Page 1

THE CANTUARIAN. VoL. Ill.

NOVEMBER, x8go.

No. r.

EDITORIAL. Editors are but human; but our readers do not seem yet to have learnt that simple !\ B C. Even within the first week of this new year our ears were welcomed by their 1 rics, " How soon wilt another Cantuarian he out ?" Ah ! would that they all were 1¡ditors. Perhaps then they migh t learn that an editor's " life is not a happy one, happy one." But now to begin. Editors ruay be divided into three distinct groups. I. Those who are really endowed with l(cnius, and can spin off an editorial in hw minutes. ii. Those who, not being J.II(Lcd in this way, yet do their best to l.1hour out something original. And iii. l'hosc who may well be named the " once-

more-we-take-up-the-editorial-pen class." To speak personally, the present writer is of the second class; he is doing his best to avoid falli ng into class No. 3, and yet cannot aspire to come under the category of the first. H e must therefore crave the induJ. gence of the gentle reader, if he seizes upon one clearly defined object out of the floating chaos of" what to say." This cherished haven for his troubled brain, is none other than the end of another volume. A few remarks upon the work of the last four years may not be out of place. The four years date from the time that saw a change in headmasters. The editors that began then to build are now-not here ;


2

THE. CANTUARIAN.

and four years hence the editors that began this third volume will be gone for ever, never more to scratch the editorial head or rack that august brain. "Durum sed let!ius fit patientia quidquid corrigere est 11ejas." But steady ! this is not the place for "gush." Let us try to distract our attention by a few criticisms on our past volume. Blessed be he who hit on the idea of"King School Worthies," which has stood us in good stead in our term of office. May he soon be among their number. (We are not partial, we don't know who it was). We earn estly hope and pray that this series may never be broken. Marlowe, H arvey, Abbott, \Vinchelsea, and Gunning, h:n-e already had their praises sung in our columns. We add in this number Thurlow, and hope that Linacre and Broughton may soon follow. It is our hope that soon we may be enabled to enlighten the school as to their offspring, King's School, Paramatta, founded by our worthy, Bishop Broughton. But this is not criticism. An improvement made by our recent

predecessors was the institution of l ht¡ O.K.S. column, to tell the school of ah departed ones, not at Oxford or Cam bridge. May we entreat O.K.S. not lt> be bashful, but send us tidings of them selves. It has been proposed to us thnl that we should get some 0. K.S. to writ\. a London Jetter ; and won we may be ahll' to send one to the press. One thing n~Ot l we should like to state here to be especial ly noticed by our correspondent~, name!), that it is not much good to write mon: letters on a subject which has already bcl'll the theme of one already in print. Of such letters we are in constant receipt, and w t cannot undertake to reprint them- bul, alas! this is another digression from 0 111 proposed object, and it is better for us tu take this as an omen, that there is nothing for us to criticise, except tl¡ose two poinh which we have already mentioned. Now may the curtain fall ; but let us first c:1st one Ja~t glance round our audience in wonder as to who of tl:em will end our work begun. We pass, who follows?


THE

CANTUARIAN.

3

KING'S SCHOOL WORTHIES. No. VI. LORD THURLOW. To impress the reader with the difficulty of representing Lord Thurlow's life and character in its proper light, I cannot do better than quote the opening words in Foss' article in his "Judges of England." " Lord Thurlow has been as much praised and abused as any man who has ever held the Great Seal, and for his different qualities he equally deserved both the approbation and censure he received. To a coarseness, partly natural and partly assumed, to a prescmptuous hautiness of demeanour, to a pretended disregard for the opinions of mankind, and to gross looseness .:>f morals, were added undoubted talents, courage under difficulties, love of literature, and natural good nature." There are few in fact who have gained such a high reputation among their contemporaries, and who have occupied such a comparatively low position in the estimation of posterity. Eel 1i•ard Thurlow was the son of a poor clergyman, and was born in 17 3 2 at Ashfield, in Suffolk. Of his early childhood we have a few anecdotes, all of which illustrate his overbearing disposition and extraordinary self confidence. When ten years old, he was sent to Seaming School, and from thence in x744 to the King's School. The rcason why Canterbury was chbsen, is strange. His father had acted on the advice of a friend, who, having a grudge against Mr.

Talbot, then head master, had strongly recommended it-his secret motive being that his enemy might have under his care "a daring refractory clever boy, who would be sure to torment him." At Canterbury he most probably discontinued for a time his idle ways, and laid the foundations of classical learning, for which he was so distinguished in his old age. He next went to Caius College, Cambridge, where he quickly gained a character for idleness. It is probable that this was not altogether deserved, but that he was only following a curious fashion of the day in affecting indolence, and in setting all rules at defiance. He was often seen in "Town and gown" riots, and in coffee houses, but seldom in chapel or at lectures. H owever, he was suspected of working late at night, and often when he was thought to be w~mdering in the country, he was quietly reading in his own rooms. His talent for getting into scrapes ¡was only exceeded by his ingenuity in getting out of them; often he would become responsible for acts i.n which he had had no hand, for the pleasure of arguing the case with the authorities, and of justifying what he was supposed to have done. But he brought his college career to an abrupt close by a gross act of impertinence towards the Dean. He had been ordered to translate a paper in the "Spectator" into


4

THE

CANTUARIAN.

Greek as an imposition. This he did, but sent it in to the Tutor, and on being asked why he had done so, he replied "No one respects Mr. D ean more than I do, and out of tenderness to him, I carried my exercise to one, who would inform whether I had obeyed his orders "-an answer, which did not improve his case. T he Dean was for expulsion, but thanks to the Tutor he was allowed to take his name off the college books, and thus escape the disgrace, which possibly might have ruined his life. Several years previously he had intended to take up law, and, his determination remaining unchanged, he was placed on leaving Cambridge under Mr. Chapman, an eminent solicitor of the day. Here he met as a fellow pupil William Cowper, the poet, with whom he struck up a great friendship, and to him he owed an introduction into the fashionable society of Lady H esketh. These years were by no means as profitable as they might have been, as he was very irregular at the office, and had a preference for the convivial company at Lando's Coffee-house. But, though irregular, he by no means neglected preparation for h is profession to the extreme degree he pretended. H e would work hard at times by fits and starts, and picked up a ve ry practical knowledge of law by attending t he most remarkable trials at Westminster. At last in I 754 he was called to t he bar, and thrown on his own responsibility. For some time his position was far from pleasant, for his father had withdrawn his allow-

ance, and he met with little success either in town or country. It was not until four years after that he had a chance of distin¡ guishing himself. This he did by putting down Sir Fletcher Norton, the tyrant of the bar. Norton was in the habit of treating juniors with great arrogance, but in Thurlow he had mistaken his man. For in the argument that took place bet ween them, T hurlow was more than his match, and by his powers of repartee and sarcasm completely silenced his adversary, to the great delight of the bar in general. T his incident made his name known amongst the attorneys, and brought him a fair number of unimportant briefs. But what influe nced his whole life was his retainer in the Douglas' case, in which he got a brief by the merest accident. T he case had arisen from the question whether the alleged son of Lady Jane Douglas was not a supposititious child purchased in Paris, and it had excited so much interest as to have become a general topic of conversation. It happened that Thurlow and a friend were discussing this in Lando's coffee-house, and Thurlow, most probably merely for the sake of argument, maintained the claimant to be the genuine issue. H e always ex¡ celled in conversation, and his friend could do nothing against his masterly statement of the case. But there happened to be sitting in the room at the time two Scotch lawagents, who had come up to London on business connected with the very suit, and they were so delighted with the knowledge and a cuteness that T hurlow had displayed,


THE

CANTUARIA~.

that in the morning they engaged him as junior to prepare the appellant's case. H e not unnaturally made the acquaintance of various members of the Douglas family, and among these of the Duchess of Queensbury, to whose influence he is said to have owed his silk gown in I 762. Bitter complaints were raised at his having been put over the heads of older and more experienced men, but his enemies contented themselves with thinking how ridiculous he would appear in his new positition. H e seems to have entertained no doubts of his own powers, and it 11\ust be admitted he was justified in h is self-confidence. Being now an important member of society, it was necessary for him to attach himself to some political party. He accordingly join¡ ed the Tories, and in I 764 he was returned a member for T amworth, a seat which he continued to hold till he was raised to the peerage. Meanwhile preparations had been made for the Douglas' appeal, and in I 769 it fell to his lot to plead at the bar of the House of Lords. This was on the whole the most brilliant period of his life, as he was engaged in a case of which he was thoroughly master, and in which he shewed to the fullest advantage his natural powers, and he also won great popularity for fighting a duel with a gentleman, whom he had had cause to attack in his speech, though it lay in his power to appeal to the House of Lords, who would have treated it as a breach of privilege and contempt of their authority. In the next year he made a telling maiden

5

speech in the H ouse and a few months after was appointed Attorney-General. It is unnecessary to treat at any length his parliamentary career, but only to show his gener¡ al attitude and behaviour. On all questions respecting judicial changes and the law of libel he was in favour of letting things alone. In the deba tes on America, as was to be expected, he took a very warm part, and his language against t he colonists was violent to a degree. His wholesale denunciations gained the favour of the Kihg, who considered a true friend the man, who said "Treason and rebellion are the natural growth of America." It is hard now to understand on what basis his enormous influence rested, except that he inspired all with fear. H is speeches are disappointing after making all due allowance for the defectiveneS3 of the reports. His reason¡ ing is often sophistical and he seems to have presumed at t imes on the ignorance of his audience. His physical presence was in his favour, and he often silenced an adversary by mere thunder or black looks rather than convinced him by argument. However, he must have possessed qualities which we cannot now appreciate, for he wins the warmest praise from Gibbon, the historian, in a sketch of the House, as he knew it, and it is evident that he was looked upon as one of the chief stays of his party. In I 778 on the resignation of Lord Bathurst he was appointed Lord Chancellor ; gaining at the same time the title of Baron Thurlow, of Ashfield, in Suffolk. He


6

THE

CANTUARIAN.

co ntinued to hold the Seal for twelve years, except during seven months when· it was put in commission. In the H ouse ofLords he still maintained that energy, not to say effrontery, which he had shown in the Lower House. He spoke on every conceivable subject, and treated the peers like a lot of schoolboys. T he Duke of Grafton resented this, and in an attack on him taunted him with his plebeian ext~;.1.ction. This called forth a · scathing reply, the result of which was, a contemporary relates, "both within the walls of Parliament and out of them prodigious. It gave Lord Thurlow an ascendency in the House, which no Chancellor had ever possessed; it invested him in public opinion with a character of independence and honour." But he was not to enjoy this ascendencr for ever. His own political conduct was so inconsistent that he lost the confidence of both parties. In 1788 on the agitation of the regency question though avowedly the king's greatest friend, he privatdr negotiated with the prince's party. Pill discovered this, but did not expose him at once not wishing to distress the king. In r 792 he again began to pursue the same course, and Pitt, finding it necessary to bring matters to a definite conclusion, threatened to resign if Thurlow continued to hold the Great Seal. George III. at once sacrificed tbe Chancellor and removed him from office on June rs, 1792. Lord Thurlow lived fourteen years after his retirement, and spoke but occasionally

in the House of Lords as :m independant member. H e devoted himself with great zest to literature, more especially to the classic.<;, and though never an author, his tran;latiom show great critical taste. He was a great sufferer from gout, and was frequently compelled to go to Bath for the waters. He died at Brighton on September u th, t8o6, and wa'l buried in the T emple Church at London. It is worthy of note that the same year was remarkable for the deaths of the great rivals, Fox and Pitt. Though possessing great talents, and often in his judgments showing great know ledge and research, he cannot be looked upon as anything but a political chancello1. That he was influenced by moti\·es of sdf1 in~ere;t to des~rt his party, will ever remain a blot upon his character. At the sam<: time, though not professing to b<! a good churchman, his appointments have never been complained of; and he patronised with great liberality the arts and sciences of his day, though in his own rough way. Hio physical appt!arance has been thu~ described : "At last there walked in, sup ported by a staff, a figme bent with agt·, dressed in an old fashioned grey coat with breeches and gaiters of the same stnn -a brown scratch-tremendous while bushy eyebrows-eyes still sparkling with intelligence- dreadful 'crows-feet' round them-very deep lines in the countenann· -and shrivelled complexion of a sallow hue-all indicating greater sensibility than was to be expected from the date of Ill


THE

CANTUARIA~

Iouth given in the 'Peerage'" Rudell• and coarseness marked him throughout Ill• , and the more fashionable the society lu 11.1-; in, the more pleasure he took in 111 lul~ing hi; love of the vulgar. But with 111 lu~ faults he produced a profound tulpu.:s.;ion on his generation, and owed his , 1 , to his own exertions; and that the lofty

7

position which he held fot forty years among lawyers, statesmen, and orators, and the respect and esteem with which divines, poets, and moralists regarded him, were due to something greater than mere selfconfidence and ordinary intellect, must be allowed by even the most hostile critics.

THE DEATH OF D E MOSTHENES. Jllil admim1·i prope 1-es est una, Nianici, Solnque, qnne possit fncere et s.:rMre ben tum. Hor. Epist. I . vi. Age-long tide of destiny Flow onward, ncn'!r rest ; Whose eye can pierce the mistyclouds, That drift along this breast ? Thy waYe that tosses kingdoms Like pebbles on the sand, Black storms of time have nurtured, In Fate's black sunh.:-;s land. H ide thou thy face, bright sunshine ; Ye sea birds, hush your cry; Is mortal life a shadow And only born to die? Where the land that e'er has honoured meetly, e'e n her noblest son On his crimson field of glory for the ,·ictory he has won? Thankless is the race of mortals, virtue can they ne'er behold Till its light is perished from them, till their hero is but mould. Then perchance in lamentation for his spirit, altar's flame And a Parian shrine in glory will immortalize his name. Whither flies th)' thirst for glory, cit}' of the violet crown, Whither courage, freedom, honour, and thine ancestor's renown ?


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Shall the memory of your hero fade to nought to evening's fall, Dying, dying in its splendour, sink in night beyond recall ? Fallen greatness, humbled spirit, weakly bow thy knee in fear T o the Thracian for thy sovereign, for thy patriot shed no tear. Where the sunny-waved Aegean girdles Calaureia's shore Stands a temple of Poseidon, where the snowy sea-birds soar. Thither from the traitors' malice, seeking refuge, seeking rest, Fled Demosthenes of Athens, he her noblest and her best. Falsely fair the bland deceiver seeks to draw him from the fane, -Will a traitor follow honour, or the perjured true remain?So to cheat his country's malice, and the triumph of the foe, Sought he peace and rest in Hades, justice from the gods below. Dead !-and yet the joyous sea-bird still shall scream along the wave As in former time, to-morrow ; but he sleeps within the grave. With the morrow's light mankind will haste to labour as of old, In the thirst for self-advantage, in the fever race for gold. T houghtless, harmless, all things earthly, when an actor's part is o'er Soon succeeded by another, then the loss is felt no more. All the world is cold and cheerless, happier were the men of old Loving nothing over deeply, thus against misfortune bold. True : but who would then for country or for honour risk a life? Meanness would be lord of all things, each for self would join the strife. Fiendish image, false ideal, better that life's spark were dead, If the patriot for his country, and for honour never bled. This is not the constitution that was given from above, For the main spring of creation is enthusiastic love. Thou art gone the way of all things, Athens, once the violet-crowned D ead in thee the ancients' spirit, dead the glory that they found. Shattered grandeur, broken columns, lying on the land in gloom, E mblems truly of thy greatness, like a tombstone by a tomb. Solemn chaos, desolation sit enthroned on every hand, For the former order changeth, but a castle in the sand. And a lonely wind comes sighing, sighing o'er the Grecian sea, And it moans the dirge of freedom, freedom lying dead with thee.


THE CANTUAR'l AN.

9

CAMBRIDGE LE TTER.

I

The foiJwing are the O.K.S. at present At this early period of term there is noth" •csidence :- St. Catherine's, E. Ellam, ing particular in the way of news. K.S. have W I I. Cullin; Corpus, G. F. Longfield, no special interest in the trial matches, which II V. Workman, P . G. Peacocke, P. A. are said to have produced some good play. l urnbnll, H. W. Moule ; Emmanuel, C. 1 On the river the boats are practising for the 1' , Longfield, M. J. Carr; Jesus, S. E. University Fours and the Clinker Fours, 1 \\ 11liams ; Pembroke, F. E. Beatson; Sel- 1 which came on early in November. W)'ll, G. E. W. Green, C. Nutter, T. CrasAnother Greek play is to be performed II t, Jo:. C. Frend, D . B. Watts; T rinity, R. in Cambridge this term. I t is the Ion of I • l•:lwyn, E . H . Moule, H. B. Milsome. l E uripides, for which great preparations of Among this number are four freshmen. scenery and music are making. The latter Your Cambridge correspondent owes an is the work of Mr. C. Wood, the coming upologytoR. F. Elwyn for the unintentional man of Cambridge music. On the 23rd of 111i~statement made in a recent letter, that October, 1\Ir. Stanley had an honorary 1 I his gentle men had won a Dealtry Prize at I degree conferred upon him. He was to l'rmity College. The prize which Mr. t have come up for it at the same time with a Jo:lwyn won was not that known as the j great many others, last May term, but stayed I k:tltry. We regret that this mistake has away, and some thought that Cambridge found its way into tbe pages of the " Pink was slighted. llook," and was read out in a formal manIn the Jist of" Select Preachers before m:r on Speech Day; but it was an inci- the University" for this year are the names llcntal testimony to the confidence placed of Canon Holland, and of the Head hy those in authority in your joumal and Master. 111 the assertions made therein by even your 0. K.S. humblest contributors.

i

I

I I

K ING'S SCH OOL NATURAL HISTORY AND A RCH£ 0LOGICAL SOCIE TY . A meeting was held of the above Society on September 2oth, to elect new members to the vacancies incurred by the departure of C. R. Longfield, E. B. Hawes, and H.

C. Scott (whose place had remained unfilled for a term). C. H. Wharton, R. G. Cooper, and T . C. Hincks, were elected 11cm. ccm. for ornithology, entomology,


IO

THE

CANTUARIAN.

and botany respectively. The full committee is therefore as follows :-Rev. L. H. Evans, R. G. Gordon, Esq., J. H. Smith, H. S. S. Parker, E. J. S. Athawes, C. H . Wharton, R. G. Cooper, and T . C. H incks. It was also settled at the same meeting, whom it would be most desirable to ask to give lectures to the School. The prize for the best collection of butterflies, flowers,

or eggs, which was offered last term, was awarded to Cullen. The entries were very scanty, chiefly owing, we presume, to the bad weather during June and July. The Society is now in a fairly flourishing state and bas a respectable balance. W l are also requested to state that the formn tion of a collection of coins is being set on foot. Contributions thereto are solicited.

DEBATING SOCIETY.

'

II

On Saturday, November xst, A. C. Moule moved that in the opinion of this H ouse " Canvassing at political elections is justifiable." The hon. mover began by saying that the practice had always been in use and was perfectly harmless ; some people said that it was almost as bad as bribery, others urged that canvassing put the government into the hands of the richest, but as they \Vere the chief landowners, this seemed quite fai r. Besides, canvassing got the classes who originally knew nothing about politics to take interest in them; it also made people who voted know what and whom they were voting for. H. S. S. Parker, leading the Opposition, said that the bon. mov~r had rightly remarked that canvassing had always been in use, but he had passed over the fact that it has always been regarded, more or less, as an evil. In cavassing, too, there are many instances of bribery and intimidation. He !'aid that he did not think either the

persons who had no political opinions ouHhl to be made to express any by means ol canvassing. Again, if canvassing was nol regarded as an evil, why was the Ballot J\1 1 passed ? Balloting has been employc:d everywher~, both in the colonies and on 1111 Continent. Again, the passing of tin Corrupt Practices Prevention Act proâ&#x20AC;˘~ that bribery and intimidation are common at elections. At the present time especially bribery is practised extensively in vari011 1 ways, especially under pretence of payinK large sums of money for public purposes. 111 Ireland many men would be intimidated hy the fact that if he were known to have givcu his vote for one side he might be boy cotted or worse. Bill¡posting at Elec1ic111 time was a nuisance, which was mainly 1111 result of canvassing. The ha n. membl' concluded by saying t hat he thought th1 members for the motion could not bring nn instance of an election which was free from bribery or intimidations.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

W. A. Wigram, for the motion, said that

I

I I

they were canvassing. E. J. S. Athawes on behalf of the motion hccn regarded as an evil, for in that case it then remarked that the chief advantage of 110uld have been stopped before now. Nor canvassing was that it gave the poorer oltd he think that there was bribery and inti- classes the opportunity of deciding their midation at every election. In fact, the hon. Yotes. lllCmbcr said he had not heard of people 1 W. H. Salmon, for the Opposition, said being fined £roo for bribery. Hon. that owing to the expense of canvassing members for the opposition must also rc- richer men stood more chance of election IIICmber that canvassing is one thing, than poorer H e also thought that can-,1nd bribery quite another. 1 vassing led to a great deal of strife and J. H. Smith, on behalf of the Opposition party spirit. He went on to observe that IIL¡gan b)' saying that a person might can- if two people were standing for election vass in two ways either by himself or by with equal advantages in other matters it .1gents. If he canvasses for himself he was unfair that the one whose canvassing probably gives dinners and speeches, and was more successful should be elected. Bethus practically deceives the people into fore the Corrupt Practices Preventions Act, his favour. If he votes by proxy, bribery landlords who were standing for election and intimidation must necessarily ensue. used to turn out their tenants if they did For intimidation instance the negroes in not vote for them. The hon. member America who are under the influence of concluded by saying that he thought that lhc landowners; it was this kind of thing people ought to give their votes of their which led to the Abolition of the Property own free will and opinion and not to be 1 Qualification for members of the House of won over by canvassers. Common~. The bon. member also H. Isacke, who until then had been un mentioned the fact that many great me n avoidably absent, now spoke for the motion. have tried to stop canvassing, as for instance He aaid that he thought that canvassing when Lord Russell brought forward the was necessary to set forth the candidates' Ballot Act ; for giving votes openly was opinions to those who had no access to practically the same as intimidation. The newspapers, for if they voted with no real hon. member also objected to the bon. opinion the result of the election would be mover's saying that canvassing interested a mere chance. The hon. member conthe poorer classes in politics for he thought eluded by saying that he thought canvassthat if the poorer classes had no opinion ing was justifiable, if only it could be kept !hey ought not to give their vote. He within proper limits. also thought that canvassers were not likely C. A. Knapp then spoke for the Opposito point out the faults of those for whom tion, and said that the poorer classes ought to

11 wn.s untrue that canvassing had always

I


12

T H E CANTUARIAN.

