn, b Dunlop .. . L. G. Blackmoo!', not Ollt ... .. . R. V. Rout ledgc, c i\'1crrelt, b Dunlop G. C. Payn e, c Freeborn, h CollinJ.:s .. Extms: byes, 3 1 ; wicics , I T otal

SCI·TOOL.

Total ...

SCI·TOOL. 86 27

39 o

48 24 10

o 1

6 13

3

32 11

... 151

2nd I nnings.

Ibw, b Dunlop .. . not out b Dunlop

6

34 39

12

8 oo did not hat. 13 1

5 32

... 223

Extras : byes, 2; leg·byes, I Total (2 wickcts)

3 ...

75


THE CANTUARIAN .

237

BOWLING ANALYSIS : FELSTED SCHOOL.

1st Illnings. Denne Dunlop tI'!crre{l 'ollings

.. . .. . .. . .. ,

o. 27

M.

R.

17

3 3 5

83 39 37

16'4

4

32

II

w. 3 4 0 2

2nd Innings.

o. Denne Dunlop ~'Ierrelt

...

5 6'5

w¡

M.

R.

I I

30 12

0

0

IO

0

2

Dunlop bowled 1 wide.

. / KING'S SCHOOL v.

EASTB0URNE

COLLEGE.

This match was played on the Beverley, on Tuesday, July 7th, and resulted in n win for the School, after a most excitin g game. E astbourne won the toss and olccted to bat, Cranfield and Schmeidcr opening their in nings. These two batted tl Lcadily until the score reached 51, when Cranfield was caught at extra-cover off n miss-hit half-volley. Coxhead then joined Schmeider and the score lhen began to fisc rapidly. The School bowling was at its weakes t, and the batsmen took full ndvantage of this defici ency. Sch meicle r, however, was rlln out when the score was III 74, after playing a very useful innin gs of 50. His strongest point lay in his "tilting which at times reached a very hi gh stanclarcl, while the bowling gave ~im II nty of scope for bringing off these sh ots. Tudor then came in and began battIng II a style which was very much the reverse of his partner's, who was now scoring h ~' ' Iy all round the wicket. The form e r, ho wever, played a steady, cautious game, Illnning no risks and giving no chances. This partnership was formed just before IUII Ch, and was not dissolved until 3.50, wh en Coxhead ran himself out and declared ihc Eastbourne in nings closed. Their sco re stood at 309, of which Coxhead had \'Oll tributed an excellent J 50, only givin g o ne near chance which was missed by (inrd ner on the Pavilion boundary j Tud or was not out with 87, hi s batting, too, IlO in g of a high order. The declaration was sporting but, as it proved-disastrous, lur the School e vel1t~~l1y knoc~ed up th~ requisite score¡ with hal f-an -hour to spare.

I

Gardner and Howell went in to bat first and both began scoring rapidly, treating Ih o Eastbour ne bowling in much the same way as Eastbourne had treated the School's. With the score at 60 Howell was unfortunately given out leg~befo re off a ball he had hit, :md Martin took hi s pl~ce at the wkke ts. The batting was now very strong, Mnrtin playin g with his usual confidence and Gardner hitting vigorously; and it was not unti l the sco re had reached 19 3 that Martin was caught.. on the boundary by ('lII nfield, havi ng: made a brilliant 71. Fluke joined Gardner and six o'clock fo und limBe two unseparated, and with the necessary fl1l1S amassed. Gardner ran him self nuL shortl y afterwards with his score at ] 58. ' His innings had been distinctly ~I \ nij(lt i ona l, for not only had he to all intents and purposes won the match for the


THE

CANTUARIAN.

School, but had completed his 1,000 runs for the season, and thereby established a new record. Eastbou rn e's 'declaration at so early a period was possibly due to th e fact that they werc accu::;tomf'd to a. ground on which scoring is uncommonly 51?", : however that ma)' be, the match was on the whole, for spectators and players ahke, the finest ever played on the Beverley. EASTBOURNE COLLEGE.

SO

C. F . G. Schmeider, run ou t ". R. E. Cranfield, c H owell, b Dunlop )'1. E. Coxhend, r UIl out R. G . Tutior, not out E. M. Denys ") N . Nlnxwcll I-I . A. V, May nard L. E . Dcnnys did not bat. E . A. Nairn-Smith 'I C. E. Warde A. B. Steele J Extras: byes, 13

9

ISO 87

l

13 .. 30 9

Total

KING'S G. I-I. R. A. C.

SCHOOL.

F. Howell, Ibw, b Muir-Smith .,Gardner I fun Ollt ... ,_. E. NIartin, c Cranfield, b Maynard C. Flukc, not out F . Frecborn, not out. ..

~: ra::~~dams

C. S. IVferrclt D. V. Dunlop

l

did not bat.

E. P. Collings L. G. L. Denne

Extras: byes, 19; leg¡ byes, I

j

. wldes, 1

...

... 345

T olal BOWLING AKALYSIS : EASTBOURNE

COI.I.~G~.

O.

D ennc Colli ngs Dunlop MerrCll Parsons Fluke

21

20 '4

R.

w.

2

78 SO 37

0 0

0 0

28 26

M. 0

:~ 4 2

77

0 0 0


THE 2ND

KING'S SCHOOL

Xl.

Xl.

2ND

Played on the Beverley, Jline ST.

CANTUARIAN.

I'.

239

MATCHES. ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE .

9th, 1<)08.

AUGUSTINIl'S

COLLEGE.

R. H. Fowl er, c Williamson, '1) Gordon ... E. I-I. Morison, b Gottwahz Rev. Brcreton , b Baker W. F. :-"]cCready, c Matheson, b Baker F. C. r-,'Iercier, c and b Barroll W. L . Cast ley, b Barroll C. A. Mallet, b Barroll ... G. D. Whitaker, not ou t E. \¥. Graser, c Matheson, b Baker C. E. Payne, b Baker ... J. W. Johnson, b Baker Extras ...

40

2

10 0

30 2

3 7 3

0 10 4

Total

III

1st I nnings .

KING'S SC II OOL.

It . I.. Goltwaltz, b J ohnson \V. K L. Baker, b Mercier II. II. ),1atheson, b J ohnson H. K Gordon, b Mercier i! , B)'ron, b Johnson ... H. \y, I I. Moline, b John son It. )uckes, c Caslley, b Johnson W. S. l3arroll, b Mercier ... II , I .. II. Cremer, not out... t I ( : . Williamson, b Johnson I • II . Seabrooke, b Johnson I ~x tras

I

0 0

2nd Innings.

not out not Ollt

14 II

5 0 4

... .

T otal

b M erder

3 3 17 '9 5

.,

2

Extras

8

T otal ( I wicket)

61

35

BOWLI NG ANALYS TS :

ST.

AUGUSTlN I~'S COLLEGE,

Barroll Cremer Baker Gottwaltz Gordon Baker bow led

I

wide.

O.

M,

R.

8

I

7

30

2

,2

11'3 S'S

0

32 18

4

0

16

W. 2

o 6


THE

KING'S SCHOOL

CANTUARIAN.

Xl. v. DOVER COLLEGE

2ND

2ND

Xl.

Played at Dover College, June 16th, [908 . KING'S SCHOOL. B. H. Matheson, b Foote 'v. E. L. Baker. run out R. L. Gottwaltz, c Clarke, b Power H . L. H. Cremer, hit wkt, b Power R. E. Gordon, hit wkt, b Pinder R. Jtlckes, b Power ". R. H . \1Il. Moline, c Pinder, b Foote G. Byron, c Clarke, h Foote W. S. Barroll , c and b Pi nder C. G. vVit1iam~on, not 0111

.I.

Kettelwell, Extras ...

5l

7 7

7 [ 00

o

5 4

23

6

H acke r, b Clarke ..

4 IO

Total

174

DOVER

COLLEGE.

R. H. Panniter, c Crem er, b Gottwaltz

17

K , L. H allward, b Barroll

20

R. B. Foote, lbw, b Gottwaltz E. ele L. Roebuck, not Oll t R. H. Hacker,

TUIl

16 45

ont ..

23

F, S. Clarke, not out

D. H. Pm"

T. :Miles P. R. Power P. S. Clarke J. T . Pinder Extras ...

10

} did not bat.

13

T otal (4 wickets)

[38 BOWLING ANALYSIS : DOVER COLLKGJ(,

Barroll Baker Cremer Gottwaltz l\'lalhcson

O.

14 10

6 6 2 Ma~heson bowled a wide.

M. 2 4 0

k.

39 24 29 23

9

\Y. 1 0

0 2 0


THE

KI NG'S SC HOOL

2ND

2,P

CANTUARI AN .

Xl. v.

ST. AUGUSTINE'S

COLLEGE.

Played on Blore's Piece, June 18th, 1908. ST.

AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE.

27 72

Rev. Brereton, b Bokcnh:''IIn ... R. H. Fowler, hit wkt . b Gotlwaltz W. L. Cast!cy, c and b Barroll ... F . C. l\·lercier. c l\-1athcson, b Bokcnham G. D. Whitaker, b Dokenham W. F. McCready, not out J . W. J ohnston , h Bokcnham . W. Smith, c Matheson, b ~ olllle J. Brims, h Moli ne ... . ... C. A. I'dallett, c Goltwallz, b Mohne T. S. Groser, b Bokenham Ext ras ...

2 1I 2

14

7 o

o o

n.

23 4 [ 40

Total

KING'S ' SC HOOL. 32

W. E . L. Baker, c Mallet, b Mercier R. L. Gottwaltz, b J ohnson U. H. Matheson, b J oh nson G. Byron, b J ohnson ... ..: C. G. Williamson, c Mallet , b Mercier W. S. Barroll, b J\'Iercie r R. \V. H. Moline, \) Mercier R. Juckes, b Mercier ... J . Keuclwell, b ~dcrcie r E. F. Housde n, b Brims W . J. Bokenhnm, not out Extras ...

1

o 2 1

3 [2 1

o o 13

66

T otal BOWLING ANALYSIS:

ST. AUGUSTI Ng'S COLLEGE. Barroll Baker Gottwaltz .. . Bokcnham Moline

...

O.

M.

R.

II

0 2 0

43

0

8

6

7 12'1

2

[8 27 36

w. 0

5

3


nIE CANTUAl<lAN. KING'S

SCHOOL

2ND

v.

Xl.

ST.

EDMUND'S

SCHOOL

2ND

XI.

Played at St. Ednnilld's, June 24th, l<)oS. KING'S

Innings. W. E. L. Baker, c Walker, b Darby ... R. E. Gordon,"c Darby, b Williams, H. J\L B. I-I. Matheson, b Darby R. L. Gotlwaltz, bJ ones .. . R. H. \Y. i\J oline , b Roberts .. . H. L. H. Cremer, run Ollt .. . G. Byron, b Jones ... .. . R. Jllck es, st. Davies, b Jones W. S. Ba rroll, not out R. M. Gent, lbw, h Napier W.~. llokcllham, h Napier Extras .. , 1St

2nd I nnings.

3 9

. ..

35

not ou t

22

c Cooper, b Davies ... Extras

3 0 10

5 4

"0

0 h Davies

IS

.. ST.

12 20 Ilot out 56 2

'0'

T ota l

SCHOOL.

138

T otal (2 wickets)

70

EDMUND'S SC IIOOL.

W. E. S. Napier, b Barrall

o

}. C. Shaw, Ibl\', h Barroll A. W. A. Davies, b Barroll TI. D. Cooper, Ibw, b Bokenhnm \V. E. Darby, c Gem, b Barroll H. i\L Williams, b Barrall D. D. \;Villinms, c Bokenham " b B~'r'roll B. O. Jones, c ;\Iatheson, b Uarroll J. L. Roberts, b Cremer P. L. Neal, c and b Cremer A. P. Walker, not out ... Extras .. ,

2 10

7 o o o

12 5 2

20

T otal BOWLING ANALYSI S:

ST. Barroll ... Bok cnham Baker Cremer

...

EDMUNO'S

SeI IOO!..

O.

...

>t.

R.

II

2

25

6 3 3

2

8

0

9

0

.. 7

w. 6

2


THE

CANTUARIAN.

243

SECOND XI. RETROSPECT. l\1atches played, 7 j Won, 2; Lost, 3 ; Drawn, 2, The 2nd XI. have only had a moderate season this year. Owing to illness the DoYer match (return) and the St. Lawrence College match both had to be scratched. The two victories were over the same team, St. Edmund's School 2nd XI. The Lhree defeats were at the hands of St. Augustine's College (twice) , who have this year a much stronger side than usnal, and of Harbledown. The away match, v. Dover, was drawn in favour of our opponents, and the first match against Harbledown was stopped by rain . None of the old colours had a good season. R. E . Gordon was disappointing as a bat. He played one very good innings of 100 v. Dover College, but except for this brilliant effort he hardly made any run s. He was, however. far and away the best fi eld on the side. Of the new colo urs in batting, R. L. Gottwa ltz was th e most >romisin g and showed the best style. He is at prese nt a little slow in scoring, but as Ie is still young, he will probably score mllch faster in future years. R. W. H. Nloli ne lind W. L. Baker had some success but were not very co nsistent. H. L. H. Cremer makes some good strokes, but he is too fond of drawing away from balls on his leg Htllmp. Of the bowlers, W. S¡. Barroll was the best. He is inclined to bowl short, but if he gets rid of this fault he should be useful in the future. Cremer also shows great promise in the bowling line. and, as he is still very young, should do well in future years.

I

THE RIVER. The Sculling Races were held at Fo rdwich, on July 23rd. The following wele the res ultsS I~ NIORs .- H eat I Kerrich beat Nightingale, easily. H eat 2 Smith beat Beardsworth, i. 3 leng ths. Heat 3 Sparli ng beat Turner, 2 lengths. H eat + Reynolds beat Garibaldi, 2 lengths. Heat 5 Kerrich beat Smith, 1 length . H eat 6 Sparling beat Reynolds, 3 lengths. Final Heat Sparling beat Kerrich, 3 lengths. JUNIORs.-Heat I Keyser beaL H ands, easily. Heat 2 Fishbourne beat Morris, easily. H eat 3 Keyser beat Orme, ~ length . H eat 4 Fishbourne beat Latter, easily. Final H eat Keyser beat Fishbourne, I length. [t was a great pity that the O.K.S. were unable to raise a crew this term. It is illllCh to be hoped that they will be ab le to raise one, if not two, crews next year. OLherwise, sil-.ce the Tonbridge race is away, the School will have no opportunity of '\,joing the crews row.


THE

CANTU AR IAN.

RIFLE SHOOTING . T he matc h agai nst the Canterb ury Rifle Clu h resul ted in a victory fo r the latter

by the narro w marg in o f 8 points. '''.'e School. The scores are as fol1o ws :1ST VIII. v .

CANTE IWUR V

2'; l' us. Highest possiblt: score 35

Ga lpin Baker

Yates

Fardell T ownshend Freeborn

Cowie W a rde, ii.

Can terbury R. C.

35 34 33 32 31 31 30 29

R.C. SO

WOIl

all th ree post matches again st Abingdo n 1ST V III. v. AB I NGDON.

YDS.

35 31 30 28 28 29 30 . 29 35

255

240=495

250

253 = 503

50 YDS.

li p s Galpiu Fnrdcll Townshend

Waru e, Ii. Cowie Maxtcd

Yates H ancock

35 33 32 31 30 28 28 26 25

H Ps Freeborn Baker Warden Townshend Cowie Galpin

Fardcll Yates

246

233 Abi ngdon '"

212

2S YDS . 35 33 33 32 31 31 29 29 28

Abingdon

227

T he scores of the 2nd VIII v. Abingdon were :- Morris 3', Emden 3 I , Chappell 30, Courtney 29, \.vest 29, Cottre ll 28 , D e nm an 27 , Orlll e 27. T otal, 23 2. Abingdon tota l, 198 . T he Championship (First Class) was decided on the 25 best T argets at 25 yards, and th e 5 best Targets at 50 yards , shot since last Septem ber. I n the Th ird Class, the Cham pio nship was decided on the 15 best Targe ts shot thi s term. Result :-First Class : Cowie 966, Galpi n 964, T ownshend 957 , Baker 938 , Yates 932 , Fardell 92 3; (as Cowie won th is prize last year, it goes to Gal pin). Third Class : Hands 487, H opki ns 483, Carlyle 480, Reay 43 1, T odd,¡ ii. ,p 8, Braddell 4 18. The Prizes were again most kindly given by A. S. Kettelwe ll, Esq. Month ly Prizes were wo n by-(Second Class) \\fest an d Battiscomb e, (Third Class) Williams and Ho pkins. Shooting for Certificates in the National Roll of Marksmen, insti tuted by the Society of Mi niature Rifle Clu bs, has occupied th e atte ntion o f our best shots, with the result that six First Class Certificates have beo n ga ined by Yates, Galpin , Townshend, Fardell , Cowie, Baker. The Competition invo lves rapid fi rin g as well as deliberate. Rapid firing and fi ring at unknown dista nces wi ll in future form a more defi nite part o f om shooting course, at least fo r our more ad van ced shots . Generally speaking, the shooting has very much improved . This is in no slig ht measure du e to th e efficiency of the th ree officers, Yates, T ownshend, and Galpi n, who have thrown themselves whole-h earted ly into their work .


T HE

245

CANTUARIA N.

THE LIBR AR Y.

The foll owing books have been added to the Library ;-

The Life of Lord T ennyso n, by Hallam Lord T ennyson, kind ly presented by P G. E . Chave, Esq . . T he Con~pl ete Oarsman, by R. C. Lehmann, kindly presented by L. 1. Watkin s, Esq.

Poems fro m th e Greek Anthology, by G. H. Cobb, O.K.S. , per th e Rev. C. E . Woodruff, M.A. Living London British Birds, Nests and Eggs H ome Life in Bird land . , Woodland, Field and Shore Nature's Carol Sin ge rs

Wild Wales Briti sh Birds, N ests and Eggs

In the Palace of the Kin g Humanism Essays and Addresses How it is made . . How it wo rks The Seven F ollies o f Science Outli nes of Roman History Roman Provincial Administratio n . . Ju lius Caesar Swiss Birds The New Physics â&#x20AC;˘ Chemical Analysis ..

New Physics and Chemistry Augustus Caesar Cicero and his Friends

Roman Public Life Roman H i~to ry .. T he Schools of Hellas Aspects of Greek Genius Harvard Lectures

Macleod of Dare

A. C. Dixon. O. G. Pike. O. G. Pike. Kearton.

... ...

J . Walpole Bond. Atkinson . Marion Crawford.

Schiller. Jebb. Archibald Williams. Archibald Williams. John Phi n. Pelham. Arnold. W. Wa rde Fowler. W. Warde Fowler. Poincare.

Close and Colman. W. A . Shenstone . C. H . Firth. Gasto n Boissie r.

A. H . J . Greenidge. Ferrero. Ken neth J. Freeman.

S. H . Butcher. S. H . Butcher. William Black.


THE

CANTUARIAN. Mark Twain .

A Tale of a H orse The Broken Road Alice for Short .. Somehow Good Joseph Vance .. A Lame Dog's Diary .. .. The Fortunes of Christina McNab The Romance of Modern Photography The Romance of Modern Sieges . . The Romance of Mod ern Life Fair Margaret . . A Lindsay 0' th e Dale . .

..

Baroness Orczy.

Mary Cholmondeley.

..

\ÂĽith VvolseJcy to Coomassie

.J ones of the 64th

.. 'With Airship and Submarine The Nelson Navy Book .. Under the Flag of France

bavid Ker. Dumas. Dumas. Dumas. Hardie.

.. ..

F . W. H . Myers. Gilbert Murray. Wilkins.

The Ri se of th e Greek Epic Roman Education The Religion of Ancient Greece The Religio n of Ancient Rome D cmosthenes Introduction to Greek History

Greece in the Age of Pericles Kate ;\1 credith .. The Privatee rs . . .. .. .. Portraits of the Archbi ::; hops of. Canterbury COIllJllon Sense in the Exact Sciences Sharps and Flats . Recent Discoveries in Fhysical Sc ience

The Art of Chess .. T he Fourth Dimension . .

Dorothea Conyers. F. S. Brereto n. F. S. Brereton.

I-I. Colli ngwood . T¡ C. Hadden .

The Vicomte de Bragelonne Classical Lectures Classical Lectures

C. R. Gibson . Edward Gill.t. G. F. Scott Elliott. Rider Haggard . A. G. Hales. Manville Fenn .

The Boy, Some Horses and a Gi rl

The Three Musketeers Twenty Years After

Miss Macnaghten.

Dorothea Conyers.

The Strayings of Sandy .. Gil the Gunner .. The Son of the People .. Red Pottage

A. E . W. Mason . W. de Morgan . W. de Morgan. W. de Morgan . Miss Macnaghten .

. . ..

l\'liss Jane H arrison .

Cyril Bailev. S. H. Butche r. J. P. Mahaffy. A. S Grant. C. J. Cutciiffe H yne. H. B. Marriotl-Watson. IVliss Bevan.

W. K. Clifford. Maskelyne. W. C. D. Whetham. J. Maso n. Schofield.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Th rough the Magic Door

Conan Doyle. A. M. Clerke. C. B. Fry. A. E. W. Mason. J efferies. F. T. Bullen.

A H istory of Astronomy .. A Mother' s Son Running Waters

Afte r London . . T he Log of a Sea Waif Beau Brocade .. Viscount Desmond, V .C. Red Russia Careers for our Sons

Baroness Orczy. lVI . Diver. J. Foster Fraser.

The Other Side of the Lantern

Sir Frederick Treves.

The Boy's Own Nature Book

W. Percival Westel l. Sir Evely n Wood.

Midshipman to Field Marshall .. A Study of Four Poets (Clough, Arnold, Rossetti, Morris) .. .. I n Search of El Dorado . . The Grey Lady

I

..

Stopford A. Brooke. Alexander Macdonald. H. Seton IV[er riman . \OVinston Churchill.

Con iston Morrice Buck ler Miranda of the Balconv ..

A. E . W. Mason. A. E. W. Mason.

Highways and Bywavs -(Kent)

Animal Arti sans ~ .. .. Introduclion to Gothic Architecture

Cornish . Parke r.

T he H ill All on the Irish Shore Kipps. .

Somervi lle .

Pri mitive Athens

Vache ll. H . G. Wells.

..

..

..

J. E.

Harri son.

Historical Geography of British Colonies (5 vols.) C. P. Lucns. Ongm and Growth of English Colonies How to make Cemmell Things . . .. Anticipations

Egerton. T. A. Bowen. H. G. Wells .

Classical Scholarship .. HIstory of the Un ited States Mathematical Recreations Tragic Drama . . .. History of Social Life in England..

Sandys. W. W. Rouse Ball. L. Campbell. M. B. Synge.

Br~t~sh Mammals .. B ntIsh Fresh Water Fishes

John son . Maxwell.

British Salt Water Fishes

..

Channing.

Aflalo.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL NEWS. 'YVe heartily conglatlllate R. S. ¡ 2n d ;""'1',Haskew o n winning the Silver Medal H .' L. H. Cremer, W. S. Barrell, fo r Photography, given by the Rossall ' R. E. Gottwaft., W. E . L. Baker, School Pholographic Society, in a com- R. \¡v. H. Moline. petition open to all public Schools. .

We hea rtil y cong ratulate H. Gardner

The King' s Schol ars atte.nd ed the Servi ce for the Bishops in the .Cathedral on Saturd ay. ] uly 3rd. The rest of the School was asse mbled at the West end Door of the Ca thed ral, where the procession entered. oJf.

on breaki ng th e School record for run s made in the seaso n, by a total of over 1 000 rUIlS. L. J. Bassett's total last year, whi ch was the previous record, reached 835 run s.

/'~

"

~

A most in te res ting Lecture on "The

vVe were very glad to see l\h. l\!Iason again, who came over to the School from Ramsgatc. where he was staying for a sho rt time.

i\J oo n" was given to the School on Monday, July 13th, by Mr. G. A. Tomkins, illustraled by so me unique lantern slides. The lecture and the slides were very much appreciated by all.

'liVe cong ratu late th e follo wing on getting their Cricket Colours ;1st XI.L. G. L. Denne, E. P. Collings, C. J. N . Adams, A. C. Fluke.

>}(oil-*-

In a Tennis lHatc h v. a Masters' team th e School were victorious by five matches to four.

CAMBRIDGE Dear School, \'Ve arc at prese nt ill the middl e of the Long Vacation T erm, and those of our number who arc lip here, are up to work! And ye t we receive a piteous ' request for a contribution to swell the Call1uarkm . But as we know from

LETTER.

experience that the Editor's life is not a happy one we will end eavour to oblige. In spite of the announcement in our last letter 01 th e decease-metaphori cally spea king-of our late oldest inhabitant, the Rev. H . J. Mowll, yet we have lately caught glimpses of him in Cambridge.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

The lot of Patriarch still rests upon 11 . A. Jenkin, by virtue of wh ich he is President of the Cambridge O.K.S. Clubthough he has so fa r failed to preside! Our last letter -through a clerical r rrOT, we presume-omitted to mentio n the great loss wh ich we-and, indeed. the whole 'Varsity, especially on the towpath-have sustained throu gh th e departure of Richard son . Telfer became a Wra ngler and F. M. Deighto n had bad IlIck in failing to obtain that distinction hy one place. Sop with having take n two Trips. in three years has, we believe, rorsaken us. Of H amilton we saw nothing Insl term-possibly a reaso n why he got n 2nd in th e Classical Trip. J. Deighton . I'omplaining of the lack of the fair sex In Ca mbridge, has at last taken to work i he certainly seems in a fair way to becoming a doctor. D ickson certainly does not. T he latter, we hear, plays tennis

O. K. S.

249

wh en he is not cutting up his fellow creatures. R. T. J enkin is playing cricket for Jesus Long Vac. XI. Watkins sti ll bears the name of the Rowing Blue at Corpus : we were sorry not to see him helping Corpus to victo ry at H enl ey again this year. Of H oward we have heard nothing lately ; the last news was to the effect that he was playing fives with his College Dons. Kempe made a century for Corp us last term and kept wicket whe n not understudi ed by Gage. Pin sent's last effort is to t urn Moralist ; also he says he was acti ng in Milton's Com us recently prod uced up here. Thomas is in great demand at every College Conce rt worth go ing to, by virtue of his flute-playing. In. conclusion we offer YO ll our hearty sympathies in not beating Dove r. Yours, O.K.S. CANTAB.

NEWS.

We heartily cong ratulate I. R. Madge who left the School last Summer to go to Il lI rva rd Unive rsity, U .S.A., on being 1110ctcd to a Lawrence Scholarship for Hi-le nce.

At an O rdination held on Trinity Sunday by the Bishop of Salisbury, A. C. Durham was ordained Deacon.

o'f. ,yo

We congratu late Lieut. A. L. Paris ( Royal Engineers) on receiving his promotion. to the rank of Captai n.

..

lJirlll. -A t Bay Cottage, Melplas h, Dorse t, on June 16th. the wife of (;co rge C. Valpy, F.i\II . S. Civil Service, a SOn.

or

.;;-

>'fo

i:¡

\Ve congratulate C. IVL Ricke tts on uhtaining a 2nd Class in the Theolugical Tripos at Oxford.

Capt. W. O. Boothby with II.~I.S . escorting the Prince of \¡Vales to Canada. Il1/nolaur is


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CANADIAN LETTER . GRHRN COURT

P.O.,

A LT, CANADA,

20, vi.. '08. DEAR SI"S,

In reference to Mr.

~.

L. Johnston's

correspondence or the 26th Dec. , 1907, in the Ma rc h number of the Canluariall, 1908, I append a list of O.K.S. with initials and addresses where known, whom I believe to be in Canada. I would be extremely obliged to anyone wh o will send me correction s and additions of any omiSSion and other information of this nature. Graham ~lcG:\chen

(Sen.), Manager B. of Montreal, Winnipeg, Mnss. E. i\'lcGnchcn (Son of above) , B. of :'-.i ontreal, Vancouver, B. C. H, J. F. Grier, i\IOllt rca l. S. U. Uailey 13. 51. W. Saunders. Sovereign Bank, Perth, Ont. J. H. Rammcll, Karnioopcs, B.C. C. A. R. Dobson路Smith, St fasburg, Sask, (married). R. W. Ma rshall , Qu'Appclle, Sask. E. L. Johnston z, Go\'n n P.O. , Sask . S. Clayton I, } C. NI. Dunlop!, ) P. H. H awkes, Green Court 1.0., Alt. N. E. Hressey, 2 H. M. Cooper, U. of Commerce, Vancollver, B.C. - Williams F. H. Vaughan, Nnhun, Vernon, E.c. E. R. Mason W. G. Campbell, B. of Sea forth , Onto G. Lee路Warner, Inni sjail, Aita. Brown I, Dominion Bank, Winnipeg, Mass. P. C. Brown 2 , Union Bank, Winnipeg, Mass.

I fear that thi s is an incomplete list, but it will anyhow uphold my estimate

now, sin ce our numbers have been increased by one, viz. : N. E . Hressey. \,Vith the usual apologies for space.&c., as well as for not se nding off Lette r NO路3. it will shortly come ! All of us unite in. wishing YO ll the best of good luck. Yours truly, HAMILTON BALY. P. S.-路 l n reference to Capt. C . A. E napp's lette rs to the same ed itio n of the Call/llarian, if the Pink Book is unable . to sl.!e its way to publish a complete list o f O.K.S., I am will ing to offer myse lf to O .K.S. as an editor to bring o ut a booklet containi ng all possible names and addrt:sses of all livin g O.I(.S. , if only they wi ll themselves help me in collecting the necessary data, and will slmd it direct to me here; then, with the assista nce of the four oLhers here, we shall be enabl ed LO tabulate it. I sho uld suggest that the following information should be given :I. Year and term of entry and departure at the Schoo l. z. Address. 3. What doing. Details of cost to be settled hereafte r. Yours truly, H. B. thnnk Mr. Bnly very much for his kind offcr, and hope thnt O.K.S. will take advantage of it.

EDD. - WC


THE

CANTUARIAN.

ACC OUNTS.

SHOP

EASTER RECE IVED.

TERl\'I ,

£ s. d. ". 131 4 4

\ 1'1111'. Rcceipts

19°7. s. d.

£

3 I 8 9 13 9 4

"5

Brock .. . Bunce .. . Carr Cox and Scott Cullcn .. . Fcthc rstone H un t... ..' Pi lch. Collard & Co. I hibbard Robins ". Rowntrec Riley r·..lilk WAges ... Gas Bnlnnce

21 10 0 3 17 14 I 10 0 4 010 2 14 6 15 13 14 3 4 6 iO I 17 23 13

4

6~

0 3~ 3 0 I

"10 4 0

8

"

£ 13 1 4 4

-----

SUMMER

I!

III". Receipts

RECEIVED.

£

s. d. 8

159 4

TERl\'I. PAID.

Brock .. . Bunce .. .

Cnrr Cox and Scott Cull en .. Felherstone H unt ... Hubbard Robins .. Rowntree Riley Rigden ... Wages ... Gas Milk .. . T nylor .. . Gintler .. . Gentry .. . Balance

£ s. d. 15 14 5 5 16 20

2

7

9 10 1 9

043 22 14 I

0

3 5.

o 10 0 4 6 II

IS I 4 13 16 II 1 18 4

7

10

4

I~ ~.

4 13 o 15

0

7 6 o 14 3 22 7 7


T HE

CANTUARIAN.

CHRISTMAS TERM.

£

RECEI VED.

Term 's Receipts

146

s. d. 8 9

PAID. Brock Bunce .. . Ca rr .. .

2 3 6 13 19 II 29 19 11 o 4 3~

Cox and Scott Cullen ... Fethe rstOIlC .

14

Hl1 nt ... Hu bbard Robins ...

I

Riley". Wages .. Ma rshall Insurnnce '" Pilch, Collard & Co. Balance

gu ineas a

yea~ is giv~ th e Boal Club and

8 6~

5 1 I I 12

5

II

2 JO

0

o 8

II

7

Gns

12

4 II

06 8

Rowntrcc

Of the bnlance.

£ s. d . 16 J I 4

the fcst to the

4

0 2 13 II

046 036 28 10

4.

S ports' ~ -

NOTI CES. We beg to acknowledge with thanks. th e receipt of the fol!owing

subscnptlOns ;-

D. V. Bacon. Esq. (3/ 6). B. L. Hooper, Esq . (5/- ). A. W. Rammel!, Esq. (3/ 6 ), Rev. C. E. Woodrllff ( 3/ 6). C. H. Goulden, Esq. (3/ 6), Rev. A. M. Foster (3/ 6), E. K. liarber. E'q. (2/-). E. F inn.

Esq .. ( ' 0/6). Capt. C. A. Knapp (2 1/-). A. Grllrbrand. Esq. ( 14/--). W. H unt. Esq. (3/ 6 ). F. G. L. Scott. Esq. (7/-). T. R. Graly. Esq . (7/- ). T . E. Rammel! Esq. (3/ 6 ). F . C. Bovenschen. Esq. (7/-). J. H. Rammcll. Esq. (7/-). C. J. M. Evans, Esq. (7(-): H . C. Baker, Esq. (3/ 0). Miss W,lklllson {.l/6) . E. G. T easdal e. Esq . (3/ 6), P. G. E . Chave. Esq. (3/6).

-=====

OUR CONTEMPORARIES .

\~e beg to ack nowledge with than ks the receIpt or the followin & contemporaries :A I~eYII;all. Blue (2), Bradfield College

CIlro1tlclc, Brollls/{/,OVHlII , Car/hm/aft, Clly of L ondou School 111f1gazt'lIe, COS, CIt/h bert/all, D~IlS/0Iliafl ( 2), Eas/bourn/all, Ebza-

be/lta ll , Fe/sletiiflll, FeI/esz(w, Glmalmomi College Chron/de, llellmic H erald. K elly College ,ChroJlt'cle, Leys ForlniglJ/ty (2), jJfalve~-JlJ((n, O/aV/~n, P (Ylll otl,l'an, Porlcullis, R adieulll, R ep/oman, Shirburlll(l1l Strand SellOol 11fagllzille, Swan, 'Ionbn'dg;z'all,

Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Palace Street, Canterbury.


THE Vor" VII,

CANTUARI AN. OCTOBER,

1908.

No.

I I.

EDI TORI A L. Once again th~ 1/ duces virtute functi" have gone : once again the remnant rally It) support the school life so broken by th e end of every Summer Term. New boys IIlIly be recognized by their presence und er the Mint Yard tree, where the seat II the I'lopcrty of the Ki ng's School " offers th em peace from the curious crowd. We never lo.md out why that seat was regarded as the exclusive property of the youth fresh hom the outer world. For the first time in its career the Calltuaria1l has paid its way, 'I'h late Secretary, now one of the trip le compilers of this magazine, has beaten all tI!tIVious records by sq ueezing ÂŁ65 out of subscribers during his year of office. Noti 0 the smile of righteous pride I We were very pleased to welcome Mr. Ev~ns hnr k again, the same as always, only looking better than ever. Mr. Latter is where Mr. Hodgson was : we can only wish him as long and happy a time there as had his precursor. The new improvements in the Junior School have met, we believe, with ~h o full appreciation of all the Parrots who think l\'lr. Latter's taste in such matters Hood. Football has begun and the ground is not aggressive as in the last three ),{'IU'S, when we have had to wait for throe weeks before commencing at all. The lllg-her Certificate Resul ts are good, but if we had more candidates taking Natural I'hUosopl.1Y and Chipese. (iistinctiops Ivo~ld be more ab~ndant. The Greek distinction


THE

CANTUARIAN.

is fast becoming extinct and collectors should hurry to secure specimens before it entirely dies out. Scholarship and Army Examinations threaten the Success of the FODtbal,t team, ~nd are a continual worry to many of us. Consequently we seek so lac~ In a partIcularly early number of the Catzlttadall, which fact scoffers and unbeltevers are req,nested to mark and attempt to digest. It is entire ly due to the energy of us, that IS the Editors: we bow in response and retire.

PRESENTATION TO THE REV. R. G. HODGSON. At noon on Speech Day many of Mr. Hodgson's old pupils, including a strong muster of a.K.S., many of who:n had travelled considerable distances in order to be present, assembled in the Big Schoolroom to witness the presentation to himself and t? M~s. Hod gson of a testimonial from all their friends at the SchooL Dr. Bnan Rlgden spoke from forty years' friendship with Mr. Hodgson, under whom he had been as a boy at the School. and th e Rev. R. F. Elwyn voiced the feelings of all present \Vh,en he s.poke of the ~ffectioll and respect which Mr. and Mrs. Hod gso n had won dunng their long serVIce to the School. The Captain of the School, C. J. N. Adams, then handed to Mrs . Hodgson an amethyst pendant in the shape of the. School ~rms s~t Ill. p~a rls, and presented to Mr. Hodgson a silver rose-bowl on whIch a SUItable ll1SCnptI?n had been engraved. In making the presentation he as.ked them to accept the g ifts as a mark of gratitude from their many old pupils and fnends . Mr. H odgson thanked the donors on behalf of himself and of Mrs. Hodgso n, In a speech which WIll not soon be forgotten by those who heard it. In conclusion t~e Headmaster, who had been in the chair throughout the proceedings, expressed his heartfelt thanks to Mr. Hodgson for the invaluable help and counsel which he had continually given to the masters of the School as well as to the boys.

SPEECH

DA Y.

Speec h D~y. was this year celebrated on ThurSday, July 30th, and was once more favoured by bnlha~t weathe r an,d a lar.ge company including many senior O ,K.S. who came to take part ltl th e School s offiCIal fare well to the Rev. R. G. Hodgso n. The Holy Communion Service in the Cathedral at 7.45 a.m. was attended by large numbers, wl~Ile at the Commemoration Service at 10 a.m., the Choir was almost filled. The Anmver~ary Sermon was preached by His Grace The Archbishop of Sydney, who, as Chamnan of th e Governing Body of the King's School Paramatta " was especially welcome to the School. At

2

p.m, the Speeches were delivered in the Chapter House, among those


THE

CANTUARIAN.

255

present being the Dean of Canterbury. the Archbishop of Sydney, the Mayor of anterbury, Canon Mason, the Archdeacon of Maidstone. and Canon Moore as well ns many parents and frie nds of the School. The number of Speeches perfo rmed 'by the Sixth Form was again four; since, though a Latin Speech re-appeared on the programme, there was, to our great ! egret, no I I Tragic English" Speech. 'We mu ch hope that next year we shall once mo;e h ar one of England's kings hail his noble lords of Church and State on th~ stage 111 the Chapter House, even if Sheridan's wits must for once make room for him. The programme was as follows : I.-Scenes from U Mostellaria " Act i~ " Sc, i. and ii. Platt/us. Theuropides (the jalller) •. C. B. Simeon. Philolaches (IllS son) .. G. F. Howell. Tra nio (Illei.,.. serva1JI) E. B. Hosking. Philolaches in the absence of his fath er abroad, has been living riotously with his friend s in his fAlher's house. Suddenly Tranio enters with ' riews that T hcuropidcs has re~urncd and is just coming to the hmlse. Philolachts is in despair; but Tranio thinking of a plan, tells h~m to lock up the house ~nd . lay indoors, whil e he remains out~ide, ahd prevents Thcuropides (rom entering the house by ~re!cndmg that it is now haunted, and therefore shut up and descrted. This he does :. and a shout from wlthm from the impntient Philolaches helps on Tranio's fraud, and Theuropides runs off in terror.

1.-Scene from L'Avare, Act iii., Sc, i. Harpagon (a 1I11str) •• Mattre J acques (his cook and coaclz1IIan) Valere (h.s steward) Brindavoine La Merluche (servants 10 H arpagoll)

1

Moliere.

J.

S. Yates. G, F. H?,~ell. C. G. Wilham son. c. T. Galplll. C. F . N. Ryan.

Harpagon, who is going to g ive a feast, inst ructs his servants to exercise due economy in s~~vin.g Ihe wine and the dishes. His cook·coachman, who suggests an elaborate menu, says the first requIsite IS money, This enrages Harp"'gon, and Valere, who is in love with the mise!'s daughter, for his own ends !lldes with him and argues with Mattre J acques. The lalter, again, on bemg asked, as a coachman, ~o prorare to drive the party to the fair, declines to drive the horses which he says are reduced to mere sk ill 1\1\( hone. A partial reconciliation is effected, and Matt re Jacques is induced to tell Harpagon what Ilcople think of him, and is beaten for his honesty,

.-Scenes from the H Wasps" Philocleon Bdelycleon (IllS SOfl) Xanthias (the slave) Labes (a thiev.sh dog) Cydathenaeus (anotller dog)

.• Anstophattes. R. M . Gent. C. J. N . Adams. A. R. Bellars. C. J. Galpin. D. J. N. Lee.

Philoeleon is an old Athenian citizen badly bitten with the prevailing passion for legal prosecution, which provided occupation and emolument for 6,000 jurymen, and kept many an honest man in constant

fI nr of being dragged on a frivolous charge before a merciless jury. The old jury-maniac has a son (lJdelycleon) bent on curing his fat her of this craze, and after vainly trying to keep him a t home by hiding


THE

CANTUARIAN.

~~~ ~~~ti~~!'n~~c~e~!r~ade.s t~e old gentleman to stay indoors nnd constitute himself n supreme tribunal for and the sudden app~~~~~~cl~}h~ h~h~eho~~. .T~.e paraphernalia of ~ law comt arc hastily requistioned provides the first case T he dan ,las ~ Indignant slave cook, In search of L'lbes, a thiev{sh dog, d fi : og IS arralgne on a cha rge of cheese-stealing ' the cook refuses to !~r~s\~~k~' dO nIdi a rival dog (Cydathcnaeus) to stand as !>!aintiff. The old juryman's thirst for blood ho~vc~er ni~sis~nc Ie ~ 11 ,scarcely be. restained fro~ cone cnming the hungry cur unheard. The. son, (a satiri~al hit atO~h~ f%~h~n~l. pleadt~ lor /~c. d~g himself, produces its puppies to whine on its behalf upon th~ soft~r s'le f Um ft!' prac 'fe hO nngmN a defendant's wife and child ren into court to play mistake into the a~~uit~al ~ Jur>'-r~en Sid ~arts) , an r. ~nally ~lccciyes his father i!,to pUlting his vote by tricked int . . x. e 0 Juryman Inmts with dismay at the discovery that he has been to bring hiom'rcq o,llIt tm g a de~efndh~nt well within !he clutches of the law; and it takes the son all his time md an d P:1CI y IS wounded vamty.

4.-Scenes from the H Rivals" Bob Acres â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ Sir Lucius O'Trigger Capt. Absolute .. Mr. Faulkland A Servant

Sheridan. R. M. Gent. C. J. N. Adams. J . S. Yates. C. G. Williamson. H . W. K. Mowll.

Scene i. Bath. Room in Hob Acre's Chambers. Scene ii. Bath. King's.Mead Fields. C'lf.t. Absolute, under the assumed name of E nsign R('verley has been payin his addres"es to ~~c~~~g ady of t~e nam.e of Lydia Languish, and has plolted to elope ~vith her. Bob A~res, a som~what his fri ~cPS.ontlf~ sqUl~e. ~vho has been courtin~ th~ same lady, and hns been rejected, is persuaded by S ~. Ir UclU~ 0 Tr!gger .to c.hal.lenge hiS rival, of whose identity he is unaware (Scene i.). ce~c II . represents hiS meetmg with IllS rival, for whom Mr. Fau lklllnd acts as second.

The order of the pri~ied programme was not followed inasmu~h as the scene Moher~ was rendered first. In th is speech Yates acted the part of the miser w~.h great vl.gour, and Howell displayed all the grace appropriate to a French speech lie he re~lted th e up-to-date menu with admirable clearn ess. Williamson walked t e. stage wlth the P?n.derous dignity of a major-dorno. In the scene from the Wasps whIch was, we beheve, new. to. our Speeches, the principal part was effectively rendered by Gent.. Though. mchned th e whole time to over-act his part, he gave ~ very c.lever mlmlcry o.fthe JudiCial manner both in voice and gesture, and succeeded m carrymg through a diffi cul t speech. Bellars only req uired a wig to make him the complete advocate. an d he was well suppo rted by Adams. thouO'h. we think th e latte r wou ld have been ,seen to ftLr greater advantage in a ' tragic ' part. There was perhaps too. much of the hu man dogs,' but all credit is due to Galpi n and Lee for th e way in Hhlch they played the most trying part we h<\ve ever seen taken in th e Chapter ouse. The new p~on'tll1ciation seemed somehow to create a more Plautine atmosphe~e for the Latm Speech, which was quite am using. Hoskin ~ made a firstrat~ Tramo, though he w.as much too fast, especially when telling hiS ghost story, rh11e both I~owell and Silneon showed off well th e slock characters of Latin comedy. 11 the Engbsh speech Gent was again admirab le fo r most of the time, but our f

r?m

'h


THE

CANTUARIAN.

257

, dtic ism already made applies still more to an English speech which is' understanded the people.' Adam') made a very staid Sir Lucius with a delightful Irish brogue. while Yates made us wish to see far more of Captain Absolute. Vye must say that all Ili n speeches seemed to be too fast, but perhaps this was because three of the f~ur IVt)rO distinctly longer than usual, and the rendering was, on the whole qUIte . lIe cssfut. At the conclusion of the speeches the Headmaster gave an account of the c~ hool year. H e was sure, he said, that they wou ld join with him in giving a hearty \lot of thanks to the Masters who had had charge of the preparati on of the boys for Ih speeches- to Mr. Bell, who had taken charge of the French, to Mr. Moxon, who Imd charge of the Latin and Greek speeches, and to NIr. Everitt, who had charge 01 the English speech. I n this connection Mr. Ga1pln paid a warm tribute to lho Rev. L. G. Mason, who for many years had the entire charge of those speeches, ~'I\d who retired from the School last Easter. He remarked that Mr. Mason entered the Htlhool as a boy in , 86 I, SO that for exactly forty-seven years he was connected with Iii School-for thirty-seven years as a member of th e staff. Mr. Mason had splendid puwers of teaching discipline, and a most devoted attachment and zeal for the Scho~l. J'hey wished him every possible happiness in his retirement, and man):" and still IIlf8 er, fish to his rod. After alluding to the excellent record of the JUnIor School with its nine scholarships gained in the year, the speaker concluded with a warm IIib ute to IVIr. Hodgson, who has now relinquished the Head-mastership of that School. Mr. Hodgson had, he said, been there as Master for fo rt y years, and during that time he Imd never missed a day's teaching th rough illness. He had had accidents. Sometim~s hl) had taught on crutches, sometimes from an invalid chair, and he had even taught ltl Il\ld. That was just one typical instance of the splendid devotion to duty and the fai~h ­ Ililness to his trust, which they, who knew Mr. Hodgso n, recognised was the chlef • haracteristic of the example which he set them . He liked to think of Mr. Hodgson " the shepherd of his people. First, he had red with sound teaching the boys in the HI,nior School for I I years and in the Junior for zq years. Then he had ruled and lontrolled. There had been no nonsense about Mr. Hodgson when he had to be III> yed. But lastly, also, like a shepherd Mr. H odgson had led , not only the boys hut also them, as Masters, by his good example. Their prayer was that he and Mrs. Hodgson might have many years, not of idleness, but of different work from that whic h they had been doing, and that they might continue to remain citizens of ( :hn terbury. After the distribution of prizes,' the Dean read the list of School distinctions Kll ined during the past year and obser·ved that this was a remarkable list of distinctions IO liove been gained by a School of two hundred and .fifty boys. Speaking, he said, on hchalf of th e Governing Body of the School. and he thought he might unite with th om the parents who were present, he desired to tender thei r heartiest thanks to the Ilcadmaster and his colleagues for the admirable, devoted work which alone could

III


THE

CANTUARIAN.

have produced such results. It was one thing for a School to be able to maintain a high distinction in one branch of learning. say in the classics. in mathemati cs, or in modern languages; it was another and a much more difficult ~hing to maintain an equally high distinction and an equally high level in the various subjects of English educati on . The Dean referred to the greater variety of subjects which were now taught throughout the public Schools in consequence of the great development which there had been in English life, and the different careers which had been opened up. The highest service, he said, which th ey could ask from any School was that it should be able to give boys an adequate training for any walk in life that they might desire to enter. I-Ie thought that they were justified in saying that by a list of distinctions of that kind, that was what that School had shewn itself able to do. H e believed that the practical test of training boys for careers in life was really th at which. determin ed in the long run the many disputed questions about education in this country. What they might do when all the Schools in the country came uud er the control of the Board of Education he did not know; he hoped they never woul d - but what they had hitherto been able to do in this country was to adapt their Schqol teaching to the wants of their scholars. In his further remarks the Dean humorously observed that he, a nd he thought his colleagues also, felt relieved when the Headmaster said that he did not want the School to numb er more than 2 50 boys, because at the rate they had been going on during the past few years the Dea n and Chapter would very soon have to vacate the Cathedral and leave it at th e di sposal of the Headmaster and the King's Scholars. The principal guests were cheered, with the usual intervals. on coming out of the Chapter House, and a large company was subsequ ently entertained by the H ead· master and Mrs. Galpin at a garden party on the Green Court.

PRIZES ADJUDGED

DURING THE YEAR 1907-1908.

Classics (Mitchimon) Mathematics (lJ!litc 1d1lSon) ... . .. Modern Languages, French ( Mitchimo1t)

...

" " German (Greaves) Natural Science ( lJ!l£tchimoll) Greek and Latin (Broughton) .. . Divinity (Brougkton) .. . English Literature (Stt'eatftild) .. . Classical Composition ( D ea1l Farrar) .. . Private Study (Edward B lore ) Latin Prose .•

.. .

...

...

.;.

C. J. N. Adams. D. H. Cowie. D. H. Cowie. J J. W. M. Maynard . ( H. Gardner (Pn'ze). H. T ownshend. J C. J. N. Adams. l A. R, Bellars (P"'~e). R. M. Gent. J. S. Yates. C. J. N . Adams. A. R. Bellars.

J.

S. Yates.


THE

259

CANTUARIAN.

R. M. Gent. G. F. Howell . C. J. N. Adams. ... W. A. F . Kerrich. C. J. N . Adams. ... { J ..S. Yate~.r Pfize). ... ',l'. S. Ca~e . i. c. H. Woodhouse.

Latin Verse ... Greek Prose Greek Verse ... Geography ( H&1Zltiker Rea/oil) English Essays (Waddy) .

...

Natural History Collection.f Head ~jaste,) Drawing (Lady Stuart)

...

Shorthand ...

G. H. Mercer. E. F. Housden. G. H. Claypole. ... T. E. M. Boultbee. R. M. Gent. ... \ C. B. Simeon. J. Kettlewell. E. F. Housden. R. de B. Saunderson. G. W. A. T odd , ii. W . J. Bokenham. C. A. ";Yest. G. E. L. Hargreaves. H. H. Wakeford.

Divinity, Va. Form (Marshall W:U) " Vb. Form (ilfarshall Wild) " Va. and Vb. Forms (Elwyn) ... " IVa. and I ViI. Forms (ElwYIl) Ll istory, VI. Form (Stanley) ... Va. Form (Seuesdtal) Vb. Form (Senese/tal) IVa. Form (Emden) " IVb. Form (Emden) ... French, IVa. to lIlt . Forms (Greaves) Mathematics, Div. II. (Hm'rison) Div. III. (HaYrison) Div. IV. (E!n:rrison) ..

...

....

..

FCTRM VI. Form (Christmas) Va. Form (Christmas) " (Midsummer, Gordon) Composition (Prose) " Composition (Verse) II English Essay (Henniker Healou) Army Class (Christmas) (i\'Iidsummer) " Geometrical Drawing Vb. Form (Christmas) (Midsummer) " English Essay (Hemdker Heaton) IVa. Form (Christmas) (Midsummer) " 'Vb. Form (Christmas)

..

(Midsummer) II L«.. Form (Christmas) .. (Midsummer) Ill b. Form (Christmas) II (Midsummer) 111,. Form (Christmas) u (Midsummer)

Goodsall ( PriZl). IR.W. H.J. Bokenham.

PRIZES,

J. J.

... ..

... ...

S. Yates. W. M. Maynard. H. Parsons. G. H . Claypole. K. C. McCleland. C. F . N. Ryan. H. Gardner. B. H. Matheson. A. N. I. Lilly. F . L. Sidebotham, ii. E. A. Squire. R. H. Warde, ii. C. A. West. C. W. K idson. G. E. L. Hargreaves. E. J. Hodgson. { H. de H. Smith, ii. V. S. Morley . H. A. Keyser, i. R. L. Gottwaltz. G. F. Wood. H ; C. Hands. T. ·Carlyle.


260

THE HEAD

CANTUARIAN.

MASTER'S DIVINITY PRIZES.

Army Class

R. S. Haskew. ... { W. A. F. Kerrich . ....... R. J. N, Norris. .. . ' R. de B. Saunderson .

IVa. Form ... IVb. Form .. .

.IlIa. Form .. .

M. A. Chappell. .. . { E. D. de Jongh.

lIIb. Form .. ,

R. H. Goodsali. ... { C. I-I. Trehane. ... C. King.

nlc, Form .. ,

LOWER SCHOOL PRIZES. Divinity (Lady Stuart) Mathematics (Christmas)

E. D. de Jongh. W. D. Hyde. A. M. Gelsthorpe. W. F. C. Palliser. A. G. Keyser, ii. S. J . Maiden. ... W. E. L. Baker, i. So D. Turner. '" { R. 1-1. Goodsall. W. F. C. Palliser. F . N. Holt.

J.

"

(Midsummer) Natural Science (llfitcllimoll)

French History Dictation Geography (Hemliker DeatoIJ) Music Drawing

J UNIOR SCHOOL PRIZES. lIa. Form (Christmas) "

(Midsummer)

"

( Midsummer)

IIb. Form (Christmas) lIe. Form (Christmas)

" (Midsummer) 1. Form (Christmas)

(Midsummer) ".

Divi~ity...

Mathematics (Christmas) ... .., J! (Midsummer)" . . .. English (Pri'Jts giVC1l by f. Emery, Es'l. )lIa. Form IIb. Form lIe. Form 1. Form Drawing Dictation

Music

P. D. Baker, ii. C. 1-1. C. Gore. L. Donne. ... L. S . Cave, ii. C.Orpin . . " { S. W. Williamson, ii. ." N . D. Dalton. M. D. J ames. W. T. Champion. 1). D. Baker, ii. P. D . Baker, ii. C. H. C. Gore. F . C. Gentry. R. B. S. Henning. T . R. Moore. Vi. T. Champion. J. S. Worters. C. H. C. Gore. P . S . Barber.


THE CANTUARIAN.

261

Anniversary Preacher. THE MOST REV. D R. SAUMAREZ SMITH, Lord Archbishop of Sydney, and Primate of Australia. The List of Anniversary Breachers goes back to 1714.

Exhibitioners Elected July, 1907-8. C. J. N. ADAMS, (Rose) Classical Exhibitioner or St. John's College, Oxford ( elee/ed July , 1907). A. R. BELLARS, (Stanhope) Pembroke College, Cambridge, ( elccted July, 1908).

The Shepherd Gift. T. S. NnsoN, Natural Science Scholar of University College, Oxford. H. P. SPARLING, Mathematical Scholar of Queen's College, Cambridge.

The O.K.S. Gift. C. F . FREEBORN, Central Technical College, Kensington. R. S. HASKEW, Central Technical CoIlege, Kensington.

The Waddington Gift. A. B. EMDEN, History Scholar of Lincoln College, Oxford .

Exhibitioners now at the Universities. E. A. ROPER, (Rose) Scholar of Queen's College, Oxford. R. H. L. G. W.

H. BRINSLEy· RICHARDS, CRose) Scholar of Hertford College, Oxford . V. P. TOWNEND, (Bunce) Scholar of St. John's College, Oxford. T. WATKINS, (Parker) Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. H . S. PINSENT, (Rose) )1ajor Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge. N. KEMPE, (Parker) Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.


262

THE CANTUARIAN.

Scholars. E lected, .December, 1907. KING'S

SCHOLARS.

JUNIORS.

PROBATIONERS.

R. E. L. Beardsworth, i. C. W. K idson. F. L. Goad.

E. F. Smart. K. L. Williams. R. G. Crosse. G. W. A. Todd, ii. A. Sargent. H. G. Kain. S. W. Waytc, ii. ENTRANCE SCHOLARS.

School H~ttse. E. J. H odgson. 1-1. Spence. K. L. Williams.

Afr. Evans House. A. B. Forsyth. R. C. Crowley, ii. HOUSE SCHOLAR.

School House. G. W. A. TODD, ii.

Elected,

JulY,

1908 .

K ING' S SCHOLAR S. SENIORS.

C. J. Galpin. D . J. N. Lee.

E. B. D. H. W. A. H. W,

Nelson, ii. Cowie. F. Kerrich. K. Mow ll, i.

JUNIORS.

F. D. E. E. C.

J.

PROBATIONERS.

L. Sidebotham, ii. Hussey. F. Housden . J. Hodgson. K. 1o.·[ owll, iii. C. Page.

*R. K. Pagett.

P. D. Baker, ii.

J. S. Worters.

F . C. Gentry. C. H. Gore.

ENTRANCE SCHOLARS.

School fIowe. R. G. Crosse.

*R. K. Pagett. E. F. Smart.

*R. F. Mason . *A. Seymour. HOUSE SCHOLARS.

School House. ·C. E. A. Pullan.

lIfr. Evans' Ho,ise.

·C. H. Kenyon.

.. Joined Ihe School l/lis Term .


THE CANTUARIAN.

Academical and other Distinctions gained during the year 1907-1908. , ', S, NnsoN A,

B.

Ei\lDEN ..

R, W . H , :\10LINE

II. P. SrARLING It. W, n, MOLINE

C,

J.

N . ADAMS YATES .. . II . 'l'OWNEND .. . • B. SIMEON It, C, ASHENDEN C. L, DRUlTI'

J, S,

. .. ,., . .. , .. ... . .. .,. ...

C, F. FREEBORN R. S.

HASKEW

..,

W. TELFER

G, H. S,

PINSENT

J{, 1-1, W, BRINSLEy·RI CHARDS .., A. C. RO PER. " II. p, V, TOWN END

10'. 1\'1. DEIGHTON , M, RICKETI'S PARSONS

J, R,

II. L. DIBBEN I".

C. L,

" '"

SCOTI'

(:, M, WEBSTER

..,

\y, TELFE R

J, j I.

H, NI COLLS

I. R.

MADG~

I".

,\ ,

g,

,.,

C,

BOVENSCHEN L . B. T HOMPSON , .. A, CRATY ".

,,, '"

A, G,

BLACKFORD

.. .

c.;, H,

BELLARS

'"

Open Scholarship for Natu ral Science, University Collcge, Oxford . Opcn Scholarship fo r History, Lincoln College, Oxford . Opcnl\'l athcm:ltical ~chola rship, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. Open Mathcnmlical Scholarship, Queen's College, Cambridge. Open Mathcmatical Scholarsh ip, i\'lagdalene Collegc, Cambridge. Open Classical Exhibition, S t. J ohn's Coll ege, Oxford. Open Clas.~ica l Exhibition, Henford College, Oxford. Open Mathematical Exhibition, Trini ty College, Cambridge. Ford Studcntship for Classics, Trinity College, Oxford. 1st Division, ;"'latriculation Examination, London U ni versily. Matriculation, Central Technical College, South Kensington (from Engineering- Class), Matriculation, Central Technical College, South Kensington (from Engineerillg Class). l\'fntriculation, Central Technica l College, South Kensington (from E"lfincerillg- Class), Scholar of Clare College, Cambridge: 1St Class (24th Wrangler) Mathematical T ripos, Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge: l!tt Class, Mathematical Tripos (New Regulations), Schola r of H ert rordCollcge,Oxford: 1st Class, Classica l Moderations Scholar of Kcblc College, Oxford : 1st Class, Classical f'l'loderat ions, Scholar of SL J ohn's College, Oxford : 1st Class, Classical Moderations. Scholar of Trinity Collcge, Cambridge : 2nd Class (1st Senior Optime) Mathematical Tri pos. Keble College, Oxford : 2nd Class, Final School of Theology, Exhibitioner of ~ J agdalen College, Oxford: 2nd Class Final School of Modern History, Ford Student, Trinity College, Oxford: 2nd Class, Classical Modemtions, Exhibitioncr of Merton College, Oxford: 2nd Class, Classical Moderations. Exhibitioner of Exeter College, Oxford; Squire University Scholarship in Theology. Scholar of Clare College, Cambridge: Lady Kay Scholarship for Theology nt Jeslls College, Cambridge, McGill University, Montreal: 1st Class Honours (Chemist ry and Mincralogy) in B. Sc, Examination; and British Association Gold 1\" caal and Prize for Chemistry, Lawrence Scientific Scholarship, Harvard University, First Division Clerkship, in the V,lar Office. Passed IOI St into Royal Military College, Sandhu rst. 1st Division, Matriculation Examination, London University, Travell ing !')tudcntship of the Architectural Association, Westminster. Royal Navnl College, Osborne : Meyrick Hicks Exhibition,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CRICKET. KING'S

SCHOOL

v.

O.K.S.

'We were again favoured with fine weather to play out this the most interesti ng match of the year, Bassett won the toss and decided to bat. He and Covell opened the innings to the bowling of Denne and Collings. Covell was Ollt in the first over to Denne, who was bowling extremely well, keeping a good length with a fine swing. Lucas then became associated with Bassett, and some nice bright cricket was seen; Basse tt especially being to the fore with his ofT-driving. He, however, tried it once too often and was dismissed by a one-handed ca tch in the sli ps off Denne. Adams did not stay long, but when th e Rev. R. F . Elwyn came in, one could not have wished for a better perfonnance of hitting; his off-driving also being sup erb. Huyshe and Gage gave some trouble and Johnsto n was out to a beautifully judged catch in the long field, and so the O.K.S. innings closed for 2 1 9 runs. The School commenced with Gardner and Howell. They did not seem to find a ny difficulty with the bowli ng, both of them hitting out with perfect freedom. The 1 00 was up hefore they were parted, and soon after Howell left for a well played 40. Fluke failed for a change, but with Martin in runs still came at a g reat pace. Gardner very soon reached his century, whi ch took him about an hour. Hc hit 20 fours and one six. Adams played attractive cricket and Merrett hit about lustily. At this stage, however, Bassett put himself on to bowl and immediately met with marked success, dismissing the remaining batsmen for a very few runs. The School innings closed for 332. Covell and Bassett again opened the O.K.S. inni ngs ; both playing with perfect freedom, Covell hitting with great vigour, while Bassett contented himself with beautiful stro kes all along the carpet. Dunlop was bowling exceedin gly well this innin gs, and most of the interest centred in him, as hc needed only five more wickets to com plete his 50 wickets for the seaso n. The Rev. R. F. Elwy n was the only other batsman who scored easily. \ÂĽith him out th e others fai led miserably, to such a degree that Howell and Gardner had to bowl, Howell eventu ally obtaining Hayes' wicket. The O.K.S. were all out for 141. The School this time started with the tail and the bowlers knocked off the necessary run s in (ine style. Thus the match was over before lunch on the second day, the School winning a brilliant victory by .eight wickets. The lielding on both days was ve ry good. Score as follows:-


THE

CANTUARIAN . O.K.S. 2nd I nnings.

1st I nnings. B. C. Covell, c Adams, b Denne L. J. Bassett, c Merrett, b Denne W. Lucas, c Howell, b Denne .. T. S. Adams, c and b Collings Rev. R. F. Elwyn, b Dunlop G. E. Hayes, b Collings ." W. H. Carter, b Denne R. V. Johnston, c Gardner, b Dunlop O. F . Huyshc, c Merrelt, b Collings E. T. Gage, c Adams, b Dunlop A. P. Trueman, not out Extras

42

4 c Denne, b Collings 28 c i\Ierrett, b Dunlop 22 b Merrett 16 c Adams, b Dunlop 69 c l\'lartin, b Collings 4 c Merrett, b H owell 7 c and b Dunlop 11 not out... 23 c Howell, b Collings 22 st F reeborn, b Dunlop o c Gardner, b Dunlop 13 Extras

219

Total

27 I

o

25 7

a 10 5 9

3

12

T olal

l

KI NG S SCHOOL. 1st I nnings G. F. H owell, cLucas, b Covell II. Gardner, sl Huyshe, b Adams A. C. Fluke, c Huyshe, b Adams R. E. Martin, c H ayes, b Bassett H . Parsons, b Dassett ... C. J. N. Adams, c Dassett , b Covell . F. Freeborn, c Bassett, b Covell O. V. Dunlop, c H uyshe, b Covell C. S. Merrett, c Adams, b Ba!>sett K P. Collings, cLucas, b Bassett L. G. Denne, not out I!:xtras : hyes, 4; leg-byes, 4 ; wides, 2; no¡ balls, 2

126 40

1~

Did not bat.

33 o not alit.. .

6 10

not out. .. b Covell 7 b Elwyn ... Extras : wides, 3

20 II

13 I

3

12

.,. 33 2

T olal

2nd I nnings.

33

Total

BOWLING ANALYStS : KING'S SCHOOL. 2nd Innings.

1st Innings. Denne Dun lop " . 'ollings ... Merrett ...

o. 22 7"3

15 7

M.

R.

W.

3

83 32 56 35

4 3 3 0

I

4 0

AV . 20'75 10'7

18'67

Den ne Collings ... Merrett ". Dunlop , I lowell Gardner " .

..

o. 3

II

5 12 2

M.

R.

W.

I

15 35 20 46

0 3

3 0 3 0 0

~

I

5 I

0

AV.

11'66

20 9'2 5


il 266

THE 1St O.

Innings. M.

a.K,S. AV.

R.

W.

4 0

27'25 36'00

Covell... Johnston...

18'1 6

0 0

log 41

Adam!i .

IQ

0

72

2

5

0

36

0

Hayes

CANTUARIAN .

Elwyn Covell

2nd Innings. O. 4 3'2

M. 0 0

R. II II

W.

AV. 11 11

Covell bowled 3 widcs.

Lucas. 2 0 22 0 Bassett .. 8 0 40 4 10'00 Covell bowlc.d 2 widcs, Adams 2 no¡ balls.

CRICKET

RETROSPECT,

1908.

'Matches played, 10 j ';Yon,s; Lost. 6; Drawn, 7. Vie must confess to a little disappointment at this record, for there can be no question whatever that the XI. of I goB was capable of doing better things. At th e sanJC time th~re was much that was satisfactory. The outstanding feature of the season was undoubtedly the batting of Gardner, who was ably backed up by H owell, Martin, Adams and Fluke. Gardner's performances were so remarkable that it may be worth while to enumerate his scores in order. They were as follows :-0, 27, 56, 19*, ", 32, I, '9, 27, 202, 0, 112$;'¡, 93, 48, 91*. 45 , 39, 9, SCI, 3. ' 58, 12 6,-giving him an aggr gate of ',1 68 runs, with an average of 61'3 for 19 completed innings, and in six of these innings he only compiled a total of 24. It is not often that a boy, while still at School, makes 200 run s in an innings. Gardner has done this for the second lime in his career, and Martin has don e it once. The season will also be memorable for the sensational victory over Eastbourne College. already recorded in TIle Cantuarian. As usual, the bowling has been the weakest point, though Denne and Dunlop have done some better bowling than anything we have had for the last few seasons. The fielding on the whole has been decidedly good, .but there are slill too many easy catches dropped, for which it is impossible to find any excuse. The Captain's retun\ to form was very wel comc, and we can congratulate him on his individual successes at the same time as we thank him for his efficiency in the management of the side. In conclusion may we remind the ri sing and aspiring candidates for cricket fame that they are more likely to secure it if they can bowl and field well than if they can only bat. The former art is rare and in constant demand, while the latter is more or less com mon, and we would point out that Denn~ and Collings " walked" into th e team of 1908 for their bowling, without any regard being had as to whether they could bat at all. vVc append a few remarks Oil individual members of the XI. : G. F. HOWgLL (Capt.).-R ecovered his form of two years ago and played some excellent innings. Very. good on the leg side and has developed more power on the off. Good field and has captained the side with judgment.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

from the list of . h h omenal success as wiI I be seen H' H. GARDNER .-Has met .w~t p en . drivi~O' with tremendous power. IS averages. A bnlhant forclI1g bat'E II °t fi ld and has saved many runs defe-nce has improved very much . I xce en e .. at third man and in the country. f d 'f him 'W atches the ball R. E. MARTIN .-Has not disappoi nted. the 1~op~s k~:me Ve~y good cover-point. well and puts plenty of power mto ~lS s:o t: ' His delivery is too low. C. S. MERRETT .-A fair bowler, but wantmg mS 'b~;t slow field. As a bat, can hit, but has httle defence. a e· I to a batsman of his type, . l' 19 His eye essen tla t t · C. F, FREEBORN.-D Isappo.lI1 l1: l\Jf d 't ·cket-keeper. l\'l ust learn no 0 seemed to have falled hlln. 1nO era e WI snatch at the ball, and to use both hands N t afraid to keep pitching the D . V. D UNLOP. -Very useful slow le~-h~n~ t~~'~~d N~oderate bat. ball up. Improved a good ea 11 b t '1 ' defence is not very sound, nor H PARsoNs.-Fair bat and not over for~lInate, 1I. lIS . . his bat sufficiently straight. Fan f\Cl~ al~d Imp~~v;~~s bowled very well, and L . G. L. DENNE.-Mt::dium.faced leftR~~I~~r sl~~v ~~; the fie ld but sound. should do better Wit 1 care. th last year and with. greater E . P. COLLINGs.-Bowled a goodhdetal gSIOV~r)' fa~~ field and can hit, but has no steadiness, but without rouC S Ill. defence. ' ·d b t ith much increased power and variety C. J. N. ADAMs.-Immensely Improve a w His defence has imof strokes. Good field as a rule. . . t A C. FLUKE.-A good natural cricketer wlmth . very free t~~s \ong reach. Has done d fi ld . d but he does not make Sll lClent use 0 . ~~~;;,emely well and should do belter still next year. Goo e .

f

i

1ST Name.

H. Gardner R. E. Martin A. C. Fluke C. ~ N. Adams G. 1. Howell .. C. S. Merrett " C. F. Freeborn .. II. Parsons D. V. Dunlop " K P. Collings .. I.. G. L. Denne

XI.

BATTING AVERAGES.

Innings. 22

2' 20 '7

18 15 15 18 14 12 11

Times nut out.

3 3 3 3 2 z 3 5 2 4-

Highest Score.

202 200 149* 78 69 47 46 58 30 32 30*

.. not out,

Runs.

Average.

,,68 737 65 0 47 8 4 68 210 197 2)2 102 106

6"3 40 '9 38 '7 29'7 27'6 16' J

b9

9'9

1 5'1

12' I 11'3 10'6


THE

268

CANTUARIAN.

BOWLING Name.

D. E. L. C.

V. Dunlop P. Collings .. G. L. Denne S. Merrett ..

AVERAGES.

Overs.

Maidens.

Runs.

180

26 40 27 23

859 746 782 90 1

212. '4

ZZI"2

244

Wickets.

Average .

10 '8 20 27'9 33'3

51 37 48 27

FOOTBALL. LIST Dnte.

OF

MATCHES. Opponents.

Ground.

FIRST XV.

1908. Thursday, October 15th .. .. ..... . 1\1r. Ii. Poole's xv.................. ... .. , ... .. .. Tuesday, , , 20th ... . ... " . Lcicestershire Regiment ... .. ....... ....... . . Thursday, " 22nd ..... .. ". Dover College ......... , ................... .. . Tuesday, ,,27th ... . ..... . Wyc College ... .... ..... .. .................... ::: Thu rsday, .. 29th ........ .. Mr. A. Latter's xv..... ~ ......... .... ..... . .. Wednesday, November 4th ..... . Merchant T aylor's SchooL...... .. . .. ........ .. Saturday, ,,7th Sutton Valence School. ... .. ..... ............ . T uesday, loth " .. .. Epsom College ..... ......... ... ............... :. Tuesday, ,,17 th ,", .. Mr. G. B. Cockrem's xv ..................... . Thursday, ,,19th .. " .. Eastbourne College ....... . ............ ... .. .. . Saturday, 2 1St . . ... . Thursday, , , 26tH : ... .

Saturday. Monday,

, , 28th .. .. . December 2 1St . . ... .

1909·

~:1~~.c~:~F:.:·.: : .·: : : : ·: : : : : : · : : : :

H o me .. , ............... ." .. H ome ........ .. I-l ome , ... .... .. ... ........ . \·Vye ...... .. ... ............ .

J·lome .. .... . .......... ... .. H ome .. .. ................ ... Sutton ... , .... .. ..... ..... . Bcckcnham ........... .. .. [-l onle ... .. , ........... ..... . Eastbourne .... ............ . H onle .. , ...... , .......... , .. I-l ome ..... .. ..... ...... ... .. D over ..... .. ............. .. H onle ............ .. ........ .

Thursday, February lI th .. ...... . H ampstead Wanderers .... . .......... . ........ H ome ........... .... .... .. Saturday, II 13th ........ . I-Iythe .. .............. .. .... .... .. .: ......... . .. .. I-Iollle .. .. ,

................

1908·

SECOND XV.

Thursday, October 22nd ... . ..... . Dover .College 2nd xv............... .. ...... .. Dover ...... , ......... , ...... \¥etlncsday, I t 28th ........ .. Tonbndge School 3rd xv ................. ... . T onbricige" .. '1 •• •••••••••• Thursday, November 12th ...... . ~onbridge School 3rd xv ..... . ............. . Satu rday, 14th ' '' ' , .. over Coll ege 2nd xv ......................... .