I

give their votes according as they have before now, if the mem ber;; of Parliam. 111 formed their opinions, and not as the can- had not good reason for allowing it. vassers decide them. He said they gener- 1 R. H . Parr then spoke for the motum ally followed the advice of the first agent J. H. Smith in reply to H. E. Rap•• who came to them, and took the can- speech then said that the people 11'1 11 \·assers view as the only possible ones. likely to be perplexed by the argument H e also said that very often the employes of the cam·assers of both sides and would voted as their employe rs. not kno\1" which to vote for. He thouvh• H . K Raper then said that canvassing that people ought to vote from their n d shows both sides of the question, for each opinion, and not from the rxcitcnh 111 man points out the virtues of his candidate caused by polling. and the vices of the other. After that the A. C. Moule then made the concludu•1 poorer classes can talk it over and draw speech. H e said that the hon. mcn1 ln• the ir own conclusions. H e observed also opposite appeared to have misund,crstu•ul that it was uot easy to intimidate the aver- the motion, and had wasted their breath h) age working man, and, if it was, they could talking about bribery instead of canv:ts,in1 vote as they liked, for no one saw them The debate was not on the corrupt p1.11 voting. tiscs, which were somctimrs unqucstum . R. J. Castley, on behalf of the ~pposi-~ ably the acc~mpanime~ts . of cam·as•UII t1on, recalled an hon. members re- but on canvassmg as a prmc•ple. ,\ n hou mark that canvassing led to no serious • member of the Opposition had said th.•• results. H e said that he did not hold that canvassing forced people to Yote agam • opinion and instanced the case of canvass- their own interests ; this remark might lu ing in Ireland. He also said t hat the applied to bribery, hut scarcely to c·" ' poorer classes were often imposed upon by vassing, and fi nally the poorer classes would a~e nts. surely not have been enfranchised if lht) E . H. Spencer, against the motion, then were not supposed to vote, a nd the Oppn gave an instance of bribery in canvassing sition had said that they were not sup]JIINl't I when Wilberforce spent £6o,ooo on his to \'Ote if they had no political views of l htn t:lection. H e also saw that the poorer own. people ought to be sufficiently grateful for 1 On the President then calling for a ~hm1 the franchise to take an interest in politics I of hands, it w'\s found that the motion ''·' and find motives of their own to vote. 1 carried by a mnjority of 5, for the mot••·ll They could get their opinions from news- ~ J], against, 12. T he debate was 11 II papers, or reading-rooms. He observed attended, clos~.; on so persons bt:in~ I'll that canvassmg would have been stopped ent. ·

l


THE CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL OFFICERS. CHRISTMAS TERM, x89o. Captain of the School J. H. Smith, x89o. Captain of Cricket .. . H. S. S. Parker, 1889. Captain of Football .. . H. M. James, x8go. Captain of Games .. . J . H. Smith, r88g.

Editors of " Tlte Cantuarim1."

J. H. Smith,

1889; H. S. S. Parker, x8go ; A. C. Moulc, r8go. Hon. Sec., W, H. Salmon, x8go.

Sport's C01imtiflee. Hon. Sec., J. H. Smith. Sept., x8go H. S. S. Parker, Sept. x888. R. J. Castley H. M. James H. Isacke } Sept. E. J. S. Athawes x8go. C. II. Wharton

Mo11itors. W. A. Wigram, Sept., 1890 (Senior House Monitor) J. H. Smith } Sept. A. C. Moulc } Sept. H. S. S. Parker x88g. H. Isackc x8go. Debating Society. President .. . J. H. Smith. COMirnTTEJ::: H. S. S. Parker. C. A. Knapp. W. A. Wigram. E. J. S. Athawes. W. H. Salmon (Secretary) R. J. Castley. A. C. Moule (Vice·President). H. Isackc.

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRU M DU C E S.

1>.

S. ·!\I. TASSELL-Entered Senior Department, Sept., x884 ; VI. Form, Sept. x887 ; Monitor, June 1889 ; Captain of School, Sept. x88g-go; President Debating Society, Sept. 1889 ; Football XV., Dec, 1889; Cricket XI., July, x8go; Open Scholarship Christ Church, Oxford, March x8go; School E xhibition, July, x8go.


THE

I4

CANTUARIAN.

E. B. HAwES-Entered School, Sept. 1885; VI. Form, Sept. x887; Monitor, June x889; 1st School Exhibition, July r89o; Captain 2nd Eleven, May x89o; Et.l. Cattluan'tm, Sept. 1889. H. W. MouLE-Entered School, Jan. 1887; VI. Form, Sept. 1888; Elected Scholar of C.C.C. Cambridge, March 1890; School Exhibition, July, 1890. C. R. LoNGFIELD-Entered School, May x886; VI. Form, Jan. 1889; Monitor, Sept. x889 ; Football XV., Nov. 1889. Goes to Emmanuel College, Cambridge. H. E. GouLDEN-Entered Senior Department, Sept. x884; VI. Form, Sept. r88f! • Monitor, June 1889 ; Sports' Secretary and Ed. Cantuarian, Sept. 1889; Crirk1•t XI., x89o. Goes to Trinity College, Oxford. D. B. WATTS-Entered School, Sept. x884; VI. Form, Sept. 1889. Goes to Selwyn College, Cambridge. A. L. TuRNBULL-Entered School, Jan. x885; VI. Form, Sept. x889; Monit(u, Sept. x889; Football XV., x888; Captain thereof r889-90. P. W. }AMES-Entered School, Jan. x886; Football XV., 1888-89. Goes to Guy' Hospital.

SCHOOL NEWS. The Archbishop, accompanied by the Bishop ofDurham, visited the school on Saturday, October r8th, and kindly requested the H eadmaster to give three half holidays, one for himself, one for the Bishop of Durham, and the third for the new Bishop of Dover. ** * We are glad to welcome back Mr. Evans after his absence through illness. Mr. Smith has now left.

.

••

Football began on Monday, September 29th, there being a special half-holiday for the purpose.

•••

The Rev. H. Whitehead, head of the

Oxford mission at Calcutta, preached to till' school in the chapel on Sunday Oct. 5th. * • • A special class for Shorthand has be~ 11 started in the school. The hours for it :t•• from 5 to 6 on Tuesdays and Thursd:1y The system taught is the Oxford. ** * The school attended the Ha rvc~ t Thanksgiving service in the Cathedral ou Wednesday, October 8th. Mendelssohn' "Lauda Sion " was performed. The hcrul master was the preacher. * • The Green Court* archway, which h been for some time in a state of rcpa11 owing to its unsafe condition, has now bl'ut


THE

CANTUARI')\N.

tully restored, and the scaffolding taken down.

wi th the School crest and blue wreath in front.

The Chess Club has begun again this ll'rm. The new members of t he Committee hcing Beynon and Salmon, who have taken 1he places of Longfield and Turnbull.

Bishop Smythies of Central Africa paid the school a visit on Friday, Octocer I7th, and gave a short lecture on work in Africa. * •* The school was present at the consecra~ion of the Rev. G. R. Eden, M. A. as Bishop of D over, on St. Luke's Day, Oct. 18th. The scholars formed part of the procession.

..... ..

** I t has been decided to have a chess tournament again this year, as last.

** The Choral Society* is engaged this term In practising Macfarren's "May-day." * * * The Sports Committee have decided to Hh•c a cap to those who represent the School against other Schools in fives, or who have represented the School since the present head-master's succession. The new fives' cap is of white flannel,

.

....

..

* *

The O.K.S. who wish to play in the O.K.S. match on Friday, Dec. 19th, are requested to communicate with A L. Turnbull, T emple Ewell Vicarage, Dover.

.. ..

The School will probably break up on Saturday, December 2oth.

O.K.S. COLUMN. Capt. E. S. D. Crowther, (O.K.S.), Koyal Marines, has been appointed Supt. of Military Gymnasia at Devenport. ** * C. H. Deuton has accepted an assistant ml\Stersbip at I sle of Wight College.

•• *

H. C. Scott has won a £so scholarship nt King's College, London.

The Rev. R. L. Ottley preached the sermon in the Cathedral, at the consecration of the new B1shop of Dover, on Saturday, October x8=h. *• * L0. K.S. are requested to send any news about themselves, to be published in thi!! column, as it is difficult to keep it filled up by other means. J


r6

THE

CANTUARI AN.

CRICKET MATCH. A match was played on September 25th by the King's School XI. against a team captained by R. E. B. Roe. The scratch eleven contained several well-known local a mateurs, including W. H Barnes, the St. Lawrence wicket keeper, who was in fatal form, J. D. Bode, the Captain of the S.A.C.C.C., G. T. Drury, H. R. Blore, and others, and was altogether a very fair one. The King's School, who were represented by the same team, with two exceptions, as did battle for them last term, batted first, hut did not fare very well, nine wickets being down with the total at 74¡ Then Young joined James, and the pair brought up the score to 97, both hitting merrily all round the wtcket. Our opponents opened their venture with Bode and Blore, a somewhat formid able couple, but with the score at 13 Parker got rid of Bode. Then Blore began smiting furiously and mercilessly, treating the attack with impartial contempt, and wa~ not dismissed till he bad 41 to his credit, out of 64 runs made during his stay. Wharton was now bowling at the Nackington end and Roe had resumed at the other, vice Castley, who had been punished severely. The pair put an entirely different aspcrt on the game, and despite the cautious efforts of Barnes, who carried out his bat, di~ missed the seven remaining batsmen for an addition of x6, the whole side being out fOr 8o. The King's School were thus left victors by I'l runs. ,_.... .

~-----

CRICKET REV lEW . In presenting our readers with the annual review of the Cricket Season, the fact i forcibly borne upon us that the reviewer's task is not a happy one. It is not ple:~.sant tu have to state, as we are compelled to state, that the season just over has been vccy unsuccessful. T en matches were played, two of which only we re won, and the rest lo~l - anything but a grand result to chronicle- a far less satisfactory result even than ln, l year. But in justice to the XI ., we feel bound to say that the unsatisfactoriness sOilll what disappears when we look into the matter ; and taking everything into consideratc<HI we have no reason to be ashamed of our performances on the cricket field. Of couc c we make no attempt to congratulate ourselves. The truth is, without inventing excuses, the team were b elow the average-below in every department of the game. A â&#x20AC;˘ in 1889, fortune was unkind to them at starting, Out of the five old members, wlcu remained at the close of the previous season, R:~.mmcll and Stuart left before eric~ 1 I

"">


THE

CANTUARIAN.

time came round, and their loss was severely felt. Eight fresh choices had to be made -a very hard task for a new captain-and no really good material was at hand. It is not therefore surprising¡ that small success awaited them; but with one or two exceptions they played up well, and most of the matches were keenly contested and provided plenty of excitement. Their batting was lamentably weak, as the scores and averages sho\V; there was a great lack of defensive power ; not one (if we except Parker) could be relied upon to make double figures, and consequently the total scores made were small. Their two regular bowlers were good, but the others were only moderate. Their fielding all round was superior to their predecessors, for though none of them could be called brilliant, yet they acquitted themselves respectably. There is, however, still room for improvement. Certainly they were seen to greater advantage in the field than when batting; if their own scores were small, on the other hand they kept their opponents as a rule from scoring heavily. Both matches with the C.O.S. were very exciting. The former being lost by 4 and the latter won by 8. The matches with Dover College, the Depot, and St. Lawrence, were very even. We certainly ought to have beaten Chartham, and we made a very poor show at Highgate. We defeated the Pilgrims after a capital game, running up our highest score, the only one above 200. The O.K.S. match was not so hollow as might have been expected, while that with St. Augustine's was lost through our own fault entirely. In conclusion we wish we could have detected greater promise in the other elevens for next year's team, but we hope it may appear. At any rate we are glad that this year's Captain will still be here. Individual remarks subjoined : p \RKER, H. S. S. (Captain).-Good all round cricketer. Very straight and reliable bowler, and though not so successful as last year, kept up his form well. Played some good innings, and had by far the best average, but did not come up to expectation. Improved in the field. C .\STLEY, R. J.-Hits well, but has too weak defence to make good scores. Fair change bowler, :~nd good field. S L.\TER, P. H.-A promising bnt, showed capital form and ought to turn out useful. Did not shine as wicket keep, but was quite ne\v to it. ¡ l s ACKE, H.-Had a very fair defence, but would try to score too quickly, and so often came to grief. Rather sluggish in the field. I'ARR, R. H.-Made good strides in batting; fair defence and proved of service. Moderate field. WHARTON, C. H.-Deteriorated still more as a batter; had no sort of defence, but relied on making one or two hits. Improved somewhat in the field. 13 EVNON, F. S.-Moderate left-banded batter and bowler. Fair field.


18

THE

CANTUARIAN.

SHORTING, C. E. N.-Another disappointing bat. Lost his wicket constantly from a fatal habit of pulling. Good field at times. R oE, C. H.-Had the best analysis in bowling and well sustained his reputation. Unfortunately was of little use with the bat, as he seemed to have lost all form and nerve. Lazy in the field. GouLDEN, H. E. -Batted well at times, but bad sight prevented him from doing himself full justice. Very fair field, but unsafe catch. JAMES, H. M.-Poor bat, with cramped style. Not successful at the wicket, but good in the out field. TASSELL, D. S. M.-Only once showed anything like form: Very poor batter, but fai r field. CRICKET AVERAGES. BATTING AVERAGES. Times Highest Innings. not out. Runs. score. Average. H. S. S. Parker ..... . 2 8o* IS 405 31.2 R. J. Castley ........ . 2 16I 13 49* I4·7 P. H. Slater ........ . 2 28* 14.I 9 99 H. Isacke .. .... .... .. 2 13 I3 143 53* R. H. Parr ......... .. . 2 12 14 I44 C. H. Wharton ..... . 0 124 13 31 9·7 F. S. Beynon ........ . 6 2 8.2 24 34 C. E. N. Shorting .. . 0 13 ss 99 7·8 C. H. Roe .... ...... .. I2 0 86 7·2 35 H. E. Goulden ..... . 18 14 I 73 s.s H. M. James ....... .. 13 0 70 25 5·5 D. S. M. Tassell .... .. IO 0 45 I9 4·5 BOWLING AVERAGES. Overs. Maidens. Runs. Wickets. Average. C. H. Roe ..... .. ..... I7I . 59 388 I 1. 25 33 R. J. Castley ......... IIo 28 324 I3.I 2 24 I6.2 C. H. Wharton .... .. 66 r7 r62 IO :R.. H. Parr............ 12 2 43 14. I 3 H . S. S. Parker...... 234 63 627 36 I7·I5 Parker bowled two no balls, and Wharton and Roe one each. Beynon, Tassell, and Shorting also bowled, but without success.

so


THE CANTUARIAN·.

1'9

FOOTBALL PROSPECTS . Our prospects for this year's football cannot be said to be very bright, but are quite equal to last year's. Of our old XV. we have only three colours left, two of two year's standing, and one of last year. We have thus still left Ja mes as ~ back, Athawes as ~ back and Wigram as forward. Of the new players Flint (1) and Raper seem to be good forwards, especially useful in the scrimmage ; but are not very quick on the ball yet. As :t whole the scrimmage is fairly heavy, and forms together sooner and tighter than was noticeable last year. Practices this year :tre much improved. The compulsory days are Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday; and hitherto we have hardly had to complain of the absence of any important player from the field. The time for beginning is observ· ed more punctually. Another improvement too for punctuality has been made in picking up sides at the school and not on the ground. It is encouraging for us in our diminished colours to hear that Dover College has only two colours left. There is too a rumour tbat South Eastern College has only two members of their old XV. left; of Sutton Valence we have heard nothing as yet. We are playing this year for the first time the Thanet Wanderers; a club we can hardly hope to beat ; but one with which we intend to have a good struggle. Cavalry Depot have taken to Association. But it is cheering for us to be able to contemplate renewed con· tests with St. Augustine's College, before very long, as they have a strong Rugby advocate in J. D. Bode, who intends to bring a scratch team against us. We have been obliged to drop the idea of a return match with South Eastern College, as it could not be arranged. As our forwards have already received a word of comment, the other promising members for the XV. ought not to be left unspoken of. Shorting ought to make a good threequarters ; he has a good pace, and fights his way through very fairly well, and Castley, who sometimes playes as ~ back, dodges well and is, as a forward, very quick on the ball. It is rather doubtful as yet who will take the other ~ back's place. As a general comment, we should say that the scrimmage is fairly good, and that the ~ backs ought soon to make themselves very serviceable. One fault, continued from l:lst year is still observeable; namely that of passing. And this is a failing that ought to be remedied. Two years back our passing was one of our best points. Players are now too fond of keeping the ball to themselves or else not passing at the right time, and fail-


20

THE

CANTUARIAN.

ing to pass it far enough. This we hope will soon be rendered remains but to append the fixtures for the season. 1890¡ Saturday, October x8th, South Eastern College, Saturday, November xst, Thanet Wanderers, Wednesday, November sth, Sutton Valence, Tuesday, November xI th, Dover College, Thursday, November 2oth, Dover Town, Thursday, December 4th, Sutton Valence, Thursday, December nth, P. A. Turnbull's XV., Friday, December 19th, O.K.S., 1891. Thursday, February sth, Dover Town, Wednesday, February nth, Dover College,

better.

Nothing now

Blore's Piece. Blore's Piece. Blore's Piece. Blore's Piece. Dover. Sutton. Blore's Piece. Blore's Piece. Blore's Piece. Dover.

F OOTBALL. K.S. v. S.E.C. This, our first match, played on Blore's Piece on Oct. z8th, proved a win for th~ visiloa, by 6 points to 2. Parker kicked off for the School and the S.E.C. were kept on lin defensive nearly the whole of the first half. After a penalty free kick for the Sehoul which proved fruitless, some good passing was shown by James, Athawes, Shorting, and Castley, ending in a try for the School by Athawes- the place kicking failing. Anolh~â&#x20AC;˘ try by Shorting, well backed up by Athawes, also failed to produce a goal. After half-time a goal was neatly dropped by one of the S.E.C. three-quarters, and ro minutes before time an over-confident appeal for" collared " was not upheld, and l .cc r.111 in for S.E.C. unmolested. The try being c:>nverted, the S.E.C. were left winnt'" by 2 goals to 2 tries. We had the best of the game throughout the first half, but the S.E.C. seemecl '" better training and had the advantage in the second. James' collaring was excellent, while Athawes, Shorting, and Flint did good work. The team may learn t hree old lessons from the match, i., that the ball is in play until the whistle sounds ; ii., thal to k11 ~ in front of our own goal is to give the game away; iii., that goal posts as well as goal lim have their use.


THE CANTUARIAN.

21

CORRESPONDENCE. N D. - The Editor• cluli11e to occept any .,.e,ponsibility connected with the opmion8 of their corrupond.enls. Nam e ond oddreu m tLat atwa,yr be given, not necessarily for pub t~ca tion, bul as a guarantee of good fa ith. Per;o11alities 1Di!L i nvolve ce,·tain rejection.

T HE

II

PINK BOOK."

To the Etlitors tif" THE

CANTUARIAN."

SIR,-Your correspondent "H.D.S." presents a strong case in favour of the re· form of the "Pink Book, " but not perhaps as strong as he might have done. The x889 edition contained some real gems ; for instance, Mr. Campbell is down aq hailing from "Exeter College, Cam· hridge"; but it is fair to say that the r 889 i~sue is now purged of several of these pieces of information. Nevertheless some gross blunders have b~ cn suffered to remain. In the list of those who have obtained University honours since 1859, there is a patr iotic but somewhat shortsighted tendency to move people up a cbss. One gentleman who got a 3rd in Lit. Hum. is generously presented with a 2nd, while two others, who, owing to the prejudices of bigoted examiners, only got a fourth in Theology and Modern History respectively, now blossom out in all the glory of a 3rd. Mr. E. H edger was never at St. J ohn's, Cambridge ; the na me of Mr. T uckey's college is not given; Mr. Crabtree's mathematical successes are left unhonoured and unsung ; Mr. H. V. Cobb's Indian Civil honours are ignored; and Mr. Corbould's 4th in Lit. Hum. is passed over

in silence, although a similar class in the far less important school of theology is scrupulously recorded below. These at random ; doubtless more detailed investigation would } ield. a richer crop of errors. Turning to the list of Old Cantuars, one finds some very bad things. The number· ing should be remodelled to facilitate re· ference, and a certain plausible uniformity of description in the case of University honours should be aimed at. No. x8 has never taken his M.A. degree. No. 43 is insufficiently described. H e was Denyer and Johnson Scholar, r 87 x, and Senior H all-Houghton Greek·Testament Prizeman 1873. No. 85 did not take honours .in History but in J urisprudence. No 56 has got beyond the B.A. degree. So long ago as x883 he had taken the M.B. at Oxford. These again I take at random. Surely " H.D.S, " and I have, between us, made out a case for reform. The "Pink Book, " wants an efficient sub-editor. I don't know who is responsible for the mis· takes ; probably nobody at .aJI, which sufficiently accounts for their appearance. But someone ought to be responsible. Yours etc., 0. K. S. Oxon.


THE

22

CANTUARIAN.

PETER GUNNING.

To the Editors o/"THE

CANTURIAN."

Dear Sirs,-Will you kindly allow me to remove a false impression which the last number of T/ze Cantuarian may have created. In the article on Bishop Gunning it would have been more correct to say he was the author of the "Prayer for all sorts and conditions of men" than the " General supplication," which is according to the Prayer Book Rubrics another name for the Litany, and that he certainly did not write. It is perhaps hardly necessary to add that "Ceoper's Coli." is merely a brilliant but unwarranted emendation of the printer's for Corpus. The other mis-prints are more or less obvious. Yours &c., O.K.S. Temple Ewell Vicarage, D over. OUR FOUNDER.

To the E ditors oj"TnE CANTURJAN." Dear Sirs,-May I ask a question now, which ought to have been asked long ago, but apparently never has been ? It is on a subject which has been the cause of suppressed d isapproval among all the Conservative members of the school for some time. I refer to the four words in the school grace "Henrico rege, fimdatore 11oslro." Henry VIII. was 11ot our founder. He was no doubt a great benefactor to the school in making fresh buildings, and altering the site of the school ; but he was not for that reason, our founder. The school was {Ounded as a fact by Theodore of Tarsus,

between ~e years 668-6go, and when H enry VIII. set the school on a new basis, he transferred John Twyne, headmaster, and in all probability most, if not all, of th..: King's scholars to this fresh building. He cannot therefore be called our founder. The school boasts, and always has boasted of its real founder, Theodore, and why should this traditional fact be the object of a radical invasion. Perhaps the school would be pacified by adding the prcfi:< re to fimdaton" Yours ever, CONSERVATI VE. THE DAY BOYS' LAVAT ORY.

To flu E dito1·s if" THE

CANTUARJAN."

Dear Sirs,-On behalf of that "neglected" portion of the King's School, the day boy , I beg 'to point out with your permission th<.• following somewhat alarming fact; thai for the convenience of some 8 or 1o boy •, who play football there is provided on \. solitary towel (if the article in question cnn be called by that name), for their needful ablutions after football. From its appca• ance I should imagine that this towel might havebeenlatelydugup from the ground (p Cl haps by the Archreological Society in thci• recent excavations). Are towels so expc u sive that not more than one can ht provided ? Or is it desired that s urplice~ should take their place. With many apologies for trespassing on so much of you 1 space, I remain, Yours truly, A DAY BOY. October 6th, I 8go.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

A PROTEST. To tlze Editors if"THECANl'UARIAN." Dear Sirs,-During the last four years or so, there has been a gradual though steady curtailing of School privileges. The upper dormitory has materially suffered. Those in the Studies have this term to go up to Uall for supper, and are limited in time, lhough this limit is not strictly enforced. This arrangement, of course, does not ex¡ extend to the Sixth, nor ought it to. Going out after four o'clock is no longer the privi¡ lege of the Choral Society and Upper School Drawing Class. All these we used to regard as our rights. We are now hcing instructed that old customs and traditions are not of themselves rights. But what are rights ? Are half-past tenncrs that have been promised us, either at the request of his Grace the Archbishop, or for University distinctions? There have been several promised us which we have not had. Now what is to become of these? Surely they are not being saved up for next year. Even in r 889, I believe, lhcre were some promised which we did not get, and which we expected this year, IJut in vain. May I suggest that a list of lhc half-past tenners promised and a list of those actually enjoyed, be published either in The Crmtuaria11 or on the notice-board in the Schoolroom. There is a general feeling about the School that we have not had our rights in this respect. If this idea is wrong, I think it should be publicly cont radicted. Yours in protest, R.H.P.