~~~:~~ ::: ::. ::~: ::.: ::~:: ::::


THE

CANTUARIAN.

269

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. . J. N.

ADAMs.-King's Scholar j Entered the School, Sept., 1897 i VI. F orm, Jan., 19°5; NTonitor, Sept .. 1906; Captain of the School, Sept., '.9 0 7 i Secretary of Ca1ltuaria1l J rvTay, 1906 : Editor, Sept., 1906 ; Presldent of Debating Society. Sept., 1907; Sports' Committee, Sept., 19 06 : 1st XL . 1906, 19p8 j 1St XV., 1907-8; Sports' Colours, 1908; FIves Colours. 1907-8; Stanhope Exhibitioner, and Exhibition'er of St. John's College, Oxford.

. F. I-Iow ELL.- King' s Scholar ; Entered the School, Jan .• 1903; VI. Form, Jan., 19 05; Monitor. Sept., I C)06; Honse Monitor, 1908 ; Editor of Call1uariall, Jan ., 1908 ; Sports' Committee, May, 1905 ; 1St XL, 19 05- 6-7- 8 ; Captain of Cricket, 1908 j Fives' Pair, ' 906 -7 , . B. SlM wN.-King's Scholar; Entered the School. May, 1899; VI. Form. Sept., 19 0 5 j Monitor, Sept. 1906 ; 1St XV., 1907-8 i Sports' Colours, 190 7- 8 ; Ford Student, Trinity College, Oxford. C. G. WILLIA'lSoN.-Entered the School, May, 1896; VI. Form. Sept., 19 0 5 ; Monitor, Sept., 1906 j IstXV., 1904, 5, 6, 7, 8 i Captain of Football, 1908 j Sports' Colours, 1907 , 8.

J.

S. YAT Es.-Entered the School, Jan., 1903 ; VI. Form, Jan., 1906 ; Monitor, Sept., 1906; Exhibitioner of Hertford College, Oxford.

A. R. DELLARs.-King's Scholar; Entered the School, May, 1898 ; VI. Form, Sept., 1905; Monitor. May, 1907 j Hon. Sec. of the CalltuariatJ, Nov., ' 906 ; Stanhope Exhibitioner at Pembroke College, Cambridge.

I L P . SPARLING.-King's Scholar; En tered the School. Sept., 190 3 i VI. Form, Sept, 1906 j Scholar of Quee n's College, Cambridge.

J. W.

MAYNARD.-Killg's Scholar; Entered the School; Sept., 190 5; VI. Form, Christmas, 1907 .

T. S. NELsoN.-Entered the School, Sept., H)03; VI. Form, Jan., '908; Boatin g Colours, 1905 . 6, 7. 8; Captai n of the Boat Cl ub, 1907-8 ; Scholar of University College. Oxro rd.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

C. S. EMDEN.-Entered the School, Sept., IqoJ ; VI. Form, July, 1908. C. F . FREERoRN.-E ntered Ihe School, Sept., 1904 ; 1St XV., 1907-8 ; 1St Xl., 190 7- 8. S. D. T URr.;ER.-Entered the School, Sept., 1903 j Boat Colours. 1<)08 ; Sports' Colours, 1908 . G. A. C. JONEs.-Entered the School, Sept., 19°1

j

Rowing Colours, IQ07-8.

E. P. COLLINGs.-Entered the School, May, 1903; 1St XI., 1908.

V ALETE. C. T . Marshall, E. W. Todd, R. S. Haskew, G. M. Emery, J. H. Houghton; C. M. Sutto n, A. H. Warde, W. J. Bokenham, G. Scolt-Moncrieff W. D. Glyn,1 E . D. de Jongh, W. E . L. Baker, C. C. Reay. '

DEBATING SOCIETY. At a Meeting of the Committee held on Monday September 21 st, it was decided in order to re-organ ize t he Society: I. T hat debates be held as far as possible every alternate Wednesday in the Parry Library, at 6,30 p.m. ; II. T hat there be three set speakers on each side and that one or morc of these at each debate should no t be members of the Committee; IlL That anyone who prepares a speech on informing the President beforehand will be called on to speak immediately after the set speakers ;

IV. That only a limi ted number of the rest of the School be present.

On Tuesday evening September 29th, in the Parry Library, H. D. TouJ?lend moved that in the '4 opi ni on of this House vivisection should be abolished by law." U nder the new regim e the audience th ough not so numerous as of yore was manifestly better in te rested and better mannered, the ., heckling" which charatterised the Schoolroom proceed-


THE

CANTUARIAN.

1118 5 being entirely absent, and though IIl1s slightly detracted from ~he aml~se1I1cnt of the casual auditor It ce rtaIn ly n\Usl have conduced to the comfort of I ho speakers.

H. D . T071J?le1ld's speech proposing lh motion, though somew hat barren of 1,Iets was a pleasant eno ugh affaIr. H e ,Iwelt on the sentimental aspect of the c'lIse suggested a few statistics, mad.e Ii s,~eet appeal to the patriotism of hIS heare rs, U British fair-play," and ma?e Ii remark ane nt the substitution of .lunatIcs (or the "little guin ea pig " winch was 'to become famous j which done he sat down. E . B. Hosking rising to oppose ~he Illotion was valiantly scientific for a wIllIe, 11Iling the air with aHusio,!s to. Malta felVc r, goat's milk (I), sleep~n~ Slc,kness I\ nd the T setse fly. He speCIalIsed 1Il the value of anaesthetics and pointed out lhat the same animal was never operated on twice. D. J. N. L ee rising '~ith a ,~o~ried look asked the audience If the VIVIsectio nist would abide by law. This rernark though inconseque nt ~\'as deemed cond usive and no one tned to answe r lhe rhetorical question. H e pointed out the apirit of speculation that perva~es all viv isectionist work and the uncertalll ty of lesults and, seeking to find an etJ.uival~nt lor the "little guinea-pig" (l~1l1atIcs omitted), explained how Dr. . Slm pson discovered chloroform hy expenments 0!l himself. T he speaker did not make 1t clear whether he considered the doctor the equal of the ubiquitous quadruped or the reve rse.

H . W K. 111()UJ1l then risi ng overwhelmed his hearers with floods. of statistics and quotations. Some captlO.us ones might find fault '~ith th ~ pun~y of his German accent (Ill namlllg Ius authorities) but his etymological discuss!on on "lesions" was delightful. The speaKer evinced a knowlege of t he insides of. the guinea-pig as rar.o as it was allunng. assuring the auch ence that (the aforementioned) " l es~ons on th~ in.ward par~s 11 were entirely pai nless. HIS ll1trod uctlOll o f local colour in the shape of H arvey O. K.S. was masterly and his delivery though a little reminiscent of a gramaphone (possibly ?~ving to the numerOUS quotations) beautIfully fluent.

R. W. H. 111o/i1lt (slightly hampered bv verbal di fferences of opinion with lrie leader of the opposition) propounded th e Neitzcheik theory of killing off the aged and incapable; he suggeste~ theIr substitution for both the lunatICS of the fi rst speech or the little guinea-pig (in which animals the speaker seem to have made a corner); he inserted the usual sentimental appeal and concluded.

C. J. Galpl" in what was undoubtedly the best speech of the evening, ap?iogised ror talking at all, but was contradIcted by frantic applause. His uttcrn:nces. t~,ough obscured by 1lUmlCeS of .. a'!t1-tox lT~ ~nd "dipheretic cures " were qUIte CO nVll1Clllg, though one was not sure that the conviclions thus engendered had anythi ng to do with vivisection. H e only had the gathe rin g of the frag ments, which doubtless handicapped him, as he was the last speaker. G. ll. Claypol, was called upon for


THE

I

CANTUARIAN:

'a speech and asserted thai the only reasonable plea for the abol ition of vivisection came from the sentimentalist but asked if the sentimentalist was to b~ allowed to interfere with medical progress. He made his statement with the air of a discoverer seemingly oblivious of the fad that it had already been worn to tatters. The, debate was then opened to the auchence. C. F . M. N. Ryan in a pleasantly co nfident way quibbled abont th e technical meaning of th e . word "tort~re" with na"ive inaccuracy. lightly

touching upo n the cruelty of hUllting and rabbit shooting as opposed to tha t of vivisection ; he did not omit reference to the much discussed lunatics, and opposed the motion . He was followed by

J. Kettelwell who made a few remarks in a vei n of happy idiocy, but did .not

seem to throw much light on the subject or help matters forward at all; he supported the motion. D. Hussey remarked th e

cruelty of driving lame cab- horses, while Sarg?nt was ,Perfectly pulverizing !Il Ills merciless logic that animals were lIltended for the use of man this remark was reiterated by F. L.' Goad with passionate tone in a brief speech.

!--. c::.

1-1. D. TO'Wllend then made the closing speech and a show of hands being demanded it transpired that the motio n was lost by 8 votes to 23.

It must have been gratifying to those who have mad e the new arrangements to sec .15 prese nt, also to. find so many speakers am ong the audIence, who, it is to be hoped, having now made their de buts wili be nerved to try agai n. It ~h ould be noted that the audience looked IIlterested rather than amused as thouO'h they percei ved that the gathering was fur a d.e b~t~ and not for an unholy din: is it a sig nifi cant fact that there was so much talk of lunatics?

ARCHBISHOP TEMPLE AS A SCHOOLMASTER. ~ost of .llS knew Dr. Temple as an ~rch.blshoI?' III fact that period of his

his fath er on retiri ng from the Arm y settled down as a small landowner in !Ife 111 which he occupied that position Devonshire, and the son was destined IS. more remembered in these days than to follow an agricultural career, to wh ich his more co nfined but no less important end he received some practical lessons work as Headmaster of Rugby. . in fannin g. This accounts for the legend that Dr. Temple rose "from the pJoughFrederick T emple was born at Santa tail." Howeve r, he was sent to Tiverton _Manra, one of the Ionian Is1i.mds, in 1821 ; Grammar School, and from thence gained


.THE CANTUAR IAN. a Scholarship at Balliol in 1838. Besides his character. His manners were prohis ordinary ed ucation he cul tivated at verbially strange. It is said tha~ a friend Tiverton his great walking powers, so once comm ented on his habit of sitting that he could state in I gOI that he had with his hands on his knees and his toes for many years bee n able to walk six miles turned in. "\;Vhy shouldn' t I ?" replied an hour with comparative ease I Four he, .. I am told the Choctaw Indians years before he left school his father died. always do." H e was a" mighty laugher"; leaving him in straitened circurnstances, one day a very small boy was , 4 sent up" to which he owed the independe nce for smoking. Dr. T emple looked at him and sturdi ness which characte rized his and said ÂŤ \Vhat! you smoking?" and actions. In 184z he took a double first went otT into a roar of laughter, which and his degree, and was elected Fellow doubtless made the boy feel still smaller. of his College a nd Lecturer on MatheHis delight in athletics was always matics and Logic. Education had from the first attracted his attention. and he strong. and his profidency in. them was resigned his fellowship in ord er to be- remarkable : it is recorded that whilc come principal of an undenominational walking across the quadrangle with one college for training masters of wo:-k- of the boys, the latte r was just going to houses and penal schools. From this re move a rather high hurdle from the he was appoi nted Inspector of Schools pathl when the Doctor stopped him-, in 1855 , and succeeded Dr. Goulburn, saying" What are you doing that for?" Il eadmaster of Rugby, three years later. and over he went, fo llowed by th e boy. A typical" Temple story" is told of the In this connection might be me ntioned Orst school prayers taken by the new an instance of his grim humonr: he one H ead master.. According to custom, the day heard a me mb er of his Confirmation sixty boys were seated on the. tables with class say to a friend, 41 Oh yes! ' I'm their feet on the forms waiting to be entered for th e Confirmation StakeS." ailed over. Mr. Temple, disdaining "'Well," said the Doctor, turnin g sharply the butler who had always preceded .round, " you're scratched now J " Dr. Gou lburn on these occasions, without Concerning his personality so many gown or cassock, marched in. He stared with a look of surprise and half-suspicion .. T em ple Stories," true and untrue, of mischief at the boys, but. instantly have sprung up, that no article is conre -assured by the solem n faces of the sidered to be complete without a long Perhaps two may be Sixth Form waiting to receive him, took list of them. his seat with the characteristically short allowed here. Shortly after his career speech 1'1 hope we shall all get to know at Rugby, as Bishop of Exeter he was onc another in a very short time." And holding a Confirmation in a country it took a very short time. Despite parish, and staying th e night at the the ruggedness and abruptness of his rectory. The rector's wife, to do the manners, th e school soo n found the g reat man honour. produced her best genuine kindliness a nd manliness of silver candlesticks to grace th e eRiscopal


THE CANTUARIAN .

~74

bedroom. The Bishop came and went: and the candlesticks disappeared . His hostess, in alarm, hurriedly wrote to the Bishop to ask if he kn ew anything of the missing property, a nd received the following telegram: "Poor, but honest. L ook in the bottom drawer." The last story is closely connected with Canterbury.

A certain gentleman was requested to visit the Archbishop on a matter of some importance. Ushered by the resplendent butler he app roac hed the study, and was greeted by "Oh I come in, Sir, come in. I'm just doing my butcher's bills,H Comment is unnecessa ry.

SCHOOL NEWS. We offer the heartiest congratulations of the School to IVIr, Hodgson on his appointment by the Archbishop as Six-Preacher on the Cathedral Foundation. *%* We heartily congratulate C. J. Galpin, D. H . Cowie, W. J. S. Price, H. F . Reynolds, W. A. F. Kerrich and B. H. MCitheson on being made Monitors this term. " ~* The following were promoted into the Sixth Form at the end of last term: H. Parsons, H. D . Townend, i., G. H . Claypole. J. B. Sidebotham, i., J. Kettel well, K. C. McCleland, C. F. Battiscombe, A. N. 1. Lilly, B. H . Matheson. -t- >\'~

In the Oxford and Cambridge Higher Certificate Examination nine members of the School obtained Certificates : C. J. N. Adams ann J. S. Yates obtained Distinctions in Latin j C. J. N. Adams and A. R. Bellars in Divinity and Roman H istory.

On Wednesday, Oct. 6th, at the request of Dr. Mason, the School were granted a half-holiday in honour of his appoinLment as Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University. ~

~.

*

We offer our congratulations to C. L. DruiLt, C. F. Freeborn and R. S. Haskew on passing the Matriculation Examination for the Central T echnical College, South Ken 5ington. Last holidays H. Gardner made 89 for the Pub lic School team against Essex Club and gro und, and 56 for Essex Club and ground . both being top scores. 1f '/(.