23

[Eo.-The break down of privilege is and always has been a most interesting study. We will not at present trouble you with an essay on the subject, bot simply state the list you ask for. The following is the list of half-holiday's promised:Two from the Archbishop. Both given. One from the Mayor (being an O.K.S.) F . D. Sladen's rst class in Mods., Oxford. E. H. Moule's Schol. at Trin. Col., Cam. H. W. Moule's Schol. at C.C.C., Cam. D. S. M. Tassell's Schol. at Ch. Cb., Oxford. Cricket half-holiday. Given. One for Mrs. Field's birthday. Given. From this our correspondent may learn there are five owing.]

THE SCHOOL L ECTERN. To tlze Editors of "

THE C ANTUA!' IAN."

Dear Sirs,-! am undertaking a weary and dishear:ening task when I b~gin to write this letter. Once again I would call the attention of your readers to a matter which still remains not only without remedy or alteration, but rather grows daily worse and worse. This matter is the lectern in the school-room. The good old carved oak lectern that used to grace that room has been appropriated for the last three years or so for the use of the Chapel, and has also been adorned with a pair of brazen candlesticks, which for some reason were not put


THE

CANTUARIAN.

on straight, so that they swing round, if the lectern is shaken in the least, and throw no light on the sacred page whatever. A few terms ago a member of the Schoolwho now, alas ! is numbered among the noble army of O.K.S.-very generously offered to make us an "iron-work" lectern for the Chapel, and so enable us to have the one that is there now brought back to its proper place. The trouble our friend took over this was, we believe, very considerable; he had diagrams and designs made, which were thoroughly approved of by all who saw them ; we believe he even had the materials ready, and was only waiting for the sanction of those in authority before he began. But those in authority did not giye their sanction; they let the golden opportunity slip, and now our would.be benefactor has left, and those who, if not the chief supporters of the plan, would probably have had most to do with it in a practical way, ha,¡c left or will have left soon. We have been informed that there seems to have been an idea current in some quarters that this plan was only the hobby of him who so kind ly offered to give us the lectern and that the school in general didn' t care about it in the least. May I here say that, if there ever was such an idea prevalent, it was, to the best of my knowledge, entirely without foundation. No one that I have ever spoken to on the subject has appeared in the least opposed to the plan, or even neutral, but all have heartily approved it, at the same time using very unkind language about that tumble down trumpery,

tottering thing that is at present in the schoolroom, the book rest of which has several times come off, and is now hanging by one nail, and is liable at any moment to revolve and spill the Bible on the floor, which, in the middle of the lesson would be - tableau I "The Bible" reminds me. The Bible now in use is of t he kind known as " a tenpenny-" T he New Testament and the Old are entirely separate works, while neither of them recognise a ny connection with the covers, and I think I may safely add that several pages arc missing; certainly many, both at the beginning and end are very much so, "all tattered and torn." We used to boast a very genteel and respectable old volume, but it had the misfortune one day to mislay its cover (quite an accident we presume1 or possibly it was vain, and wanted the "!alcst Paris fashions," its prophectic soul, of course, teiling it that this line of action would result in immediate re-binding). However, that may be, it disappeared, and now, after the lapse of ages, we are told that it ha'i been rebound. But is does not return to the School-room, the reason being, doubt less, that it would there find no decent accommodation. I have said that the opportunity ho ~ been lost. But has it ? If we cannot C\'l'll now accept (which is much to be wish~:cl) the offer made by our " ironwork " fr knd, must we therefore lower ourselYes to alluw that we have not enterprise or skill enOIIL'h left to produce between us a lectern whu It, if not beautiful, would at any rate be dct c111 and substantial. I hope that before anotl11 t


THE

CANTUARI~N.

Cantuarian is brought out we may have substantial proof that we need not make this humiliating confession. Believe me, yours truly,

AN IRONICAL ADMIRER. [Eo.-Since we received

zs

munication, the school have had substantial evidence of the justice of your plea. We hope you me,ln no pun in your signature, but under the influence of your frenzied indignation are irresponsible for your word& and actions.]

your com-

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. The Brighton Oollege Magazino confines its hulk this time bo but sixty po.ges. or these sixty, fot·ty nro devote<l to tho <loings of JIMt or prosout Bright. onions ino.thletic tmt·suits. The poem "An o.gony" is r~n<lllblo, we quoto :Tho fish or. " 'l'ho fi ahot•mn u rudely rejoices Full fniuly ho fastens his fly, And cl'ics in the go.yast of Toiccs, Why, who.t's to be dono in tho llry ? C1·icke~. But woo to the game of tho mttion, 'Ve cannot plo.y cl'ickot in shitlll, Its ho.viug o. lengthy duro.tiou This 3olnr eclipse." The OhoLmclcia1~ boasts a phologmpb which wo presume represents •hoil· cho.pel. '!'his plpet· alijO contains o. poem on the wonthor, entitled St. Swithin's Rovons:e, which is distinctly well wriHon, We should like to hoo.r ft·om tho o.uthor thereof ngniu. Tho o.rticle on "Sho.dows nut! Sbo.1es " is nlso good. vro mo.y cougratult~te tho eleven on ~heir successful cricket snnson. Proceeding to tho Dovo1·ia1~ we ngo.iu nl'.l mut with rotnn.rks nno.thematising the miu-gocl. "A \Tisit to Fnirylancl '' does not seem to suit o. school tmtlor very well, at nuy mte this visit. In nn article of tho nome of " t ho Buffalo," n col'lniu "Billy " Jlot·(orms gt·cnt feats during n struggle with ouo of thcao infuriated nnimals, but ho novor lost his tn·osonce of mind for an instant for that would bo.ve IlCon fatnl, nnd eventually overcomes him, with Msistnnco. N ux.t to this we find "Tho Cowboy, "

equally iustrno~ive-for those who wish to cultivate Amoric11nismR. 'Ve romo.rk several discrepancies in tho ct·ioket review nnd tho accounts of cricket mntcbos. 'l'bo P l1111~othia1l is the nex.t on the pile. The uumbet· is tlistiuotly brief. 0£ course it conto.ins o. n. !lOOm on lho weatbct·, the finale of which is chcot•ful. " Aml 11iuco t lnst from thili laid uowu my pen, 'l'ho mist nml clouds nud ro.in havo ranched their cue!, 'l'bo o'•oning sky hns got 11. tinge of gold, Antl hero n.ud there "' dnsh of sco.rlot bold, Aucl wo remember, freed from uo.turo's hood, That tbnt·s o.n ill wind which to nouo blows good. l!'t·orn this wo infer that the ntmosphoro of Plymou~h is almost ns heavy as th11t of Co.nterbury. Tllo Ht,cl llersfie~ll Oo Uege Magazine is rather n.bovo it11 nvemge. 'l'he majority of tho p11por is worth roncliug. "Tho Ox.fortl Fresher" is good, aud tho whole number does credit to the outgoing Editor. 'Iho OklhaLLa.n o o m~s uex.t under our cditorinl n?so . Wo heartily oongmtulate the lucky trio who have gniued their half-crowns for lcnrnin~ to swim nct·osll tho pond. 'fhe school seems to br~vo hntl o\ successful cricket season, nud to possess n. goocl bowler in Bt·untlrit, who is credited with 58 wicket. fot· 4 runs npiece . We wondor whnt tho brothers


THE

CANTUARIAN.

who won the Consolntion UI\CO did with their Preserve Pot. 01~r SchooL 'l'iu1es informs us thllt they have tattled into their llllrncss for tho work of nuother term, which news wo woro unturnlly very edified to receive. Tho umnbor is Rbove criticism. Tho A!le yr~im~ of October contains a sc..111.1ty supply of subject matter, thirty pllgcs being devoted to ol'ickot. Surely it ia mthor unnecessary to chronicle nil tho cup wlltcbos both in the Senior and Junior school P Dulwich seems to have lost a very 11rowisiug Cl'ickotor iu C. ll!. Wells whose porfol·wanccs both iu lmtting nnd bowling nrc wonderful. Wo wish biw llll success at College. It is

iu Fowowny cousoliug to {col thllt we bare fellow suffcreru from ill luck iu tho D ulwieh ole,•on. Tho G!cnutmollcZ Cht·onicle coutlli1•s multitudes of specimens of the wit of t ho North Briton. Tho jokes nro magnilicout, tho puns side SJllit' ing. Do Olennlmond cricketers liko having their cffort;s thus ridiculed uunecessllrily P 'Ve wonder what the saii\I'Y of tho sporting correspondent ia. .Aro such articles ehcnp iu Scotch schools? 'l'ho Lcys Fortr1i(lhlty rotnins its reputation for regularity of appet~rrmco. Tho poem "linec olim momiuisso juvl\bit " (how many nrticlcs hnvc been bol\ded thus?) is whnt mny bo tormod " shod and sweet. "

N OTICES. We beg to acknowledge, with thanks, the receipt of the following Magazines :" Alleynian," " Brighton College Magazine," " Cholmeleian," "Cranbrookian," "Glenalmond Chronicle," " Haileyburian," "Huddersfield College Magazine," "Lane· ing College Magazine," " Leodiensian," "Leys Fortnightly" (2), "Miltonian," " Oldhallian," " Our School Times," "Plymotbian," "School " (2 ), "St. Edward's School Chronicle."

*•*

The Secretary desires us to acknowledge subscriptions from the following :-R. A. Wigram, Rev. F. L. Perkins, Rev. C. Hale,

L. H. Finn, B. T. Boothby, G. Austin, C. Scudamore, and G. E. Jones.

•• *

All back numbers of Tlte Ca11tuarian, except Nos. r, 2 , and 6, may be obtained from W. H. Salmon, Secretary (first vol. at 2d. per number, second vol. at 4d. per number, and also the Index of the second vol.); single copies of the current number from Mr. Ginder, St. George's Hall, Canterbury.

••

" should be at once All changes of address notified to the Secretary, to whom also subscriptions should be sent.


THE VoL. III.

CA I'~TUARIAN. DECEMBER, x8go.

No.

2.

EDITORIAL. We waited, as we wishfully wondered, and waited and waited in vain For the requisite substance and matter, to bring out "a number" again. We sighed, as we longingly listened, with no ready assistance at hand, To whom shall we turn in our trouble ? How encounter the constant demand? We groaned, as we grumblingly grovelled, and racked "Editorial brains " 0 help, H eliconian Homer, deliver tlS out of our pains I But help was at hand, and it reached us, it stretched out a favouring arm In the guise of the bag of the postman ; shamfaced fled away our alarm. What blessing, what trouble, has ever, I ask you, come ever alone? This blessing was doubled, nay trebled, and bade us to cease " making moan." We chortled, and gleefully grasped them, to the winds went our doubts and our woes, No longer a griminess tearful bedewed "Editorial nose." 0 bless you, contributors bless you, whoever you are, or you aren't; And don't when next asked for a poem, or an essay, reply "0 I can't."


2

THE CANTUARIAN. Now blooms Canluarian matter, like the Biblical green bay tree Now gone is our moping and moaning, our "hey dey" and "misery me." 0 would that our funds were as blooming, or would that subscriptions were paid! The cashjboxes empty replenished, the Editors wealthier made I For printers have bills that are long, sirs, as .the bill of the heron is long, That cannot be paid by the wishing, or satisfied with a mere song. So send us our dues with all speed, sirs, pro,¡oke not an angrier call, So m ending we'll heartily wish you, the jolliest Christmas of all.

LORD THURLOW. As a supplement to the account of Lord Thurlow's life given in our last num ber, it may be of interest to some to know that the head master has purchased an engraving of Lord T hurlow, taken from Sir Joshua R eynolds' picture of the same, which be intends shortly to place in the Library. The original picture by Sir Joshua Reynolds It in Lord Bath's collection, but how it came there is not known for certain. is supposed that as Thurlow early in his political life sat in the H ouse of Commons for Tamworth, a pocket borough of Lord Weymouth's, he sent his portrait later on to one who had befriended him in his early career. A paragraph in the newspapers lately stated that there is another picture in the corridor at Windsor Castle.

"BELL HARRY." All King's Scholars, past or present, that have the least spark of sentiment in their composition, have a kindly feeling towards "Bell Harry." Outsiders perhaps mar wonder why we should respect so highly a bell which is remarkable neither for its size or age,-(it bears the prosaic legend "Josephus Ii:zldt me fecit I6Js ")-nor, if the honest truth be told, for it's tone. No!

I

we don't deny that there is just a suspicion of crackiness, which after all is not surpris ing when we think of the amount of work that bell has done for the last two hundred and sixty-five years. Just think of it, four times a day since he came from the founclr) of J oe Hatch, of Ulcombe; unless we gh. him a few months' off during the Purit 111 Ascendancy when those bigots objected tu


II

I! . THE

CANTUARIAN.

\

his calling people to church, but even then the fact that it is 8 o'clock and my verses he had to ring on market days. Why l he for the morrow are still untouched ? Or was tolling for afternoon service, t'\\o and am I standing on the school steps waiting twenty years ago, while a little boy in Eton until the oft repeated note dies away, and jacket and turn over collar received a few we start in our long line for church, under parting words of advice from his Pater, in the arches and the limes where we are the Dark Entry, and, stupid little chap, painfully conscious that the rooks have us (the boy I mean) felt quite a large lump at considerable advantage, and up that rise in his throat as the last stroke of the very steep "Austenesque "staircase into the bell made the fat her hurry off to the ser- Cathedral. Bell Harry is very regular in his habits, vice. And he was ringing away just as merrily seven years afterwards when a boy he never speaks out of his turn unless he (young man?) in a tail coat clambered to has something of real importance to say. the top of the L.C.D. 'Bus, after his last We know that a very illustrious person Speech Day. And he has been faithful to indeed has passed away, if he calls our his appointed times ever since. So it is attention to the circumstance.* Only once in the memory of man has not wonderful if he begins to show signs of wear and tear, but for all that we would his voice been heard when none expected by no means have him re-cast, we lo,·e his it, namely when the Cathedral was disvoice all the better for the gentle quaver in covered to be on fire in 1872. it. Just as some of us old boys, whe n How well I remember that warm Septwe attend Cathedral on Speech Day ember morning I We we re droning away prefer-in our inmost hearts-to hear the in the close schoolroom, over some partivoice of some good old lay clerk, who3e cularly disagreeable work-indeed I am tones after thirty or forty years service are inclined to think that we were engaged in not quite so full and round as of yore, to that very harassing exercise vulgarly the efforts of some new star risen since our called "Week's work with the G·v-n.or" day, and soon destined to pass to constell- -when someone rushed in and said ations beyond our orbit. Yes l the voice something that did'nt reach me, but of Bell Harry is laden with associations ; which had the effect of making master and they come thick about me as I write. Is boys spring to their feet, and after a it the "Ave" waking me at 5·45 a.m. on a momentary glance at the sky (as it seemed) bright J nne morning ?-a time of " half- rush headlong out. I honestly confess t hat past tenners" and cricket matches. Well I thought the end of the world had come, then, I know if any work is to be done this •Bell Harry rings out for an whole hour to term out of school it must be done before announce the death of the "King, Queen, or breakfast. Is it the Curfew rousing me to Archbishop." Gostlimg's Walk , JJ !50 nolc.

I!

II

II li


THE

CANTUARIAN.

and was not a little relieved to find that it given by him to the present writer's fathct was only the roof of the Cathedral that was in 18r 8, they have probably never seen in flames. What followed can be read in the light before : the Chronological History of the Cathe"BELL HARRY. " dral by G. S., Canterbury, 1883, which is Soundly sleeps the tired schoolboy no doubt in the School Library, and I need In his dormitory cell, say no more on that head, except that the Till the stated call awakes him great Church was probably saved by the Of the Royal Founder's bell. timely warning given by Bell Harry. Now the joyous days are coming, Our forefathers could scarcely have reOn swift pinions shall arrive garded Bell Harry with the unmixed Learning's tasks awhile suspended, feelings that we do, because in their days T he delights of home revive. the morning bell-5.45 in summer and When the ode of 'Dulce domum,'t 6.45 in winter- was rung to " call up the Is the theme of every boy, scholars," and that on a dark D ecember How profusely blest the period morning meant dressing by the light of a Which no thought or cares annoy l farthing dip, and groping one's way to the old schoolroom in the Almonry Chapel. Pass a few more sweet vacations, Years of toil and danger come, The present generation can hear the Stormy seas may then divide them Matins bell with considerable satisfaction, From their loved and happy home. for to them it is only a reminder that there still remains another full half-hour in the Such the fate of those whose absence realms of dreamland before the wretched Parents oft are doom'd to mourn ; little creature of over the H all finally Life how transient is thy morning murders sleep. t The following verses are Never, neTer to return! from the pen of one William Bunce (an :tWhat was tho "Dulce domum " odo P I honoured name at Canterbury), who was, have hoard my father say that in his dn.y J 8 I ~ I believe, at the King's School sometime -1819, it was the oustom of tho Dean tu at the end of the last century, and were come into school before the Christmns hr•ll t Pe1·haps it may not be generally known that evon at as lato a date as 1682, the morning bell rn.ng for the purpose of calling people to church, for in those ua.ys mornin~ prayers wore said in tho Cathedral "on workmg days by the P oti Canons in thoir turns at six of tho clock in summer and seven in winter." ( Answe1·s to Visitation questions, in A?'Ch· bishop Sancrojtp's time, Tanner M.S.S. Bod:).

da.ys, and aftor addressing a. few words to I h•• scholars, the latter would break forth into t hn following doggerel :Omne bene Sino poont\ Tempus est ludondi Venit hora Sine mora Domun redouudi Parhaps one of the ancients could gi,·o 11 some more?


THE ~ource

CANTUARI AN.

of all its fond endearments Guard their breasts from vain alarms, l'hou, through tempests toils and d angers C::m'st restore them to fond arms. llul should thy unerring judgment Place them on a distant shore,

Give them peace in thy appointments Though they should re turn no more. Ever mindful of life's duties May they still repose as 'veil As when no'v in life's gay morning Waked by Royal Harry's Bell.

'' THE ADELPHI." l t is supposed that in the year 1674, the King's Scholars acted at C hristmas the play ul "The Adelphi." This custom of acting some Latin or Greek play was at one time , ncral throughout most schools in the kingdom ; but it has gradually died out, and 1

â&#x20AC;˘notlcrn farces, &c., have taken its place. At Westminster only does this old custom ull survive. The following is the Epilogue spoken on the occasion before mentioned. Ripe for destruction tho' unripe in Age, U nskilful Youth assumes of life the stage. F ull of his own dear empty self he roves Still follows as unbounded fa ncy moves : And now no longer touching book or pen T he World must understand and study Men. Chameleon like no colours of his own, H e borrows from each object of the T own. With gamesters games, with drinkers is a sot, And 'vith Gallants some Cloli is his lot Pleased with his ruin, Cloti sooths the boy, And Circe like enchants but to destroy For knowledge purchas'd in ye dangerous way, Deluded youth I how dearly must you pa}. Such physick in the working fatal kills, A Medicine not unlike, 0 Ward, thy Pills.


32

THE

CANTUARIAN.

On Learning's Basis lay of life the Plan 'Tis this foundation only builds the Man. Whom aping him at sixteen years we see, A boy at forty certainly will be. Thus when unkindly Seasons nip the Year, 'Tis blasted fruit which first does ripe appear.

A bill of expenses laid out for Christmas play in the King's School in the year r674. Imprimis for boards of the Stage Item for the Scaffold Item for the Dancing .i\Iaster Item for the Musick Item for the greate sconce Item for the Candles Item for the Nails Item for the Matt Item for the Porter Item for the Beards

ÂŁ

d.

03 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

s. 04 rs r6 r6 o6 02 or 04 or 00

00 00 00 o6 o6 o6 00 00 00 03

o6

o6

09

00 00 00

12

os OJ

00 00 o6

00

r8

o6

07

os

03

----Laid out for the play on the sth of November, I67 5¡ Imprimis for the Dancing Master Item for the Musick Item for Candles and Nails

-----


THE CANTUARIAN.

33

KING'S SCHOOL NATURAL HISTORY AND ARCHJEOLOGICAL SOCIETY. On Saturday, November 15th, W. P. Mann, Esq., M.A., was kind enough to deliver to the above Society a lecture on '路Waves" in every sense of the word. The lecturer made the subject most interesting, .and gave many good practical illustrations from various instruments, etc. We much regret that we are not able to give a detailed account of the proceedings. On Saturday, November 29th, the'8chool had the pleasure of listening to a most interesting account of Canon Holland's visit to Canada, with magic lantern slides illustrating the chief points. T he lecturer, after a few preliminary words from Mr. Evans, began by telling us how difficult a subject Canada presented, on which to lecture, the subject was so inexhaustible and extensi\路e. When he himself was a school路 master, he had once given " C anada" as a subject for an essay, and what was pro路 duced by one ingenious youth was this. ' l'he boy described with great brilliancy and at great length, t he journey from Liverpool to America, and when he had arrived at New York, he remarked that h e had come to the end of his paper and his time, and he was afraid that he would h ave to postpone his account of Canada for some future occa5ion. Well, he was not going to treat '"as that boy had treated him. But he would say something about his voyage,

for there were two things that attracted him especially, (x) his fellow passengers, (z) the icebergs that the ship passed. Among the passengers, he told us, there were two men who were of somewhat marked interest. T he fi rst, was an old Welshman, who though most meanly attired, and d irty looking, could play five musical instruments to perfection, and almost electrified the company by his playing of the violin at the coucert given on the last evening of the yoyage. The second person was one well known to all at least by name. Lieutenant Stairs who was wounded by a poisoned arrow in Africa in t be course of the Stanley Expedition. And if Lieutenant Stairs paid his promised visit to himself (the lecturer), he would do his best to try and get him to come and lecture to us (loud applause). Then he proceeded to tell us a bout the icebergs and an excellent slide accompanied his remarks. He said it surprised him how marvellously close to them, dangerously close he thought, the steamer was allowed to pass. T he colour on the icebergs were most lovely, rich hues of blue and green. Then he would take us to Montreal, but would not leave us there but pass on to the prairies. And with the prairies his lecture, that evening 'vould have most to do. In them, he went on to remark, you


34

THE

CANTUARIAN.

could go for thirty or forty miles without coming across any water whatsoever. I t was remarkable how dreary and uncuiti· vated t he prairies were, the soil was splendid but their was this want of water. The general appearance of the praries was yellow, but now and then you would find quite ten or twelve miles of country all burnt down. Another feature of the more hilly parts of the country were the innumerable forests of firs, which wearied the eyesight perpetually, sometimes presenting a view of a vast expanse of ground covered with charred stumps. But inparts the land was rich with corn. Then again it was wonderful how few inhabitants you would meet-you could go for hundreds of miles without seeing a soul. By the railway side there were occasionally huts where the train would stop and the inhabitants would come out with vessels to get water from the tank of the engine. This was the only means they had of obtaining any water either for household purposes or to drink. Then followed a description of the trains a ~d slides were exhibited illustrating the Pullman Cars, both sleeping and dining compartments. On the whole he said they were preferable to English trains for a long journey. Then he would pass on and take us to Pence (?} where he was met by some of his friends, The lecturer then described the hotel to which he was taken for breakfast, and the carriage in which he was driven across the praries- a long drive due South. In the course of the drive he made the acquaint·

ance of gophers the farmer's bane. 'l'ht 1 little beasts are most destructive, and rn111 the corn crops, they do not actually t 11 the corn, but suck the moisture from t h stems, presumably because they , 111 not obtain any water. The H 111 of prairie is exceedingly cheap, tlu price of four hundred acres that his fricml were farming being only £2 xos. 'l'lu farm house they occupied consis tin ~-; ul eight rooms was considered the most 11111)« nificent in the country round, but for 1111 that there is no house in Canterbury th:ll 1 poorer. The whole region in which tiH'I were living was utterly isolated. The k• turer then humorously described how lu was made to pay for his board by h.ttol work, finding himself on the first day to I" off to bind sheaves, and on the next to 1J, 11 away a manure heap, and so on. H ow(\tl, on the whole, there were many good pmut in such a life. There was a certain noluht) in it. I t was extraordinary too how 1 uh 1 vated some of the very poorest men w~ 11 An engine d.river for instance that he fl•lltu with, could discourse fluently on such wml as Newman's Apologia, and he gave ~~ '' raJ other instances of similar ed uc:ltlllll There is also a certain satisfaction in d11111 your own work. There are hardly ~~~· h things as wages. Canon H olland then proceeded to ~·" us a very graphic account of calllc r:uu lu11 in general, and horse ranching in part i1 11111 with several clear slides on the subject. On• or the ranches he visited, he was introdw 1 to a horse of the peculiar name of <,111111


THE

CANTUARI AN. \

qungessima. This horse's grandfather was a wmner of the Derby, and its grandson is 1he la~t winner of the same race. In fact 1hl'sc horses are a breed of racers of great '.lluc. The lecturer then passed over the Rocky Mountains to Vancouver, and reruarked in passing that the west side of the I' ockies is as delightful as the east side is drl·ary. He then went on to say that h e had not I irnc that evening to tell us all he should

35

~ II

like about Canada and his visit generally. He then spent the last quarter of an hour in describing the Yellowstone Park, with many details of the geysers and other subjects of interests. The magic lantern slides exhibited during the lecture were excellent. At the close Mr. Evans proposed a hearty vote of thanks to Canon Holland which was unanimously, not to mention vocifer· ously, carried.