â&#x20AC;˘

Mr. F. S. Porter has kindly undertaken the chargt! of the School Garnes as l\,Ir. Latter's new duties in the Parrots will prevent him giving as mu ch time to them as heretofore.

*'â&#x20AC;˘';\'-

On Friday, Sept. 25th, the team of


/ THE

the Leicester Regiment came over from Rhorncliffe and gave om 1St a gam.e. They were defeated by 9 pomts to 11l1. the tries being scored by Parsons, Gardner und Dunlop.

xy.

*'.**'

On Saturday, Sept. 20th, at a meetin g ( f the Cathedral Chapter, Mr. Evans \~'as elected on to the Cathedral FoundatlOn "' Hypodidascalus of the King's School in succession to Mr. Hodgson. \Ve offer him ou r hearty congratulations. '/(.

275

CANTUARIAN .

-),'.

:,:.

We offer om hearty congratulations the members of the Lower Four.th on having the privileges ,of the Dnll on I"rielay mornings extended to them.

10

*' -),'.

"

The following words were inscribed

on th e silver rose-bowl presented to MI'. Hodgson on Speech Day: VIRO REVERENDO RICARDO GREAVES HODGSON, QUI ANDII ARDORE SAPU-:NTIAQU lt DlSCll'ULORU M STUDiUM BEN IGNITAT lt AMORKM , D. D. SCHOLAE REGIAE CANTUARIENSIS ALUM NI, A. D. iii. KAL. AUG. MCMVIII. -),'.~/

The Editors hope that O.K.S. will keep them informed of anythIn g of interest concerning themselves or others suitable for insertion. They will also be grateful fo r original literarr contributions whether in the form of arllcIes, poems or letters from both KS. and O.K.S. ...'

-1;.

" fo r the School The subscriptions rear, I gOg, fall due this. term fl:nd the Editors hope that subscnbers .wIll sav.e unnecessary trouble by sendlllg then subscriptions punctually.

THE SCHOOL. Captain : Captain of Cricket .. Captain of Football Captain of Games .'

R . M.

GENT .

R. E. MARTIN . H. GARDNER . H . GARDNER.

MONITORS:

.

GtE B Hosking H . W. 1<. Mowll, H. Gardne r, R. W. H. Moh ne, R. M. e J. ·G.-lpin, D . Cowie, W. J. S. Price, H . F. Rey nolds, W. A. F. Kerrich, B. H . Matheson.

C:

H.

EDITORS OF THE" CANTUARIAN ."

.

R M. Gent H. W. K. Mowll, C. J. GalpIn. .

,

1)

SECRETARY OF T1-m

,I

CANTUARIAN .

H. D. T ow nend. SPORTS' COMMIT'PEE :

.

H Gardner, B. H. Matheso n, H. F. Reynolds, R. M. Gent, D. H. Cowie, . C. A. M. Richardson, A. C. Fluke.


THE CANTUARIAN.

EXTRACTS FROM OUR CONTEMPORARIES. For how can I sing in an audible manner,

Cutllberiiall .- "You should never do to-day what you could do equally well to -morrow," From. a school-boy's point of view my versio n of the adage hardly needs substantiati ng i just think of the ridiculously and obviollsly false economy of doing impositions at the first opportunity without giving the master even a chance of forgetting. lvlalverJliall,-We have a shrewd notion the Editorial is not the most popular feature of any pe riodical ; th at it is not ' for the Editorial alone that expectant youths clamour for th eir " Malvernians."

H erifOrdl"atl .-Every one of us can take a certain pride in having done something, however little, to uphol d the t raditions of a School whi ch - and th is is a fact whi ch is on ly too apt to be forgotte n - is probably the oldest in the ki ngdo m. Fellesian. One thing I'm hoping and ¡ that is that Fettes To-day entertai ning no fierce suffragette is j

If I'm drowned by a bell or obscured by

a banner. The Olavilw in an excellent article on the German poet Schiller concludes with the following :-

o

I will say that these poems of Schiller are th e most vapid specimens of amateur versi fi cation that ever school- boy had to co mmit to memory. Their most salient feature is childishness, and thei r hallmark insipidity. A study of the II Gedichte" is more co ndu cive to listlessness than to anything like indignation j after a few weeks his chil dish blunde rs cease to be am using, a nd his efforts to sustain the met re cease to make li S uncomfortable. Simultaneously with the disinclination to use the critical fac ulties at all, there begins to creep over us a feeling of drowsiness. Pictures of bygone nurse ry scenes float befo re the eyes an d more than once it has been only a question of seconds between Schiller and Morpheus.

W.e should like to draw the attention of the readers of this Magazine to the Mr. Bell, in the October numb er of the" Sch ool," Besides giv ing a most pict uresq ue acco unt of our histo ry from the earliest hmes, he mentions our fam ous alumni ami. concludes with ~ minute description of our School life at the present day. The Magazine also lJ1c1 udes an excellent supplement in the form of a full-page photograph of the MlOt Yard. spl c~ (hd account of the School, by p~lbhshcd by I\1urray~ at 6~1. nett.


THE

I

CANTUARIAN.

POETA MUNDANUS. When we write (as poets do). . Sometimes from our mother WIt Not a "rolling line " will comeOnly little bits of it. H ere and there a versicle, Or anon a canticle, Little touch of ridi cul e On the latest topic ; Ancient proverb newly hash' d, Saws of bygone prophets mash'd, This we dish up, unabashed, T o blue-pencilled critic. Heterogeneosity ! 'Weird extraneosity !

..

â&#x20AC;˘

Then it all comes back again . Pencilled till we scarcely }mow It. ./ Incohe rent." And' we say (Eu phemistically) "Dlow it I"

H ARV E Y S OCI E T Y . The Committee is sor ry to notice and promises of papers for next term are that interest in the Harvey Society has also required. been declining, for the last year or two, Members have recently been very to judge from the attendances and. the ready to pay th eir subsc ript~ons , but number of papers read at the meetlllgs. large r attendances at th e m e~tl11 gs, a~l d , This term an effort is being made to above all, less diffidence III o ffen ng revive the Society and to bring to life th e to give papers is desired. E veryone, interest in it which existed s0I?-e years whether a member of the Vlth form or figO . It is hoped that at least SIX. papers not, who possesses a hobby of some kind n various subjects may be read thiS term,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

is asked to come forward and to make use of his special knowledge.

E ven if a member does not fee l able to write a pape r on his ow n account. he can do so in collabo ration wit h another, and mos t ca n spa re ti me to atte nd some, at least, of th e pape rs during t he te rm. The following papers have, so far. bee n a rranged:DAT~.

Sat. , Oct.

T I T U-:.

AUTHOR.

3. - " T he Piano an d its Evolution. "

C.

J.

GALP I N.

Sal., Oct. 24.- " Some Brit ish Butterfli es." C. 1-1. WOODHOUSE. Sat. , Nov. 7.-" T he Evolution of the Motor Car. " M . A. CHA I'},EL l " H

SaL , Nov. 28._ Nature anti Early Man in Noeth America." Rev. A. J. GALP I N. Sat., Dec.

5. - " A Holiday in Switzerland ." R. E. EVER ITT, Esq.

9n

Saturday, October 3rd, at a of the H arvey Society, C. J. Galpin read a paper on the "Piano and its E volutio n. " m eet~n g

Beginning from th e earliest ti mes, the instrum ent of prim itive man was his hunting-bow, upo n which after the chase ~r battl e he. wo ul ~1 play. by tapping the tightened strI ng Wit h a piece of stick; to gain in volume of sound he placed the bow agains t his teeth w that the cavity of his mouth form ed a resonator. From this arose the harps and dulci mers of ancient Egypt and Assyria, the di ffe rence being thut the harpstring is plucked while

t hat of t he dul cimer is struck.

The key-

board, which was invented in t he time of Cice ro fo r the hyd raulu s or Rom an

water-organ, was app lied to these two species of instrume nts shortly before the 13th century A.D. The com bination of the keyboard a nd dulcime r produ ced the

clavic hord, in which the strin gs are struck by tange nts; this was t he favourite instrum ent of Sebastian Bac h. The combination of the keyboard and harp prod uced the vi rginal, in which the stri ngs wore 1~llI ck ed by c.row-quills. The virgina l ga~e nsc to the spInet and the harpsichord , whIch we re only elabo rated fo rms. Owing to the fact that no matter how hard the ke~ was struck, the qui ll oul y plucked the strI ng With the same force, expression could not be obtained by tOllch; it had to be sought by multiplying th e numbers and varieties of qui lls and strings. T he !larpsichord was an exceedingly elaborate lI1stru menL, th~ last word of the quill towa rds exp ressIOn. T he hammer action of the piano was invented in ql o by Bartoiommeo Christofali of Padua. It was brought to England in q 69 by twelve working pia no makers ; at t he same date ZUlll p6. a German, began to manufac ture ~mal l. pianos, which soon becam e popular III thiS country. In 1867 t he Committee of the Grand In ternatio nal Exhibi tion decided that English make rs were far superior to those of other co un tries. The piano action invol ves the " striking " pr~ncipl e of the clavichord, and may be Sai d to be desce nded from it, but it has a ra nge and power of expression that the soft and de licale clavicho rd could neve r Ilflve . T he lectu re co ncl ud ed with ~ d?sc r.iption of the modern g rand piano acti on.


.THE

CANTUARIAN·.

279

O. K. S. NEWS. We heartily congratulate J . R . Parsons on obtaining 2nd class honours in the Final History School at Oxford.

A. L. B. Thompso n passed 10 1St into the .Royal Military College, Sandhurst.

«- «-

." Also W. T elfer on being elected to a Lady Kay Scholarship for Theology at ,Jesus College, Cambridge.

A. B. Blackford has obtained a Travelling Studentship of the Architectural Association, Westm inster.

""" Marriagt.-On the 2 Jrd of September very quietly at St. Mary Abbot's, Kensington, th e Rev. R . M. Tuke, H eadmaster of the Cathedral Choir School, Manchester,. eldest son of Francis Melville Tuke an d Mrs. Tuke, of Westcroft, Gravese nd, to Hilda, second daughter of Edward Turner, barrister-at-law, and Mrs. Turner, 5, Marston Ferry Road, Oxford.

"..,.

J. H . H . Nicholls obtained 1St class honours in Chemistry and Mineralogy in the B.Sc. examination at the McGill University, Montreal, and we also congratulate him on obtaining th e British Association Gold Medal and Prize for Chemistry. F. C. Bovenschen has bee n appointed to a 1st Division Clerkship in the War Office.

Vve offer our heartiest congratulations to Canon Austen on his appointment by th e Archbishop of York to succeed the late Canon Fleming as a Canon Reside ntiary of York Minster. Canon Austen has been Rector of Whitby since 1875 , and as the father of our late Sixth Form Master, has taken a great interest in the School. The Rev. W. H. Maundrell made 79 runs and took 7 wickets for the rest of th e Fleet against H.M. S. " King Alfred ,. recently at Wei-hai-wei.

H. H. H ayes has passed out of Sand hurst and has obtained a commission in th e South Wales Borderers. H e sails for India in October.


¡T HE ' C~NT(]ARIAN,

¡80

C, M, Morris has passed ,85th into Sandhurst, It is rum our~ d that Mr, Baly is paying a flymg VI Sit to England at Christmas and that C. M. Dunlop is. also returning and will play in the O,KS, Match, N , E. Bressey has joined the colony at Green Court, Alberta.

We heartily cong ratulate W, R, N, 9n passing 2 Jrd into the Royal MIlItary CoIl.ge, Sand hurst,

L~s~te

. A marriage has be011 arranged and will take place next month between A. M. T oulmin, Lieu!' R,M,L,r., of H,M,S. " yictor~ous" stationed at Sheerness, and IVltss Gnmston. His elder brother, E. M. Toulmin, is coming home from Buenos Ayres and is to act as best man.

We regret to record that Judge

Emden, O,KS" and the donor of the ~mden History Prizes, met with a severe motor accident on Tuesday, September 29th. He was thrown out of his car which was completely wrecked. We are glad to hear that His Honour is progressing satisfactorily.

*"Jf.*' On . Tuesday, October 6th, the marnage took place in Liverpool Cathedral of the Rev. George Foster Carter, Rector of St, Aldate, Oxford, and Miss D?rothea Ch~vasse, daughter of the B.IShop of LI,verpool. The bride was gIven away by her uucle, Sir Thomas Chavassc,.and the ceremony was performed by th e BIshop of Liverpool, assisted by the BIshop of Durham, the Bishop of Jarrow: t!le Rector of Liverpool, the Rev. . Maude, uncle of the bride and the Re.~, George Howson, The 'Rev, F, W, Eddison acted as best man,

*,," All those who wish to play in the O,KS, Match are requested to send in theIr names to L, J. Bassett, Esq., I7 I, Sloane Street, Belgravia.


\ tHE

CANTUARIAN,

.8 1

"ERRATA."

The four of us, all from K.S., had assembled at an old rambling farmhouse at Wasdale Head in Cumberland, Three of us, the Skipper, Snod-rass and I had arrived as rati~:mal t:'eings by ,taking t~e midnight train from Euston, th en descending to a mountalll railway which hurrted along at an average rate of ten miles per hour, as it could not go fast uphill, feared to do 50 downhill and had not a level spot the whole way on which to shew off its real powers. We then finished our journey by walking six miles over a mountain pass, with a doubtful track and three streams to crosS as best we could. Incidentally we got wet through, which, as we were still fresh from civilisation annoyed us considerably. The ~cenery of th? lake is beyol?d my powers of ~escription, a long sheet of water shut III by mountams on every Side, but for a detailed account see the guide book. The . next daX, Sunday, I went to meet Bloggs who was coming by a train of hIS own dIscovery j none of us could find it in Bradshaw. In the middle of the pass I saw someone in the distance; I rushed at him with hoots of joy, and found he was an utter stranger; we both felt rather shy after this dramatic introduction. From him I heard that no one answering to the name of. Bloggs had come by the last train. and so I turned home again. The Skipper's brother joined us ' on Sunday night,. he had int~nded to do ,a walking tour and then finish up at our farm, but after walkmg forty mIles and findmg no rest for the sole of his foot at any of the farms he came straight on, It rained on Sunday, it poured on Monday, it was wet on _, perhaps after all it would be shorter to say that the only day it did not rain was our last Friday. Late on Monday eveni ng Bloggs turned up, Such is the tale of his journey whi~h he.divulged between his sixte~nth and twen~ieth slices of bread and jam. "I, set off Jauntily at} I p.m. to Euston 1Il plenty of time to catch th e midnight tram ~o the North. From ,the moment I ~et foo t on Ellston platform my appalling xpe n enc?s began-my tram was non-Cxlstent. I began ' by getting into the 11.35 whlch was going goodness knows wh ere j on being ejected from this, and after countless wordy ba~tles with guards, station-masters, porters, ticket-collectors, nnd the customary verrnm of such a place as Ellston, I managed to find a train which was ~oiI?g in my direction, though how far I was blissfully ignorant. I was not to rernam Ignorant long, for at 3 a.m. I was turned out at Warringford which was occupied by one sleepy porter and a pourboire-hunting station-master, who


28.

THE

CANTUARIAN,

on learnin g my plight tol d me th ere was a trai n on at 8,45 and shewed me obsequiously into a dingy waiting-room which. I fo und infested with a snorin g tramp; on pointing out this defect to t he station-m aster I was ushered into another apartment (a Ladies first-class) and there managed to catch nearly two minutes sleep per hour. However, morning carne at last and I got into the train again en route for Preston, having sumptuously breakfasted off a banana. We crawled into Preston at J I a.m. and I leapt from the carriage in anticipation of missing my connection j in nervous haste I demanded from a ticket-collector where and when the Seascale train was to start. H e looked at me pityingly and said in a languid voice, "four-fifty, sir." IVly spirit was completely broken. H ow I got through those six hours I cannot tell, but at last they came to an end and I joyfully boarded the train for Carnforth, my next halt. On arriving I learnt that t here was no train until fbur the following mornin g : hard ened to this so rt of treatment I went and chartered a bed (for 1/6, I have al ready said I was broken) and caught th e 7.0 train on Monday morning after a 3d. breakfast. My journey was at an end j a six mile tramp brought me to my destination and I stalked in closely resembling an un employed foot-pad." I must now . explain the state of the land j there were no shops, the Postman did all our shopping for us at Gosforth twelve miles off, he sold stamps, bought Grape Nuts, and did anything-for a consideration ; there was one road. and that we should bl ush fo r in the south and there were three mou ntai n passes, when you could find them. On Tuesda y th e rain stopped for a short rest before continuing its efforts. so we seized the opportunity and rushed up Scawfell, three th ousand feet high, in two hours. At first it was steep grass slopes still slippery with the rain, and then it changed to scree, an abominable device consisting of sharp loose stones which gi ve way when you tread on them-moral, be the first up a scree, the last man gets a miniature avala nche on him .the whole time. They tell me the view was glori ous at the top, and that you could see many of the lakes down below, and the cliffs of th e Isle of Man i I was wonderi ng how I was going to get down the gullies up which we had crawled like flies, as I remembered having kicked off every possible hold in my efforts to get up. But all down one side there were grass slopes, the Skipper and Snodgrass look thirty-six min utes coming down, Bloggs and I came down more sedately, mostly in a recumbent posture. One afternoon we all went to bathe in cold Wast water, and we all caught colds by having to wait in the process of undressing wh ile a party of tourists stalked slowly down our only road. The Skipp er went in pink and came out bright blue. The Skipper and Snodgrass were keen anglers and caught diminutive troutlets small er than sardines. The Skipper got so used to yank ing these out with a jerk that landed them behi nd his back, that when at last he hooked a decent sized trout, he gave the usual spasmodic jerk and the line broke, After that it was quite sad to see him carefully playing the tiniest minnows that ever hid behind a blade of grass. Another brilliant idea of his was to fish for pike by sendin g a bladder across the lake with a small troutlet "' bait, With this intent he procured four pigs'


THE

CANTUARIAN,

bladders. At last we managed to, blow two up, but in the night the do~s ~ot hald 0 f t I1e at IleT t wo, t n'ed to dI gest tl,eln , but we have reasons forf behevtmg 1 r 'I d One of the survivors we played foo tball with, and it un ortuna e y they laI e . f VV hauled the nauseous thing up 2000 burst ; the last \~e took g~e~t f~'~~~ ~o' catc~ a fi;h to bait it with, so we kicked 1 . h t . ts passed along the feet to a mountam tarn, u it down again. It alway~ seemed my \urn carry l~ w S~l~d~~~~ tried to send it road . The end of thIS o~le wa~ t lat oggs ~n. the lake and we saw it across the lake, bU,t the '~lllld O~J.ec~~l~ ~~~dt;r~;s l~v~~w;uite inconsolable for its ;::, I d' d appetite' but we no more I wasn t at a so rr) , loss j he 'said it had a healthy s~ell <l:nd gave. him a sp en. 1 he' was ah~a s (L to never noticed any diminution 111 ,Ius appetite afterw~Tds ~everal 'times s~oilt by

tiy

~rr~~,~s~t i~I~I~~~~~I:J'db~ot~O ;r~~~~ I;~r ~~~r~~~z:e;\!>~:Jd 0;~1?d ~~: ;~~~e:r~:ln~II~~

a~~~:. t\~er~~::d'e tl!l1tb~~~ ~f ::r u~~l~ fine day by c1.imbing ov~r(Yt~ ~l~ldteIl~~~d fJle prettiest of the smaller lakes j It was abou\ 1 l:ll1les, ~utLI! °s~~ee ' we ha\'~ a short cut over a moun~ain and h~d an aw ,u h~~~~ ~~ts ove r m o~ ntains. at digcovered that there aren t s ~ch thm gs as s hand ) but they aren't short. least the cuts are there ~I stIll 1have ~ne ft~r m~actl y a fortnight and walked B10ggs an.d I had to br~a ,up t le~ ~tr ~o:rs of ~he mo rnin g. I 'hear that ~n the 14 mIles to th e stati on III th ~ ea y Ll ss they held up the mountain tram Monday when the othh.elr tlhvo redt~lrdne th~~rerclo~~lel~a at' the engine fire. So ended the for half an hour w 1 e t e:y ne wettest, jolliest and freest holiday we have eve r spent.

t

r


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CORRESPONDENCE. 1'1. B. -The Edt'tors deC/im to accept alty responsibility connected wi/It the o~i"io1lS oj Iheir CornsjJo". dellis. Name atld addrtss mltst always be givell, 1I0t 1ucessarily for publica/jolt, but as a gtlatantee ~ good fait/to Persollalitie: will ~-'lVolve certaitl t'ejulion, Letters should be written all Olle side of Ihe paper only.

To tlu Editors of

fI

THE CANTUARIAN."

DEAR SIRS,

7 b /he Editors

of

"THE CANTUARIAN'"

DEAR SIRS,

I welcome this, the first opportunity since Speech Day now afforded me by your columns to thank most heartily all the kind donors for the very beautiful gifts received on that day. In this Mr. Hodgson joins me, though he was able to express his thanks on the occasion of the presentation. We deeply appreciate the gifts and still more, the affection and goodwill which prompted them . I need ha rdly say that we shall never cease to take a deep in terest in the dear old School, though alas I we have left it; and shall always have a welcome for its members, past and prese nt, whom we have the pleasure of knowing . Believe me, Yours ve ry sincerely,

MARY HODGSON.

As I have received many kind letters fr.o m O.K.S. expressing regret that thl:!Y (lid not know sooner of my retirement from work at the School, I shall feel obliged if yo u will insert this in your correspo ndence coll1mns of the next issue of thn Can/uar/an . For I should like to exp lai n, to all who care to know that owing to bad attacks of bronchitis during the ''''inter terms of 1906-I907, and a seriol1S ca rriage accident in September, 1 QO? , I somewhat hurriedly decided last Christmas, by my doctor's advice, to retire from work at KS.C., in April of this year. Of co urse I was very busy, in co nsequence, all ~h c LO.nt Ter~ with moving and private busl1l(:;ss 111 addItIOn to my School work(to say nothing of another bad attack of bronchitis)- and so I had no spare time then for general letter-writing. I am glad, therefore, now to take this opportunity-though so mewhat lateof saying good-bye to all O.K.S. whom


.THE ·CANTUARIAN·. I have known, and specially to those with whom I have been associated in Speeches and Theatricals during the 36 years of my Mastership at the King's School.

Surely the wearer of the gown ought to conform to the customs assbciated with it. I am, with the usual apologies,

With every good wish to them and you, and best thanks to all those who have written so kindly to me.

G. OWNEND.

"Believe me,

DEAR SIRS,

Ever yours and theirs very sincerely.

L. G. MASON.

To the Editors

of "THE

CANTUARIAN."

DEAR SIRS, For the past six years the nam es of the Exhibitioners have been omitted to be placed on the boards provided for that purpose in th e Schoolroom . Surely th ose who in the past six years have won this lis tinction deserv e to see their narnes placed on the boar.d before they have lost 1\11 practical touch with the School.

REWARD.

'1'0 Ihe Edt'lors of

To th' Editors of .. THE CANTlJARIAN."

"THE CANTUARIAN ."

I)EA R SIRS,

I appeal to a ll Probs. and Juni ors not 10 allow to drop the ancient custom of l'IiLting off the pointed sleeve end s about nn inch from the end. This custom is almost as old as the Mow n itself and was rendered necessa ry hy scholars hitting each other with stones plnced in the sleeves.

Would it not be possible to arrange an annual Steeple-chase against St. Edmund's School. to be run in the Easter T erm? The School team would, of course, be chosen from among the winners in' ·the Op'e)l Steeple-chase. The latter, in order to prevent the proposed contest interfering with the Sports, might be run slightly earlier than usual.

.. MARATHON." 1b tM Edt'tors of DEAR

"THE CANTUARTAN."

SIRS,

- Would it be impertinent to ask if the , cases of shells in the Museum are to be . allowed to remain in their present banausic condition ? They may be specimen cases, they more nearly resemble rubbi sh-heaps. ' Vith the us~al profuse ap<?l?gies, hopin g to soo n see a change.I remain, Yours, etc.,

F. 'UGH. [This improvement we also hope soon to sec.-

Eoo.]


.8&

T HE CANT UARIAN.

RIFLE

SHOOTING ACCOUNTS.

Q!;t: •

By Subscript ions, 1907-8 .. .. Sa le of Extra Ammunition and Scoring Books

£ s. d. 53 8 9 9 17 10

1ll • • Balance deficit Cartridges Air Rifle Pellets .. Affiliat ion Fce to C. R. C. Barker, Attendance Dadds, Arm Chests

Fox , 3 w. O. Rifles Pollard, Prizes ~.

." Gibbs, Printing Score Book s, &c. Horlon, T nrllct Frames ... Targets .. . ". Postage and Telegrams Repairs .. . .. Certificates (Nat. Roll) . .. Sundries... Balance

£63 6 7

£ 2 22 2 3 7 2 6

s. d. 3 I, 17 9 IS 6 16 6 2 6 12 8 I 6

I 0 0 2 II 6 o 17 II

096 044 I 12 9 o II 0 I

£63 6 7 C. W. BELL.

Accounts examined and found correct :

A.

I,

I II

7 8

J. GALPIN,

{ I

N


THE CANTUARIAN.

SPORTS ' FUND ACCOUNT. RECEIPTS. Balance in hand, September, 1907 Boys'Subscdpt ions£ s. d. 1St Term .. 60 5 0 2nd Term 62 7 6

3rd Term

£ s. d. 13 9 91

66 3 6

Masters' Donations (,'anluarian Subscriptions Shop Profits ... .. . . .. Rent for Pasturage (Blore's Piece) Sale of FixlUre Cards ... Interest on Deposit Account ...

188 16 0 820 65 8 6 "

66 14 10 12 0 0

3 4 10 o 17 4

£

EXPENDITURE. CricketRent of Grou nd... ".£50 Professional and Goods. . 79 Water Company 4 Marl for Green Court 14 Nels, &c. 8 Fares and Lunches 5 Austen 2 Bu rton ." . . . 0 Sundry Expenses 0

0

0

4 9 2

0

2

6

II

3

17 4 0

0

7 6 16

8

FootballRcnts Bunce Gentry.,. ~'I atch Expcnses

K.C.R.F. U.

22 10

9

00

0

7 6 10

6

35 9 6

Football (md erleNetAusten Lilley, .. Rates and Taxes Burton .. , Rights-of- Way Marsh Repairs ...

2

0

I

o

165 6

2

I

s. d.

37 7 2 ... 15 7 0

~ I~ ~, 2

2

3

10

0

10

6

o

0

SportsPrizes and Starpps

12 18

Call tuaYia1~­

3

29 18 0

Printing ...

IIfisce/laneQltsGeneral Printing. .

7 19 0 Aldershot Expenses I 18 IO Dunce 2 1 2 10 Tennis Prize." 1 0 0 Stationery and Fives Balls 2 I 0

15 II 8 Balance in hand, Sept., 1908 ',,,

£358 13 31

£358 13 3, ALGERNON

A.udited and found correct :

A. Oct. 6t/l l I908.

J. GALPIN,

29 19 5

LATTER, I-Ioll. Treasurer.


• 88

THE

CANTUARIAN .

NOTICES. We beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following

subscriptions :H. E . H. Hayes, Esq. (3/6), A. R. Bellars, Esq. (3/6). H. P. Sparling, E sq. (3/ 6 ), R. S. Haskew, Esq. (3/6), G. C. Valpy, Esq. (7/- ), E. M. F. Evans. Esq. (10/6). Miss Smith ( 3/6), B. W. Leefe, Esq. ( ZI /-), R. W. H. Glennie, E sq. (7/-). A. C. Lock, Esq. (21 /-) , E. H. L. Johnston, Esq. (4/-), Rev. N. H . Theodosius

17/-), L. E. Reay, Esq. (3/6), H. I-I. E . Gossett, Esq, (3/ 6), W. N. Goss. Esq. (3/ 6), G. A. Purton, Esq. (3/6), H. Poole, Esq. ( 3/6), G. F. J. Rosenberg, Esq. (J/6), F. S. Porter, Esq. (3/6), M. Ware, Esq. (3/ 6 ), L. F. Paris, E sq. ( 10/6), Rev. L. H. Evans (3/6), H. J. Cape, Esq·U/ 6 ), J. E . Husbands, Esq. (7/-), E. P. Guest, E sq. (3/6). C. W. Bell, Esq . (3/6), C. J. Williamson, Esq. (3/6).

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. We beg to acknowledge the receipt of CIl1"01ui.:le, K elly College Chronicle, Herefordian , Lancing College Magazl'1lC, L eys the following contemporaries :AlleYllian, Bradfield College Chronicle, l!'orinigllliy, L ily, Jl1atverniatJ, Olavian, Bro11lsf{rovi(pz, Burian, Easlboumiatt, E liza- Radleian, Replo1ziall, Slu'rhurnian, Worksop bethan, Felsledian, Fellesiall , Glmalmolld College, UjIvem .

Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Palace St reel, Ca~·terbu·ry.


THE VOL .

VI I.

CANTUARIAN. DECEMBER,

I

g08 .

No . rz .

EDITORIAL. So we come to the end of another ter m- a term whi ch will not perhaps go down to history as one of the most notable ill our lengthy ex istence, but yet has seen moTt;! hard work and a greater keenness in every department of school life than many past terms. Change naturally rife at the beginning of another School year-we have recently been rem inded it is about the J 3 l oth of our existence-has resulted in our former \'igour bein g not merely mai ntai ned but even increased. One by one th e results of the entrance scholarships at Oxford and Cambridge Ilrc being announced, and with Classical successes at Oxford and Mathematical at Cnmbridge , th e work of the School has as least maintain ed its former high stan ding. The Football Team has playe d up hard th roughout the season and even when defeated by a stronge r side played such a good game that the defeat was not disI r 'ditable. We offer our thanks to Gardner for the way he has captained that team IIIId to Reyno ld s for his energy and dash in leading the forwards. The Debating Society has undoubted ly flourished more this term than in the p.lst; the H arv ey Society has likewise prospered, whi le the drill on Friday mornings 11I{'sents an improvement wonderful to behold. The Parrots migh t naturally he expected to be suffering from the loss of Mr. Il odgson, but Mr. Latter has so well carried on his policy that we hear rum.ours tha~ 1\ Purrot Penny Reading is soon to be afail accompli.


THE

CANTUARIAN .

It has been a great pleasure to welco m~ back Mr. Baly after his eighteen months absence, a nd his lecture on O.K..S. life in. Canada showed us that O.K.S., however far from Canterbury, form a very vigo rous body. Last, but not least, we come to the most noteworthy event of the past term, the publication of the School History by Messrs. Woodruff a nd Cape. The style in which the History has been written makes it a book of hvi ng interest for all in any way connected with us, fo r not only does it show our remarkable past, but a large portion has bee n reserved fo r an ample account of the present school. We wish our readers a H ap py Christmas a nd enj oyable holidays that th ey may come back refreshed and vigorous to co ntinue t he successes of th e School in the coming year.

SCHOLA

REGIA

The history is now published, and ready for the many readers who will naturally be anxious to make acquaintance with its contents. A brief outline of the general plan was given in a previous num ber of the Call1uarian and no more need now be add ed to th at. The book is ha ndsomely got u p, well illustrated with

pictures of the old school and its surroun dings, an d the result of the E ditors' researches is placed before the reade r in an easy and pleasant literary form. On account of th e co ntents of the modern part there will probably be some searching of hearts, as there must, of course, be so many different opi nio ns as th ere arc readers, and there is no need here to anticipate discussion . Mr. Cape has written a lengthy appreciation of th e wo rk of th e present H eadmaster i and, in the opinion of th e writer of this articl e, it is well that those, who only know the School as it is now, should be reminded of the vast change for the better wh ic h has come over th e

CANTUARIENSIS. place. The somewhat squalid and primit ive buil dings have been renovated and new ones added, electric lighting in stalled in mos t of th e class roo ms, and also the gy mn asium, and is shortl y to be continued to the studies. And here, it may be no ted, the lighti ng, or rathe r wan t of lighting. in the classrooms, forme rly could onl y be described as criminally inadequate. Improvements also have been made in other directio ns which need not be specifi ed. but whic h we re equally needed. T he re are, and must always be, considerab le differences of opinion about the detai ls of e ve ry administration, but most will concur in th e vie w that the general im provement in the condition ~ and status of the School is due mainly to the capacity and e nergy of t he present H eadmaster, and to him ve ry rightly is th is book dedicated. No a pology on the part o f th!' Edi to rs was needed fo r the inclusion of ath letic record s. Such records becomu of antiqua rian interest for future genera-


THE

CANTUARIAN.

tions, and further go to show, that in addition to the excellent-and, it may be added, successful - intellectual training here provided th ere is now ample pro-

vision for th e cultivation of those games and outdoor recreations which go so far to foster and develop much of all that is healthy and vigorous in English life.

FOOTBALL. KING'S SCHOOL v. MR. H. POOLE'S XV. . Played October 15 th. This, the first match of th e seaSOll resulted in an easy victory [or the Schoo l, by 33 points to nil, which was main ly brought about by the fin e play of th e for wards. T hey packed and broke up well and the ir work in the open was at times brill iant, Garibald i was to be seen at the head of most of the forward ru shes. while Richardson and Reynolds a-Iso showed up prominently. Alth?ugh the scori ng ,~'as fairly proli.fic not half the chances were accep ted, the passlll.g of the backs bell1g rath e r errattc. Martin at back kicked we ll but otherwi se had ~lOt much to do, Tries were sco red by Parsons (4), Matheson (2 ), Gardner, Kern ch, and Reynolds. The Schdol team was as follows :R. E. Martin (back) ; B. H . Matheson , R. M. Gent, H. Parso ns, D. V. Dunlop (three-guarters) ; H. Gardner, W. A. F . Kerrich (halves); H . F. Reynolds, V. C. f aylo r, C. A. M. Richardson, D . H . Cowie, J. W. S. Price. A. C. Fluke, R. C. Cumberbatc h, B. G. Garibaldi (for wards). KING'S SCHOOL v. LE I CE ST E R REGIMENT. on. October 20th, an d resulting in a defeat by 25 points to nil. From the start It was eVident that our backs were qui te outclassed in speed and weight, but n.,ILhough ,our oppone nts got three tries in the first fifteen minutes they did not sco re again Lil l half-time. Our forwards played very we ll together and quite held th eir own, bu t the three-q uarters ne ver ~ee m e d to get really goi ng and when th ey di d get the ball, which was not ~req u e nt, theI r chances were often thrown away by bad passing. Gardner ~cver.al tun es saved tries by his adm irable tackling ~nd Rey nolds was also prominent !" tIllS d ep~r tm e nt. Gen.t was easily the bes t of the three-quarters, and had bad IUGk 111 not scon ng once or tWice , T hough our opponents crossed ou r li ne seve n times play was by no means confined to our twenty-five, fo r th ey were often compelled to Louch dow n. The School team was as follows : R. E. Martin ( back) ; B. H . Matheson, R. M. Gent, H. Parsons, D . V. Du nl op ~layed


THE

2Q2

CANTUARIAN.

(th ree-quarters); H. Gardner. and W. A. F . Kerrich (halves) ; H . F. Reynolds, V. C. Taylor, C. A. M. Richardson. B. G. Garibaldi, A. C. Fluke, D. H. Cowie, R. C. Cumberbatch, J. W. S. Price (forwards). KING'S

SCHOOL v.

WYE

COLLEGE .

This match was played at \Vye , on Tuesday, October 27th, and resu lted in a win

for the school by one goal one try (eight points). to one try (3 points).

At the start

the school forwards did not seem to get together as they had done in previous matches, but got much qetter as the game went on, readl ing qu ite a high standard at th e end especially in t.he open; we were pressin g the greate r part of the fi rst half. Gardner, soon after the start, scored a clashing try whi ch was converted by Taylor. After this Wye began to press and dribbling over the line scored. Then the game went back to their twenty-five line and Reynolds afte r a forw ard rush scored, but it was not converted. During the whole match the ball was in the scrum and when it did get out into t.he open the three-quarters did not seem to be able to combine, and although better than usual still needed improvement. At half-time the score stood at eight points to three. In the second half we were very near scorin g two or three times and the game became much harder, but both sides failed to score . The School team was as follows: R. E. Martin (back) ; B. H. Matheson. R. M. Gent, H. Parsons, D. V. Dunlop

(three-quarters); H . Gardner, R. E. Gordon (halves) ; H. F. Rey nolds, V. C. Taylor, C. A. Nr. Richardson, B. G. Garibaldi, D. H. Cowie, A. C. Fluke, R. C. Cumberbatch , J. W. S. Price (forwards). KING'S SCHOOL v. MERCHANT TAYLORS. Played Wednesday, November 4-th. Fluke kicked off for the School and from a scrum in their twenty-fi ve Gardner broke through and gained a try in the first minu te. Taylor convertin g. On resuming two more tries in quick succession were obtained by Gottwaltz and Gard ner, but after th is the game suddenly changed: a relief kick from th eir back enabled a fast three -quarter to follow up hard, to swerve past Martin, and gain a try in the centre, a goal resulting. A littl e later they again broke awny and scemed certain scorers, but Gardner sprinted up from behind out-paced their rea l man and tackled him finely near our line . Before the wh istle went for half time wu managed to add one more goal, through Matheson who mad e a fine run by vigorou A handing off down the field and scored beneath the posts (20- 5)¡ After the interval we had the game completely in our hands the forwards playing excell ently, while 0111 backs were far superior to our opponents. Gott waltz, who played a good ga11w, opened our accoun t and he was soon followed by Gardner. All the three-quartou4 played a sound game and they combined better than in previous matches. Garcl1lt11


THE

CANTUARIAN.

293

played a ~agnific~nt .game frequently employ.ing the cross¡ kick ; once when he was near t.oue on th ~lr Im e, Gent follow erl up hard and scored . He gained five tries and kicked magnIficently. A .fe~ture of the g-ame was Taylor' s kicking: six of th~ goals h,e converted, Ga rdner klckmg the remain ing one . Final score of goals 5 tries (So pomts) to 1 goal (5 points). other tries were scored by Gent (2) Mer;ett and

Reynolds. Of the forwards Reynolds, Garibaldi and Taylor were the most conspicuous. The School team was as follows ;R. E. Martin (back); H. Parsons, R. M. Gent, C. S. Merrett. B. H . Matheson ghree-qudrters) ; H . Gardner, R: L. Gottwallz (halves); H. F . Reynolds, V. C. Taylor .W A. l'vSl.pR~chardson, B. G. Ganbaldl, D. H . Cowie, A. C. Fluke, R. C. Cumberbatch'

J.

.

. flee (forwards).

KI NG'S

)

SCHOOL v. SUTTON

VALENCE.

Th is match was played at Sutton Val ence OIl Saturday November 7th The Scho~1 \\~on ~y 3 goals l o.tries to I try. In th e first half the School started w~lI and sco.re I1ln ~ tlI~es. one bell1g converterl . The passing of the three-quarters and al so ~h~~r .~omlbI~atlOn was mu~h better; Gent especially played brilliantly maki~g several Inc.IVI ua e orts and sconng 1 tim es. Price got hurt soon after the start and had to ~C Llre: ~n the second half our 0Pl?onents I?layed up much better and we only scored our tIm es, and two goals we re kIcked. Sutton Valence at one time pressed hard ~~ld a try wdasGsc~red ~ather far out. Tries wcre also scored by Parsons (4) Dunlop ( 3) If crrett an anbald l. ' , The School team was as follo ws :H. A. Keyser (bac k) ; H. Parsons. C. S. Merrett, R. M Gent D V D unl oP (three R. E. Martin, R. G: Gottw.ltz (halves) ; H. Re;noid; , V. T.v1or-

'(II~te~~)~.

F.

c

; J' 'k' (lfchardson, B. G. Ganbaldl, A. C. Fluke, R. C. Cum berbatch J. W S Price' ' .. , I.... uc es orwards). KI NG'S ~~'his n~~~ch

SC HOOL v.

EPSOM

COLLEGE.

was played on th e Beckenham Club Ground kindly lent for the III'caSlon . .. e School forwards started on' in the slack and easy wa with which we Wtlrc so famIlIar last yea r, but which had. hitherto been lacking this ye~r. The would have th: ba~ out smar.tl'y. and when It came out it seldom went further than 'kartin W 10 seeme. to ave a posItIve horror of letting the ball out of his hands. I . !-arly 111 the game Siaribaldi se.veral tim es got away from the line out, but no ';11:. <lppa rently thou.ght It worth whIle to support him. After a few minutes play the I, Ie-quarters, fi ndlllg that they cou ld not give or take passes whilst in motion 'II{ cavonred to do so whil'it stationary. There wa s no visible improve ment and it IIIlIrcly meant that any ground gain ed was lhc res ult of an in dividual effort. 'SllOrtly

lit


294

THE

CANTUARIAN .

before half time Parsons scored between the posts after a fine swerving run, and Taylor converted. After half time the forwards awoke to the fact that they were affording rather a disgusting spectacle to the select body of O.1<.S. 011 the touch lille, and played a vigorous game. The Epsom three-quarters had looked dangerous several, hmes, chiefly owing to the superiority of their halves, and at length scored a try, whIch w~s conve rted. A little la ter Dunlop scored after a run from half way, and Taylor agam converted, but almost immediately our opponents scored again. The try however was not converted. The School now pressed and wo uld almost certain ly have scored had not Pallise r shown his usual perverted notion of when and how to pass. A few minutes before time Parsons again scored, but far out, and Taylor failed to convert. The whole game was disappoi nting and rather I scrappy.' The forwards \~ e re inexcusably bad in the first half, but in the second th e~ did their be.st to re.t neve a bad past. The three-quarters were compleLCly 01T theH game. posslbly oWlI1g to the absence of Gardner and Gent; Parso ns was the best individually of a bad lot, bu t Merrett shewed signs of relapsing into his old habits of stopping short and passing wildly. Martin at half had, we doubt not, good intentions. but does better at back. We were glad to see several O.K..S. and other friends of the School amongst lhe spectators, who urged on the team which was as follows :H . A. Keyser (back) ; D. V. Dunlop, B. I-I. Matheson, C. S. Merrelt, H. Parson s (three-quarters) ; R. E. Martin, R. L. Gottwaltz (halves); H. F. Reynolds, V. C. Taylor, C. A. IVI. Richardson, B. G. Garibaldi, A. C. Fluke, R. C. Cumberbatch, R . Juckes, W. F. C. Palliser (forwards ). KING'S SCHOOL v. DOVER COLLEGE. Played on Cullen's, Thursday, November 12th. The School began to press . immediately and Dover was compelled to touch down. The ball soon after came out to Parsons on the ri ght wing who made a fine swerving run finishing up with a brill iant try. no goal resulting. Shortly after Gottwaltz threw himself over fr?m a five yards serum on their li ne, but though we tried hard they prevented us sco nn qagain in this half. The school forwards were not playing up to form and allowed our ' opponents to get the ball very often, and the careful markin g of our backs alO1~o preven ted them from breaking away. Loose serums in mid-field oftcn resulted III the Dover forward s making some dangerous rushes which were on ly stopped by.tho grand saving and kicking of Gent and Gardner. Thus we led by a mer~ 6 pomts to ni l wh en the half-time whistle went. After the interval the forwards, adnl1rably leel by Reyn olds, immediately showed a marked improvement, and Dover w~re soon hard pressed. At this point we were very un fort unate in losing Gent who rettred hurt, but immediately after Gardner broke through and scored, converting his try. 'We wcr never much in difficulties after that and some good passing among the backs enabled


THE

CANTUARIAN.

us to add another try, Gardner being the scorer. Before the close the ball several times went right down the back division. to 1\1atheson, but he was so well marked that he could not get away. Gottwaltz succeeded in obtain~ng one m.ore try be~ore the whistle blew, leaving us victors hy 3 goals and 2 tnes ( 2l" pomts) to ml. Of the forwards Reynolds stood ou t by himself pl.aying a fine game all through: Garibaldi, Taylor, and Richardson were also consplcuoUS. The three-quarters played very well but certainly missed several chances. The School team was as follows :R. E . Martin (back); B. H. Matheson, C. S. Merrett, R. M. Gent, H. Parsons (three-quarters) ; H . Gardner. R. L. Gottwaltz (halves); H. F. Reynolds, V. C. Taylor, C. A. M. Richardson, B. G. Garibaldi, D. H. Cowie, A. C. F luke, R. C. Cumberbatch, R. J uckes (forwards). KING'S SCHOOL v. MR. G. B. COCKREM'S XV. Played on Cullen's, November 17th. A magnificen t game ended in a ~ictory for the opposing team, which included such well known players as Archer, Stnnger and Jones, by two goals (one dropped) and four tries (21 points) t? two goals and one try ( 13 points). They kicked off, and play for the first few mlllutes was confined to scrum s near the centre but grad ually th e school began to press them back within Lheir twenty-five. H ere we remained for a long time and thou.gh our three-quarters often got possession they were always tackled close to th e lme. At last a scrum almost on the line gave us our chance and, Gottwaltz passing neatly out to Gardner, lhe latter made a clever run round th e blind side, passed to IVlatheson who just managed to throw himself over. Our next try was lucky. Fine ki cking by Gardner and good play amongst the forwards brought us into th ei r twenty-five again and here na rdner broke through but dropped the ball,. while Dunlop picking up slipped in between the posts, Gardner succeeding at th e kick. Thls was an excellent start agamst n very strong team, bllt after this, Cockrem's team began to p~ess us back and when Jones passed to Stringe.r in our twenty-five.n. try seemed ~ertalll , but Gardner came to Oll r reSClle with a magnificent tackle. A httle later Stnnger scored far o~t, a goal r -stilting. The latter soon after tried to drop a goal, but the ball falhng short Gardner relieved by a beautiful kick. Half-time then came with the sco re 8 pOi,nts ~o 5 in our favo ur. On resuming it was soon seen that our forwa rds, though plaYlllg ('xcellently, could not keep it up for th ey quickly got into our twenty-five where Stri?ger dropped a goal straight in front. This put them ahead (9-~) and they qUIckly "hawed their superiority in the back division by another try in the corner, the ball hnving gone down th e line to Stringer. The ~ick failed. The opposing forwards h!ld now got well into their game and two mor.e tnes f~llowed, one far out o.n the left, lhr. other nearer in. The kicks both went wiele leavmg the score 18 POlllts to 8. 'I'hough the forwards made a last dash and. got near their goal some good combination between Jones and Stringer resulted tn another try. It was now close


THE

CAN~UARIAN.

on time, but from a line out Matheson dribbled right down the field and scored und er th e posts, Gardner converti ng. Gardner played exceptionally well, as also did all the three-quarters and the forwards showed what a magnifice nt pack they are. Reynolds played his usual untiring game, Garibaldi and Taylor were also prominent. The School team. was as follows:R. E. Martin (back); H. Parso ns, C. S. Merrett, B. H . Matheson, D. V. Dunlop, H . Gardner, R. L. Gottwaltz (hal ves) ; H. F. Reynolds, V. C. Taylor. C. A. M. Richardson, B. G. Garibaldi, D. H. Cowie, R. C. Cumberbatch, A. C. Fluke, R. Juckes (forwards). KING'S SCHOOL v. EASTBOURNE COLLEGE. This match was played at Eastbourne on Novem.ber 19th, and resulted in a win for our opponents by two tries (6 points) to nothing. Eastbourne settled down in our twenty-five at once, but co uld get no , further. Their sc rum of seven men fully held thei r own, led brilliantly by a massive forward who sec urecl the ball consistently in every line-out, and worked in the scrum proportionately. The School defence was very sound and Carnac's fei nts had no result except to attract four school people round his ankles and neck. The game was quite merciless but played with the utm ost good spirit by both teams. After twenty minutes play in which iVlartin mad~ a reputation at full back, Eastbourne sco red far out owing LO a complete misunderstanding on the part of the School defence who chose to consider that the ball had bee n thrown out from the wrong point in tOllch. The goal kick failed, and the School promptly made a bee-line for Eastbourne terri tory. Seve ral limes we should have scored if the inside three-quarters had been less selfish and sent the ball along to Matheson or Parsons, who had little to do, but looked dangero us the moment thp.y had a chance. Half time came wi th the School pressing after more excellent work by ,Martin . Restarting the same thing happened again. Eastbourne pressed 'at first, but th e man with the ball was promptly grassed, Steele, th eir scrum half, wh o thro ughout had played right on top of his form, repeatedly beat our first line of defence, but his outside three-quarters could not attack wi th any combination and his efforts were always frustrated, till at len gth in one of th ese little dashes he found a responsible person in Carnac ready for the pass, The latter feinting all the way collapsed over ' the line to score Eastbourne's second try i again nothing res ul ted from the kick at goal. The School continued to play up, and the inside three-quarters by way of a novel experiment decided to se nd t he ball out to th e wings. Parsons in conseq uence nea rly scored afte r a fine combined run of our line of offence j-the offensiveness lay particularly in th e two in sides (laugh ter). Merrett again was laid low a yard outside th e line, and finally another bout of passing very nearly let us in, but again th e Eastbourne defence proved sou nd , No-side was sounded directly afterwards. The game was <l.S hard and strenuous us


THE

CANTUARIAN.

297

could be wish~d, and while we were unlucky to lose we should have been distinctly fort unate to WlIl. We must congratulate our opponents on the very fine team they possess, and thank them most heartily for their hospitality to us. The School team was as follows ;R. E. Martin (back); B. H . Matheson, R. M. Gent, C. S. Merrett, H. Parsons (three-quarters) ; H. Gardner, R. L. Gottwaltz (halves ); H . F. Reynolds, C. A. M. RIchardson , B. G. Ga ribaldi, R. C. Cumberbatch, D. H . Cowie, A. C. Fluke, R. Juckes. G. O. Norton (forwards). KING'S SCHOOL v. HYTHE F .C. This,match ~va s played on Cullen's Grounel, on Saturday, November 21st, and resulted In a W111 for the School by one point, th e score being I goal 2 tries, to 2 g<?als. Th~ school started off with a rush and we pressed our opponents for a conslderable tn~e . Dunlop getting the ball from a pass from Merrett ran Some way along the touch 11l1e and then scored. After th is the O"ame became harder nevertheless,. \:e were able to cross th e line twi ce m?re., I,n the second half our' opponents gettll1 0 together much better crossed our line tWIce and the try in each case was converted . At this point the school came to cheer on the team who were able to prevent our opponents from scoring again j the school were without the services of som~ of the backs ancl were for this reason rather weak behind . The two tries in the mst half were sco red by Gottwaltz and Merrett. The School team was as follows ;R. E. Martin (back) ; D. V. Dunlop. C. S. Merrett, l-I. Parsons, C. V. Snatt (tl.Hee-quarters); , l B R. L. Gotlwaltz, R. E. Gordon (halves ) " H ' F . Reyno ld s, CAM . .j â&#x20AC;˘ 1\.IC lardson. ,G. Garibaldi, R, C, Cumberbatch, D. H . Cowie, A. C. Fluke, R. Juckes, G O. Norton (forward s). KING'S SCHOOL v. WYE COLLEGE. Played on November 26th. Before the game had been in progress very long Dunlop had crossed their near touch. The try was unconverted, but we immediately rll s~le d the ball back to OUf. op ponents â&#x20AC;˘ 25' and Parsons got in after a good run, willch he repeated a, f0W ~TIInu tes afterwards, Merrett succeeded with the place-kick and ~rom, the fol,loWIng kick-off. the Viye forwards, keeping well together dribbled to our 2~, l\Iarllll, however, picked up beautifully and after 11 short run found lou~h \~'lth a ,magnificent kick ~vith in a ,few yards of our opponent's line. The game Hla)cd 111 their half !rom now till half- tllnc and we scored + times, through Parsons t 2) [uld l\'Ferrett (2) . 1 he .fonner played a very good game at outside-right running and K\~e rvll1g well and hal1dll~g off strongly. After half-time vVye had the advantage of wlild and ground and gamed three tries, all of which were converted. About ten


29 8

THE

CANTUARI AN .

minutes from time they had the misfortune to lose one of their halves who had been playing well; just be fore time Cottrell made a good run and got over, but t he kick failed and we we re left victorious by 28 points (2 goal s 6 tries) to 15 points (3 goals). KING' S SCHOOL v. DOVER COLLEGE. T his match was played at Dover. and resulted in the decisive victory 'of z4-nil in our opponents' favour. TWe 111<\)', however. co nsole ourselves with the fact t hat we had only one 1St colour in our th ree-quarter line a ne! not a 1St game ha lf on th e field. The combinati on a nd pace of our opponents' line was very goo d and it was on ly owing to this that th ey were able to score so frequently. Our forwarrl s, who were in full force, played an excellent game and it mu st ha ve been most disheartenin g after having taken the ball right into their twenty-five to see their line break away with scarcely any opposition, and time after time take th e ball right back again. The School team was as follows ;R. E. Martin (back) ; H. Parsons, A. C . Cott rell, D. V. Dunlop, C . V. Snatt (three-quarters) ; C. S. Merrett, H. L. H. Crem er (halves) ; H. F. Rey nolds, C. A. M. Richard son, V. C. Taylor, B. G. Gariba ldi, R. C. Cumberbatch, D. H. Cowie, A. C. Fluke, W. J. S. Price (forwards) .

DEBATING SOCIETY. This term has witn essed the 25th anniversary of th e Te-foundin g of th e King's School Debating Society. and a period of new life has beeH ushered i)l , if the in crease in th e number of th e debates be any criteri on. The first debate of the term on Vivisection was reported in th e last issue of th e Cau/ua.ria.ll. On Wednesday, October 13th, th e experim ent of an impromptu de bate was tried and proved highly successful. T he six selected speake rs were divided by lot into two sid es, a nel 1\11r. Cape had kindly written seve ral subj ects on different sealed pieces of paper. One was opened and

contained the motion "That in th e opllllon of thi s house the Jll venile Smoking Bill is an unwarra ntable infringement of the liberty of the subject." H . W. K. Mowll had bee u selected by lot as th e move r a nd was supported by C . J. Galpin and H. D. Townend. R. M. Ge nt led th e opposition , supported by C. F. M. N . Ryan an d J. Kette lwell . They were all in the unfortunate position of being ignora nt of th e te rm s of th e Bi ll whi ch were onl y gradually e lucidated as th e debate prog ressed . The supporters of the mOLi on showed th at smokin g had no effect on brai n-powt' r. a nd that if boys we re nOL a llowed to smoke out-ofdoors, they would do so at home j th o


./

THE

CANTUARIAN.

latter bein g far more injurious. Various experts made sundry attempts to state the in gredients of an ordinary cigarette and its rival the dirty " fag-end. 1I The debate became vi gorous wh en it was asked what boys would buy instead of ciga rettes. I t was de cided to be impossible to save half-pence, and the rival merits of "blueeyed rats tJ and such like swee ts or penn}' dreadfuls fonnd eager parLisans. From th e aud ience E. B. Hosking with racy an ecdotes made what was undoubtedly th e ~est speech of th e evening . \¡V. A. F. Kernch a nd D. J. N. Lee spoke against, while B. G. Ga ribaldi , V. C. Taylor and C .. C. Denma n supported the motion, whIch, on a show of hand s, was won by 2Z votes to 1 9. On \Vedn esday, Octobe r 28th, E. B. H ?s kin g moved .â&#x20AC;˘ Tha t in th e opinion of tl~I S h.ouse the passing of the Lice nsing BIll (slllce deceased) would be bene fi cia l." His clear-cut and deci sive arguments as to ti ed-houses, the e ffect on the price of beer, fictitious "' wid ows," &c., were most convincing, but R . .M . Gent appea led to th e audi ence with impassioned oratory to reject th e spoliation of pri vate property H. W. K. Mow ll ,hawed how th e bill ought to be accepted as t he firsLstep to Telllper~n ce Reform, whil e C. J. Ga lpin drew lund pictures of village life without th e ' . pub." H . D . T owne nd spoke of g rocers' licenses and the evils of ti ed hOllses, displaying his powe rs as a master of finan ce, while J. Kettclwell , who qlloted Omar Khayyam, delivered a speec h of which th e peroration on the advan tages of beer not only captivate d hi s audi ence, but will long remain as one of th e bes t rh etorical efforts we have heard at a

,-

299

From the audience school debate. C. F. M. N. Ryan, in a carefully prepared speech with numerous extracts from recent speeches by membe rs of both political parties in favour of Local Option, opposed t he motion, as also did V. C. Taylor, and on a show of hands it was lost by 36 votes to 12 . On Wednesday, Novembe r 11th, C. J. Galpin proposed a motion HThat in the opinion of thi s house the suffrage should not be extended to women." He was supported by C. F. M. N. Ryan and R. W. H. Moline, whil e H. D. TOlVnend and D. J. N . Lee led the opposition. T he audience appeared to have even more in te rest than usual in this debate, and each speaker was vigorously applauded and heckled. The mover pointed out that th e prope r sphere of woman was in th e hom e, and the objections we re not raised against the suffragists so much as against the suffragettes. The supporters of the moti on argued that wom en generally do not wish to practice politics, but people like Mrs. Pankhurst will seize the opportunity. \Vomen, they declared, were too greatly influenced by sentimenta lism. E. B. H osking from the audi ence made the best speech of th e e vening. He showed the present glarin g injustices to wom en, who hav e shewn resource, wit, &c., a nd asked if one suffragette can outwit a whole HOllse of Commons, what they will not be capable of with regard to war. C. H. Crowley and F . L . Goad also opposed the motion, while C. \"1. Kidson and G. C. dt! Mattos supported it. Un a show of ha nds it was won by 26 votes to 1 2 .


THE

300

CANTUARIAN.

POETA COELESTIS. (WITH

ApOLOGIES

TO

POETA

MUNDANUS.)

When we write <as poets can), Smitten by divine affiatus, Rampant, ready rhythm s come, And the enraptured critics mte us. A fabric of phil osophy, Theoremic theosophy, 'With here an apt apostrophe, And there an illustration. Similes, of course, sublime, Culled from every agc and clime, Expressed in deathl ess, flowing rhyme, With alliteration. Panteclmichon-monstrosity! Naive ne bulosity I

â&#x20AC;˘.

Thus it goes to connoisseurs, Destined fair for rame immortal, Bound to pull th eir learned legs (Bless its heart ), and so we chortle I

HARVEY SOCIETY. At a meeting held on Novembe r 7th, M. A. Chappell read a paper on ÂŤThe Evolution of the Motor Car." The paper began with a description of the first motor car put on the public roads, and a slide illustratin g this car was shown. The reader proceeded to give a short outline of th e history of the motor up to the time of the introduction into England of the petrol car, and he then explained by means of slides the working motions

of th e modern four-cycle petrol engine. The exhibitio n of some slides illustrating various types of modern car concluded th e pa per, to which H. de H . Smith contributed.