FOOTBALL. Even the Secretary to the Lord l.rcutenant of I reland plays gol£ So also docs a member of the Edinburgh Mathe· nlatical Society, we presume only under uffcrance and by the kind indulgence of other amateurs of the game. It certainly ~~·ems a most ungrateful return for the ~ indness which allows him, though a Mathematician to disport himself on the green, if he uses that opportunity not to play golf in a sensible manner but to study 111 the base fashion of Mathematicians, the path and velocity of a golf ball in the air, .md the laws which govern its actual motions, and to inflict moreover on the learned society of which he is a member a disquisition on the mathematical problems presented by the ball, a disquisition which we arc informed is quite beyond the comprehension of all except first-rate Mathe· maticians.

It would seem almost equally ungracious of Schoolmasters, if they are allowed under sufferance of course, still to indulge in the noble game of football, to make for that indulgence the barbarous return of speculation as to the origin and history of the game. Football is to be enjoyed and not to be encumbered with ant iquarian and anthropological speculation. Of course the Greeks and the Romans had a species of inferior amusement in which there was a ball filled sometimes, save the mark, with fig seeds, and they hit it or caught it or scrambled for it or did something with it, and of course Martial says:"Folie dccet pueros ludc1·e, folic smes," but in all probability no game of the ancient world presented any resemblance to football as· we understand it, and what Martial means to say is that "follis "

II


THE

CANTUARIAN.

is a thing in .which boys who are too young or men who are too old to do anything else may without serious impropriety indulge. This is a very different thing from a game which demands the freshest energies of the most vigorous athletic frame. For all that, the history of Football may not be without interest even to those who play the game as rational creatures ought, and concern themselves far more with the prospect of winning their colours in the next match than in the precise rules under whtch it was played a century ago. But such a history of Football ns that which appear;; in the Badmington Library has a special interest in a school which no less than schools of greater note has played this ancient game for centuries. We are told that Football the earliest national pastime that we have (introduced of course into this country by S. Augustine) after having braved the Edicts of Kings and the terrors of grand juries, sank at the end oi the last century into low repute and was regarded as a rough and degraded pastime suitable only for butcher boys or ploughmen. ¡I t was played on traditional occasions like Shrove Tuesday in country villages where the sides might have varied fron1 t wo to three hundred, and the goals, a pond at one end and a barn at the other, seem to have been from two to three miles apart. But in our public schools and notably a t Rugby a game had gone on, conducted in a more civilized and reasonable fashion, though even there as readers of Tom Brown are aware admitting of something

like rso players on a side. It is from the football of our public school~ and not from the butcher-boy amusement of the market place, as played I believe even now on Easter Monday at Kingston-on-Thames, that the organized football has been developed. The course of that development ever) football player should read. He will see that while every single school had its own special mlcs, these rules wcrl' formed to suit the convenience of the school playground. lienee it was that Rugby, which was the only school enjoying a large and open fieltl, wac; a lHolutely the only school where runninJ and collaring was allowed. Everywhere else the destruction of garments and collarbones, the bills oJ tailors a nd doctor;; compelled some reslrk tion to be placed on the uc;e of the hand , while at Westminster and Charterhou~t, two schools limited to cloister courts, thl strictest rules were enforced ac; to the u,,, of the hands, while large privileges of oft side were allowed, presumably because 111 such narrow spaces they could not Ill abused. The Eton and Harrow games preserv1¡ an intermediate form, the offside rule bcin~t practically as strict as at Rugby, while tht use of the hands is in the latter g::ulll allowed, at least for a free catch. H e re rll Canterbury we had a long-standing anti traditional set of rules suited for a ground set about with trees. Carrying the h.tll was not permitted, but it was permitted '" t::tke it alon_5 by bouncing it. I still rcn!l'rn ber a remarkably pretty run alon:â&#x20AC;˘, "'


l

THE CANTUARIAN.

37

perhaps I should say among the trees at ous. I should however be extremely glad the west end of the Green Court. The if one of those old copies were unearthed goals were originally those which may still from some recess in those vast cupboards be traced with the letters U. G. and L. G. with which our more exalted dignitaries on the Deanery wall and th at of 1\Ir. Wood- are favoured, because they did embody house's garden, and large goals were sub- whatever had survived of the local traditions stituted for them, I presume about 1864, under which football had been played in at the corner by the Bishop of Dover's the Green Court, and which ought to be and directly opposite. There was from as sacred a memory to us as the "\\'all" is the nature of the ground no possibility of to an Etonian. obtaining "a try " a feature which curiously lt is indeed to be observed with interest enough lis found not only at Rugby but that football rules like the laws of Greece also in the "rouge " at Eton, and in a and Rome were handed down for centuries point scored in the game as played a.t by tradition. It is in comparatively recent Repton till ten years ago. When we first times ¡that they were printed anywhere. moved to Blore's piece the rules were The laws of the Eton Field game seem to modified and Mr. E. Latter and myself have been drawn up in 1847 and of the undertook the duty of reducing them to a \\'all Game in 1849.-0ur rules were not codified form with such alterations as the codified till 1872. Their author may be new ground necessitated. These I hope permitted to recall with pride the feelings and trust have disappeared. One learns of a Draco ora Decenwirat the signalaccomto reverence the audacities of one's youth; plishment of this man¡ellous feat. but the construction of an original code of Secondly in the prehistoric period football rules is an audacity at which most it is probable that the rules were somewhat men might feel a little awkward-! can clastic-there must have been considerhowever ,say from experience that while able doubt as to the legitimacy of this probably the best means of assuring success practice or of that. Even in cricket there in a game is to have a set of rules with arc still some three or four points to which which no one but yourself is acquai nted, no actual rule can be applied, and in any the next best method is to draw up a set game of which the rules arc not actually which no one but yourself can understand. clown in black and white there will be This feat we accomplished or nearly ac- doubtless many such loopholes for practices complished-some of our more intimate which the ingenuity or guile of some :lcquaintanccs professed to understa nd the I player whose enthusiasm is too much for the rules and I believe did more or less, his momls may deYise and adopt. I rebut none of our opponents did and in conse- member one or two such points arising in t[UCnce our success in football was conspicu- the Harrow rules and during the few years

I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

of the life of the Rugby Union it has rep eatedly been fou nd necessary to supplement the existing code, Thirdly in those happy days there seem to have been no definite penalties for viola. tions of rule and beyond doubt originally the off-side rule was of a very indefinite kind ; and was merely enforced by a vigorous public opinion. It is still called " sneaking" at Eton-and so at first it was regarded as a lowminded practice which no football player who had a grain of self respect would indulge in and which was to be repressed rather by contempt of all right minded people than by any very generally recognised punishment. There was not and I think is not at Harrow, any penalty for "hands," though in ordinary play they may no more be used than in the Association game. . If we turn from the Badminton Library to our old friend Tom Brown we shall glean some more information as to football as it was played in the "thirties."-The account of Tom Brown's first football match is one of the clearest and most vivid pieces of description imaginable and deserves more study than it generally gets. vVe observe in passing the general laxity of the arrangements. The whole school play and it would seem in their ordinary attire, some who mean business do indeed divest themselves of coat, necktie and braces, but even this does not seem universal, while the school house alone have any kind of special nether garment. Special football clothes for ordinary games

were nof lhought of here thirty years ago. T hen for the organization of the game I cannot remember when I first played football any special division of players. There was it is true a goal keeper, and well do I remember on my first football half-holiday forming one of a double line of small boys, who were drawn up between the goal posts the whole afternoon, and not allowed to stir, but beyond this, people played where and how they liked. So in T om Brown the organization of the game is most rudimentary, and on the school side practically does not exist, while the school house owed their discipline and arrangement to the individual generalship of" Old Brookt·." We have changed all that, but only lately. A cricket eleven that went into the field with no recognised position for anyone, except the bowler, would be regarded with astonishment and surprise. But thct 1 must have been a time when the field stood where and how they pleased, and "" far as I know history does not preserve tlu name of the genius who first taught pnml to snap a catch, and cover point to dash •I a cut, which else had gone for four. ll tll the organ ization which cricket recci\•1 tl long ago, football has been acquiring in uut own day, and a fifteen whtch goes on to 1111 ground without its recognised back~, bah t and three.quarters, is as antedtluvian .t ' cricket eleven which fails to dist ingui~h 1h special duties of long-leg and the wh ~ • keeper. The classical scholar may be inclinl•tl t••


THE

CANTUAR~AN.

add the impertinent remark that the Athenians did for triremes just what we have done for football. They organized the operations of a naval battle and invented peripluses and d ivers manceuvres which depended for their success on highly trained crews, each man of whom knew his special duties. One further remark may be suggested by Tom Brown. It will be observed that an operat ion is performed by Old Brooke and Crab Jones, the like of which is not to be found in our modern game. When a try was obtained the losing side retreated into goal and one of the side who had gained the try kicked the ball from behind the goal line to one of his side standing in front of the goal, who then made his mark for a free catch. Once it would seem the losing side had a fair chance of preventing this catch from being made, but as skill a nd science increased, it was found that the catch was a pract ical certainty, and therefore it was abolished as a formality which wasted time, in spite, I may add, of the protests of my own tutor who is one of the most conservative of men. The place kick from a try was therefore originally merely a kick from a free catch, given, however, under circumstances which made it impossible for the defending side to stop it. An interesting survival of this was abolished with in the last fe w years.

39

One other survival of a similar kind might be mentioned. Those who read the account of the " wall " game at Eton on S. Andrew's Day may remember that the match is won by "shies." Now a shy means the privilege of throwing the ball at the goal, a door at one end and a tree at the other, neither of which be it observed are actually within the ground at all. The rules naively remark that a goal counts more than any number of shies which may well be the case if as an old Etonian informs me a goal is never got, because it is practically impossible to throw the ball so that the defenders cannot intercept it. Enough has been said to show that the elaborate codes of rules known by the names of Association and Rugby Union respectively have not grown up in a day. They represent the survival of the fi ttest and have killed the hundred of little local codes which were followed each in the place that gave them birth. But they doubtless rwe the fittest and give to our generation separate forms of what is the ne west and yet the oldest pastime known to men, a game which in spite of the brutality imported into it by some ruffians who play it as mercenary hirelings, is for those who love it for its own sake, one of the noblest and most invigorating and most generous of games.


â&#x20AC;˘ THE

CANTUARIAN.

F OOTBALL MATCHE S. K.S. v. J. D. M. BODE'S XV. This match was played on Blore's P iece on Wednesday, October 29th. Bode kicked off, and the School at once began to press, James racing round, and obtaining n t1 y close to the touch line. The place kick, which was entrusted to Parker, failed, the hnll rolling over after it had been placed. Shortly afterwards Isacke ran in from touch, hut Castley failed to convert, and just before half-time was called, Parker took the ball from a good throw out by Crawford, and managing to escape the clutches of Woodwnrd, scored a third try for the School, close up to goal. The kick again did not improw matters, though it was an easy one. After half-time the scratch team played up hardct, and the game was fairly even till after some good dribbling by the St. Augustine's men Bode dropped a neat goal, being enabled to do so by some very loose passing of ours 111 front of goal. The game now stood three points all ; but we were destined to ht defeated, as almost immediately owing again to loose passing, Lea ran in for the Scratch, and planted the ball right between our goal posts. Bode, howe\'er, did not conwrt, the ball striking the bar. In spite of the desperate efforts of the School the} were unable to score anything more, though James actually did cross mn opponents' line, but was pulled out again by at least five of their men, four ul whom collared him after be had crossed the line, but the referee could nul obtain a clear view of what was happening and the point was not allowed. We then II' tired defeated by three points to four. It was our passing at random that lost us the mntrh without doubt, but it also taught the three quarters a useful les;;on, namely, of dropp111~ at goal when they get a good chance. For tiS James worked like a horse, and Wigram and R. Flint played well, while Athawes was very useful at half-back. The match w.1 at the same time disappointing and encouraging. Appended are the names of the School representatives :-Back, W. T. Redmayne; tltne-quarters, H. James, C. E. Shorting, I I Flint; l1alves, E. J. S. Athawes, H. Isacke, J. N . Crawford; jo1'1oards, W. A. Wigr:u11, J. H. Smith, H. S. S. Parker, R. J. Castley, H. E. Raper, R. B. Flint, R. H. P:111, C. H. Roe. KHiG'S SCHOOL v. THANET WANDERERS. This match wa~, we believe, the first we have ever played against this club, and '1111 sideting the club's well-known name it is not much wonder that we were beaten. 'l' hl \ brought down a strong team against us,. heavy in the scrimmage, and gdod in the otl111


THE

CANTUARIAN.

parts of the field. The School began with the upper end ofBiore's Piece, and kicked off, Thanet taking the Pavilion end. The ball was kept within our fifty mostly throughout the game, which might well be accounted for by the weight of their scrimmage, which rushed .the school scrimmage more than once. Castley, J an.es, and Shorting, who were playing for our three-quarters, were, however, quick in collaring, and their opponents found some difficulty in getting in. After about a quarter of an hour's play, one of their three quarters, Williamson, succeed ed in getting over our goal line after a dodgy run; hut the touch was not improved on. Soon after a twenty-five kick, Lace ran in for them, hut they failed to score more than one point. Half time being called, the School played up well, and the ball was kept more in the centre of the field. James got off once or twice, but they collared too well for us to do much. Soon Lace, taking the ball from a throw-ou t in our twenty-five, ran in, but the touch was again not converted, although there was not much excuse. Another mistake again on our part (our usual one) let I ,angley in. The mistake referred Jo was that of not attending to the whistle. Thanet took advantage of it to run in close to goaJ, and the ball was touched down without much dif1iculty. This time they improved on their advantage, and were thus left victors by ~ix points (one goal, three tries) to m't. The following represented the School :-Forwfl1 ds: W. A. \Vigram, J. H. Smith, H. S. S. Parker, R. Flint, R. H. Parr, H. E. Raper, H. E. Flint, and C. H. Roe. Halfbacks: E. J. S. Athawes, H. Isacke, J. N. Crawford. '/'/me-quarter-backs: H. M. James, R. J. Castley, C. E. Shorting. Back: W. T. R edmayne.

KING'S SCHOOL v. SUTTON VALENCE. This match was played on Blore's Piece on Wednesday, 5th November, Sutton \'alcnce kicked off, and James returned the ball into touch. Hunt threw it out straight to Rowlands, who was standing unmarked far out. Our team were quite unprepared fur such a manceuvre, and a try was obtained, which was converted into a goal. Less than five minutes after, the same act was repeated, and Rowlands again got in behind the post. As this was also converted, the out-look was not encouraging for us, two goals tu nil within the first five minutes ; however, K.S. now pulled themselves together, and the play became very even. The excellence of the Sutton Valence passing confused our lurk division considerably, but forward we were heavier, and often carried the serums. \\ c had, however, to touch down in self-defence once, and another time a maul in our â&#x20AC;˘ ual resulted in the Suttonian being dragged out. Just before halt-time, Shorting 111.1dc a very fine run round their three-quarters, and scored the first try for us. The


42

THE

CANTUARIAN.

kick which was a very difficult one, was a failure. After half-time, play continued to be very even for about 15 minutes, but then Hunt made a good run from the Sutton 25, and got over our lines. No goal resulted, and play recommenced, but we now took the offensive, and attacking our opponents' goal. The good collaring of Sutton Valence, however, kept us out till just before time, when Castley rushed over, and secured o second try for us. Again the kick failed, though James very nearly succeeded, and time was called at once. If the first five minutes, when our side appeared asleep, be taken out of the calculation, it was throughout a very close and interesting game. Tht· superior passing of our opponents and also their powers of throwing out of "touch " secured them their victory. For Sutton Valence, Rowlands, Hunt and Luker all played well, and in the scrummage, Ebbets. For us, James, Castley and Athawes ·were conspicuous, and the forwards mac.l c several good rushes. In conclusion, we would advise the halves to throw out of touch to the three-quartetII occasionally, and not always to the forwards, while the whole team should remembct that to collar low is the only certain way of stopping a man. We were as will be seen, beaten by 2 goals and I try to 2 tries.

KING'S SCHOOL v. DOVER COLLEGE. This match took place at Blore's Piece on Tuesday, November I Ith, and is memorabll' for two reasons-first, because it broke the spell of our misfortunes, and secondly, becaust it was our first win over the College at football. Our victory by 7 points to nil was mo ~l satisfactory and ought to be highlr gratifying to the captain. T here was a numcrou company to witness the match, which began just after 3.30. The College kicked uh, a nd following up well, charged down J ames' return, and a scrimmage was formed in 11111 25. After the first few minutes the School woke up and played a good, sound game nil through. The ball was gradually but surely worked into our opponents 25 by the :tid 111 some useful runs, and when a quarter of an hour had elapsed, Castley, after getting d o 1 to their goal line, passed to Athawes, who gained a try; but the place kick- an easy 0111 -failed. The School still pressed, and soon after bad a penalty kick awarded thuu but nothing came of it. Then the College had their turn and pressed; the ball "·' carried uncomfortably near our goal line. One or two scrimmages were formed and 11, drove them back a little, but the ball was in our 25 at half-time. On play being rcsumul the game was mostly in our favour. Some capital running and passing took place bctwt, 11 the three-quarters, who were kept well going by the halves. Several times we were wit hill


THE

CANTUARIAN.

43

ace of scoring, but the College back was too sure. James and Shorting, however, •••zed a good opportunity and dropped two capital goals. When time was called we had \\nn, as stated above, by 2 goals and a try to nothing. The passing and collaring of the School were decidedly good; the latter especially howcd great improvement on previous performances; our opponents were safely tackled hLfore they could get away. We were still too uncertain in catching the ball. The only real fault perhaps to be found in our play. The College were slightly superior in the 1 lim mages, but were "not in it," so to speak, with our backs. It is only fair, however, to add that one of them had to retire before half-time and could take no further part in the game. james, Castley, and Shorting all played extremely well. Athinves and I sackc at half tlld their duty capitally, feeding the three-quarters and stopping rushes well. Crawford he hind the scrimmage was very useful, while Wigram as usual, and Parker, were the pick of the forwards. On the Dover side Bell and Robinson deserve special mention. 111

KING'S SCHOOL v. DOVER FOOTBALL CLUB. This match was played at Dover on Thursday, November 2oth and resulted in a for our opponents by a dropped goal and lwe tries to nil. The game throughout was one-sided, but this was not owing to the strength of our opponents as much as to their acfcrce whose one idea seemed to be giving everything that Dover Town appealed for. '\dams for Dover dropped a magnificent goal, and showed himrelf a fine place-kick as well. Our representatives had little chance of distinguishing themselves owing to the mdemency of the referee's decisions, but they all worked with a will. Our half backs were specially handicapped. •\ ppended is the list of the school team:Back: H . J. Cullin. Tlt-ree Quarterbacks: H. James, R. J. Castley, H. E. l•'lint. Ilaljbacks: E. J . S. Athawes, H . Isacke, J. N. Crawford. Fonoards: W. A. Wigram, J. H. Smith. H. S. S. Parker, R. B. Flint, R. H . Parr, H . E. Raper, C. H. Roc, C. Lowry.

11m

K I NG'S SCHOOL v. SUTTON VALENCE. This match was played at Sutton, on Thursday, December 4th. Owing to the ~cvcre weather, football had been impossible for either team for several days before. In fact, our opponents had carted the snow from their ground Of1ly the previous afternoon,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

to make the match possible. As was natural after such weather, the ground was a si111pl• swamp. Sutton Valence kicked off, and scrummage after scrummage took place in lin neutral territory, for it was impossible to pass or bold the ball with any certainty, .11111 almost impossible to run. The weight of our forwards told in the scrummag~·, hut the skill of the Sutton men in "breaking away" and dribbling counterbalanced thi~, arul we gained but little ground. After about 20 minutes play, Rowland raced round 11111 backs, and got over the line, but the kick was unsuccessful. Castley drop lu ~ I out of XXV. and another long series of scrummages took place, which ended in ll urrl gaining a second try for Sutton Valance. This also remained a try, it being aluu 1 impossible to kick the sodden ball to any purpose. Half-time was now called, the ""' being two tries for Sutton and King's School nil. A few minutes after, Sutton Valence dribbled the ball right past our forward ~, ,uul almost to our goal-line, but James cleverly saved what looked like a certain try. A little later, howen!r, Hunt again got over our lines, but again the kick was a faihr11 and play recommenced, the ball however still hanging about the border of our \ \ \ About ro minutes before time one of the Sutton Valence men appcalo:d rnr " collared "against Isacke; the appeal was not granted, but our men fell into their old mistake waiting for the whistle to blow, and Sutton Valence planted the ball dirt • 11 behind our goal. The umpire declined to interfere, hut Hunt the S.V. Captain, '"' generously decided to have the ball ~ck, to scrummage where the appeal was ll" • 11 We could 1vish that other clubs would follow so courteous an example. No f111th• r point was scored, the remainder of the game being occupied with sc rummagc~ in lho middle of the ground; we were thus beaten by 3 points to nil, but throughout rl '' ' a most evenly contested and enjoyable game, and we must hope for many mor~ like 11 On the side of Sutton Vallence, Hunt, Rowland and Elbbetts played conspicuou h well; on ours, James and Athawes outside the serummage, and all the forward~, I'·" ticularly Flint and Parker, did good work. In conclusion, we should like to advise the forwards to practice dribbling, 1h• advantages of which were most conspicuous on the wet ground, and further to cxpro our best thanks to the H ead Master of Sutton Valence for the hospitable man1111 111 which we were entertained.


45

THE CANTUARI AN.

FIVE S TIES.

I

OPEN. FIRST ROUND. Cooper Solmon beat Smith i beat Parker , Crawford , Parr , Vernon I sacke , Wharton Beynon a bye. Mowll Spencer " SEcOND RouND. beat Spencer Salmon beat Parker , Parr Beynon , Vlharton THIRD ROUND. Wharton beat Salmon I Parker beat Parr The final round has not yet been played. UNDER r6. FIRST RouND. beat Sopwith Richardson beat Roe , Stringer Spencer Campbell , , Reale Hincks , Lux more , Venn Wigram , Castley Johnson a bye. SECO:"'D RoUND. beat Richardson \Vigram beat Campbell Johnson Spencer , Roe " THIRD ROUND. beat Roe I Castley beat Richardson Spencer (2) a bye. FOURTH ROUND. Richardson beat Spencer (2 ). Castley a bye.

I

I

FINAL.

Castley beat R ichardson.

Bell James Duval Vernon 'Smith

Lee \Yarncr Ridley Candy H olmes Luxmoore Hincks Campbell


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CHESS TOURNAMENT. F I RST ROUND.

Lux moore beat Mr. Ritchie , Salmon ,

Shorting Headlam Murray

I

Beynon beat Cooper , Mr. Evans ,

Mrs. Southgate Barlee Smith

SECOND ROUND.

Salmon beat Beynon I Cooper beat Luxmoore. Mr. Evans beat Mr. Ritchie. THIRD ROUND.

Salmon beat Mr. Evans. Cooper a bye. FINAL RO UND.

Salmon beat Cooper.

SCHOOL NEWS. A magnificent school flag has been made on the pattern of those that mark the boundaries of the football ground. Two Oagstaffs also have been erected, one on Blore's Piece, close to the Pavilion, the other over the Schoolroom, or rather " The Rabbit Hutch."

* • * On Thursday, November 27th, J. Ellaby,

Esq., B.A., of St. John's College, Oxford, gave a recitation ofShakespeare's " Julius Cresar," which was an unqualified success. The recitation took place in the schoolroom, instead of in the gymnasium, as was advertised, owing to the coldness and inconvenience of the latter.

•• •

I t may interest O.K.S. to- learn that,

the honour list has been painted on the boards, up to date.

••

The concert is fi xed for Thursday, D c1 . 18th, at 8 o'clock p.m.

..•

It is a matter to be regretted, that th1 match arranged with the Faversham F. ·. for Nov. 27 had to be postponed, owing lo the 11eavy fall of snow on Wednesday and Thursday in that week. It is hoped thnt we shall be able to arrange a match next term.

•• •

It may interest some of our readers tu hear that the Library has been opened to the School at large, on half halidays fro111 four to six o'clock in the afternoon. Tht.


THE

C ANTUARI AN.

1 1 hoon, which is very much appreciated I . 111, as it supplies a want that has long

I . 11

fdt. Perhaps if this privilege is not lou , t1 tt may lead to what has nlso often h ~~~ demanded, namely, a reading room \\llh papers, etc. We earnestly hope so at ill) 1,\t~·.

••

\ penny reading was held in the school' 111111 on November 22nd, of which the folloowh•K was the programme :<,>unrlelt-" Where are you going to," Caldecott. 11. Scrivnor (treble), W. H . Maund rell (,lito). H. Johnson (tenor), and Rev. L. I I. Evans (bass). Reading W. A Wigram. Song, "The Warrior," Ciro Pinsuli. H. S. S. Parker. Duet, .. . " Buttercup" .. . Sullivan. T. Young and W. H. Maundrell. Reading, Mr. Ritchie. ,, Solo, "The Bailiff's daughter," T . Young. Traditional. Chorus, " Merry Boys," Bisltop. GOD SAVE T HE QUEEN.

l'h~:

opening quartett was hardly done Jll~ ticc to, the performers did not seem well 111~cthcr in places, and parts dragged rather. l'hc piece Wigram selected to read was

47

Lamb's "Dissertation on Roast Pig." Needless to say it was much appreciated, though perhaps it was read a little too fast. Young's solo, "The Bailiff's Daughter of Islington," was really beautiful and well deserved the encore it received, as did also his duet with Maundrell. Mr. Ritchi c read a piece out of "Three men in a boat," which was screamingly funny all through. The finale, "Merry Boys," was very well sung too, and did not flag in any part. On the whole the performance was one of the most successful of its kind ever given by the School. It was a great pity the evening was so stormy, as the weather doubtless prevented the attendance of many who intended to come.

*.,

* caps in the school The holders of fives' at present are C. H. Wharton, W. H . Salmon, H. Isacke, and R. H. Parr. * .. R. G. Castley and C. E. N. Shorting received their football colours as threequarter-backs after the match with Dover College. * * J. H. Smith, H . S. S. Parker, R. Flint, H. E. Raper and C. H. Roe, won their colours afterwards in the second Sutton Valence match.

I

...


THE

CANTUARI AN.

O.K.S. COLUMN. On Nov. 2nd, at All Soul's Church, Leeds, Bishop Mitchinson preached at the evening s'!rvice, his chaplain being the R ev. H. H. H. Boys.

•••

W. Temple has passed the I ntermediate

Examination, held at the Incorporated I , 1 \\ Society's H all, on Nov. 6th.

..

* •

G. E . W. Green, was one of the fl u. and H ounds team representing Cambnch • against Oxford ai Roehampton.

CAMBRIDGE LETTER. Dear Sirs,- Since the appearance of the last Cantuarian O.K.S. at Cambridge have had the pleasure of seeing Mr. and Mrs. Field. Mr. Field preached the University Sermon on November 23rd. In spite of the short time at their disposal they managed, we think, to see most of the O.K.S. in residence. We hope they may soon return. Since then one member of the K. S. has come up, H . S. S. Parker, to try for a scholarship at Christ's. Whether the Cantuarian will have appeared before his fate is sealed we do not, of course, know ; at the time of writing we can only wish him success. We must congratulate G. E. W. Green on running for the U niversity H are and Hounds against Oxford ; we cannot comment upon any special perfo rmance of his

because the trail was lost a nd the m.ll• h came to an untimely end. We hear, hrm ever, that it will be settled next te rm. We hope that C. F rend may distinv111 J, himself in the Lents ; he has begun wdl It~ stroking the winning trial eight at Schl') c1 Otherwise there are no O.K.S. who h.1 • done anything calling for special mentum None of our number did an}'thing fo1 tlu Iou, except to watch it. A Greek pl.l) • produced in the Cambridge theatre uudo1 peculiar disadvantages, caused by t lu nature of the place itself and other rca~o " But making allowance for these clrawh.u ~ the performance was thoroughly surcc·. lui and the Managing Committee scc111 In have done the best with the material~ th• had.


THE

CANTUARI AN.

49

CORRESPONDENCE. II IJ -'l'ho E~ilors d ecline to acce,pt any 1·esponsibility connected 1oilh 'ho opirtions of their correSJJCm· tlrn 1s. .:\amc and a{i(lress must altUays be given, nol 11ccessm•i!y jo1· pttblication bttl as a yual'ttllleo of goo£Zjaith. P e1·.:onaZities 1o·U invoZuo cel'lain 1·~ection. '

I' I fE STILE AT BLORE'S PIECE.

To I he Editors of "THE CANTUARIAN." DRAR SIRS,-Might I suggest an improvement with regard to the e ntrance to Blore's Piece, that the stile which at present occupies the prominent pusition should be replaced by a gate of .ome sort. There is, I admit, a gate further up which is used by a few on state occa~•ons, but this is in a very inconvenient po~ition for those who play football and practice for the sports, chiefly because the hedge at the side of the field is generally IHed to hang coats and hats on as it is ncar the stile. However, if this gate on the south side was used the railings would doubtless be employed for that purpose and with this innovation, in all probability, a number of outsiders would suddenly take an unaccountable interest in the school !<tUn es, of course leaning on those railings 10 watch the game and leaving in most rases before it was finished, and as accidents 1oill happen perhaps they might mi ~take some of the coats for their pocket handkerchiefs and take them away with them, or if found in possession of one of the school hats the much maligned innocents would graphically relate how they had found it on the road, or how "Jim "

had given it to them and they was jest a goin' to bring it back, sir; so much for the evils of using this gate. In addition to this I feel no doubt that those who do usc the other gate grumble at the extra walk. The stile comes in for most blame as a means of exit. After foot ball there is always a crowd near it all trying to get out, and it seems, according to the natural perverseness of things, that just when you a re mounting it, :seven other people seize the opportunity and try to do the same thing ; the person on the top of it, who is just jumping off, invariably appears to consider that your hand is the best place to " take off" from, while you youself are dimly conscious that some one behind you is thirsting for you blood, in atonement for a crushed toe. When you have surmounted the dizzy height, everyone behind evinces a desire to help you down quickly, at the imminent risk of having you brains dashed out. It will perhaps be found on investigation that those who approve of the stile have not been blessed with brains, and consequently do not fear this. But mine is not the only complaint, for nature has already asserted herself, and several fellows have broken down a small portion of the hedge to avoid the perilous descent, ap-


so

THE

CANTUARIAN.

parently not discouraged by the fact that the twigs and thorns always stick themselves out when they see anyone trying to get through the hole, and insist on retaining some portion of their clothes. If this bole increases the sheep that feed on the grass are certain to stray out through it when nobody is looking and get lost, while of course the most Yaluable will be run over by carts and gentlemen who are not known in Canterbury, a nd drive away without giving any explanation. In time also the steam roller may mistake it for a thoroughfare and come and scream at us to get out of it's way. All these evils will be averted by a gate, and winding up with the usual apology for trespassing so much on the invaluable space of your priceless print. I remain, Yonrs truly, K. LAVATORY AT BLORE'S PIECE.

To tlze Editors of" THE CANTUARIAN."

hand from its income, '"hich might hl annually banked to gain this object. Sub scriptions might be solicited and in two 01 three years the requisite sum, (which I think would not exceed £2o) might In secured, at any rate, if we never try, wt· shall probably never get a lavatory, but 11 it was once gained its value would Ill beyond question. Hoping to see a step made in this direction shortly. I remain, Yours etc. SOAP & WATER. GYMNASIUM MATTRESSES.

To tlze Editors of "TnE

CANTUAR IAN. ' '

Sms,-Might I suggest throu~-:h you to the authorities that the mattresses 111 the gymnasium would be very much the bel ter for re-stuffing. At the present momcm they are in a wretched condition and not of much use, for they are almost as hard a~ the floor, and are so loose, through then being so little in them, that the only thlll)l they are good at is tripping one up. Believe me, Yours truly, IMPROVE:tviENT. Kings School, Canterbury. DEAR

DEAR SIRs,-It seems to me, and I have no doubt that Yisiting football teams share my opinion, that it would be advisable for the Sports Committee to devote, if possible, a portion of their income to the providing of a decent lavatory at Blore's A COMPLAI NT FROM THE LITTJ .I•: GOALS. Piece. There would be no difficulty in building a small extension to the present T o tl1e E ditors of " T HE CANTU.\RINN. Dear Sirs,-Could not something l11 pavilion, and water might be laid on, and basin ' provided. Of course this will cost done for those who play football :tt thl money, but I fancy that the Sports Com- little goals ? Firstly, might ther~ not be ,, mittee has generally a small surplus in captain elected who should choose tlu


THE

CANTUARIA~.

~tdcs

for the games, as at present it takes ucarly a quarter of an hour to begin a game. !'iccondly, could not the captain allow those who play best to have a certain mark on their jersey, for instance, a wh ite stripe as 11 would make the fellows keen er for playtllg.

Yours, etc., LITTLE GOALS. THE OVERMANTLE I N H ALL. To ll1e Editors of "THE C A N TUARJAN." Dear Sirs,-I am sure other people besides myself have noticed the filthy condition of the overmantle over t he top lireplace in Hall. I do not think it bas been dusted once-in term time at any rate, perhaps it bas in the holidays-since it has been put up. On looking at it, on the top one sees an elaborate a rrangement of cobwebs, no doubt extremely artistic in the eyes of spiders, but rather an eyesore to those who look. at it. Might not this be dusted now and then if not every day :ll any rate often enough to keep the dust from the fire, etc. I t may not be more than a quarter of an inch deep on the ledges and ornamentations. H oping to sec some improvement, I remain, yours, etc., CLEANLINESS. T H E PINK BOO K. To lite Editors of "THE C ANTUARIAN. " DE.\R SIRS, - Your correspondents, I l. D.S. and O.K.S. (Oxon) have, in their letters drawing attention to certain in-

sr

accuracies in the Calendar or Pink Book, certainly made out a case requiring an answer from somebody, but from whom ? The latter suggests that someone ought to be responsible for the matters referred to and with this everyone will agree, but still the f.1ct remains that hitherto no one has had the responsibility imposed upon him. The mistakes occur almost entirely in that part of the Calendar which contains the list of Old Cantuars, and I therefore feel called upon to wri te to you specially with regard to this since it may be suggested that as the list is compiled and kept by the Bursar to the Bunce Exhibition Augmentation Fund I am to some extent responsible for its correctness. I am not aware, however, that either my predecessors in office, or I myself, have ever taken upon ourselves, or even been expected to take upon ourselves,¡any responsibility with regard to the publication of the list other than that of seeing that the names of all subscribers to the fund are duly inserted therein. Information as to Universi:y and other honours has from time to time been furnished to the Bursar fo r the time being and as furnished so it has appeared. A note is appended to the list of names requesting tbat any change in Academical Degree or Military Rank may be communicated to the Bursar and if any honours have been omitted, or any new degree not noted the reason is that the recipient ha<; neglected to inform the Bursar. I have always thought it unsatisfactory that matters should be left somewhat to

j


THE

CANTUARIAN.

chance in this way, and I have endeavoured to keep the record up to date as far as possible from information contained in Tlte Canluan'an, and from other sources. I have also on the notices which I send out of the subscription to the fund being due notified that any correction for the Calendar should be communicated to me. I t is obvious from the letters of your correspondents that some reform is necessa ry and '~ith a view tc bringing this about I am willing and prepared with the H ead Master's approval to take upon myself the responsibility of editing what I may call the O.K.S. part of the Calendar, that is the H onours list and the list of Old Cantuars retaining their names on the School Books. I n doing this, however, I must ask for the assistance (which I am sure w·ill be readily given) of yourselves as Editors of The Cantua !ian, of your Oxford and Cambridge Correspondents, and of the old Cantuars themselves. The publication by you from time to

time of the Record of O.K.S. on their ll,t\ ing School, such as appeared in the No~ ember Number, will be of the greatest htlp, I don't remember having seen this hch•11 - the idea is a most excellent one and 1 hope it will be regularly kept up. I shall be glad to receive suggestion, ·' to any improvements which might l>c intt~> duced in the part of the Calendar ahu1, referred to. Amongst those which 1~:" , occurred to me I may mention the follo11 ing-The insertion of the date of leaviu as well as that of entering the School, tlu adoption of some uniformity in the dcsc ttp tion of University H onours,and the inscrucm of the same immediately after the n:1n11 instead of at the foot of the page. Yours fai thfully, E. G. SPI ERS. H on. Bursar to the Bunce l•;,Ju bition Augmentation Fu nd. 12, New I nn, London, W. C., 4th December, r8go.

OUR ·CONTEMPORARIES. We find in the Cric"et R eview of the

hi> legs" ; while several appea r to '" They d evote six pa·~ • to a Speech D ay sermon. We mmt condole with F oyle Collcw, 'vho on one occasion were dismissed fru111 the wicket> for the miserable total of •1 they appear however, to have bee n vc 1 succe>sful in football, especially with rc 14 r.l

JJromsgrovian, an a natomical description of devoid of " eye." the various member.; of the team ; one is described as "squatting at every ball, like a hare, and never stretching out his arms and shoulders " ; another is " A very poor simulacrum of a wicket keeper" ; a third i:; "A muddling field" ; and " useless with


THE CANTUARIAN.

53

to their " old boys." In this respect also wretched thing t ime after time as if it was we must heartily congratulate the Ley's something to be proud of. School. T he Ousd contains " A Poem with a T he Alltyniall contains an amusing poetn Point." We presume the t itle is a sort of entitled " I dyll of the King." Their foot- pun on the words of this poem. We fail hall team appear;; to be a pow.::rful one. to fi nd any other " point. " But we let On taking np the Plymotlzian we are our readers judge for themselves. struck by the prodigous size of the ornaOnly a pi n ; yet it calmly lay mental letter:> with which each article On the dusty floor in the light of day : begins. We measured and found one, 2 And it shone serenely fair and bright, inches by 2; a second, 4 inches by xt R eflecting back the noonday light. and so on. There is also a great inconOnly a boy ; yet he saw that pin ; sistency noticeable both in the size and And his face assumed a fiendish grin; r.haracter of these. Why, for instance, should H e stooped for a while with look intent "An Allegory " or " The Natural History Till he a nd that pin alike were bent. Society," be honoured with such especially Only a chair; but upon its seat large ones? A well bent pin found safe retreat. T/u Hailev/mrian of October contains Nor had the kee nest eye discerned a fairly good verse translation of H or. Odes. That heavenward 1ts point was turned. l. 3 7 ; but in the stranza :Only a man; but he chanced to drop. • * • • U pon that chair when fizzy-bang pop! Great C:esar did her haughty spirit tam e H e leaped like a cork from out of a Frenzied with wine, and turne d to truer bottle. drea d And opened wide his valve de throttle (!) When in pursuit from Italy he sped. Only a yell ; though a n honest one. Frenzied witll 1e>im seems to us whe n I t lacked the element of fun. reading it through without regard to the And boy and man and pin, and chair. original, to refer most naturally to Cresar. I n wild confusion mingled there. T he S .E. C. Magazitte always pains our The Camcrossllurstian continues its eyes by heading an article " SECular. " There arc, of course, such thing;; as classi- abuses of the present adminstration of the rnl puns, but the modern pun that will bear Royal Naval School ; we t rust they ar.! repeating must be good indeed, yet the only inspi red by patriot ism and if t heir obmngazine persists m publishing this ject is praiseworthy they will succeed.

I


54

THE CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. We beg to acknowledge the receipt of subscriptions from Miss Barber, Rev. H . H. H. Boys, Rev. J. W. Horsley, Rev. F. Harrison, Rev. \\'. Cobb ; Col. W. Cantis, Messrs. W. Cowper ; E . G. Spiers R. Hake ; J. Dixon ; R. P, Atherton ; C. W. Cobb ; A. L. Duval ; Mrs. Bredin; Miss Evans. * .. * Back numbers of Tlte Cant~tarian with the exception of Nos. t. :z, 6, of Vol. I, can be had on application to W. H. Salmon.

Secretary, at 2d. each for those in Vol. I • and 4d. each for those in Vol. II.

•••

We acknowledge with thanks, the

r~cc1p1

of the following:" Alleynian," "Bromsgrovian," "Dovo• ian," "Felstedian," "Glenalmond Chron1 cle," "Miltonian," "Ousel," "St. Edward'• School Chronicle," "Plymothian," "Jlaiky burian," (3), "Lcys Fortnightly," (3), "Ou1 School Times," "South Eastern Collcpt Magazine," and "Camcrosshurstian."


THE CANTUARIAN. VoL. III.

MARCH, x8gx.

No.3¡

EDITORIAL. Great changes and wonderful met us at the beginning of this term. The two class rooms over what used to be the Day Boys' Hall have been thrown into one, and the ceiling taken nway, so that now there is an open rafter roof something like that in t he Hall only slightly more elaborate in detail. The only defect noticeable in the room at present is the mean appearance of the windows compared with the magnificence of the rest of the room; however, it is not quite complete yet, and some day this defect may perhaps be remedied. Soon after the beginning of the term all the books and shelves were taken from the Library and transferred to this room. T here are now thirty-one shelves exLending round the west side and both ends of the room. All the books have been put in their right shelves, but the arrangement of them is not quite finished yet. The room is used, as the Library has been for the last four years, as the Sixth Form Class-room, we are however deprived of the use of the tables which we used in the old room. In the left hand half of the room, which is the part occupied by the Sixth, there is a large array of desks arranged across the room facing south, the head-master's table is just under the window at that end, and the Library desk stands close by. At the other end are what were the Library tables in two rows running parallel with the side of the room. They are intended for the convenience of those who from 4 to 6 p.m. on Tuesdays,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Thursdays, a nd Saturdays, according to the excellent arrangement instituted last term, go there to read in peace and quietness. We must not forget to mention that the do01' have been left exactly as they were; on opening the door that opens on to the top ut the steps you find yourself in a small antechamber with a door on each side. Th•• arrangement is excellent; first, because it breaks the squareness and symmetry of th1 place (though taken by itself the erection is not beautiful) ; seconply, because tlu dnmght might be unpleasant if there was only one door, whereas now the enemy has teo get round two corners and pass two doors. We hope to see in course of time engra\ ings or other pictures hung up round the walls; the upper school drawing class might perhaps be generous enough to bequeath some of their productio_ns. The room i~ lighted by" meteor " gas, this is a great improvement on the ordinary gas, and we rcgr1•t that it could not be put up in the Hall as was intended. At present one side of tl11 room is occupied by the museum-or part of it- in no sort of order, and altogcthl'l presenting a most dismal appearance; however, there are prospects of their going to a place more fit ted to receive them. Speaking of the museum we should like · to call attention to the serious blunders 111 the labelling of our collection of eggs, which Mr. Evans' lecture brought to light, but this will be spoken of elsewhere. In connection with the same we should like to apologise to the lecturer for th1 carelessness of someone who attended the lecture, in breaking an egg which was kindh passed round for inspection ; more especially as it did not belong to the School. Football is being kept on much longer than usual this term. The Faversham mat< h is arranged for March sth, a date on which practice has tlsually come to an end ; but 11 the present warm weather continues we do not expect practise will be continued aftl'l that match, at any rate not for long. We had some hopes of introducing quite a new element into this number, viz., nmsi1 But, while we offer our most sincere thanks to the composer (an O.K.S.) for his kind permission to print his works in our columns, we regret to say that we arc, for variou reasons, unable to print them nqw, but we hope we may be able to do so on sonu future occasion.


THE

CANTUARI AN.