On Novembe r 21 st C. H. \;Voodhouse read a pa pe r on" Some British Butterflies." H e dealt especially with those species of butterflies whi ch arc found in Kent, pointing out that, although the distribu-


THE

CANTUARIAN.

lion of butterflies is, as a rule, extremely local, a chalk soil is favourable to many kinds of them. The paper was illustrated by hand -painted slides, which reproduced in detail the markings and colouring of the types shown. Some of the slides, including one of the "peacock " butterfly, were chosen to illustrate protective colouration, the eye-spots on th e wings of the "peacock" diverting the attention of a bird from the vital parts of the insect. The paper also touched 011 the q l1 cstion of th e mig ration of butterflies rro m the co ntinent to England. At a meeting held on November 28th, Rev. A. J. Galpin spoke on the subj ect of "Nature and Early Man in North Am erica." After giving a general sketc h or the geographical ieatures of th e co ntinent, the lecturer discussed th e different types of prehistoric remains round there. These remains may be rlivided roughly i'nto two classes, those c'onsisting of enclosures, either munitive or sacred, and mounds properly so called. The sacred enclosures show similar rlmtures to those found in Great Britain II lld elsewhere ; they are remarkable for Ih()i r size and for their regularity of con-

RIFLE

301

struction. The mounds, which may have bee n built originally of clay bricks, are usually either burial mOl1nds, or of a symbolical nature, made in th e shape of men, animals, and bi rds. The great serpent mound of Ohio and the elepha~t mound of \Visconsin form notable speclmens of the latter class. The lecture, which was illustrated with diagrams, closed with an account of the early history of some of the tribes of North America, and with a description of a visit to the Great Salt Lake of Utah.

On December 5th, a paper was read by R. E . Everitt, Esq., on "A Holiday in Switzerland." The reader gave an interesting description of his experiences in the AIDS, showing that there are many occupations in Switzerland for a visitor between ascending the Matterhorn, on the one hand, and being pulled up the Rigi by a funicular railway, on the other. The paper included a first-hand account of the sensations incident to falling down a precipice, and at the conclusion a di scllssion was held on the causes of a c urious colour phenomenon seen by the reader in the Alps.

SHOOTING.

The Black Horse Medals were competed for this term in all three Classes. The lo nditions in Class I. consisted of deliberate shooti ng at 25 and 50 yards, and dIKrt/)pearin g targets at 25 yards and a t unmarked distances . .In Class II ..we had Ite Ii )crate shooting, and one time limit practice. In Class III. It wa~ all delIberate. I Il1'lphore siO'naliinO' was a condition in all three classes. The wll1ners were :I ' I II.~ 1.: C. Galpi':-t who beat K. L. Williams by one point on the shooting, but 1II1I1pletely mastered him with" the signalling flags. Class II.: H. ~ . H. Cremer, who, t.hough he got second high est points in shooting, took the pnze away from

r


302

THE

CANTUAluAN.

R. D. N. Daniel by his superiority in signalling . Class III.: A. E . Carpente r, with H. Threlfall a good second. The entries were not very good; indeed only twelve boys took the trouble to go through the whole of the conditions of their respective competitions. We have had 1 30 boys under instruction this term, but many of these, who have shown little inte rest in shooting. will have to retire next term in favour of a good numb er of boys who joined the School in September. l..iVe have had three excellent officers in the persons of Galpi n. Townshend , and Courtney, while Townend has also done excellent work in taking the semaphore classes. It is pleasing to note that t he average standard is quite fair, while th ere arc a goodly number of First Class boys who can always be relied on to make a good target, and we have had seve ral I I possibles" this term. The Town In ~clo or Ran ge is now fitted with disappeari ng targets and a running man -a most elusive gentleman. Major Hulke, of the I< Buffs," veq' kinelly came and presented the medals on Monday, Nov. 30th. His presence on that occasion is one marc proof-if further proof be need ed-of the great interest and real helpful sympathy which military officers sho w in civi lian rifle shooti ng. Major Hulke was met in the Mint Yard by the Drilling Co mpa ny drawn up in three sides of a square. After the presentation of prizes, the Company was put through a few Com pany movements and ski rmishing drill, which they pe rformed very well and dre w from Major Hu lke a very high compliment. The writer of this who has had a good deal to do with working up the Company to their present satisfactory level would like to take th is opportunity of acknowledgi ng the interest and keenness shown by the rank and file and by the section commanders, as well as by those of th e School at large who attended the voluntary drills. Of course we don't yet insti nctive ly know the difference between left turn and right turn-we don't have enough practice for that-b ut we have at least learnt in a small Company how it is possi ble to move large bodies of men from one place to another, in an orderly array and not as a rabb l e .~ With a li ttle more attention when on parade and a little more precision in immediately carrying out C. W. B. orders, the Company sho ul d become quite good.

J.

THE POEMS OF R. That differential treatm ent which accepts an author's prose wo rks duty free, while it lays a heavy embargo all. his poetry, has affected Robert Louis Stevenson more than most other writers. As a novelist he is recognised as the creator of a new standard of style : as an

L. STEVENSON.

essayist he is known ancl loved of all wh o can appreciate a perfectly balanced union of wi t and wisdo m and a firm ness and delicacy in language that reminds one of nothin g so much as of the movements of a billiard cue in the hands of a talented player.


THE CANTUARIAN.

30 3

As a narrator of quiet uneventful man who has enl arged am sy mpathies journeyings, wherein he opens th.e eyes a nd taught us the beauty of am own of th e blind to unsuspected beautIe~ ancl language in "Vailima L~tters", •. ,:irgin,: interests, he has found many admIrers, ibus Pu~ri sque ", or "\\lelr of H ermlston. But th ere is some thing more : for but few or none who have dared to imitate' as a writer of letters he affords when a prose-writer falls to writing poetry almost'the only modern insta~ce to it will often be because he has thoughts disprove the decadence <?f epIstolary to express which eith er cannot subm it to literature-but. as a poet (If we except the restraints of prose or prefe r to wear two or three short pieces) he is neglected the veil wh ich protects th em from the bv most and to many unknown. c'dry light" of criticism, whi.le it enha~l~es . It may be argued that the titl~ of .their beauty in the eyes of kmdred spmts. And indeed the com mon theory that the poet is too lofty for one. who ha~ wnlten so little verse in compan son to hiS p~ose , poet is enslaved b~ the claims .of scansion and has confined himself almost entIr.cly and rhyme is a mIstake. It IS th e prose to short lyrical or elegiac pieces, leavmg writer who is in bondage and can not f~ll'y unproved his power in a sllstained effo rt. express himself; in poetry the. SpIrIt But the Marathon race is not the only goes free, in a phrase or a .word, WIth an elasticity and lightness demed to the more test of the runn er. precise idioms and more cumbrou~ ~orms T he reputation of Tennyson rests on of the rival style: and the Sptnt of " 1n Memoriam" rather than on the Stevenson, while it su ffers less th~n. that "Idylls." rvratth ~w Arrl:old mi gh t have l e~t of any other writer from t~lese restnctIon~, "Merope" 1ll1wntten, withoutdamageto hiS still seems to feel at tunes th~ fette~ s fame : and if Browning is to be kn.ow n to gan ing, and is. fai n. to .release Itself m posterity as the author of :' The RlI1g and song and claim ItS bIrthnght not from the the Book," his readers WIll gladly grant bondwoman but from the free . him the titl e of poet on the score of ~he There is a notable passage in <I The soliloquy of " The Pope," without trudgll1g all the weary way (with Calverley) "from Woodman " which describes the. s~rugg} e for existence in Nature as exhIbIted 111 here to Mesopotamy." a tropical forest : the dignity an.d .forc~­ But if Stevenson' s poems are sli.ght fulness both of rhythm and dIction IS in for m they are large in conceptlon. really beyond criticism,and one is teI?pted There js the' same masterly command of to wonder whether Stevenson h~mse~f lucid expression , the sa.me sen~e ~f could have drawn a finer picture In Ius restrained power aI~d fe~11l1g that 111 hI S ow n inimitable prose. prose writings belIe hIS modest sel f.. I saw the wood for what it was, criticism-"we think ourselves fin~ fello.ws The lost and the victorious calise. nowadays but we can not WrIte like T he dt:adly batt le pitched in lin~ ; Hazlitt" ;' and in •• U nd erwoods", ,. Songs Saw silent weapons cros!> and shune ; Silent defeat, silent assault, of Travel " and .. Ballads" we find all A battle and a burial vault. the" sign ~nd note and character" of the


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Thick round me in the teellling mud Briar and fern st rove to the blood: The hooked Iian:!. in h is gin Noosed his reluctant neighbour in, And wantoned on his climbing coil : Contending roots fought for the soil Like fri ~htcncd demons; in despair Compctlllg branches pushed fur Rir : G reen conquerors from overhead

Best rode the bodies of their dead ... •l

But the mysteries of the Tropic have fascinated other writers besides Stevenson ; and Mr. Winston Churchill in his newly published book on his Africa n travels has attempted a similar description in prese" One becomes, not without n secret sense of .. aversion, the spectator of an intense convulsion of life and death. Reproduction and decay II are locked struggli ng together in infinite (I

"embraces ...... Huge trces jostle one another " for room to live j slender growths stretch up· " ward, as it seems in agony, to\va l'ds sunlight " and life. T he soil bursts with irrepressible "vegetation : ever}' victor, trampling on the "totting mould of exterminated antagonists, " soars aloft only to encounter another host of "aerial rivals, to be burdened with masses of "parasit ic foli age ...... laced and bound and " interwoven with interminable tangles of vines "and trailers."

It will be seen that Churchill follows very closely his unacknowledged original i but I put these two passages side by side, not

so much for the purpose of comparing two different styles as to call attention to one of the distingu ishing features of Stevenson's genius. For while Churchill leaves us blindly struggling, as with a sense of op pression in the tropical overgrowth of words, Stevenson wa ves his poet's wand over the picture. and sels it in the t ru e perspective, till we see it with his eyes, as an integral part of the cosmic order"Here also sounil Th}' fans, 0 God ! Here too Thy banners move abroad; Forest and city, sea and shore And the whole earth Thy threshing Aoor. "

It is this tran sllluting touch that marks so many of his poems. He like Euripides has his "Tonches of things common Till they rise to tonch the spheres."

both in his language, and his thoughts. The comm on and prosaic word acquires under his hand a true poetiC gracefulness i while in his subjects there is no plundering of brilliant historical episodes, no delv ing in clark places to extract themes t hat will arrest attentio n by thei r novelty, but a natural presentment of homely and simp le thoughts changed by his alchemy into pure gold . [To bt cOllthmtd.]

SCHOOL NEWS. We heartily congratulate R. M. Gent on being elected to an £80 Scholarship for Classics at T rinity College, Oxford.

Our hp.artiest congratulations arc offered to E. B. H osking on being elected to an '£80 Scholarship for Classics at Wadham College, Oxford. ~.

~~

0)(.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

'VVe hearti ly cong ratul ate H . T ownshend a ll being elected to a l\II inor Scholarship for Mathematics at Trinity College, Cam bridge. ';'',.:.';'~

We offer our hearty congratulations to R. VV. H. Moli ne on being elected to a £60 Scholarship for Mathematics at Emmanuel College, Cambridge. -::- 'X

30 5

add ress on Monday, Dec. Chapel Service. -::-1:'*

~.\

~:.

-:.'

E. B. H osking was elected to a £50 Exhibition for Classics at Hertfo rd College, Oxford . Vo/e congratulate the following, who receive(! their Colours on Nov. 2 Ist ;1St XV. B. G. Garibaldi. D. H. Cowie, R. C. Cumberbatch, R. E . l\,Iartin. 2nd XV. R . ]uckes, R. L. GOltwaltz. R. E. Gordon, D. O. Fard ell, P. C. Snatt, A. F . Cottrell . ~:-*.-::-

'VVe also congratul ate the following, who received th eir Colours on Dec. 12th :1St XV. A. C. Fluke, R. L. Gottwaltz, C. S. Merrett. W. ]. S. Price. 2nd XV. G.O. Norton. W.F.C.Palliser, L. G. L. Denne, C. V. Snalt, H. A. Keyser, T . D. Salt, L. L. F oster, J. W. Wayte. 0)(.,~

*'

On Advent Sun day, the Rev. R. G. 11 0dgs0I1 kindly came and preached in I he School Chapel. 'i.\~-:"

His Grace the Archbishop, as Visitor the School, has consented to give a short

at our last

On Nov. 25th, Mr. E. Stuart Bruce came and exhibi ted his Aerial Graphoscope to the School. There we re man)' speculations as to what this mach ine wou ld do, and the lecturer, not only gave the answe r to t hese questio ns, but also explained the mechanism of the Graphoscope itself.

:,:.

R. M. Gent was elected to an H onorary Scholarship for Classics at E xeter College, Oxford.

2 J st,

,;,,,,:.~.,

On Dec . •• th. Mr. Bal)', who left us in the slimmer of 1907 to go out with a part}' of O.K.S. to Canada, came and gave the School a most interesting lantern lecture, which showed life at the Green Court Store, in all its various aspects from the time 'of its foundation. The lecture not only proved most amusing. but gave a remarkably vivid idea of the conditions of life in th e Far West. ~.\

~.~

* On Saturday, Nov. 21st, the Dean installed NI r. Hodgson as Six-Preacher. and Mr. Evans as H ypodidascalus of th e King's School, on the Cathedral Foundation . \'/" The Scholarships have been awarded as follows :J UNIORS. R. J. N. Norris. D. H. G. Northcote.

I I

H. C. Powell.

R. Juckes.

PROBATIONERS.

G. E. J. Gent.· C. D. Watkins.· K. C. Lill ingston. · C. S. Pittis.· P. S. Barber. ENTRANC~: .

G. E. J. Gent.· C. E. W. Chapman. ·

I

E. F. Smart. K. C. Lill ingston.·

H OUSE.

D. F. Kelly.·

I

C. R. Evershed.· open pro hac viet to all bo)'s under 14 now being educated in the King's School. F. C. Gentry. • Havt 1101 ytl mtertd tltt School.