57

THE BALLYHOOLY "BLAZERS" v. THE KILLALOO FOOTBALL CLUB. I have heard it remarked that only at schools is football played as it ought to be played; older teams may have acquired more science, but they have lost half the school hoy's dash and enthusiasm, and wi th them half the spirit of the game. And I too used lO be much of the same opinion myself; but since taking part in the match which I am about to describe, I have come to the conclusion that enthusiasm is an Irish word ; we t·old·blooded Saxons '· wot not what it means. " It was my friend P athrick Dooley of Ballyhooley Castle, who had formed the team out of his tenants and retainers : and his right hand man was the gamekeeper, a wild· spirited gypsy-looking fellow, known by the suggestive sobrique t of "The Divil. " The Ballyhooley Blazers (as they were dubbed by their opponents), were not perhaps a particularly scientific team, but veritable sons of Anak in physique, for fully a dozen men out of the fifteen must have been upwards of six feet and twelve stone in height and weight respectively, and when one went into a scrimmage with them, one felt about as much use as a rat in a team of cart horses. They had played Killaloo once already that season, and one of their men having been injured in the match I was called upon to take his place, when we went forth burning with an unquenchable lust to avenge the disastrous defeat we had sustained on that occasion. Killaloo is about eight miles from the castle and we made a triumphant progress thither in a waggonnette. All the population of the district seemed to have turned out to cheer us, and there was not a man digging praties in a field but gave us a shout of encouragement as we passed. The market place at Killaloo was thronged to receive us, and we were escorted to the ground with as much eclat as if we had been pathriot mim· hers of parliament fresh from the plank bed. We were to play in a bog of' course, that was only to be expected in Ireland. Not that I mean to say it was a bog by profession, but only temporarily, for it lay low near the river, and the late heavy rains had Hooded it. "They've been bailing it off in buckets all the morning," explained our friends. But even all this laudable energy, and all the sacks full of sawdust which had been emptied over the wettest parts had not mended matters much. Moreover, the wind was blowing great guns off the Atlantic, (having had no obstacle to check it since leaving America,) and carrying the rain across the ground m horizontal lines, so that, while waiting for our opponents, we were thankful to form up in single file under the lee of a solitary umbrella.


ss -~-=--=-

THE

CANTUARIAN.

---- - - ---==----===-== ===-

What most surprised me was the number of ;spectators. In London we should hnrtll) have attracted that single stranger who is usually impressed to act as time-keeper and 11 feree. Here many had tramped all the 8 miles from Ballyhooley, and in all some 6orâ&#x20AC;˘ people lined the ropes. I had hardlv thought the county contained so many. .Fortunately the Killaloo bhoys, (every bit as big a set as our own,) soon appean:d , and there was no time to waste, for the sun in those latitudes sets early in winter ; :~rut as we were to pl:ty for an hour and a half exclusive of stoppages, and to argue for liH minutes or thereabouts over every decision of umpire or referee, it was clear we mu~ l begin by 2 o'clock if we wished to get finished before dark. W t:. began pretty soberly, but the excitement of the game and the yells of our suppcut ers warmed us up quickly enough, And now I began to realise what a ticklish pl:u 1 three.quarter back: is in a match of this kind. True we had no passes to take, for wt did not play scientifically, neither was tackling a matter of any difficulty on such sli pp~: r) ground. But the bhoys' te mpers broke loose often enough if the ball did not, and wt hovered round the back of the scrimmage on the look out for that. Any one showin~-: symptoms of pugnacity was at once pounced upon, hauled out, and pinioned ; and tht game suspended for two or three minutes till the patient was sufficiently calm to he al lowed to go in again. And as the game became faster and more furious, and the howls of the spectator louder and more loud, one gradually yielded to the uncomfortable cotwiction that if h any chance a blow was struck before we could get in to prevent it, not only the two teams, but the whole body of spectators, would go for one another without a moment'~ hesitation, and be only too glad of the excuse. As for "The Divil" he had parted with his last vestiges of sanity at the kick off, and now pranced about the field like a Red Indian in a war dance, charging the ball, when ever it got loose, with a wild "Whirroo! ",and as much disregard for other people's limb~ as his own, His method of collaring was to spring at his opponent's head like a tiger, and usc it as a pivot to swing himself round till the quarry came to grass. I fairly gasp ed the first time I saw this manreuvre put into practice, and cannot to this day conceiw how he missed twisting the head off altogether. But in spi te of all our efforts it soon became evident that our adversaries former vic tory was no fluke. Presently we were penned in our own half; then, just before half time, the ball was rushed over from a line out, and though we disputed the try valiant!) for fully ten minutes, the decision finally went against us. We had no better luck nc:>..t time either, and a second try gained after some 70 minutes play was carried by our op. ponents against the full voting strength of ourselves and our umpire.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

59

True in each instance the man was collared the moment he crossed the line, and the ball grounded so near the corner flag that the kick at goal never caused us the least anxiety. But for all that there seemed nothing for 1t but to die with honour and only minutes remained for play.

â&#x20AC;˘s

But " There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, take n at the flood, leads on to fortune." For almost the first time in the match the ball had been worked back close to our adversaries' 25 ; and there our boys were going "bald-headed," as the Yankees say, into an unimaginably desperate scrimmage. Where the ball was, probably not one man in ten had the vaguest idea, but so it came to pass that when they surged headlong through the midst of their opponents they carried it with them in the stampede. The three-quarter back plunged at it and missed it, th e next instant it was over the line, a nd all men were hurling the mselves precipitately into a chaotic mountain of arms and legs which had suddenly formed over the spot where it was last visible. The excavation of the debris resulted eventually in the discovery of " the Divil" with the ball under him; and the determined argument which followed, was at last decided in our favour by the casting vote of the referee. H ad the kick: been an easy one, the kicker would probably not have been able to lift the ball a yard above the grass ; for we bad not a decent kick in the team. But this time somehow, to his own unbounded astonishment, he sent it soaring up the breeze like a sky rocket, till, its impetus failing before the force of the wind, it obligingly curled round, and dropped just over the bar. To attempt a description of the rest of the play would be absolutely futile. Never have I seen such a seething turmoil of men and mud, or heard such a n ear-splitting hullaballoo, as during the Killaloo bhoy's last effort to retrieve the fortu nes of the day. But though they worked like horses they could not get the upper hand ; and even the three minutes extra which elapsed b efore the referee was able to get paid the least attention with his frantic blasts on the whistle, left the ball still mid-way between the goals, and the one point still in our favour. The game \Vas over; a nd we adjourned to the town to prove our mutual good feeling by the imbibing of whiskey. I t might have been expected from the character of the play it took a good deal of whiskey to do this. For my own part I hate whiskey, but I might as well have tried to get out of drinking Her Majesty's health at the Lord Mayor's Banquet; a nd at all events the final result was satisfactory, for though twenty minutes before they had been ready to fly at each others throats, yet by the time we had all got


6o

THE

CANTUARIAN.

upstairs to tea, and a fire that might have satisfied Nebuchadnezzar, everybody was on terms of the utmost cordiality with everybody else. Such is the nature of an Irishman ; I do not think he can bear malice. He may give you a bloody coxcomb, but he'll be your dearest friend next minute ; and I believe he " sets nothing by a bloody coxcomb," or even considers it as a mark of alrection. Even Nrel-dunc's crew were chips off the same block. "Each would as lief he had died, as have done the other a wrong. " But they did not think that a reason why (when they could not get at their enemies), they should not form parties among themselves to play "wigs on the green " at every stopping place. And so thoroughly did they carry out this programme that it was only a tithe of them that returned to the island of Finn. After tea came whiskey again, then more whiskey, and whiskey to wind up. And then the waggonnette was packed with fifteen men and an umpire; and then convinced that it was able to accommodate four extra; for some of our supporters were in such a condition that they might have "got into trouble "over their laudable enthusiasm, if we had not felt it our bounden duty to see them safe home. Accordingly they were placed in the middle, too tightly wedged to have room for tumbling down, and shaking hands with us fervently all the way back from Killaloo. Aud thus we departed in a perfect tornado of cheering which was prolonged until we were out of ear shot,-at what distance I would not like to hazard a guess. And if our journey to the fi eld of battle had b een an ovation worthy of a Roman con· queror, what words can I use to describe our return? The news of our victory had pre· ceded us ; and the news of the Battle of Waterloo itself may well have been received with less enthusiasm. Volleys of cheering saluted us at every point upon the journey, swept along the road before us, and followed us up behind. Suffice it to say we even tually arrived in safety at the castle, as hoarse as crows with shouting, but no other dam· age worth speaking of. " For there were but two men hurt in the whole game at all ; and shure they were about again in a fortnight or three weeks.


THE CANTUARIAN.

-

6x ~--

--------

EXAMINATIONS IN ADVERTISEMENTS. [We publish this paper with the intention that readers may have an opportunity of testing their po wer of observation an d of memory. E o. J (Give prices whenever you can.) (I.) Give the date of the first advertisement of P ear's Soap. Mention the chief features of any six illustrated advertisements of the same. (II.) Give as far as you can the connection between E no's fruit salt and (a) The str uggle between light and darkness. (b) The honours of war. (c) The nobility of life. Illustrate by quotations. (III.) Where do the following occur : ( r) Where great patrician> shall attend . . . . . and in the e nd admire. (2) You may change the trickling stream but not the raging torrent. (3) Leaves a good impression b ehind. (4) Arrest all dirt. (5) Children like it. (6) There is no appeal beyond Cresar. (7) She who rocks the cradle rules the wo rld. {8) And it will I have, or I will have none. (IV.) Discuss the properties of the following : Sapolio, Sozodont, Farola, Coralline,

Vinolia, Rizine, Harlene, Pepsalia, the Carbolic Smoke ball, Lanura, B.O.S., L.L., Crissel, Datura, J .atula. Derive when yo n can. (V.) State briefly : Who was saved by the use of Lam plough's P yretic Saline? Whose cod liver oil is "as sweet as cream and practically tasteless? " What is described by the Daily .News as "the drink of the future ?" Who took Bouillon F leet and when ? What is " a perfect treasure in the kitchen? " "Why does a woman look old sooner than a man?" \ Vho analysed Lazenbey's pickles and when? Who called this an age or Apollonaris Water? What is " T he World's desire ? " (VI.) What do you connect with the namea:R owland, Bird, N eedham, Aspinall, Liebig, Borwick, Dinneford, Brinsmead, Benson, Carter, H orniman. How much does an artificial nose cost? What European Monarch carries a box of Beecham's Pills in his pocket and takes a couple before meals ? By buying what can one help "the East End Toilers ? " What are owners of cart bullocks advised to use? How can one escape " a state of seige ? " How much Chocolnte Menier is consumed weekly? What "Hatterie " does the Queen prefer? How can the hair be changed to " a golden bronze ? "


62

THE

CANTUARIAN.

(VII.) Write (a) a testimonial on (b) an advertisement of any patent medicine (not less than 6 lines in each case). (VIII.) Finish the following quotations : (x) " I says to Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Harris, says I, use . . . . . . " (2) "T's said pain and sufferi ng kill hope .. . . . . . "

I

(3)

" What are the wild waves sa} i111, ~

(4)

"Call a spade a spade and . . .• ,

"

"

(5) "We are a capital pair the munn and I • •. . . . . " (1x) Give a complete and scientifi, classification of soaps.

FOOTBALL .

I read with great interest your dead ball themselves induced it to bow11l notice of football, as anciently played and then ran away with it. Another mo1~ at Canterbury School, and I should like, serious inconvenience that we found it with your permission, to supplement it by necessary to guard against was the practin· a few recollections starting from a period 1 of lloldiug the ball for an indefinitely lonv still earlier than that of which your es- t ime. T here was a boy in the school who teemed correspondent wntcs. had a most remarkable skill in retaininv We had originally, as he points out, his hold of the ball. When he had got 11 practically no rules at all. It was only the !\afely tucked under his a rm, there it n. necessity of getting rid of one or two mained ; and the game was so m eti me ~ practical inconveniences that led us to suspended for a quarter of an hour or more legislate. One of these (Mirabile dicht I) while he formed the centre of a surgin~-: was the prevalence of the habit of running mass of players, from which he generall} with the ball. I don't know why we thought emerged breathless, but triumphant, anti this a nuisance, but we did-perhaps it was still holding the ball. We eventually made laziness. At any rate, a rule was made a rule that the ball must be dropped a~ that a player might run with the ball tj soon as the player holding it was collared. pursued, but the moment pursuit stopped (I am not sure that we did not first try the he must stop too. Moreover, a player was expedient of allowing him a free kick.) not allowed to pick up the ball from the I do not think that our game \fas a rough ground when dead, though he might catch one. Certainly I do not remember man} it on the bound and then run with it. I serious accidents, though the Green Court regret to say some mean persons took with its trees and railings was an awkward advantage of this rule and by kicking a place to play in. I remember seeing the


THE

CANTUARIAN.

present esteemed Principal of a Northern T he result being that he kicked five goals Clergy School-pluckiest of football players before we found out the trick. Then, I in his day- rip his arm up from elbow to I need hardly say, he got no more. In the wrist on the Deanery railing:;, and another same match our opponents practised upon player had an arm broken by being violently us an invention of theirs which they called dashed against the wall of what is now, I be- 1 ' Scragging. ' I t was done by coming believe, the Chorister.:; Scho~l. Thesc, how- hind a player engaged in the scrimmage, cver, arc the only accidcnts I remember. passing both hands round his head till they Of arrangement as your correspondent says, met over his forehead, and then jerking we had li ttle, but in one of the first House his head violently backwards. It caused v. School Matches in which I played, some some little ill-feeling at the time. slight attempt was made to sort the players I have already protracted these remarks of the House-five of the best players being unduly, or I would go on to speak of the stationed in a line in front, behind them the great football schism, which arose out of general body of players, and as a th ird line the claim of the Sixth to the exclusive the small boys in goal I can still remem- right to take out the ball for practice. This ber my elated feelings when I was chosen was resisted by the players below the Sixth to be one of the five. At that time the and the result was that a C.O.S. match boarders numbered only about 40 and of was played with what was practically a course appeared a mere handful in com- second or third eleven with disastrous reparison with the hosts opposing them. I suits remember a match against a neighbouring The great merit of football in those days school which I will not further particularise, was that it was the only game in wh ich in which we suffered severely from this want small boys could share. Of practice with of organization, and perhaps too from the the bat and ball they go t none, as there absence of a proper rule of off-side. We was only one eleven which filled up vacanplayed on their ground, which was on a cies by co-option, and practice on the Green hill, and the ground was so marked out Court was confined to those members of it that while the goals were fairly on a level who were fortunate enough to be fi rst in with one another there was a considerable securing possession after school. slope from one ride of the ground to the But on these dark ages it were well to other. On the upper side of this draw a veil. slope, slightly in advance of, and to I am Sir, the side of our goal they posted one of Your obedient servant, their best players and assiduously fed him. FILA.

I

I

I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

VOX DORMIENTIS. If we can rely on the words of our text appearing in print in the same characters as they arc now represented in this manuscript, we may assume our readers to be taugh~ by a certain poet perhaps not altogether unknown that there exist such things as " winged paths " which arc, if we adopt the general reading, " attendants of sleep." Oh ! how little did imaginative Aeschylus dream that his words would bear such startling proof in these degenerate days. I have often wondered in mysel f whether Greek schools-if such things existed-had learnt the art of catching boarders and having dormitories, or whether they were all day-schools. As I have not had the pluck to examine into this question in fullest detail I must leave this passage open for criticism. If the former supposition should be set at rest by an affirmative, I think I should certainly begin to edit an Aeschylus with notes that I might dazzle the world with a brilliant note on this one line, refuting all commentators' criticisms, and settling the true reading with one bold 5troke (I have no doubt that I could pick up a medley of notes from divers other notators to fill up the rest). For what could be more obvious even to the shallowest brain but that Aeschylus would here be referring to a school dormitory-always supposing of course that

such an article were known in his dayt~. But alas ! Professor Mahaffy by whos~ opinion I am obliged to abide as his Greek Antiquities ' is the only refer ence book I have handy, informs me that the schools bad to close with sun-set anti open with sun-rise; so that I natura lly in¡ fer there were no boarding schools. It follows then that my Aeschylus will never be 'sub divum raptus. ' But I think an honourable member here remarks "Quo Musa tend is?" Descend then, 0 Muse, and 'die' him. The objccl of this scrap is to follow up "the wingl!d paths attendant on sleep. " How vast a world is enrolled ar our feet in a twinkling, at the mere magic of this title. I feel like }Eneas standing on his hill in Hades and seeing races and people innumerable down in their reduct valley, and all wandering about in hazy darkness along their own ways, unheeding one another-by the way, is this strictly true said of iEneas ?-anyhow it is what I can sec unravelling itself slowly as I lie awake on nightly couch, and when I suddenly catch sight of a polite young gentleman addressing a visitor- no doubt a lady- in the sweetest of voices " Oh! woll't you take a chair?" whereon he sudden ly seems to faint for only an in. distinct murmur is further heard ; and while I am picturing to myself the beautiful

I

'


THE

CANTUARIAN. \

scene which has just faded away, and wondering with rambling imagination what is happening in that room, a loud shout breaks upon my silence and I am standing in the class-room kept in out of school, and waiting for the detinent master, with another chap who screams out "Curse Xhe wants to be hanged ! " also followed by a murmur and silence, perhaps owing to X - suddenly appearing at the door. No sooner has Xbegun to grow dim than I am suddenly made aware of an exciting chase going on apparently hetween a mouse and a certain member of the dormitory. A third person is standing by, howling with laughter " Look out ! Stop him from getting into that hole!! Oh! he's coming th-." As my nerves are gradually recovering from this sudden whirl, I hear a low giggle every now and then, no doubt from this visionary being who is now fleeting further and fur ther away on t he winged paths, attendant on sleep. A long period of silence ensues, while I gaze into the blackness arround, feeling drowsier and drowsier, while breathing of all the various notes of the gamut (chiefly bass) forms a humming blullaby, and my mind is left to wander on its own paths in silence, coming ever and anon upon such floating visions in various stages of every day life, where no voice jars on the peaceful serenity. Do any of you know what it is to be standing on a lawn in some country place, when the t wilight is gradually deepening; and at a time when no words can e..xpress the evening halm better tr.an those that

6s

open Gray's Elegy? The distant silence and the darkening sky encompass you ; and ever and anon some wandering beetle breaks upon the stillness with his flying bum ; at first you bear a dull buzz, which in a second has grown, a nd is now passing close by your ear, and is as soon gone past as its author flies forth into the blue darkness, while his music faints away till a ll is still again. So come and pass these wandering scenes. Even now there is rising on the breeze a distant mur¡ mur gathering stnmgth and form as it is borne along to me ; and now I can hear it plainly: It is the err of one but just disturbed from his nocturnal repose,and as it flits before me the phantom words shape themselves into this " It isn't time to get up yet-shut up ! shut-" the rest being buried in the gloom. Next comes a floating vision- like C larence's shade-and a study gradually expands which a visitor for tea with a large appetite has just abandoned leaving his entertainers to discuss the rate at which he has just demolished a cake, for suddenly there breaks through the stillness the cry "Why ! What great teeth the man must have got ! " What a scene is here ! I was straining my eyes to catch what followed when my ears were stupefied with the distant cry of "class! " With this astounding intelligence even the singers before mentioned seem to be likewise astonied, for all arc quickly silent. Whence did this woe-ful cry arise ? At last I thought I descried through the obscurity the form of Sergeant Naylor in the Gymn-


66

THE

CANTUARIAN.

nasium, at the further end of which certain youths were striving, not in the approved gymnastic fashion. No doubt it was the echo of the Sergeant's well-known cry that thus had brought the musicians to order. The stillness, however, is suddenly broken by that detestable little brute of a dog outside. This small demon being eventually scared by an apparition at a ce rtain upper window, the

soul returns once more to its peace and flitting to and fro a short while like a leaf of paper fluttering to the ground, it eventually wings its own flight to join its companions in the secluded vale below the hill whence it has been keeping its watch all this time.- And soon it too is flitting.

rrTEpo'Ls ur.a8ots inrvov

K~A~v8ots.

THE FLOODS IN CHINA. 1 can see is all water with tops of trees showCustom House, Tientsin, ing; this plain was filled in about r 2 hours 30, October, r89r. We have had tremendous floods here ; by r 2 large breaches in the Peiho river I suppose you have read all about it in the between here and Peking. The Arsenal papers. It began to rain on July 2 x, and which is built about 3 miles out in that to the end of the month it continued to direction was saved from being flooded by rain almost without ceasi ng ; altogether in embankments heing thrown up all round. the xo days 32 in. of rain fell. I n this We now ha,¡e our boat house out on that province (Chihli) alone 6,ooo sq. miles are side and have races once a week, a boat flooded, in fact you might almost say the club having been started until the going whole country drained by the Peiho, (on down of the floods. On this side of the whose banks the settlement and city of river, part of the Chinese city and the Tientsin arc situated,) and its tributaries. houses on the outskirts of the settlement The settlement and Chinese city being on are flooded. When the river was at its high ground escaped, although nearly the highest the French bund was flooded whole of the latter would have been swept about 18 inches, being lower than our bund, away by the water rushing down from the although the main street of our settlement hilly country ncar Peking, if the southern was a fool below the level of the river. bank of the grand canal had not given The racecourse and its road were all undc1 way and allowed the pent up waters to water, and t he water was only kept from cover the south part of the province. On entering the south portion cf the settle the north side of the ri,¡er as f.1r ac; one ment, where there were a lot of houses h~


THE CANTUARIAN.

- - - - - ----lunging to Chinese, by an embankment ahout 200 yards long and 6 feet high ; this wns built by coolies in one night. I and another fellow were out there at r o'clock .It night, watching them working by torchlight. I suppose there must have been .thout I,ooo coolies, and 200 torches burnmg, while every now a nd then you would hea r the noise of a gong and the men would rush off to a place where the bank was not safe. Walking along the top of 1he embankment, on one side was low lyi ng ~ round with a background of the houses m the settlement and on the other, nearly level with the top ofthe embankment and rising inch by inch was one vast sheet of waCer as far as the eye could reach. About z o'clock we left to go to bed and when we went the next morning we saw a trim ~¡mbankment with a path along the top and watchmen here and there carrying l(Ongs. One would have thought the emh:mkment had been there for years from the quiet look of the place, instead of only having being put up last night. Now the floods having gone down about fiye feet, the mcecourse road is dry to within a mile uf the course and the embankment has disappeared. The lower courts of the tennis club were all flooded about 2 feet, .md tennis was given up for boating and <'anoeing.T clegraphicand courier communi' at ion with P eking was stopped for a week and when the Commissioners sent up a light-draught steamlauncb, with mails and despatches to try and reach Tungchow, .1 village about 14 miles from Peking, they

had to return owing to the danger of being sucked through the breaches in the river banks and upset. At one place for about a mile the river was running backward, this being caused by the water rushing through a big breach into the open country. I and some other fellows 11¡ent by boat to see the big breach in the grand canal. The northern bank of the canal was entire ly washed away, and as fa r as one could see was water. The main breach that we saw was roo yards wide and the water rushing through it like a mill-mce was 18 feet deep. There were about a do7.en more breaches furth er which we had no time to see. When the floods first came and the water was clean we used to bathe every day, and on\! day about a dozen of us rowed out to the race-course grand st:1nd and had tiffin there and bathed the whole day. Moonlight pic:nics too were often got up to the same place where we used to have dinner. About the beginning of August we had the hottest day and night of the summer, but as I had gone down the river in the steam launch with the commissioner it \l'as fairly cool, as we had our own l)reeze, and slept on deck during the return journey by night. In the settlement the thermometer was roo degrees F. the whole night. At the end of Aug ust one of our fellows left for Amoz, and a new man from Amoz has come here. I and a bank fellow here went to a place about r 5 miles from here to shoot snipe. In the evening we put up at the general's house in the fort therl!, he being a great friend of the fellow I was with. This genera 1

-

-

-

-

----


68

THE CANTUARIAN.

is a great big-bug, being commander-inc hief of the forces in Chihli, he fought with General Gordon through the rebellion, and remembers him quite well. He gave us a very good dinner, half English and half Chinese. He would insist on making us drinking his champagne, which was the most frightful stuff I ever tasted, tasting like sour gooseberries. The only drawback to your sleeping peacefully was the beating of the watch all through the night. There was a fight the other day in the settlement between some soldie rs and salt smugglers, three of the former were killed and one smuggler, while three were captured. They had an epidemic of cholera in Shanghai, about 40 Europeans died, and and the Chinese died every day by the hundreds. Now the cold weather has come it has subsided. There will be splendid skating and icc-yachting this year,

especially the latter as one will be able to sail for hundreds of miles over the flooded country. Another month and we shall be skating. The F rench and American gunboats have both arrived and taken up their quarters for the winter, and I believe an English one is coming, at any rate we all signed a paper as,king for one on account of the number of refugees from the floods, and beggars, who might try and create a disturbance. There is a proclamation posted up by someone in the city, saying that the foreigners are all going to be mur dered in the middle of next month, and the man who is going to do it will then march up to Peking and kill the Emperor and make hims':!lf Emperor. Of course it is all humbug; but still it eggs on the row dies, who think they will be backed by the the powers that be.

FOOTBALL MATCH . K.S.C. v. DOVER. We played our return match with Dover Town on our own ground on Wednesday, February 4th. The result of it was a decisive victory for them- 3 goals and 2 tries to a goal, or 11 points to 3¡ The game was started by Parker kicking off for us. It Wl'l soon pretty evident that their backs were superior to ours, and that we were better in the packs. For the first half hour the struggle was very close and even, each side scoring a try and converting into a goal. Adams got in for Dover, an appeal for clearly on¡ side play being unnoticed, and himself kicked the goal. We had our turn shortly after restarting ; Shorting after a splendid run crossing the line, and Castley from a difficult


THE

CANTUARIAN. ·

6g

position safely scored the major point. Nothing further happened and half-time was • ailed with the scores equal, 3 points each. Dover now had the advantage of the wind which was blowing more strongly than at the beginning, and certainly made good use uf it. The running and the passing of their three-quarters were exceedingly good, and c·ompletely seemed to puzzle our backs; 4 other tries were obtained, of which 2 were turned into goals. In spite of these reverses, however, we played up pluckily, and were very nearly rewarded by success, Castley just failing to cross our opponents line. The ~o~a me e nded as above stated. Our team appeared to tire a good deal in the second half, and our tackling was greatly at fault during that period ; otherwise little fault could be found with our play. Besides those mentioned above J ames, Wigram and Athawes ~t ruggled hard to avert defeat. On the Dover side special mention must be made of l.ong who obtained all 4 tries in the 2nd half of the game ; Adams was also exceedingly .lC'tive and pbyed a good fast game.

CONCERT. On Thursday, December 18th, 189o, the ('bora! Society gave a concert in the school •ymnasium. The decorations were of a lc:ss extensive nature than usual, on account .,r the ~1ayor's refusal to lend the flags, lanterns, etc., on which the School have c hiefly relied for the adornment of the room in former years. But we had ourc:lves to thank for that. Still what there was, can be said to have been in good taste, nnd we would offer our sincere thanks to lhc contributors of evergreens and others who assisted to render the decorations 1•ffcctive. 0 K.S. mustered in greater force .1~ the day of the concert advanced, and in the evening there was a fairly good gather111g of them. I t would be unlike the Callluariall if it did not also state that there

1

I

was a numerous and fashionable company present. Hut now to the actual performance. The proceedings opened with a pianoforte duet between Mr. G. E. Jones and J. H. Scrivener, followed by a Yiolin solo by J. S. Grundy, which was much appreciated. The piece he played was Predham's" Hope told a flattering tale." A glee, " The Miller's Wooing," (Eaton Faning) was then performed by the Choral Society. This was fair, but might have been better. Mr. H. F ielding (O.K.S.), then delighted the audience with violincello solos which were encored. The pieces selected were " Benedictus," Holma.1l, and Romance in F, Fischer. G. A . llfacjar· ren's cantata " May Day" followed. On the whole it was well sung, but another


THE

CANTUARIAN.

time we hope the majority of the trebles will not indulge in such flat freaks during a pretty solo by one of their number. We allude to the burden ' Hey N onny, non ny' during Young's solo, ' Beautiful May with thy garland of flowers.' But we must at the same time admit that the cantata is decidedly difficult in places and on the whole was good. The tenors were perhaps the weakest department. The King's School has always been weak in tenors, and with its usual staunch conservatism (in which it almost rivals ./tpito?· Stator ' the staunch Conservative ') it never likes to break down a precedent. At least most of us do not, but there are some Radicals among us now. With the conclusion of' i\Iay Day,' ended Part I. Part II., as usual, consisted of carols and school songs. ' The Incarnation' and 'If ye would hear' ( Gnatot·ex) were the first on the list. Then followed Gou11od's 1 Naz:ueth,' which Young sang splendidly. Loud demands for an encore were made, but with no result. Why, we

ask, is it that sacred music is never repeat ed, at King's School concerts ? Mo~t people were of the opinion that an encon would have been most desirable in th•· instance. We presume ' conservatism ' puts its veto on the pr.:>ceedings. Aft ~:• ' Nazareth ' came 1 Bethlehem,' by tht same composer, followed by Farme r'. ' H ark I the glad sound,' and them canll the King's School carol, which we never gt·t weary of hearing, ' The winter night,' h}· Bishop Mitchinson. ' Noel ' was o mi tt~:d , and why, we are not certain. The school songs which were lustily sung were ' lu triumphe,' 1 F orty years on,' and "Und1:1 neath the briny sea.' James did his dut)· magnificently in the ' Follow up ' in th1 football song. The performance closed with the National Anthem. We trust that Wt shall not be thought presumptuous if Wt take the liberty of suggesting that 1 Aultl lang syne ' might well be added at the ~:nc l of the concert another year, before tlu National Anthem.

I I

OXFORD LETTER. I believe it is customary to insert in this letter a list of resident O.K. S. The following are, so far as I know all that arc up at present. Lowndes, Gordon, Atherton, Latter, Smith, Hawes, (Trinity), Sbden (Hertford), Tassell (Ch. Ch.), Bingley (Keble), rviiskin (Wad-

ham), Thompson (St. Edmund's H all), Hichens (Magdalen), Kitchingman (l-it John's). The graduate members connc• I ed with the School are W. H. Pall • (B.N.C.), F. H. Hall (Oriel), who is .II present P ro-Proctor, and F. G. Brahn11 (Corpus). We congratulate J. H. Snuth

I


THE

CANTUARIAN. \

un his election to an Exeter Scholarship :tnd Hawes to the Ford at Trinity. We â&#x20AC;˘egret having lost Spencer (Pembroke) who took his degree at the end of last term. We nrc also without Gibson and Ashton who arc reading down. Of distinctions Latter has been eclipsing himself in Football as an 1mportant member of the Trinity XV, and has also won the long and high jumps and the quarter in the T rinity sports. Gordon hns been playing golf for the Varsity, and J lawes has been running in the hare and hounds ; the latter also secured 2nd place in the mile at his College sports. R. P. Atherton is rowing No. 4 in the Trinity Torpid. Finally, we were glad to see G. K W. Green among the Cambridge representatives who were over here for the interVarsity hare and hounds earlier on in the term. Of Oxford News generally there is not very much to record. A coach and four was seen on the river at the beginning of

71

term well packed inside and out with passengers besides many dozen people holding on behind. But now the strange carnival has given place to more regular occupations and at the time of writing the Torpids are in full swing. The O. U.D.S. have performed " King John " with more or less success; and two attempts at the Oxford and Cambridge football match have been interfered with by the fog. The prospects for the boat race are somewhat indefinite at present, but there seems every probability of the Oxford crew proving exceptionally good and strong. We hear that the School is increasing and acquiring more accommodation, and we hope that continued prosperity will also enable us to welcome a larger number of new O.K.S. up here in October. Yours with all good wishes, O.K.S.

CAMBRIDGE LETTER . The melancholy accidents which have twice occurred within eight days, put off for the second and third time this season, the Rugby Union Match with Oxford, have of course deprived a Cambridge correspondence of a good staple topic. I t would have been pleasant to record victory, and even to lament defeat would ¡ have helped

us through our task, but neither of these things was to be. At the first attempt the fog was too much ; what was the matter at the second, we eagerly wait to learn. Perhaps, however your Oxford correspondent, who is nearer the fountain of information has told you already. You may have heard from Oxford also, what that Univer-


THE

CANTUARIAN.

sity thinks of the edition of the newly found work of Aristotle, which has, the edition as well as the work, caused so much stir lately. It will interest such K. S. as do not know it already, to hear that the most prominent critic and emender of the new Aristotle is that well known alummts of the King's School, Mr. Wyse: some of whose " corrections" according to the Review have been triumphantly established

by examination, whether of the papyru~ itself or of ancient authorities. The Cambridge crew seems to have been changed a good deal lately, it has been going about as well as was under the circumstances to be expected. O.K.S. are not doing much in the Lents. Frend is or was rowing in Selwyn I; and C. R. Longfield has been coxing for Emmanuel. Arc we to see any K.S. here this term?

CORRESPONDENCE. N.B.-The Editors decline to accept any responsibility connected 1uith. the opinions of fhsir coJ¡rssponclenls. Name and addrus umst alltu<ll!fs be given, not necessarity for publication, bt'i as a guarantee of good f aith. Per,onalitiss wrH i 1wotve certain rejection.

THE NEW LIBRARY. To the Editors of" THE CANTUARIAN. " DEAR SrRs,-Now that the change of libraries seems to have been completed, may I also suggest that the engraving of Dr. Harvey at present in the old Library should follow the example of the books. I should also like to add a suggestion. that the School should buy up engravings of as many K.S. worthies as may be possible, to add to the attractions of the new Library. Yours truly, "LIBER." THE OVERMANTEL IN HALL. To tlte Editors of" THE CANTUARIAN. " DEAR SIRs,~May I by your agency suggest to those in authority that, the

School is not very fond of seeing " Boulanger, " and Mr. Gladstone and Co. always staring at them from the over-mante in Hall. Would it not be much more appropriate if their places could be supplied! by photographs of distinguished O.K.S. or O.K.S. masters. Among the former I should include those whose names are familiar to us by recurring on the School Boards. Yours truly, HALL. THE FIVES' COURT. To the Editors of"THE CANTUARIAN." DEAR SrRs,-Could not a covering be provided for the Fives Court in rainy wea¡ ther, to spread over the floor? Surely


THE

CANTUARIAN. •

l'nough money could be got together for lhi'l purpose by subscriptions from those who play the game. Yours truly, " QUINQUIA."

I

THE DAY BOYS' LAVATORY. 'L'o tlze Ed£tors of" T HE CANTUARIAN." DEAR S1Rs,-Yet once again I take up rny pen on behalf of the day-boys. I have noticed, not without " some" regret, their non-appearance at football, and yet, perhaps, one has not fa r to look for the reaHOns, as regards those who change down at school. These I will state as briefly as possible. (x) Ice cold water to wash in, without any vestige of a fire, on days whose temperature averages about 38 °. (2) Practically nothing to dry oneself with, except air. (3) No looking-glass to make oneself look decently respectable. (4) On half-holidays dust an inch thick on one's clothes, which probably lie either scattered about · or soaked in water. (s) Finally, having bravely mastered all these difficulties, you run the chance of getting kicked out by the Form to which the class-room belongs, being intended, I suppose, to finish dressing in the Mint Yard. My wonder is, that any day boys, whether they change at school or not, ever take the trouble to turn up at footer, so long as such a disgraceful state of affairs lasts. These are only five instances out of about xoo, and one might well repeat Shakespeare's words, "0 pardon,

since a crooked figure may attest in little space a million." Yours truly, etc., SOCIETY FOR PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS. Canterbury, Feb. 4th, x891. THE H OUSE LAVATORY. To tile Editors of "THE CANTUARIAN." DEAR SIRS,-Might I draw attention to the state of the hot water taps in the House Lavatory? At present out of the twelve taps only three can be induced to supply hot water; the 'rest generally drip for a few seconds, and then stop altogether. In nearly every case all the water spurts out at the sides and back of the tap which when the water is hot scalds the fingers of anyone who is rash enough to attempt to draw it. For the benefit of the unwary members of th1s otherwise-altogether-unreproachable institution I would suggest that notices be placed on either side of the Lavatory to the effect that "You ·are requested not to irritate the Geysers.'' Yours ·affectionately, YAP-YAP-YAP. THE EPILOGUE TO "THE ADELPHI .'' To tlze Editors of "THE CANTUARIAN." SIRS,- Perhaps the most interesting morceatt in your very interesting December issue is that about "The Adelphi." Certainly the epilogue and the quaint accounts which you publish donnent furieusement a


74

THE

CANTUARIAN.

pmser. I t would be interesting to know at what date and at what Goth¡s instance this ancient custom of acting some complete play first fell into such undeserved abeyance. Few will dispute the policy of keeping up in all schools and seminaries of sound learning those picturesque and distinctive manners and customs, handed down, it may be, by tradition from the spacious times of great Elizabeth or even earlier, whenever such customs do not conflict with the larger principles of good order and discipline. In 1847 the authorities of Eton were anxious to abolish the :unique carnival of the " Montem," but H er Majesty was most desirous of preserving it without the abuses which had crept in, and she would only regretfully consent to the abolition on receiving the strongest assurances that it was demoralising to school discipline, and that it was impossible to reform it. That is the tender spirit in which old school customs should always be dealt with, and not only should those that are innocent be zealously kept up, but also those that have been dropped owing to the insidious levelling influence of democracy should be carefully and lovingly revived.

I have previously advocated in your columns the acting of a complete play in place of the couple of contemptible farces at Christmas, or the scrappy half-dozen scenes in a veritable Babel of languages on Speech Day, but I did not then imagine that I was pleading for what turns out to be a reversion to an ancient order unhappily fallen into disuse. Now the revival of the " Adelphi " would evidently be peculiarly appropriate, as it was acted in 1674, and there is a most curious and edifying epilogue ready to our hands. Nor can I admit that the play, with which I can claim more than merely a bowing acquaintance, presents any serious difficulties. The Rev. A. Sloman, late Master of the Queen's Scholars al Westminster, has published an inexpensive and excellent acting edition of the play, with the fullest possible stage directions. Mr. Sloman's experience renders him the safest guide imaginable. Perhaps others of your readers will offer their opinions and suggestions upon this question. Apologising for the length of my letter, Believe me, Yours, etc., PITTITE.


THE CANTUARIAN.

75

DEBATING SOCIETY. On Saturday, February 14th, a d ebate held in the new library, when J. H. <;mith moved that "In the opinion of this I [ouse a barrister is justified in maintaining ,, rause which he knows to be wrong." The R on. mover began by saying that 11 was plainly a barrister's duty to d efend nny case ; and that if the case was that of 11 prisoner who was generally supposed to he guilty, there would be thegreaterchance of distinguishing himself, were he to win such nn apparently hopeless case. If a barrister flave up the case of a murder beca use he knew the prisoner to be guilty, he would lose all chance of advancement. Such a tlcfcnce brings really good and talented lawyers to light. If the prisone r was generally supposed to be guilty, it would require greater skill on behalf of the barrister to get him off, and therein he would have an opportunity for displaying his talents. By following the instructions of his client, a barrister is not to be held reprehensible for :my misstatement of facts. W. A. Wigram, leading the Oppo~ition said in reply to the hon. mover's speech that the purpose of the law-courts was not to get fame for the barrister, but justice for the prisoner. People would not think it just for a barrister to defend a case which he knew to be guilty. Moreover a barrister is not an irresponsible agent, bound to maintain alt the lies a client told him. 1ÂĽ!\.'l

H. S. S. Parker, in support of the motion, brought before the notice of the H ouse that the E nglish law assumes every man to be innocent before he is definitely proved guilty, and therefore the greatest pains must always be taken to collect and examine all manner of evidence, a nd the hearing of the case must be as impartial as human capabilities will allow, and all will allow that it is the better of two evils that the guilty should escape, than that the innocent should suffer. It is always possible, that even with the most connected chain of circumstantial evidence, there may be a mistake. T here have been instances even of self accusation proved to be false. Again, there have been thousands of instances of mistaken identity. The hon. member cited the Lesurques' case, as a startling instance in point. Besides this, the feelings of a jury, when the charge is a grave one, are always rather against the accused person to start with, and therefore it is absolutely necessary that a responsible person should undertake the defence, unless the prisoner prefers to plead his own cause, and therefore a barrister, however conscientious, is justified in saying anything he honorably can in his client's favour. The English love offair play would forbid that only the prosecutdr should have a counsel. There must be one for the defence also, or justice would defeat its own end. And so he maintained that


THE --

CANTUARIAN. 0

in the cause of English justice a barrister is 1 highest aim, nor ought any man's chi~·l certainly justified in defending a cause, aim in life be his ~wn advancement (as the even though he may privately have reason hon. mover had smd), but rather to secun• to know it to be wrong. the welfare of his fellow creatures and ol W. H. Salmon speaking for the Opposi- his counhy, and, if he were a lawyer, thl' tion in answer to the close of the bon, promotion more especially of honesty and mover's speech, said that it was not justifi- justice; and a man should not take dis able to tell lies in any case and that the honourable means to secure his own barrister would have to introduce into the advance. And he failed to see how cer case other lies besides what his client told tain cases, quoted by one of the member , him. Again, if a barrister were always de- for the motion, of innocent men being con fending clients he knew to be guilty, his demned by false · identity or other reasonH sense of justice would become warped and bore on the question. he would be standing up for what he knew E. J. S. Athawes, in speaking for lht· to be wrong at other times. Whenever a motion, said in reply 'to one of the speeches murderer gets acquitted, it is only too like- against the motion, that a man's actions in ly he will commit other murders hoping to court have nothing to do with his action.. get acquitted in the same way, if he is out of court. The bon. member thought also that a murderer if acquitted would accused. W. M. Carter, speaking in support of hesitate before committing another murder. the motion, said that a criminal would only C. A. Knapp opposing the motion ob be prompted to tell his advocate of his served that though it might be true thnt real guilt, by feelings of remorse, and that clients tell their counsels of their guilt, be in this case there would be good reason for ing moved by remorse, yet their repcn his acquittal. A barrister is quite justified tance ought not to secure their acquittal. •i n defending a client against laws of which But as a matter of fact they generally con he does not approve, as for instance the fessed in order that their counsel might -penal laws, to which a great many object. avoid delicate points in cross-examination. A. C. Moule, speaking against the Civil cases must be considered as well ~~~ motion, stated that he quite agreed with bon. criminal. By gaining a case for a guilty ·members supporting the motion when they defendant a barrister would be injurinJ« observed that the English law required a other people, while the condemnation ul counsel for the accused as well as for the the defendant would not involve death to prosecutor ; but he did not consider that him, and would secure justice to both that justified untrue statements being made parties. in the course of the defence. Again, a R. J. Castley, in reply to one of the bon barrister's promotion ought not to be his members speaking against the motion,

I


THE ~t• marked

CANTUARIAN.

that it would not be at all neces.• 1ry for a barrister to tell more lies t han his ' hcnt told him, as he seemed to think. W. A. Wigram and W. H. Salmon then t pokc again against the motion, and were answered by W. M. Carter and H. S. S. l':trker. C. A. Knapp also spoke again for the opposition. A. H . Barlee called attention to the case uf President Lincoln who won success in the law-courts although he refused to plead (or guilty clients at the very outset of his 1·nreer. It H: Mow11, speaking for the motion, said that when a man was called to the bar he uwed all his duty to the law and not to his c:onscientious scruples, the law saying that 1t was his duty to defend the prisoner. J. H . Smith in closing the debate, remarked that, while he had been in the chair he had been accused falsely of having made several remarkable statements. He had never said that a man's highest aim was his own promotion ; nor that a barrister was bound to tell lies in defending a guilty prisoner. A barrister lived in two spheres; when he was in court he was a barrister, when in private life he was not ; so that his actions as a barrister could not be laid to

\

77

his charge out of court. Each side in a suit had its advocate; and if the case were really against the prisoner, the advocate for the prosecution would be more likely to secure justice than the counsel for the defence ; so that a barrister need never be ashamed of defending a guilty client. Cases of mistaken identity which the hon. member leading the opposition had scouted as irrelevant, were not at all so ; for they proved that a man can never really be known to be guilty ; hence there was every reason for the defendant to have an advocate. Hon. members on the Opposition had been basing their objections on religious grounds of conscientiousness which he did not consider ought to be discussed. Besides if it were decided that barristers could not be justified in defending guilty clients, what would the hon. gentlemen have ? Justice required that each side should have its advocate, and would they (the Opposition) maintain that justice was unjustifiable ? The President then called for a show of hands, and the motion was found to have been carried by I 7 votes to 8. (This debate was the first held in the New Library).

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES.

Jl. l sACKE-Entered Senior School, Jan., 1886; Cricket xst XI., x8go; Football, xst XV., x8go; VI. Form, Sept, x88g ; Monitor, Sept., 18go. R. H. PARR-Entered School, May, x886; Cricket xst XI., x8go; Football zst XV., z8go.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

H. E. RAPER-Entered School, Sept., x887; Football rst XV .. 1890. C. H. RoE-Entered School, Sept., x888; Cricket xst XI., x889-9o; Football xst XV., 1890. J. N. CRAWFORD-Entered School, IVIay, 1887; Football rst XV., r89o.

SCHOOL NEWS. We regret to announce that Mrs. Southgate left us at the end of last term. The School presented her with a testimonial of books shortly before breaking up. .. * • A. C. Grylls, Esq., bas left the school. H e has now, we believe, taken a school at Liverpool, where we wish him all success.

The Choral Society now meets in tlw Old Library. We should like to see mon• enthusiasm about it, the number of it~ adherents being very limited at present.

Three football matches were stopped at the close of the last term by the snow and frost, vi z., those against Faversham, P. A. Turnbull's XI., and the O.K.S. • * • We should like here to thank Mrs. Coutts, of Stone House, for the kind wa y in which she invited any from the school to skate on her private pond, at the end of last term. • * The final of the *Single Five's Ties last term resulted in a victory for C. H. Wharton.

Five matches are being arranged against Sutton Valence, St. Augustine's and thl

......

... +

The breaking up concert last term was grven by the Choral Society, on December r8th, in the Gymnasium. An account is given elsewhere.

.. .•. .•.

Monday and Tue;day, April 6th and 7th, have been fixed upon as the dates for the sports.

c.o.s.

J. H . Smith has been elected to a Ha~ ker Scholarship at Exeter College, Oxford, value £8o.

..

We hear there is a p rospect of H odgson'i Hall once more returning to its former state, and it is ·rumoured in connectio11 with t he same that Mr. Gordon is going to take possession of the house now occu pied by Mr. Woodhouse.

. ..

Another report adds that the room over the arch-way (coveted so long) is soon to be rented as a School Museum, (N.B.-These last two items are un official).


THE CANTUARIAN.