T J I~; H EYMAN SCHOLARS HIP,


..

~~~~ ----~------------------------~ THE

CANTUARIAN.

LIFE IN A POND.

On Monday, October 19th, 1908, th e Rev. Theodore Vlood gave us his annu al lecture in th e Par ry Library; the subject he chose was" Life in a Pond." His first example was a small fish, commonly kn own as th e Stickleback. so-called because of three sharp dorsal spines it bears. I t is abo ut three inches long and of a silvery-grey hue during most of the year, but in the breeding season it assu mes mOst beautiful colours, which he represen ted by a chal k drawin g on the board. The next inhabitant of the pond he chose was a bee tle. common ly known as the Great 'Water Beetle. In relation to its wonderful diving powers. Mr. ,;Vood described how on one occasion he kept onc of these beetlc5 entirely under water for one hour and twenty minutes. When re-enterin g the pond, after a nocturnal flight, it drops from a considerable height, in order to force its way below the sur race, and it is owin g to this that it sometimes gets itself into trouble, for, mistaking the sli my panes of a glass conse rvatory for the water in the pond, on a moonlight night, it stu ns and even kills itself by the force of its j~lI.

His next selection was also a beetle, by nam e th e Wh irligig. This insect may ofte n be seen gyrating in giddy twirl on the surface of a pond. The most peculiar feature of thi s insect is its eyes, which are arranged in four groups, two above, for seeing things in the air, and two below, specially adapted on the principle of the water-telesco pe, for observing objects below it in the water. The next class of anim al life his programme was that of IIGrubs"; the first example of which he took Caddis-fly Caterpillar, which spends life taking care of its tail.

on for the its

The second, was the grub of th e Drago n-fly, called by the ru stics" The Horse¡ sti nger ", because it has never been known to sti ng horses. And he took as his last example, the life-history of the Gnat, which lays its eggs in the for m of a life-boat, and which is also capable of inflicting a ve ry severe probe or bite j and concl uded his lecture with an amusing a nd somewhat " tall" Ameri can story of two men, some mo sq uitos, a nd a large dish-cove r. .


~--------------~, THE CANTUARIAN.

PE NN Y READINGS.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER TARA NT IH.I.A,

J.

C.

a 4..

for Piano,

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER

24th .

..N. Rubinstein.

CI10RU.'1. •.. "

Ieh grollc nieht, } SchulJIallll. Die Rose, die Lilie,

MR.

SONG .•..

e.

GODFREY. I MPROl\!I'TU,

READING ..

H. 'vV. K. Mown.

"

s

.... Elgar.

SALUT U' AMOR, for Piano

GALP IN, ~h . GODFREY.

R. E. C. SONGS { ( Q.) (b.)

14th.

I n these delightful grovcs " . .Purcell. SMITH.

.. c. Dcvon" ...... . Ed. German. L. NIGHTINGALE.

for piano, Op. 141, NO.2 .. . Scll1loert. t.:. J. GALI' IN.

READING .•

l 'OLK · ONGS

{ (a.) Lament," Winter,"} Russian (0.) "May is coming," .

C.

J.

GALPI~.

I'OLK-SON G.... " Blackeycd SUS.,\11 " ...... .. Eug /is/I . SPANISH DANCE,

Op.

12,

E. F. II

fhtCITATION {

for

The Rhyme of the} E. B. Duchess May ," ... B1·owlling.

SONG ....

EVANS.

.. ... The Midshipmite" .... . s. Adams. R. G. HA NCOCK .

C. A. M. SONG ....................

J.

~fR.

NIGHTINGAI.E.

VALSE CHROMATIQUE,

for Piano, Op. 88 .. Godard. RTCI-IARDSO~ .

Fhairson ," ..... . ................ .

M . COURTNE·Y.

(a.)

II

Moth~r take m~}

to thltle Anns,·

{ (b.) "Oh you goose,"

NIGHTINGALE, R.

G.

.

Russum.

SONG.

EVERITT.

.. . . •• Loch Lomond".

W. F. C. PRI~LUDIo:,

HA NCOCK.

. . ... Scolcll •

PALLISER.

Csharp minor, for Piano Raclllllaltt"l1off. C. A. ~r. RI CHARDSON.

FOLK.SONG .... .. . " Thrce Ravcns" .. ........ .scotclt.

POLKA LA R ....INE, for Piano ..

C. N.

RYAN.

SONG ......... "The little Irish Girl " ..

Ouln ........ ....... " The Twins," ..

C. L.

(a.) Study }for Piano ..... Bergmu/ler. (b .) Albumblatt .. . R . G. Hancock. R. G. HA NCOCK.

The Admiral's Broom," ... . ... Bevan.

C. L.

FOL K-SONGS

Af. Afosk()7.lJsl-i.

I·I oUSDEN.

Ry.v. L. H. SO~G . . ...... "

Piano

MR . E. L. H.

JOI-I NS'I'ON .

.. ...... Raff.


THE

CANTU ARIAN.

A LAY OF 1919. What whirls its lanky white-washed lath, Like comet in its heavenly path Or sunset's go lden after-math? The graphoscope.

What puts ghost-daggers on the stage? What SLOpS the critic's scorni ng page', And makes the dullest play the rage? The graphoscope.

What keeps invaders from our shore, Perchance attracts the alie n more To come and make them by the score? (Those grap hoscopes).

'Wh at turns in never-ceasing tracks ( Until behind the scenes g rows lax Some "Rivet(t) ", and the woodwork cracks)? The graphoscope.

What teaches " Tommy" how to wag, \Vith lightning speed his dot-dash flag And never lets his eyesight lag? The graphoscope.

Of graphosco pes you can not tire (A nd wh en YO ll do, there is the fire) But pity, pray, th e boy you hire To turn the graphoscope.

O. K. S. NEWS. Rev. "V. H. Maundrell averaged over a century for H.M.S. J("'g Alfred during the past cricket season at Wei-hai-wei. 'I.~

:\'. *" E . H. L. John ston visited the School on his return from Canada and sang at the School E ntertainment on Nov. 14th.

""..

T . S. Adams visited the School prior to his departure to take up an appointment in the Malay States. ,;;.

*" * G. F. H owell has been playing Soccer for the Freshers at Oxford .

...."

T. S. Nelson rowed No. 2 in the winnin g boat of the Junior Fours at Universi ty College, Oxford.

*'"1f

O. B. Parsons has bee n playing H ockey regularl y for Devonshire and a lso for ,"Vest versus East. <ÂŁ.

.. <-

L. P. Abbott stroked the winni ng boat in the Morrell Fours at OXford .

**",

L. T. \"'atkins is captain of th o Boat Club of Corpus Ch risti College, Cambridge .


TH E

CANTUARIAN.

G. L. Morris won Putting the Weight ( , bibs. ) 32 ft . 4 in., at the Chilian Sports at I quique in South America. H e has also played polo for the South versus North, when the South won by 9 to 2 .

G. C. R. Cooke ( ,898 - ' 903) is to be ordained Deacon from Ely Theological College this Fourth Sunday in Advent, by the Bishop of Durham, for St. Columba's Church, Sun derland.

.,

*" â&#x20AC;˘

The Weslllll',lsler Gazelle recently contai ned the followin g : Mr. Frederick Watson, British Vice-Consul at Valparaiso, is acting as Consul-General for Chile, pending the arrival of 1\1r. Nightin gale." F . Watson left the School at the end of the Summ er T erm, 18c)9 ' *'#11-

At the Sports at Magdalene College, Cam bridge, C. G. Williamson won the 100 Yards ( I Itsecs.), Putting th e Weight 27 ft., 4 in. ), H igh Jump (5 It. 3 in.), \ t'reshmen's 200 Yards (22t secs.), and was seco nd in the Quarter Mile.

..

f;. :'(.

The Annual O.K.S. Dinner will be held at the Iv10nico Restaurant, Piccadilly 'i rcus,on ' '''ednesday, January 1 3th, 1 909 , lit 7. ' 5 p .m. The Rev. R. G. Hodgson has kindly consented to take the chair, fl il d it is hoped that O.K.S. will mark

their app reciation of his sple ndid services to the School by supporting him on this occasion in un precedented numbers. It is hoped that arrangements may be made whereby O.K.S. who live at a distance from Lond on may receive hospitality at the hands of those who live in or near London. Any who intend to be prese nt, and any who are prepared to put up one or more O.K.S. (six or seve n have already offered to do so), or who wish. to receive hospitality, are requested to write as soon as possible to B. H. Latter, Esq., Pix field, Bromley, Kent. No tickets are issued, but the sum of 7/- will be collected from. those present at the Dinner. The following have already signified their in tention of being present :Rev. A. J. Galpin, Rev. R. G. H oogson, Dean, C. T. Donaldson, W. R. 1\'[ow11. E. Latter, A. H. Latter, ll. H. Latter, H. R. Latter , A. Latter, J. Ritchie, H. I sacke, Rev. Canon Wild, E. L. Payne, E. H. L. Johnston, R. V. . L. J ohnston, Rev. J. F. Johnson, A. S. Johnson, D. V. Bacon, H . D. Robinson , F . H. I larrison, Rev. F. T . H arrison, C. M. Ricketts, P. N. Dalton , H. G. Dalton, Rev. A. J. Fenn, II. S. Parker, Rev. P. Malden, E . E. Ostler, A. S. Athawes, C. H. Dorman, H. J. Prest, \Y. Temple, Kennerle}' Rumford, W. G. Price, C. A. Knapp, Rev. A. 1-1. Barlee, G. F. J. Rosent)crg, R ev. L. H. Evans, H. Baly, Rc\'. R. F. E lwyn.

J.


3 '0

THE

CANTUARIAN.

PRECINCT GHOSTS.

"Do you beli eve in ghos ts? " seems to be the natural question to ask a narrator of gh ost stori es. 'iVe may an swer in the word s of Colerid ge II No, I've seen too man y ry f them." But

wheth er th e reader of th is arti cle believes o r does not believe in ghosts, he cann ot be ignorant of th e many interes ting legends ce nt rin g round th e ghosts of Canterbury Ca th edral and Precincts, every o ne of whi ch can be expl ained away by the incredul o lls, and most of whi ch change

with the occ upants of the Precinct houses. With regard to th e School ghosts ; th ere is a legend of a d rumm er-boy who beats his drum occasio nally outside th e windo ws of o ne of th e back studie s, and who brin gs ill luck to hi s hea rers ; ~o n e acco unt, in deed, goes so far as to say that wh en he is heard a ll the eld est sons in t.he schoo l die within a yea r. The curtain of o ne o r the c ubi cles in a certain do rmitory is supposed to be drawn sli g htly by a ghost at a certain hour eve ry night ; this legen d howeve r seems to have d ied out entire ly. Any boy

may heor the ghost bell of S. Alphege's (the Church opposite th e Parrots ). This bell has no rope attached to it, and th erefore it ca nn ot be run g wit.h huma n hands, but on a clear nig ht, more often than not, it rings a few short notes.

The Parrots . . so near to the old Arc hbishop's Palace, seems a natural place to be haunted by Becket. Many years ago there was a boy unfortunately named T ho mas. ta ll, thin and pale, with a mass of black hair. O ne nig ht he had retired to bed when he remembered so methin g t hat he had l ~ rt down stairs. No w th e Parrots had been e xpress ly rorbid den to go down stairs when once th ey had gone to bed, but he determill ed to do so, and also to use the nearest avail ab le staircase, whi ch was one reIt served for masters and servants. happened perchance, that as he desce nded, attired o nly in his white nightshi rt, a kitchen maid was coming up to bed . Sudde nly seein g th is fi g ure in white loom o ut of the darkness, she ga ve a scream, th inking it to be a g host. T o a ll ay her fea rs, he cried o ut, " Don't min d me, it's o nly Thomas ." This was too much fo r her, and she fa inted on the s pot. So it came to pass that Thomas a Becket haun ts the Junio r Sc hool. The G reen Co urt possesses a fun e ral coach, which is said to dri ve round , drawn by phantom horses at du sk, bu t we belie v that it is ge nerally heard a fte r dinner. C hill end en C ham bers, deli g htful old house as it is, unfortunately possesses no ghost; that is to say, no ghost has eV4J1


\

THE

CANTUARIAN.

been seen or heard in it by its present or last occupants. In Bisho p Parry' s time, however, twenty years ago, th ere was a story current of a mother who had li ved

and 1died and had lost all her children there. She sometimes appeared, but only to children, who would sudd enly look up a nd smile, a nd hold out their arm s to someone who could not be seen. The best known g host of . the Precincts-a spectre , in fact. with a worl dwide reputa tio n- is of course Nell Coo k, wh o on Friday nig hts at nine o'clock is supposed to haunt th e Da rk En try. The story is so we ll kno wn fro m th e In golds by l . ege nds that th ere is no need to relate it here . Some declare th at Nell Coo k is non-existent; that Ba rham in passi ng through th e Dark Entry thou ght it such an ideal spot for a g host story that he invented th e lege nd. O thers say th at " Nell Cook ., is an owl whi ch inhabits the Dark j~ ntry. There are only two occasions on whi ch she has been seen, to our kn owledge. Some years ago' a boy was passin g throu gh on hi s way to a service, and saw a li ttl e o ld woman in a lo ng black cloak by one of th e pillars. As he drew near she vani shed into space . The seco nd appearance occurred only last spring. Two ladies were go in g home throu gh th e Pl ecincts, and liS they passed the choir sc hools they both Hilwa little old woman in a long black d oak just in front of them. On reachin g lhe entrance of the Dark En trv she IIlI ddenly vani shed into th e wall. . They Wt}rc both vcry astoni shed and though t thnt she mi ght ha ve go ne into th e lJaptistry ga rde n, but on trying th e gate

Ihey found it locked. The sequel is a

3"

sad one, for one of the ladi es lost a sister within a .week, acco rding to th e legend. Another story of a mo re plea sant nature is ' cO lln ected with the "Entry D ark.'1 One evenin g a lady was passing round that way. past Becket' s crown, when to her horro r she saw a monk standing in the arch above the entrance. Not darin g to go throug h, she returned, and meeting a man a ~ ked him to accompa ny her. But wh en he we nt rOllnd the corner he al so saw th e fi gure and did not like to proceed furth er. Presently a party of se ven had collected, and still the monk did not move from the arch. At least one of them determined to find out what it was, and fe tching a ladd er, clim be d up. Still th e monk remained there, and no wonder, for it was a du mmy fig ure rigged up by an arti st who t ho ug ht th at a picture of the Dark E ntry wo uld be incomplete without a mo nk, and had left his model there for use the next day. . \Vhe n Queen Elizabeth vi sited Ca nterbury, a laun drymaid was hun g fo r not s tarchin g her ruffl es properly, and he r g host is suppose d to haunt in some form one of the houses in the Preci ncts. It is a well-known fact that g ho!:i ts neve r leave in anyone's possession a paper which incriminates themselves. The foll o win g story illustrates this point:I t lVl aster Hom er's," the old guesthOllse of th e Monastery is naturally th e sce ne of num berless tradition s. A great crime was committed there, around which I he variou s lege nds cluster. Cardinal ColigllY, brother of the famous Admira l


3 12

THE

CANTUARIAN .

CoJigny, was murdered by his valet who gave him a poisoned pear, and his body was temporarily burit!d in a bricked-up grave in Becket's Crown pending its removal to France. It was never fetched and it still remains the re in its temporary resting place. A Canon who lived the re some time ago awoke once when it was quite li g ht and saw one of his daughters come into the room, and pass befo re both or the windows whi ch were o pposite his bcd, and then kn eel down by his side. She remained there motionless unlil he began to be surprised, and asked her wh at she wanted . The figure rose up silently, passed the first window - but di d not pass the second. The Canon thought this very strange and got out of bed to expl ore the room, but no one was there. As he was lookin g round, his wife entered the room and he related the occurrence to her. They found that neither of hi s daughters had come in, and a s the Canon could draw well, his wife begged him to make a sketch of the apparition . She took away the sket ch and locked it up in a private desk which no one but herself opened. Some weeks after they heard that a married daughter had died sud de nly at that hour in the Straits Settl ements. They went to look for the sketch to see if there was any resemblance between it a nd their daughter, but whereas all the other papers were intact, that had vanished. One eve ning, as the Canon's wife was sitti ng in her drawing room with her dogs, she heard someone ascend the stairs and pause outside the door. The dogs, instead of barking, came and

huddl ed round her ski rt s. She called .1 come in" but no one entered. After about an hour one of her daughters came in and showed a yellow piece of paper which she had picked up, and which appeared to have been pushed under the door. On it was written in old French 10 Je ne suys pas Ie diable." The Canon's wife (w ho did not belie ve in ghosts) locked it up in a bureau, but when she went to fetch it a day or two afterwards to shew it to a friend. it had di sap peared from under lock and key. One night, as this lady was leaving the drawing-room to go to prayers, she saw a yellow sc rap of paper tyin g on the carpe,t. On it she read , <C J e ne suys pas Ie diable" again written in old French. As she could not wait, she put it into a box on the mantel-shelf. After praye rs she came up for it; the box was th ere, bUl the paper had gone. Everyone in the house had been at prayers. One of the corrido rs of this house was sup posed to' be haunted by the Cardinal's valet, who banged at every door with his portmanteau, trying to get back to France. A sailo r son of thc Canon dete rmined to investigate this phenomenon and took hi s two fi er.ce dogs to one of the rooms off th e passage, The knocks comm enced but the dogs cowered ncar him and he wa s so startled by their fright that he did not go Ollt when the knock came to his door. Truth to tell, the house was overrun by rats, and si nce it has been thorough ly repaired from top to bottom by the prescnt Canon, and every rat has bee n destroyed, there have been no ghosts and the hOlllso is as quiet as any other.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

The Cathed ral itself is sadly lackin g in ghosts. The re is Becket's ghost in th e crypt, which was ca u ~ed by a figure painted in bygone times on one 0"[ the pillars. Some declare that they hear the monks at night-time singing in the choir, and on entering echoes make hundreds

OXFORD Dear School, Is it merely a coincidence that an O.K.S. letter very rarely appears un til after sprouting scholars and exp~c~ant exhibitione rs from the School have vIsited Oxfo rd? I wond er. This more likely . means a case of effect and cause. However, it is a satisfying feelin g that our duty we have done, so faites Ie jeu. messieurs, faites Ie jeu. First, who we re those appearil1g like stars on the Oxonian horizon last term ? With us for a time, but alas ! no longer entirely of us, and about to leave us perhaps for ever. T. S'. Adams made a brief pied-a.-terre ea rly III the term, en route for foreign parts. whither he sailed the othe r day. Best of lu ck to him! Sarso n 0' Lil{coln was with us for a while hlst week - g roups his purpose, monographs his pastime. Chiefcst and greatest of bu r present Imnd, the great Lord of Luna comes with hi s stately strid e, the Limping Vulcan of ¡orpus. Another great o ne is Webster, It convert to the Catholic Athletic Sect, playing football and hockey, and rowing

3'3

of footsteps wh ich seem to be dashing away at the other end of the building. Bu't to those who are nervou s of O"host5, let us co nclude with a certain ~ethod of insta ntl~' getting rid of them.. Ask them for a subscription, and be sure it's for the Cathedral Reparatio n Fund."

LETT ER. with equal grace and vigour. The great T wi n Brethren (Quee n's and K eble:;) still remain eni g matic of able personalities to a ll and sundnr â&#x20AC;˘ Of Strahan we have heard great things with our ears, an c.1 he ha!:i ap peared at an O.K.S. Meetlllg: of Budd likewise. The D oyen or th e Corps, R. H. W. Brinsley-Richards, has been O"reatly in evidence 0 11 the runnin g gro und, and at the Union, where on hi s election to the Standing Committee we congrattlla~e him on obtaining the recompen::.e of hiS reward . H . P. V. Townend has been co-opted on to the Library Co mmittee, where he drives the Librarian frantic by suggesting interesting but entirely unin structive literature for his perusal and adoption. The sanctity of the St. John 's Contingent is well maintained by C. J. N. Adams, who is a useful and ornamental memb er of society. G. D . Maclear and C. N . Smith still ruu and now work, and play Bridge in greater or less degree. J. R. S. Aylward is a massive membe r of the College, and promises to develop into a 'Rugger Blood.' A. B. Emden, of Lincoln, is an elusive personality toying with literary


3'4

THE

CANTUARIAN.

subjects, a nd culling broken beer bottle glass from dens a nd caves of the earth, a nd call ing it Roman Amphorae (sic). H e does row. P. G. E. Chave, of the same parish, I mean college, startled society by appearing in a pair of un¡ we tted L eand er socks. T he wages of pink socks is death: R.I.P. Chave's socks. T. S. Nelson has been highly ' successful on the river, a n element of whic h he is an ab le expo nent. G. F. Howell is at prese nt reading H ono ur i'/[ods. , but contemplates a deeper search in to nature. H e has fo und his true football vocation, and plays soccer, and golf, in which he is a worthy successor of Scott, of iVIerton , who still plays golf a nd has taken to the art of classical a nd oth er dan ci ng. Armitage is a gross-slacker as secretary. Horn is much interested in Varsity Football , notably the three-quarter line. Abbott is in great form at Smokers . The Trinity H atc h pot.ch is doing well. Dibben dispenses Trinity Teas with the grande aire of a society hostess. Emden, jun., does his little best, and Simeon is a bit of a high flye r-at fas hio n a nd jumping. What more need I tell of Yates and Burdett, of Chaning-Pea rce

and Baker? We mentio n them by faith, we have hardly seen them. Before concl uding me nti on must be made of th ree stlccessfui O.K.S. meetings : the first, on Friday, October z3rd, was in Abbott's room, and we were entertained by Exeter: the seco nd, on Monday. No v. 30th, in Aylward's room with the t hree Senior Saints of St. J oh n'S as hosts. Last and above all on J une ' 7th, at Sandford, Dr. Field very ki ndly entertained us at di nn er agai n. It was with great reg ret that we heard th at the H eadmaster co ul d not be present. Yet, altho ugh the eveni ng was di mm ed by the absence of the light of his genial presence, the time passed very ph::asant ly. Some com mendab le hilarity was caused bv Scott an d Tow nend, as also by Ar mitage's speech. O ur heartiest thanks are agai n due to Dr. Field for his kind hospitality. We were glad to welcome Gent and H oski ng last week, and sorry to miss Kettelwcll; but we wish them the best of luck in thei r Exams . Best wishes to the School fo r a happy Xmas . T ouj ours a vous, O. K.S. OXON.


, THE

CANTUARIAN.

CAMBRIDGE

Dear School, At the Edito r's bidding, wit h only two days' notice, we se nd yo u this to tell yo u of our doings. I n nu mbers we are sixteen, including H . A. J enkin, who toils incessa ntly, instructi ng the youth of th is fortunate town. Telfe r can spare littl e time from his theological studies for social frivolities, bu t has been known to ru n along the tow-path. J, Deighton a nd Dickson are in the throes of an exami nati on, but th e forme r has foun d time to play fo r T rinity Ist XV. Histo ry does not record ho w Dickson occ upies his leisure hours-perhaps he has none. At Corpus, O.K. S. are to be foun d in eve ry team. Gage is a leadi ng for ward nnd also plays for the soccer team. Ke mpe plays rugger and hockey an d is also cricket secretary, while Watkins 'on6nes his attenti on to nautica l matlers. Pinsent has beco me a pro minen t mber o f the Fabian Society. and, when not engaged upon th e Cam in the 1st Trinity n~? boat, is to be seen III

3'5

LETTER.

discussing 'social' problems with his â&#x20AC;˘ com rades '. (T hat the less-informed may fully appreciate the inte rest of such topics, it shoul d be mentio ned that th e Fabian Society embraces any membe r of the U nive rsity or of Girto n and Ne wnham Colleges). Bella rs began bad ly and spent t he first fe w weeks in bed, but we hope to see him figuring in rugge r ci rcles next year. Pe mbro ke is a hot-house fo r ' blues' , Sparling, Dal wigk, 'vVilliamson a nd Todd are rowing in thei r respective College 'trials', and it is rumo ured t hat greater th ings are in store for C. G. W., though he has not neglected his other accom plishments, as is shown by his success in the Magdalene sports, In concl usion, we beg you to send us recruits of your best, heroes of brain and muscle, .. to uphold the g lorious traditions of our ancient School " (vide every An ni versary Preache r). Yours e ver, O. K. S., CANTAB.


3 16

THE

CANTUARIAN.

INDIAN

Dear' Cantuarian " So little straw that bricks arc few this tim e - as freq uently. Patriarch Mowll (W. R. , of course) has been writi ng to me in his sCJlemn win k- one-eye stvle, which proves he is of the same m'etal as of old. I imagine he is to be seen any day leaning against the iron bar in th e Mint Yard side of the Grange. G. Lee 'Warn e r, wh o illtrod nced him self to the School and immo rtal popularity by walking in on his hand s about the year 1887, ha s gone into vol untary retirement again. I wish yotl .could extract anmher letter from hi m. All th e same, your Canadi an letters are of mu ch inte rest. Your correspondent may like to know of an ex-K.S. captain , L. \V. Smith, wh o is helping to make the Empire in Montrea l. I noti ced hi s name was om itted from the Canadian list . I was ve ry glad to read some time back of the K. S. C., sta rting its own corps of hoplites. No w that numbe rs have increased so mu ch, I expect the re is plenty of room fo r a ll extra eig hts, elevens or fiJtee ns. In Illy tim e , these extra" Events" would have crea ted much blood-shed a t th e Spo rts' Comm ittee meeti ngs, for there was H . S . S. Parker tearing e veryone's hair off, if fellows

LETTER.

didn't t urn up for cricket every day; Mr. Ritchie getting quite morose a.n d playing doleful music on hi s organ if the chaps didn't boat; H. lVI. James runnin g amok among the defaulters at football. But, apparently. the Sports' Committee now are glad to have so many departments into which they can sh unt odd-fellows. I have been a hoplite myself Qut he re: and have served 1lon siue gloria on the Bangalore parade ground, and agai n at Indore. I can't remember my parma being 110 11 bwe relida anywhere. ex~ept when I stumbled OVe r my swo rd as I was bowing to Lo rd Curzon at a L evee. At Ind ore, we were a squad of six caval ry ; parades? ten half-hours a year and musketry qualified you. The squad consisted of the heads of vario us departments, the on ly N.C.O. being a j unior clerk. " Yo u see that bloo min' 'ill hover th ere", said our Sergeant Instructor. ,. You've got to git to it afore th e hen cmy. Now lick!" And we licked: three chaps wisely kept the road, th e padre among them : three others cut acroSS country - bu t it was full of impossible ho les, and we had a ri ckety tim e and a rrived last. That was my las t dril l. 1 went to a country where there werc no vol untee rs, so I 'chucked il,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

and th oug ht it was rather shabby of Government to bill me afterwards for my riding breeches and tunic. and to demand back my buttons. I may join again soon if there is a sq uad at Mount Aln, the hill section of Rajputana , and o nly twenty mi les from my wind ows. You see how naturally we come from Canada tq K. S. C., and th ence by a paragraphic link to India. Capt. A. L, Paris has been cor responding with me; he is going stro ng at Poona , and rowed three in a Poona four which smashed up Madras recently. ] o nes(T.W. H .. Capt ) remi nds me that he is alive, but is extremely mod est and reticent. H. V. Cobb has been posted for a time to act as Resid ent in Kashmir) which is the In dian paradise, I saw J. E. Husband's name as a recent passe nger from home to I ndia. H. J, Trueman is only 25 miles from here, at Erinpura: and we a re corresponding about a little shoot soo n. Paris has heard of i\1[ajor E. L. Berger and Major E . Wintour ( both .O .K.S .). either in t he Punjab o r Sindh . I forget th eir Regiments and stations. J. H. Smith has

31 7

moved from C utch to Siro hi, a State of Rajputana. It is the g reat day of the Dasc nra festival. T he silence of the bun galow has just been broken by the sound of tom -toms: and a small procession of unkemp t retaine rs on nags, harnessed wi th coloured strings, an d a gorgeous ba nner, have ridd en alo ng past the compo un d hedge, esco rting a ca rr iage, in which I presume some Sirdar has just arrived from the jungle to take part in the g reat procession of th e evening. I thi nk that is eno ug h bakh for this go. ]. H. SM ITH. SIROHI. Oct. 5. I90$,

PS.-I protest stro ngly agai nst th e habit of your late EDD. callin g my rece nt dumicile Bhing: it is a reflection on my handicraft. It is BHUJ, pronounced bhooj; yo u can get the "bh" with a little pract ice. You know how melodramatic singers si ng co 0 where is my b(o)hoy to-night ."


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CORRESPONDENCE.

N. B.-TIlt Editors dec/flU to accept any "espomibility comucted 'with the o/Jim'om oj thdr Correspon¡ dents. Nam e and address mitst always be ,Riven, not necessarily lor publicatioll, but as a s uatan!ee of good f aith. Pers01laiities will involve cerlain 1'cjectioll. Letters SllOltld Of w,.illm Olt one side qf th e pape,- Dilly.

GEORGETOWN, DEMERARA .

I2/h Nov., I90S.

To Ilu Editors of

H

THE

to carry on the g reat traditions engraved by th em on the reco rds of the School. I am , etc.,

PERCY

HE IVIE RY.

CANTUARIAN."

DEAR SIRS.

S.

MARY'S CLERGY HOUSE ,

Although the R evs. R. G. Hodgson and L. G. Mason have no bly earned the rest and retirement whi ch I sincere ly trust they may live many years to enjoy, I co uld not help feding regret at their leaving th e old Sc hoo l with whi ch they have been so lon g anel so hono urably associated . I think Mr. H odgsOl~ came to the School before I left, anyhow, I kn ew ancl played cricket with him i Mr . Mason I was actually at School with, and he never seemed to g ro w any older, th ough I have seen him several times s in ce. I am sorry to see from his letter that he has had

a good deal of illness lately. The School is the poorer for the loss of two good men i let us hope that others will rise up

CABLE STltEET,

To lite Ethtors of" THE

F:.

CANTUARIAN./t

DEAR SIRS ,

May I avai l myself of the hospita lit)' of your paper to reach any O.K.S. livin g in or Il car London who may be inten:stcd in East E nd vVork. I am anx ious to heM of some me n who would help in runni llN Club s for working lads. I should also bl' . very g lad to welcome any O.K.S. who may ca re to come down to see a raLh M t}'pical East E nd Parish. Believe me,

Yours faithfully. A. H. BAR LEE. O.JC.s.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES.

We

beg

to

thanks the receipt subscriptions :-

acknowledge of

the

with

Hawkes. Esq. ()/6). W. H. S. Redpath. Esq . (J/6). F. Cremer. Esq. ()/6). E. E. Ostler. Esq. (7/-). R. Watson. Esq. ( ) / 6). J. S. Yates. Esq. () /6). C. B. Simeon. Esq. ()/6). J. P. Ryl ey. Esq. ( 3/6). B. Crowl ey. Esq. (3/ 6). Col. C. H a miltonTrueman (6/ 6). D. F . Corson. Esq. (3/ 6). W. H . Horsley. Esq. (3/ 6). B. E. Money. Esq. (3/6). L. W. Smith. Esq. (3/6). Rev. A. H. Barl ee ( 3/6). R. C. J er ra m. Esq. C.l /6). H. M. Cockrem. E sq. (3/6). G. F. H eys. Esq. (3/6). C. W. S. Redman. E sq. (.1/6). L. N. Scorer, Esq. (7/-) . Rev. G. C. E. Ryley ()/6). Captain W. H. Evans ()/ 6). T. E. Ramm ell. Esq. (3/6). J . Goodae re. Esq. ( J/6 ). P. H emery. E sq. ( )/6). C. Battisco mbe. E sq. ( ) / 6). S. U. Baily. Esq. (3/6). D. L. Robe rtso n. Esq. ( , 0/6). C. T. Marshall . Esq. (J/6).

following

R. B. Winser.Esq. (7/-).J . W. Taylor. Esq . ( )/ 6). Gibbs and Sons () / 6). Mrs. Evens ( ) / 6). W. A. Fetherstone. E sq. () / 6). Mrs. Blore ( ) / 6). Mrs. Wal sh () / 6). A. K. Mowll. Esq . ()/6). A. W. Richardso n. Esq. ()/6). C. M. Sutton. E sq. (),16). O. B. Parsous. Esq. ( 10/6). Dr. T. Whitehead Reid ( ) /6). N. E. Bressey. E sq . ( )/b). Lieu!. R. W. Swithinbauk, R.N. ( )/ 6). F. M. Furle),. Esq. ()/6). H. G. Dalton. Esq. ( ) /6) . A. W. Rammell. Esq. (2/- ). Rev. H. H. H. Boys (1/6). Rev. A. M. I'oster ( ) /6). F . P. Walker. Esq. ( 14/-). Rev. L. G. Mason (J/6) . J. W. Sharman. Esq. ( ) /6) . E. A. Grat)'. E sq. ( ) /6). T. S. Nelson. Esq. ( ) / 6). E. M. Tuke. E sq. ( )/6). Rev. R. G. Hodgson. (7/-). Rev. ano n Stuart ( J/ 6). Waller Webb. E sq. ()/6). G. V. Ormsby. Esq. ( 21/- ). F. R.

I

H. D.

TOWNEND, HOll.

Sec.


3Z0

THE CANTUARIAN.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES.

We beg to acknowl edge the receipt of the following contcmporaries:Alleynian (3), Blue, Bradfield Clzrom'cle, BngMon College lJlagazt'nt, Brollls{!rovi(w, Burian, Car l!lIfSlf!1l ('2). Cho/me/ci(m ( I ). COs.. CulldJeriiau, JJenslonloll,Dovon'an( 2). Easiboumian, St. Edwanl's School Chronicle (2), Elizabethan (2). Epsomiall, Exoniall,

Fellesian , Glenalmolld College Chromde (2). Herefordian. jolmiall, Landng College l11agazillc (2), L eodzel1Sia1l, Leys Forlmglt/(y (3), Lt'{y, Lorrelo1lia1l (3). 11!falvt1-uian, O/avian, Ouse!, Pe/erite, P1Ylllolhiau, Radldan ( 2), R ep/Olllall ('2), Slll'rburmrw, Stra nd SellOot 11£agaz/ue, SUI/OIl Va/m et

SellOut Chronicle, U.s. C. Magazine.

Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Palace Street, Canterbury.


THE VOL .

VII.

CANTUARIAN. MARCH,

Ig09.

No. 13.

EDITORIAL. Once more we take the Editorial pen in hand; once again we wish the New Year wishes; for the two hundred and tenth time we remark upon Jupiter Pluvius; rUrsus, we come to the Muses' sh rine i av, we observe that everyon e has come back more cheerfu l than before; iterum, we congratulate all that should be congratulated j ""fi~tv, we beg our readers to notice the unparalleled activity of the Editors ; encore - well, as an encore we beg to state that we have again begun an Editorial in the npproved style. " Once more" is a fine old phrase, pointing not only to the past, but also to the rl1ture. It seems to comprise the subject-matter of most Editorials. It recurs every lime, like the Editorial pen-an implement by-the-bye, which we ourselves have nover seen. There is something in the Grange Study which might be this venerable weapon, did it not bear a stronger resemblance to a football pump. Whatever it is, it ,wems to have been an object of worship and devotion, judging from the number or shoes of the faithful lately discovered in the Grange. Of course, "once more" comes in most aptly when we consider the flight of Ume ; as, for instance, the passing from onc year to another, or the length of time


THE

CANTUARIAN.

between 7.40 and 7.45 a.m . But in con nection with Jupiter P. "once more II has its full signifi cance. Onct morc we have had some skating. The joyous news that the Baths were in use led to the abandon ment of studies ; and, having armed ourselves with a PreRaphaelite pair of skates, we httrri ed with proportionate dignity to the ice. There appear to be many ways of llsing the Baths: some used them for skati ng purposes, others seemed to gain enough amusement by watching. some few Simple Life enthusiasts preferred to use them as Baths- but they were, fortunately. a minority. We, on the Editorial skates, moved, with morc or less celerity, amid a throng of whirling arms and hi larious legs : being. however, of some slight mediocre talent, we progressed with much delight and great dignity. Language cannot paint our joy in the sensation, and words absolutely failed us when we did happen to come down on the ice. But our bliss was only too short, for Jupiter P. again proved false, and we had to return before an hour had been spent. II Once more," to return to our topic, we congratul ate all who should receive congratulations: chiefly that gallant quartett whom the flame of ardent patriotism has urged to the halls of Woolwich and Sandhurst. But none the less must we congratulate ourselves: for the golden. egg has been laid, from which shall blosso m forth the variegated foliage of our very own Cadet Corps-vi vat valeatque. h Once more" we humbly beg to announce to our readers, that despite the unparalleled activity of last term (Ed itorial activity never has a parallel), and despite the fact that one of our number has gone to Italy for the express purpose of catchin g measles, nevertheless, like Goss's wilderness, we still blossom forth-and, therefore, we cease our platitudes-once more.

We, the sale remaining Editor, beg pardon, but the struggle has proved too much. We have not even the blithe ness of heart to pass over our delinquencies by some belated jest. Only one number of the Call1uaria1l will appear this term, and the effort has broken our spirit. Remember the notice over the piano in a South American saloon H Do not shoot the performer, he does his best. 1I So do we, but nobody will understand.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

THE

CONCERT.

The Annual Concert took place on Monday, December 21st. As usual, the interior of the Gym nasium of the School, in which. the proceedings took place, had been pleasingly decorated, and it may be noted that the assemblage had the benefit, for the first time all this occasion, of the electric light illumination installed this year. Mr. Godfrey had prepared an excellent programme, and, what is more, got togethe r an orchestra and chorus well adequate to the task of its performance. The items forming the programme were as under : CAR.OL

If

Winter's Night"

Words aud lJfzmi: by Bishop JlfitclH"moll.

"In these delightfu l pleasant groves,"1676 Pllrcell. I'R~LUDE (No.3 of "The 48") for piano Bach, 1685-1750.

CHORUS

C. J.

GALPIN.

Black.eyed Susan" English. (0) "Three Ravens It Scoldt. S YMPHONY. No. 35, D major (1St movement) , July. 1782 ... Jlfozarl, 1756-1791. I.' LK-SONGS J (a) " Winter" ('II. and Orch.) 1(0) "May is coming" Ruman. Il'OLK,SONGS (eh.

and Orch. (a)

II

f

.

C minor, NO. 5 (1st movement), 1809 Beethoven, 1770-1827 . • {" '.' Far away" I'OLK- SONGS "Oh, you goose" j R ussian.

HV MI'UONY.

PRELUDE

FOR P IANO,

C. A. M. FOLK-SONG

NOCTURNE

in C sharp minor, op. 3, (No.2) Rachmaninoj). RICHARDSON.

(Trebles and Orch. ) "Hiya, Hiya,l Ho)l 111aort" Poi. in F minor, 0p. 55, No. I}Ch OPi1t l 1809- 1849.

POLKA DE LA REINE, 0p.

95

.. .

(lor piano).

C. N.

Fo , LK- SONGS NELL

GYWNNE

FOLK-SONG

RYAN.

Ai r du Prix" Song" I "Peasant 01

RajJ,

1822-1882.

...

French. Czech.

SUITE (for Orch.), 1st movement Ed. Germall. " Fisher Legend" ... CMmse.

"Pomp nnd Circumstance Ed. Elgar. CHORUS . . • I I Kirmesse Scene," from Faust ... Gotmod, 1818- 1893. FOOTBALL SONG "40 Years on " ... J. Farmer. MARCH,

op. 39, No.

I

)I

We reprint the following from the Call1erbury Press : Apart fro m selections from the works of the well known composers, it will be seen that the music consisted largely of folk so ngs, which, whil e affording good scope for the exercise of the abilities of the chorus and orchestra, were in several instances notable for their tune4 fulness and novelty. Encores were frequent and in not a few cases the concluding portions were repeated .


THE

CANTUARIAN.

One was also gratified to hear again the I I Kirmesse Scene" from Gounod's " Faust," the reception of which was no less enthusiastic than on a former The spirit of the various occasion. compositions was capitally interpreted, and ill these, as in the orchestral pieces, Sun. shine bright on the Ho I-lang Ho, Mr. Godfrey had his forces splendidly Shine on the waters of the 1-10 I-lang Ho, in hand. Though of the best type, the While my boat on i!S bosom wide, Rocks in the arms of the restless tide, band selections had, wisely, been made Prny the gods may grnnt my wish, from amon g those of the lighter class, Nets all sound ancl full of fi sh. with the possible exception of the Also the anticipation in the concludi ng diffi cult Beethoven music. The Mozart sy mphony was brilliantly played, and the lines1st Movement of the Nell Gwynne suite, If the gods should angry be, with its delightful swing and bagpipe Sending w~~d and stormy sea, . . . . . melody, was one of the most tuneful and Little fish he calee me. best appreciated items of the programme. The item quite caught the fancy of Well played pianoforte solos were on this the audience. as did also the peculiar occasion contributed by C. J. Galpin, style of the Russian song .r Oh, you C. A. M. Richardson and C. N. Ryan, Goose," in which a maiden rallies her and the concert concluded in customary despond ent lover. The" Winter H song, style with the well-known football song, attributed to the same nationality, with sung in inspiriting style by the scholars, an oboe introduction, is a very effective with th e captain of the team contributing melody with considerable grandeur of the" Follow up." The proceedings can .. conception, and the more joyous" May cluded on the stroke of ten o'clock-an is comi ng," with its pretty instrumental admirable example-after a thoroughly trills, afforded considerable pleasure. enjoyable two hours' entertainment.

Especially successful was the Chinese " Fisher Legend." with its quaint piccolo and drum prelude, its weird slurs and occasional prominence of xylophone and bassoon instrumentation. The words, too, are reminiscent of " Far~ Cathay":


, THE

CANTUARIAN.

THE POEMS OF R. L. STEVENSON. (Coltfi",,,d.)

The attractive power of Stevenson lies chiefly in his unaffected humanity. He plays upon many strings, but they are all hearl-strings. H e will sing you a S~Jlg that will set your feet tingling for the l11gh-road-in a few lines he will move your heart to sympathy for the lepers of Molokai more effectually than by a volume of facts-he will in the same words unlock you the secrets of his own heart-which is easy-and of yours-which is hard. He will pour you out ripples of laughter in his ow n" braid Scots" and destroy the delusion that humour is only for the Southron j and if we cannot claim for ourselves the 1ctt{:;rs in verse addressed to his friends, yet we can share in the delight with which Andrew Lang must have received the little ode "Dear Andrew with the brindled hair/' or Henley perused the noble tribute which is prefaced by his name. Stevenson is a lover of contrasts, and like Timotheus in Dryden's ode can II infuse soft pity" or kind le a strong motion at will. In "The sick child" th e re is a delicate and homely picture of a mother's love, requiring a higher art than Wordsworth's to save it from mere childishness. 01

An hour or two more and God is so kind, The day shall be blue in the window blind; Then shall my child go sweetly asleep And dream of the birds and the hills of sheep."

Was it the same child over whom" Mater triumphans" cries: " Son of my woman's body, you CO to the drum and the fife, T o taste the colour of love and the other side of life. Impotent hanns in my bosom, and yet they shall wield the sword : Drugged wilh slumber and milk, you wait the day of the Lord."

The same easy passage from the soft to the stern is well exemplified in I I Skerryvore," the name (borrowed) from the stateliest of his father's Lighthouses for the pretty Bournemouth bungalow: <I

Hen all is sunny ...... and when the truant gull Skims the g reen level of the lawn, his wing Dispetals roses ...... .. . ..... .... But there Eternal granite hewn from tbe living isle And dowelled with brute iron, rears a tower That from its wet foundation to its crown Of glittering glass stands in the sweep of winds Immovable, immortal, eminent,"

Admiration must often give a bias to criticism; but a close and sympathetic study of these last five lines will shew that it is not mere servility to say that in descriptive force and masterly employment of common words they stand almost alone in English poetic literature. But there are two other features of Stevenson's verses so prominent that they cannot be passed over, his pathetic yet virile affection for his lost home and his


'tItE

CANTUARIAN.

calm untroubled questioning about the early death. he foresaw. To those who feel deeply the power of home affections, Stevenson will always come with an appealing force. He is above all other poets II harum interpres These homecurarum et conscius.1I thoughts are the thoughts of an inner chamber, written in twilight and silence, and while the pen runs feverishly upon the paper in a Vailima cottage, a Bournemouth sickroom or a Sanatorium at Davas, the spirit is abroad with Crockett in the I. gray Galloway land 11 or roaming unfettered over the hills of Fife. The lines addressed to Crockett (" Blows the wind to-day ... ") are, in the intensity of feeling and simplicity, and inviolable. The poem (know n only by its number) beginning "The Tropics vanish" is inferior to ' iVordsworth's sonnet on Westminster Bridge only in point of fame, and Wordsworth, with his heart in Lakeland, could not have sung of London" The voice of generations dead Summons me sitting distant to arise And, all mutation over, stretch me down In that denoted city of the dead" ;

If again the finest poetic tribute of a son to a father is to be found in Matthew 1\.rnold's H Rugby Chapel," at least we may ask that the second pJac,e should not be awarded without a study of the brief farewell in Underwood's (No. 28 ) penned by a son who is passing-fato profugusfrom his native coasts, beaconed by "The towers we founded and the lamps we lit,"

to raise in other lands beacons of light and hope more enduring than granite, and I. to port Some lost complaining seaman pilot home."

The exile knows that the poor flagging body must rest under the loving care. <?f his devoted Samoan people; but the spmt is not bound, and the spiritual vision enlarges as the corporal fades: II

Be it mine to behold you again in dying, Hills of home! and to hear again the call : Hear about the graves of the martyrs the peewees crying, And hear no more at al1."

To some minds the most impressive characteristic of these poems is his outlook upon death. That he had no fear of th e death that waited for him is clear from many of his writings and especially from his essay I, Aes Tripex." But that armour of II Triple Brass is at best but a human accoutrement, fashioned by strength of will and a cheerful accep~­ ance of the common lot of man. It IS left to his poems to shew us beneath that shielded breast a heart that is reverently, if vaguely, dependent on a Divine Father. His friend Henley, in the confidence of manh ood and with a .. bold output of the will" that would have mado Aeschylus stop his ears in horror, or supplied him with a theme for a new tragedy} declares .. It matter not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll , I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul."

Unlike him, Stevenson is too true to human nature to discard its sense of dependence on a higher Power. Thosu who will may read it broadcast in hi,. poems, but chiefly let them turn to th u hymn entitled "' Evensong" that clos â&#x20AC;˘ so fitly the II Songs of Travel," and .mally will be disposed to apply to those Slmpl


, .. J

THE

CANTUARIAN.

~ut inspired lines the touching appreciation accorded by T. E . Brown to the literary music of "Weir of Hermiston" ; .. If the century runs out upon this final chord, " what more do I want? Let me die with the " sough of it in my cars. It is enough: N1mc

" Dim#tis, Domine."

EVENSONG.

*" The embers of the day are red Beyond the musky hill. The kitchen smokes: the bed In the darkening house is spread:

The great sky darkens overhead And the great wooos nrc shrill. So far have I been led, Lord, by Thy will ; So far I have foll owed, Lord, and wondered stil l. .. The breeze from the embalmed land Blows sudden towards the shore, And claps my cottage door. I hear the signal, Lord-I understand, The night at Thy command Comes. I will eat and sleep and will not question more."

* Prt"1tted 'with the kind permÂŁssiolt of Messrs. Chano m:d Wz'lldus.

FOOTBALL. KING'S SCHOOL v.

O.K.S.

Played on Cullen's Ground December 21St. The School starten off with a rush scoring three tries in the first ten minutes, and it was soon seen that the School team was vastly superior to thei r opponents, many of whom seemed rather out of practice, though on paper the O.K.S. presented a strong back division. In spite of strenuous rrorts on the part of their forwards we were able to Score pretty frequently, the School three-quarters combining excellently all round. Towards the end some fine play by Bassett and Harriso n kept us on the defence, whi ch howeve r they broke through sufficient to gain their three tries one of which was converted. Gardner dropped a beautiful goal in the second half our score finally amounting to six fYoals three tries (38 points to I I ) . 0 School Team :-R. E. Martin (back); H. Parsons, R. M. Gent, C. S. Merrett, II. H. Matheson (th ree-quarters); H. Gardner, R. L. Gottwaltz (halves); H . F.

Reynolds, V. C. Taylor, C. A. M. Richardson, B. G. Garibaldi, D. H. Cowie, It C. Cumberbatch, A. C. Fluke, J. W. S. Price (forwards).


T HE

CANTUARIAN.

T UTO R

SET S.

T he Tl1tor~Set Shield has been won for th e second year ,in succession by Mr. Cape's Set, now" The H erons." Their best match was agamst Mr. Moxon 5 Set II The Gryphons," and was won by 26 POlllts to 5. The younger members of the tea~ upheld the traditions handed down to them from former years, and had ,a very large share in the victory. Of the other matches that ?et~veen Mr. R~ay sand Mr. Porter's Sets produced a great game, the former Wll111111g. by 9 P?lnts to 8. Mr. Bell's Set belied all expectations, even their own, an~l cincOy ow~ng to. the heroic work of vVayte l in the serum, and the (~caclly tack~ll1g of ~o\vle behInd, managed to win three games and so came out third on the Its~, Thel~ tl~ree-quarter line at times was great, at others notably agains.t Mr. Cape s Set dIstinctly poor. They should howeve r be a thoroughly good sIele next, yea:. Of the y?unger generation Crowther, Eastwick-Field, \Vatkins, Pullan, 10mk1l1s, and. Gent seem promising but they must remember to tackle lower. Too often th e bIgger players went right through untouched when a gentl~ persuasion round the legs would have brought them down. Appended are the vanous scores :v

I

•00

'"il'" -a. .2-;;• ~E '" ""• ~ 'r..: i:' • f-< <Jl :r: u'" :r:" - - -12- -a- - - -12- ----------220 a a x Martlets (Mr. Evans) - - -a- -6- -69- -80----Hawks - -(Mr. - -Bell) - - - -x 14 3 46 -- - -- -26- - - -----Herons --11 '50 x 24 7' 71 57 (Mr. Cape) -------------8, 27 6 x 9 a 3 Cho\lghs (Mr, Rcay) 9 - - -- - -- --169 x 3' 46 14 '4 5 Gryphons (!I.·fr . Nloxon) 80 -1'il )!. "

"

•0

"

0

0

<.)

0

Swallows (Mr. Portcr)

'3

0

a

8

a

x

31

124


. '

'.

THE ' CANTUARIAN .

3'Q

A FABLEAU. Ther wer oanes tweye bretheren, withouten fader or moder, for that thei wer deed, ne hadde nought other compaignye. They dwellide together, thilke bretheren, and weI I wot they wer poore and ladde a ful sorrowful Iyf, for pouvretie is a noyous ' thinge and gyveth men the htllnpe. Wherefor, lo rdlyngs, herken what I shal sayn, and let me te11en mi litel tale, wherein ye shal rede that al be it that a man be poore yit shal he not always cleve to honestie. Now, a Cui riche and worshipful wighte dwellide right ny to thir hous, who hadde cabbages in his garden and eek oon shepe in hys stalle. The twayne wer war of this, and oon nighte repayred to the riche wighte hys hous ful subtilly, for pouvretie maketh men to be ful of sleight and iniquitie. The first withe a sack about his necke, goeth and gan cutten him sundrie abbages in the garden, while that the other with a coulter in his honde goeth unto the stalle in such wyse that he openetll. the doore and anon ful softlie hanrlleth the sheep. Nathless, it so bifel lhat the goode man had not yit i-gon to hcd, and whan that he herd a noyse, he Hnyde to his litel son: Go, see if ther be onght in the stalle and call th e dogge. No w the dogge was hight Art-ther,* but â&#x20AC;˘ A right mery jeste. T he fabler taketh ~hilke U'IIllC from the French, which hath E tula as the ~I,'"ge

hys name, as who shu Ide sayn E s tit lit, mot In Englyshe mark how the confusioun I. betweene art thou tllere and Arthur. 111(1/1 ther,

it byfel that for hys desport he was went for th of the yerde into the feldes. Thcrfor the ladde callide Art-ther, Art-ther, and he in the stalle answerith: Yea, certes. be I here. Whan that he herd this, seeing nought in the darke, he weneth he heered the dogg" speken, and Hedde back to the goode man, sore afright, What ayleth the, deere son? quoth he. Bi mi moder soule, quoth he, Art-ther hath y-spoke to me. 'Who, oure dogge?- Yea, bi gumme, and iC that thou beleve me nought, go and herken him thiselfe. So the goode man goeth, and when he callith the dogge, the felaw answerith yet agayne, Pardi, I am here. By Goddes boones, mi son, seyd he, here be mervayles, or I am a Dutchman. T hanne sothly was his herte troubled, and al his boones i-dryed, and he remem berid upon the preest. Go speedilie my son, quoth he, and tell this lnervayle unto the preest, and bringe him hither with stole and holie water, Withoute eny delay the ladde runneth to the hous of the preste who abode right near, Rys up, sir priest, seyd he, I beseche the hertily, come and behold withinne the yerde woundrolls mervayles : never hast thou herd the lyk. Gird th i stole aboute th i necke. Grammercy, seyth the preste, thou art pullynge mi legge. I have mi bootes off and cannot com with thee.-Sir, seyth he, if that thou come nought, I will jollie wei carye thee, so save your grace, bucke uppe, Thanne the preste hongeth hys stole aboute hys


33 0

THE

CANTUARIAN.

necke withouten mo ado, and thei bathe sterte off together and by chaunce thir weye passed forby wher the cherle was cuttynge the cabbages. Whan that he sawe the twayne comynge, him thoughte that it was hys [elaw retournynge with a sheepe on hys backe. Therfor he callith out: Bringst thou one?-Yea, by mi feith, answerid thi ladde, al unwityngJy, who wened it hadde ben hys fader who callid on this wys. Quicke then, seyd he, caste him adoun. My knyf is ful sharpe : I lette sharpen. it thilke morn at the forge: and anon wil I cutte his throte withal. When that the preste heareth thilke werdes, he wencth he was betraid, so he upsterte and fledde for feare almost Qut of his witte, castynge his helie water on the grounde and levynge his surplice hongyn ge on a bushe which that it hadde

;ttl

caught in his flight. The cherie was thereatte astonied beyonde descriptioun and wi st not the resoun of at this ado. Butte anon he espyed som thynge wyt in the middel of the bushe and mayde amery chuckil. for he smellid a ratte. He hadde lange tyme agon fillide his sacke withe cabbages and but way tid for hys brother, who atte last joyned him as pryvely as he mighte, bearynge a fatte shepe on his backe and gronynge and swetynge wonderlie. Than gat thei them hom -ward right haste!y. ful content that fortune had de th em so wei sped de. and made mery over thi aventure of the surplice, for .1 be it that thei hadde not laughid for many dayes yit on thilke daye thei did not stynte to laugh. And nowe my tale is don.

f1Democfllm. 01<

It is with great regret that we announce th e death of MRS. EVENS, of the Haven, S. Stephen's. She has always bee n a true friend to n~embers of th e School, whether invalids or otherwise. The funeral, whIch was quite simple, took place at S. ~tephen's, on Wednesday, the 17th j somt: of the School attended the Semce.


THE' CANTUARIAN.

33 1

SCHOOL NEWS. We heartily congratulate H. Townshend, C. F . M. Ryan, H. D. Townend, i. and R. C. Cumberbatch on being made Monitors this term.

..

*" .. We offer our heartiest congratulations to W. A. F . Kerrich and H . Gardner. on passing 4znd and 45th respectively into Woolwich; and to B. H. Matheson and A. N. 1. Lilly on passing 14th and 17th respectively into Sandhurst.

The First Paperchase of the term was run on Wednesday, February 3rd; Garibaldi and Denne were the hares, while Fardell, i., !vey, Norton and Nightingale were the first hounds home. Nightingale and Norton brought in th e bags. Junior Steeplechase, March Ilth.Cremer. ii.; 2. Housden, ii . ; 3. Tompki ns; 4. Watney; 5. Forsyth j 6. Worters. Won by 2 minutes ; -t minute between second and third. Time: 26 mins., 48i secs. I.

Senior Steeplechase, March 13th.Telfer; 2. Saunderson; 3. Cremer, ii. ; 4. Ivey; 5¡ Cave; 6. Garibaldi; 7. Goad j 8. West. Won by 40 secs. ; 91- secs. between second and third; ' 4 sees. betwee n third and fourth . Time: 30 mins., 9t secs. I.

;.,~

%

* beg to acknowledge

We the addition to the Library of "Chinese Musical Instruments," by A. C. Moule, Esq.

*

~

On the ath of* this month, Major Isaacke, an O.K.S., kindly gave us a talk on the subject of the Cadet Corps. A full account will be given in our next number.

*....

In order to give permanency to the names of the Tutor Sets it was decided by the Tutor Set Masters that the following names should hencefor ward be given to th e vari ous sets: - Mr. Evans' Set, /I Martlets"; Mr. BeU's Set, cc Hawks" j Mr. Cape's Set, "Herons"; Mr. Reay's Set, Ii Choughs "; Mr. Moxon's Set, " Gryphons " Mr. Porter's Set, II Swallows."


THE

CANTUARIAN.

O. K. S. NEWS. The Rev. C. C. Frewer reached England on furlough from Zanzibar in December. He expects to be return路 iog to his work in the Universities' Mission to Central Africa sometim e in May this year.

tant Treasurer of the U nian Society at Oxford. *%~

C. 1\'1. Ricketts has been heard of in Dresden, where he is busily engaged in opera-hunting-latest score 40.

.."

~

We hear that some O.K.S. in India and elsewhere have prese nted Mr. 'Mason with a dressing case in memory of the happy days they 路spent with him at the School. R. H. W. Drinsley-Richards has been elected to the position of Assis-

INDIAN SIROHI, RAJPUTANA,

January 25 111, 1909路

Dear 'Cantuarian,' The Rev. H. P. Aust en, O.K.S., has been trying in a very kind way to fasten a halo round the head of your Indian Correspondent ; but I find I can still

Mr. Maundrell's latest feat.-Carried his bat through the whole innings for the China fieet v. Hong-Kon g, with a score of .60.

.. ..

H. Gardner played for the Harlequins with L. J. Dassett lately. W. A. F. Kcrrich represented 路Woolwich as one of the Gym. VIII. against Sand hu rst.

LETTER. sleep on a pillow which no haloed saint could ever have done with any pretcnCt' of comfort i so I have come to the con .. elusion that I am no saint yet and mn)' still carryo n myoid trade of 0 \>1..' 11 co nversation with you without being to n mundane.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

333

Obviously there is only one s ubj~ct me he was and will always¡ be the kindest to speak of with any vim, and that is the hearted of masters, and memories of him appearance of the History of the K.S.C. in the class room, and of him and the May I on behalf of al1 o.res. out here equally kind-h earted Mrs. Gordon ill their who know of, or will know of, this work, house (Hodgson's Hall ) or their home at tender our warmest thanks to Messrs. Rothje-Norman, will always be among Woodruff and Cape for the labour they the vividest memories of old days j and have bestowed in erecting this great there are other O.K.S. who will say the monument to the honour of the Past and same. Present King's School. The work must Mr. Ritchie, whosr. name should have have been enormous and the research been recorded more fully, is another wide, as is testified by the references to, instance of the warming influence which and quotations from, manifold and, often, masters exe rcise over boys. Pe rh aps his unexpected sources whence they have warm in g tendency affected the senior traced the details now enshri ned in their boys in their hearts more, whil~ it affected pages. the. jackets of the juniors in a more I believe that o.res. are mainly marked way. Conservative in their views of life! and I was sorry to see no mention of I feel sure that we shall all say that there II Tows" (spelling?) nor of <C slogging." never was, or could be, such a Head- "Tows" dese rved to be immortalized, master as our own, or (if we were under perhaps they are still beil)g so in practice, two) as that one under whom our though we often wished them defunct. moustaches began to grow. ' ¼ ithout I n the Lower School we were not allowed wishing to reflect on other Headmasters, to have knives at breakfast and tea; and we are all prepared to take up cudgels on had to eat our bread and butter as it behalf of our own. There are many came up from below, frequently tarnished. more points of progress or improvement The cake allowed on Sundays for tea was which may be put down under the name also often the object of merited criticism. of Dr. Field; but his Doswel1 has by his However. to cover up the dp.ficiencies of deprecatory introduction disarmed all " Potts" as the swivel -eyed purveyor critics ; and after ali, the H eadmasters of the tows was called, we organized form an unbroken pha lanx, all working studies, three or four chaps who we re for one end, and they would be the last neighbours at table pooling their stores. to wish that cudgels shoul d be lifted or T ownley, Woods, Glennie and Smith crania cracked over their respective rormed th e study which I best remember. glories. Dut by half term things began to look It is grand to read again of dear old black and we had to arrange exeats in Mr. Gordon. I don't suppose that anyone turn so as to get home for a Sunday and h:ui e ver a hard word to say against him bring back more stores; or else we had to subscribe from our pocket money to (~ x c r.pt of course at keepings-in, when no IIlaster is exempt from just blame. T o rai se a tin of potted meat. The Lower


334-

THE

CANTUARIAN.

School got 3d. a week p.tn., the upper got 6d. It was not mu ch of an advantage being in the 6th Form for they had a tradition that at the Sunday Evening Service in t he Schoolroom-when I I the Collection will be for th/'} Boys' Home" (many will recall the words and voice of our revered Dr. Blore) the 6th were to give 3d. each, which put them on a par with us.

It took me a long time to learn what was said by Dr. Blore as he stepped briskly up to the lectern on entering School at 9 a.m. The words were eventually found to be :' The following Absences." Though I did not learn the preamble till late, I was frequently made aware of the tt!rms of the Enactment which sometimes ended thus "Wimberley 25 lines, Smith SecunduS 100 lines." Then it was a ,case of Incipe pacato, Cresar Germanice, vultu Hoc opus et timidae dirige navis iter. Luckily this was the first part of a recognised pair of distichs (/) ; so on a day when time was heavy, one co uld create a stock to be kept in one's locker for future use or else be swopped to another CUlprit in exchange for a Trinidad stamp. One of Mr: Field's worst innovations was a scientific choice of the lines to be specially written or learnt for each offence. I see I have left slogging out. P. 238 refers to it as the "smacking of heads" j slogging we callen it. I remember the hushed silence of the Hall one gaslit evening when E. W. Moore, head monitor, walked up to the 4th Form table, " Pea¡ cock, where are those lines?" No answer.

Then four resounding slaps with open hand and a strong one too on Pkok's left cheek. "Wimberley, where are your lines ?H-sequel as before. It was some five minutes before the hum of Preparation set in again, for all the chaps were keenly eyeing P. and W. to see if they were much affected. But they didn't appear to be; so normal conditions resumed sway. Slogging was a painful but sal utary form of discipline before canes were entrusted to monitors. Boys didn't like it and tried to avoid excuse for it. There was a verv sad scene in the Schoolroom when Dr: Blare was retiring. F. D. Siaden, the Captain, advanced to the centre table and in an unsteady voice expressed the grief of the School at his resignation, and then proceeded to present a photo album containing the photos of all the boys. Dr. Blore replied with visible emotion and it was a relief to us all when we could change our silence to cheers . But I am trespassing on others' preserves. I feel sure that the publication of this History has moved many others to write of their renl.iniscences. If I were to go on and tell of the many incidents which really affected one in the regime of lVIr. Field, when one was older and in closer contact with the Masters, and, especially with the Headmaster, yo u would lose all your Can/uarian lJrofits. But what about India? someone will ask. True; but what can I say when O.K.S. will not send me notes abo u ~ themselves, though urged to do so. Thll papers report that F. M. Gadney- now Deputy-Inspector General of Police ill


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Poona-was married recently. Gadney knows me fairly well and should have told me this but he didn't. H . J . Trueman, whom I hoped to join in a shoot, has gone home on leave, though several of his brother officers came here recently for a shoot. As to myself, I am in a rath er jungly country, where educated folk are tew and far. I went out for a pig-shoot the other day with the Maharaja's son and some of his men. UsuaUy one does pigsticking as we used to do in Cutch, but pig-shooting is not considered bad fo rm if the ground is too bad for pig-riding. I did not know what bUlldobast had been made, but stood waiting among the b""shes in the line where the pig was expected to break. Presently a bullet from a camel-back came singing high left; then one apparently not far over my head. At this "not caring to be mistaken for a pig (proh ! Juppiter)" I began waving a hanky to show the sportsman my locality, but soon after the pig came glumphing through the bushes a few yards off me. My rifle was borrowed and of a sort I did not know; so my shot didn't go off; however, the boar kindly turned aside. Then followed

335

an animated chase for a mile or two through the low jungle, in wh ich every one blazed at the pig whenever he got a fair sight, even though other men were not far off the line of aim. A shikari gave the boar his" God save the King" at the end. He was a fair sized fellow, but still young, perhaps 4 years. In spite of the voluminous bullets sent after him, he had only three wounds. I used to agitate for a School Record, but in the face of th e History, I find that my idea was a puny one. All the same it is not only the scholars that one wants to kee p an eye on. but on all the Commoners too without whom the School would be but a small thing. The Editors hint as much when th ey talk of the futu re work which may still one day be done; and I take it they mean a Record which besides givin g the names of the fellows will preserve some record of the work which each is doing. Yours sincerely. J. H. SMITH. P.S.-Reu ter wires from London the death of Major E. L. P. Berger (O.K.S.) of the 69th Punjaubis.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES.

W. A. F. KERRlcH.-King's Scholar; Entered the School, June, 1902; VI. Form, Jan. 1908; School Monitor, Sept., 1908 .

H. GARDNER.-Entered the School, Sept., 1<)02 j VI. Form, Jan .. Jan., 1908 : Cricket XI ., 1905-08; Football XV., 1908-9; Captain of Football, 1908 j Fives' Pair, Sports' Committee, Xmas, 1907; Sports' Colours, Captain of Games, 1908.

1908 j Monitor, 1906-7. 1907-8, 1907-8, 1908-9 i 1907 and 1908 j

B. H. MATHEsoN.-Entered the School, Sept., 1904; VI. Form, Sept., Ig0 8; Monitor, Sept., 1908; Football XV., 1907-8, 190 8-9 ; Sports' Committee, Xmas, J 907 ; Sports' Colours,

I

g07 and [908.

A. N. I. LILLY.-Entered the School, Jan., '905; VI. Form, Jan., '908. W. S. BARRoLL.-Entered the School, Jan" 19°5; VI. Form, D ec., J<}oS .

C. S. MERRETl'.-Entered the School, May, '903; Cricket XI., '907 and 1908; Football XV., '908-9.


THE CANTUARIAN.

337

V ALETE.

R. H. Warde, H. T. Cannell, P. W. M. Orme, C. King, R. H. Edwards, L. L. Cobb.

THE LIBRARY.

The following books have been presented to the Library this term:" Old English Furniture," by G. Owen Wheeler, Esq.; kindly presented by the Author. Oversea Bntain," by Knight; kindly presented by W. A. Kerrich, Esq.

II

"Kelantan, a State of the Malay Peninsula"; kindly presented by P. S. F. Nairn, Esq.

"The Cradle of the Deep," by Sir Frederick Treves; ) kindly presented by II

The Discoveries in Crete." by Ronald Burrows j

Bernard Crowley, Esq.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CO R RE SPONDENCE. N. B. -Tlte Editors dedi"e /0 accept alt')' respomiMlity connected willi the opirn'om 0/ l/tet',. Correspondents. N ame and address must a/ways be ltivelZ, ',01 1tecessari/y for Imb/italioll, but as a .gua1alllte of good jaitll. Personalities will ilwolve certain rejectiou, Letters shorJId be writ/til (m om side 0/ tIle paper Oilly.

19th Feb. , 1909. DEAR" CANTUARIAN,"

As I am collecting details for the publication at so me future date, of an O.K.S. Register, I should be very much obliged if you would publish this appeal to ALL to help me in amassing the necessary information. At present I have a fairly complete list of all past as well as present K.S. from 1750 to 1908. Between the years J 870- I 890 the dates of entering and leaving the School are not complete. T he addresses and occupations of a great many I have not yet been able to obtain. I hope that everyo ne, past as well as present, will hel p me to get the following necessary facts :I.

Their own address, date of entering and, in the case of O.K.S., leaving the School, occupation and rank (if Army).

The addresses of any others that they know of. 3. The notification of any deaths.

2.

I wish all to note the following and not to act up to it. Do not say to yourself :<I Oh, someone else i~ sure to wr ite and give the information. I know, so I shan't trouble.II It is better to get the same over and over again than to miss some out, which is so orten the case. Kind ly notify me of any change of add ress as soon as possible. Present boys leavi ng wou ld greatly assist by writing at their earliest con¡ venience, sooner if they can. Dy kind permission of the Editors, I will acknowledge all communications through the Calltuaria1l, as to answer each one individually would be, I fear, too great an undertaking. Any noL acknowledged here or privately may safely be considered as lost in the Post.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

To avoid mistakes I would suggest that the names and initials be written in capital letters. Thanking all in antic;ipation, Believe me, yours since rely, Pltase address 10: HAMILTON BALY,

Green Court, Alta, Canada. T o the Editors of

II

THE CANTUARIAN."

DEAR SIRS,

I was much perturbed to-day by receiving a letter rrom H. M. James, O.K.S., of Assam, in which he so mewhat seriously rebukes me for speaking of Hoplitism in my last Indian letter to you in a vein of lighter levity th an its grave gravity demands. Dear old Jimmy 1but I do really hope that, Mr. Bell specially, and K.S.C. generally did not understand that I was humbuggin g the 'subject, or that, if I was, my remark s deserved any attention, For my own

339

small part, I fully believe in all fellows becoming hoplites: and also in the old Demosthemic idea of the Eis¢EpOV7E~ tlf/Oll7ES (am not sure no w of my Greek spelling or accents) which is the pukka ideal of patriotism. Old Tames may think that I really did grudge Government the price of my Volunteer riding breeches and tunic. If I did, it was only the bitter pain of parting from one's cash . So I hope all you fellows will not mis read my last letter as being a sneer at Volu n ~ teering or Territorialism. Far from it. H . M. James is himself proud and justly proud of belongi ng to what is perhaps the crack corps of Mounted Volunteers in India; and he is quite readv with his fellows to hit hard if called upon. Excuse me answering H. M. through you : but his letter has made me think that I may have expressed myself badly in my last contribution hence it may need explanation. Sirohi.

Yours sincerely, J. H. SMITH .


THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. The

followi ng

subscriptions

are

gratefully acknowledged:Rev. Dr. Moore (J/b), H . C. Mangin, Esq. (J/6), H. E. Morice, Esq. (7/-), W. Hunt, Esq. (J/6), F. S. Whalley, Esq. ( J/6) , C . M. Ricketts, Esq. (J/b), 1. R. Madge, Esq. (J/b). L. P. Abbott, Esq . (J/6), H enry Fielding, Esq. (J/b), Very Rev. C. L. Dundas (J /6), W. S. Barroll, Esq . (./6), C. H. Budd, Esq. (7/-), Rev. W. G. Mosse (J/6), F. H. Mosse, Esq. ( 14/-)' C. E. O. Bax, Esq. ( 10/6), E. G. Teasdale, Esq. (J/6), Rev. P. Malden (7/-), G. Lee-Warner, Esq. (4/-), Rev. A. J. Fenn (J/6), B. B. H orsbrugh, Esq.

(J/ 6), G. B. Cockrem, Esq. (7/-), Rev. F . H. Hall (J/6), J. H. Smith, Esq. (J/6), Rev. E . ]. Smith (4/-)' R. W. Mannering, Esq. (J/6), A. G. Blackford, Esq. (7/-),· E. W. Moore, Esq. (7{-), J. E. Griffen, Esq. (J/6), B. H . Latter, Esq. (J/6), S. V. Bally, Esq. (J/6), Mrs. Hichens (J/6), ]. R. T ulloch, Esq. ( 10/6). Subscribers are requested to let the Secretary have all subscriptions for 191 0 by October, 1909. and also ' to let him know at once all changes of address. H. D .

TOWNEND,

, Hon. Sec.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. The foll owin g have been received with many thanks :Alleyniall, Blue, BltmdelHan, Bradfield College Cllronicle, BrigMon College Maga zitze, Bromsf{roviall, Carillusia1l ('2), Chigwelli(w, Cuillherlian, Eagle, Eastbottrtda1l, St. Edward's SeIlool Chromde , Elizabetllall ,

Felsledzan, Felleszan, Herifordta7l, jo/miall, Kelley College Chronicle, King's School lWagazz1lt, Lawrmli{w, Lalldll,~ College lJ1agasi1le, L eodimslan, L lj's Fortnig/Illy (4), L orrelomall, lTialverllirl1l, Olavia n, Pbmot/ua1l , R adlelall, SUi/OJI Valma School C/lrom'cle, Swan, »::pver".

Gibbs and Sons, Printers, Palace Street, Canterbury.


THE VOL. VII .

CANTUARIAN. MAY,

IQ09.

No. r4.

EDITORIAL. HAnna virumque cano. H The flood is upon us, and we wallow deep in the trough of innumerable seas; Corps, Cricket, Certifi cate Examinations, Continents of work, Captain s and Corporals in their myriads hustle and hound us to the strenuous life while the th ermometer rests inexorable at 90° in the Mint Yard, or wherever we happen to be drilling, which seems never to be in th e shade. The Mint Yard we should remark in passing has died a violent death, and from the dust has come the Parade Ground . where arm ies in miniature wheel and turn to right and left. if possible as commanded, though dissentients as to the required direction are stili legion: But for the present" As you were IJ I The story of the Corps is for a hand more skilled to write. Cricket, inspired by the desperate keenness and proved personal excellence of it s Captain, struggles gamely, an d though up to date not with its customary co nspicuous success , yet it hopes and we all hope for the change of fortune which must surely come. The batting of the side is generally a one man show, and th e bowlers have had plumb wickets to deal with and thoroughly goo d opponents j the cloud must pass and the shining lights of the team must soon appea r.

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The Cantuarian March 1907 - March 1909  

The Cantuarian March 1907 - March 1909