79

A debate held towards the end of last We are sorry to say that the prospect of theatricals at the end of this term has had term decided that the House considered the Scotch system of juries preferable to to be given up. the English. C. A. Knapp brought for• ward the motion. On Bank Holiday there were over ISO • • The School Confir~ation has been fixed people sliding on a lake on Blore's Piece. Traces of this lake were still extant on first for March I zth. * .. football day this team, as we found to our H . Isacke having left. his place on the c-ost Sports Committee bas been filled by R. •• • B. Flint; W. M. Carter taking his place on Mrs. Bredin, of St. Peter's Lodge, invit- the Debating Society. * • ed the members of the football team to The H ead Master "has appointed H. M. her house to tea on Tuesday, February 3, James to be monitor. where they spent a very pleasant evening.

..

.

..

O.K.S. COLUMN. B. S. Spencer, (Pemb. Coli. Oxford) and II. A. Wimberley (Keble Coli., Oxford), have taken their B.A.

The following is an extract from a local paper:-

Mr. George Gulliver, M.A., M.B., Oxford, F.R.C.P., died ofacutepneumonia on the 11th inst., at his residence, 16, Welbeck Street, H. Maclear has passed 2nd of those Cavendish Square. He was senior assistant without honours out of Sandhurst. physician. lecturor on comparative anatomy, • • and demonstrator of mo1·bid anatomy at St. • Thomas's Hospital. and physician to the LouThe Revd. F. L. Perkins (Pemb. Coli. don Fover Hospital. Ho was the only son of Oxford) has taken his M.A. degree. the late Georgo Gulliver, F.R.S., of Canterbury, " • the well-known naturalist, who was professor The Revd. E. C. Woodroffe bas been College of anatoml and physiology at the Royal o Surgeons, and surgeon to appointed to the livintr of Bredburst. the Horse Guards. He was born at • ~ Windsor in 1851, and educated at the T ., • Gull" . 0 K Ki:cg's School, Canterbury, whence he ~u .Jr.~emo~zam.- r. tver, an · · ., proceeded to Pembroke College, Oxford, and of r87o, dted on January I xth, r891. took a first class in natural science. He was " • "

n"

s


8o

THE

- - ---------- - - --· .

CANTUARIAN.

a pupil of tho late Professor Rolleston, and was for sometimehisdemonstratorofanatomy. In 1871 he wont out as naturalist with tho Venus expedition to Rodriguez, and wrote a report on tho zoology of the island. receiving tho thanks of the Hoyal Socit·ty for his services on tlmt occasion. At the time of the last cholera epidemic:in Egypt ho was amongst the medical men who were sont out from this country, and on his return ho read a paper on tbo etiology and patnology of cholera beforo the Epidemiological Society. He inherited his father's lovo of science, eapecially of zoology, and early became a Fellow of tho Zoolo~ical Society. Ho was well known in the mcdica.l pt·ofession as a pathologist and an able physician.

• *

"

In Memoriam.-The Rev. W. N. Molesworth, L.L.D., died on December zgth, 1 8go, near Rochdale, Lanes. The following is an extract from The Guardia?t:ThoRov. William Nassau Molesworth, LL.D., ate vicar of St. Clement's, Spotla.nd, Rochdale, diod at his residence, Leo Cottage, Shawclough, on Ft'iday, at tho a~e of seventy-four. No -was oduc.'l.tod at the Kmg's School, Canterbury, and at Pombroko College, Cambridge, where he won tho Latin prizo in 1838. He graduated (being in tho semor optimo list) in 1839. In tho Mnthomatical Tdpos of that year it may be noted that Dean Cowie figured a.s Senior Wrangler, while Judge Baggallay a.nd 1'rofossor Williams wero among the Wranglers, and Lord Eshor (Master of the Rolls), Judge Eddis, n.nd Archdeacon Hopper, woro among tho senior, and Canon Freeman, of Exeter, and Sh· Charles Packer, Chief Justice of 3arbadoos, among tho junior optimos. Ho was ordained in 1839, and was a curate at tho Rochdale parish church, where his father, Dr. Molesworth, was vicar from 1839 until his death in 1877. His curacy in Rochdale ended in his O.l>pointment in 1842 as perpetual ournto of St. Andrew's, Ancoats, Manchester. In 1841 the Rev. George Herbert Cotton, the first incumbent of St. Clement's Church, Rochdale, died, and the

lato Canon was transferred to that bontOfiC'f• to which was nllotted a. largo area, containinv a population of 10,000. He worked, 1111)'1 the Yo1·kshi1·e Post, zealously in the parish, preached in remote parts of tho district. lnbom eel in tho Snndny and day schools, rogularl) conductin~ cla11ses in each ; and, in addition to this homstl'Ucted in reading at the vicamw· those of his parishioners who never had tlu· advantage of early education. At longtlo, having received the aid of a cm·nte, he devoiA••I part of his attention to assisting the cnrh struggles of the co-operative movemonli hJ delivering lectures and writing on the subjOcl Ho gave a. course of lectures to t ho mombc••·ft of tho co-operative stot·os on astronomy, 111111 took au important }>art in the instruction ul the working class in t he French lnngur\1(" In 1860 l1o wrote an essay entitled Englcwrl ancl France, showing tho importance of nu allianco between the two countries, and w11 awarded the prize which hacl been ofl'et'f•tl, Lord Brougham, Lord Clarendon and Lot·tl Shaftesbury being tho adjudicators. In l~HI'r wRs pnblished his History of the R c/O?'!n/Ji/1 of 1832 ; in 1867 he completed n. work entitlo •I A Netu System of 11Io1·al Philosophy ; noxt •· prize essay on Education. His prinoip.ol literary work, The Histo1·y of England Jl·um the Yca1· 1830, in three volumes, was publilth ed in 1874, and this book was oulo~ised by tlru late Mr. J ohn Bright in ono of his spooclu· In 1882 was published a Histo1·y of the Ch11 rd• of E1tg1and/1'01n the Yca1· 1660, and it. '"' favourably received. In 1883 his Histor11 ,., the Free ancl Open Clm1·ch Movement w11 1mblishod. In politics he was a Liberal, nwl a groat admirer of Richard <.:obden a.nd .Joh u Bright-in fact, they were personal friontl and on tho Home Rule question hoheld aimllt11 views to thoao maintained by tho latu M1 Bright. In the spring of 1889 his health l11 gan to fail, a.nd after a. faithful cm·eor ,,1 forty-five years of spiritual supervision or lit parish of Spotland he roaign~d his chnr and took up Ilia rosidenzo a.t Lee Cotl•~ Shawclough, Rochda.lo. J:lo was a L!..J), •·I tho University of Glasgow.

His name may still be seen on the Exlul•1 tion Board in the Schoolroom.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

8r

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. We had resolved not to write an article under this heading, but on reading the December number of the Dovorian, we were so taken aback by certain remarks in their football columes, that we instantly cancelled our resolve. The number is opened with the remark Ichabod I Ichabod I I A thoroughly editorial "-r6:ros." But we will not carp at that. It certainly does seem a little late to state in an issue which was sent off in January, 1891, that the inter-house cricket competition of x89o was won by such and such a house, but still we will pass on. But now we really do find something to at least comment on. We allude to the touching and altogether unamusing collection of stories for the young. Doubtless they are contributed by the Ghost of Maria Edgeworth or possibly the author of "The mother's recompense and other tales." The first ofthese charming anecdotes is headed " On the mountains " which we would advise readers of the Dovorian of December to skip, if they have not already done so. Passing on we find " An incident at Chukchu." We waded some few feet into the mire and chucked it. "Around and about" is next, in which we are informed that "Herbert caught a little dace." Please give our congratulations to Herbert. â&#x20AC;˘' A queer story and a queerer " (" Some of Uncle Jeff's own") follows, and we hope

it is Uncle Jeff's last. We extract the last paragraph for the edification of our readers. " Mrs. Gosnell was not bad looking. Ten years ago she was positively handsome. And she knew it. It was commonly said in Smardsley that when Gosnell's first house was burnt to the ground in a high wind, Mrs. Gosnell was rescued from her bedroom in her nightgown, and that she pinch¡ ed and scratched and kicked the fireman remorselessly,and shrieked at him." "Once more" (a poem) is feeble and somewhat pointless. But now we have reached a paragraph which we would like to insert in red ink. We will not comment on it but simply insert it in its integrity and leave it to our readers, and those who were rmbiassed spectators of the match, to come to their own conclusion. "Throughout the game our fonvards played up very hard and we certainly ought to have scored, bttt tl1e hazy a1ld somewhat warped ideas of the "referee " coupled with bad luck prevented it. Our backs too tvere

at a disadvantage owi1lg to our oppo1lmts playimg time lialfbacks." The remainder of the number needs no remark. We were pleased to receive the Vigornian again, after a prolonged period of absence. A good deal of the article matter is readable and some of it shows some literary talent.


THE CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. Tl1e Ca11tuaria1t year is from September We beg to acknowledge with thanks the to September and M l from New Year's receipt of subscriptions from the following : Day to New Year's Day, thus the year The Rev. A. G. B. Atkinson, Dr. Blore, September i89o-September 1891 is called A. W. Cross, E. Ellam, H. W. Frcston, 1891 for financial purposes. Subscribers W. G. Gates, W. A. Gibb, J. Gibbs, A. are respectfully requested to pay their subGordon, E. W. B. Green, Rev. F. J. 0. scriptions for each " year " before ChristH elmore, G. P. Reisch, W. H. H opkins, mas in that year if possible ; this would Col. Horsley, D. Jones, F. B. Kingdon, be a great saving of trouble to the SecreM. Kingsford, A. Latter, B. H. Latter, W. tary, and would in the end save the annoyG. Moss, G. C. E. Ryley, C.H. Roe, Mrs. ance and inconvenience which we fear Southgate, A. L. Turnbull, J. G. Turnbull. some subscribers experienced last term. For this we most humbly apologise, but at "* â&#x20AC;˘ the same time we are bound to state that All back numbers except Nos. r, 2, and the present Secretary is in no way respon- 6, of Vol. I, can be obtained from W. H. sible for it. Salmon, secretary.


THE CANTUARIAN. VOL. III.

APRIL,

I

89 I.

No. 4¡

EDITORIAL. We have had in late numbers of the Ca~tluariall editorials of all the different styles can be imngined to exist; the Editorial Regretful, in which the editor bemoans his arduous and unaccustomed task, and pleads with his renders to pardon a debutant ; the J'.ditorial I ndicative, of which an expanded index of contents forms the main, or perhaps, entire characteristic ; the Editorial Historical, narrating just one or two exciting incidents in school life; the Editorial Topical, where Cricket or Football prospects are discussed al large ; the Editorial Poetical, which is of a novel description, perhaps most closely akin to the Editorial Regretful ; and a number of other sorts perhaps best described as l~ditorials I ndescribable; in which every other kind of Editorial, besides those already noted, vies for a place, like the usual third class of everything-in-general-and-nothing-inparticular, to which the Aeolians a nd Goodwin's mixed present stemmed verbs form the

1hat

closest parallel. But yet there seems to have "lain hid " another quite possible, if not probable, class of Editorial, viz., the Editorial Critical. This kind is a rarety, but may have "escapee notice being " in school papers which have not come underneath our eye. And this i~ a class to which this pen (we will say, to avoid hackneyed expressions) is aspiring. No'' consciou.<; of its own defects, it will not seek to run. down the editorials of its contem


THE CA TUARIAN. poraries, nor will it mention names; but will try to criticize school papers generally, nul perhaps, exempti ng the Cantuarian itself. It (the pen, be it understood) supposes that School Papers, Magazines, Chronicles, c:tll them what you will, were originally started with one or two objects in Yiew, perhaps both, 1- To publish the account of the school games, or 2-To give a stimulus to rising abilitil"' in the school to cultivate their talents in the shape of contributions to that paper. Hut it seems to the aforesaid pen that these two objects have been sadly abused. It considl.'r ~ that a school paper ought to consist of both, namely School History and Schoo1 Litera ture. To save absolute dryness and lack of interest, it may com-.miently be inter~persed with wit-so long as it is connected with he school in some way; e.g., curious tran~la tions, or clever bits from alumni. Thus it comid::rs that a lot of stories and anecdotes which do not boast wit-should be sooner burnt than sent to the Press. Some of its compeers, however, send exerting little stories, one after another in one number (written we will suppose by alumni), of wh ich the number mainly consists. This pen would say at onn¡ that it is better to publish a number consisting entirely of football or cricket; or one ot only two pages, of school news. It will take for granted that every school has its Debat ing Society, Natural History Society, and Choral Society; the records of these, with the school games, ought to be able to make a number; and if ther can't let the editor. wait until they can. That is the worst of a tradition to fill up a certain amount of page .. if it leads to such an abuse as pure and simple padding with trash. Several School papers have lately been bemoaning the lack of interest shown by th<' School in forwarding contributions. This is a matter which also cuts this pen deep!). It started by pointing out that one great aim of a School paper is to encourage the rising literary talents in the School ; but seldom, if ever, has it been favoured with :r sight of its aim. It will suppose that it is natural modesty which forbids it. It would warmly commend .fortnightly paper:;, which one School alone seems as yd to have pluck to bring out-but no names! These exactly observe the aim of School papers, and have the merit of the news not being stale, as they usually arc with monthly numbers. In speaking of literary effort in the School, this pen docs not bold out the promise I n publish every scrap of literature sent to it by members of the School, in hope of il. finding a place. Should such writings ever come in frequentia, it would exhort till senders, if disappointed, to imitate Demosthenes, and others like him who knew how 111 learn the art of success, and train themselves to a style and order in writing. May 11 add this encouragement that the knowledge of the fact that so and so bas written soml thing for the School paper, will not get further than the editors, or at least ought not to. I t will not armrer for future "this-pens " Of course if it were proposed to anyone 111


THE

CA TTUARI AN. '

ss

11 ttll' to the School paper, the fi rst complaint would be "Thert's nothi ng to write .thnut" ; the second, " I can't "; or perhaps, and more probably, vice versa. But this is a digression, as the orators say. Correspondence is most distinctly, not hll'rature-at least judging from the present style of letters sent up for publication-(the Jll'll is speaking now of correspondence from the School alone), and correspondence '111ght not to be resorted to as an excellent means of filling up a paper, as several magazines have seemed to think, Tlu Ca11tuariau, at one time, not excepted. A decent coYer, also, adds not a little to the credit of a school paper; but, of course, 11 docs not intend to find fault with such magazines as have no cover, as it supposes that many have the will, without the way. ln these few remarks it has confined itself, perhaps rather narrowly, to describing a lt:m: minimum. It does not therein intend to say anything disparaging to occasional .trticles on subjects perhaps in no way connected with the School, from old boys. But articles on such subjects ought not to be too long, taking up the greater part of the number, nor ought they to be frequent. Unless written in good, readable English, and on a popular subject, they are apt, or rather bound, to fall extremely flat, though perhaps extremely interesting to the writer. Another thing might also contribute largely to the perfection of a School paper, and that is cultivation of a certain amount of style and fluency in writing, even in the de~rription of school games. I n several papers the lack of this is quite noticeable, in the Cantuarian among them sometimes. Often sentences are written down which might be construed differently from their real meaning. This need not be ; everyone knows quite enough English to be able to express any thought in unmistakable writing ; :tnd so this matter should be carefully attended to by Editors, although it may involve no slight trouble. There is no reason why School papers should not become a by no means trifling branch of English literature, if carefully got up. These remarks on the desirability of careful preparations of School papers, as no doubt many critics if they have the patience to read them, have already realised, tend rather in the opposite direction to that excellent proverb "Practice what you preach." Yet this pen has already mentioned that does not spare itself; and trusts that its gentle 1'ritics will not take umbrage at its defects and short-comings, and will (if ever they have contributed to its help) not imagine that any of these remarks are pointed against them, and thereby refuse to send any more articles. I t may assure them that it has not had :my of them in mind in writing these scraps, and hopes that none of the said scraps may be twisted " in crimen .11'

IIII H I¡

I!

II

!

I !

i I ~


86

THE

CANTUAR I AN.

PROM. VINCTUS, Ll. s6r-s87.

rts y1i j TÂŁ Io.

')'EVOS j

K . T.

A.

What land, what race, what man do I behold Fast bound to rock in iron misery ? What heinous crimes requital payeth he ? Ah ! Sharp is the Gadfly's sting that goadetb me ! Avaunt foul haunting fiend of earthborn Argus ! Ah me ! I see the herdsman myriad eyed, Ah me I he roameth, keeping his stealthy watch. No grave conceals his awful restlesss corpse, But journeying from the murky dead, pursues Over the hungry ocean's shore this wretched maid. And shepherds' pipe waxfastened, ever near, Shrills its sad lullaby, weird to hear. Ah me! Ah me ! Whither wander I ever, From this cruel bondage, 0 Cronos' son, sever A maiden of q ui ltless guilt, frenzied, demented By viperlike bite of the Gadfly to rmentedburn me with fi re, or living enwrap me, In kindly earth's bosom, earth, mother earth, 0 , th row me to monster broods ocean engendered, H ear my prayer, hearken, 0 Sovereign Lord Zeus. Surely enough have I wandered in nakedness, H ear my prayer, hearken to maiden bewitched.

a

ld. 1040 et seq : l t86n r 6L fJ.oL. - K.T. A. P rometheus : loq : F ull well I knew thy message, how 'twould beAnd yet 'tis no disgrace to suffer thus, In durance vile, foe-hated and foe-hatingNow let the fiery wreath of jagged flame Descend, consuming, let the rether crash Racked with convulsive wildness of the winds. Let awful thunder rattle, raging tempests howl. 0 that the winds would shake the very roots


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Of earths' foundations, and the ocean's wave Lashed into fury, sweep the ordered path Of H eaven's constellations, and descend To raise me high, and dash me, as I am, In the stern whirlpools of necessity, To gloomy Tartarus' abode- do what he will Zeus cannot ever bring me to my death. Id. 1o8o. Kai. p.~v Epy!j> K."r,,\, My prayer is answered, earth is quivering, Rocked and riven, riven and rocked, Thunder is echoing, ominous, awful, Lightning is flashing, forked, and fiery, Whirlwinds are raging, rolling the desert sand, T empests are co mbating, blasting each other, E:~ch is shattering, each is shattered, Mther is ocean, ocean is rether, All is confusion, I am the cause of allSuch is the blasting bolt of the Thunderer, Fear to create, but terror not creating, 0 mother reverend, earth all-producing, 0 rether, giver of light to all creatures, Gaze on my doom,-a doom of injustice.

SCRAPS ON SPORTS. Before diving into my subject I may state by way of solemn warning that this paper is both ill-arranged and scrappy. It IS not divided into heads or subdivisions ; it contains no big A (r) alpha iii; it would probably fill the learned author of Moore's rules with horror and indignation. Admirers of Moore's rules will do well to turn over to something more methodical, I!. g., a detailed account of a football match, with the points mentioned in the order in

which they were scored, and the results of the whole neatly summed up at the end. This paper is merely a collection of facâ&#x20AC;˘s and fancies on the subject of school sports, and if possible will not contain any quotation from H orace, though it is almost as difficult for an O.K.S. to keep Horace out of his productions as it was for Mr. Dick to get on without the head of Charles I st. One more remark : this paper is not written by either the present writer or 1câ&#x20AC;˘c,


88

THE

CANT UARI AN.

I never was a preseul writer and am not going to start on a career of p1-esent writing a t my time of life. I also belong to the first person singular. Easter being near, the mind of the public school-boy naturally turns to the subject of Athletic Sports, and as a preliminary he begins (or thinks he is beginning) to ' train.' I am not a med ical student, and know nothing about tissues and hydrocarbons,and very little about the digestion (though I could say something on the subject of indigestion), but information on these points will be found in Vol. II, No. 4 of this periodical. I n his concluding words the learned writer of the article referred to gives the best possible advice "most boys at school require only to avoid the tuck shops for 6 weeks before the Athletic Sports.'' Things may be altered now, but I remember the great basis of training when I was at school was marmalade and brown bread. A certain youth who sat next to me in the H all began his preparations for a long and severe course of training by providing himself with an eight pound tin of marmalade. I don't think he ever practised runni ng, but he fully made up for deficiencies in this respect by the zeal with which he nightly solved the problem of swallowing t he greatest possible quantity of the contents of the tin in the least possible time. I forget if he was able to come up to the scratch, (he was in for the Junior Hundred I think), but I know he didn't finish- that is he finished the marmalade, but not the race. R egularity both in meals and in practising

I

the events is a good general rule for training, the latter half of which is often ,¡ery much neglected. A fellow will run himsdt " dog tired " one day, and on the next will saunter about with a game leg and the air of a hero resting on his laurels. A day's rest may be necessary sometimes, hut it is clearly a mistake to do an inordinat" amount oi work in any one day. A com petitor for the mile for instance ought not to run it more than once a day, and eve n then should only occasionally do his best at the distance. One mile I think is tlte test of a runner's capabilities for it requires both pace and staying power, and a good 'miler' is usually a good man at any d istance. At School sports, however, a stayer often wins even without much pace, as long distance runners often improve their speed often reaching the ven erable age of twenty-one, while sprinters a<> a rule are at their best from eighteen to twenty, though of course there are excep tions. It will be found a useful thing to time yourself over the various portions of a long race. For instance 111 running a mile the first and last quarters should be run rather faster than the rest ; e.g. to run a mile in 5 minutes (very fair School time) the first quarter might be run in 7 2 sec., the next half-mile in x6o sec.. and the last q uarter in 68 sec. Our most successful miles at the Inter Versity sports seem to have been run on this plan, and though everyone cannot be a Cross or a Pollock-Hill, their methods may be copied with advantage. W. C.


1 THE C:c.:orgc

CANTUARIAN.

8g

in his wonderful race with CumThe great Long Jump fallacy is doubtmings when he ran a mile in 4111. sec. less due to its title. Beginners 1llill try to did the first quarter in s8 sec., an a\¡erage jump long, and long only; if they could School and College time for the quarter only get the idea of length out of their alone I heads and substitute that of height plus One half-mile should be run fair!y stead- length they would get their feet into the Ily through. Don't lag at the beginning; " hole " more frequently than they do. A 11 you are in a fit conditi0n to run good long jumper rises from 3~ to 4 feet the race a little pace at first will not do in the middle of his jump, and this carries you any harm. It is a most melancholy him farther than if only rose z or 3¡ I was ' ight to sec half a dozen snails in white told by the ground man at Oxford of a jerseys crawling from the mark, each trying long jumper of Varsity fame, who in prac10 all appearance to obtain the last position. tising used to fix a hurdle about 3 feet N.l3. It may look well to keep ten yards from the "take off," to the top of which behind the leader for three quarters of the was fastened a furze bush. If he pricked distance, and then (especially if your rela- his legs he knew h1s jump would be a bad tions are looking on) to come bounding by one, nor was it much better if he cleared m the last lap, like the ordinary athletic- the obstacle altogether (for of course this rowing-cricketing hero of a yellowback, "height" principle may be carried ad hut it sometimes happens that when the absurdum) but when he just touched the time for your bound has arrived, the gentle- bush he made his best jumps. The whole man in front can bound as well as yourself, thing depends on economy of effort, take and then-well you wish your relations a long run and endeaYour to get the full were at home again. ~ven if you are able benefit of the whole of it. This can only to imitate the fortunate hero in question, be done by constant practice. the time will probably suffer. Keep your The hurdle race is undoubtedly the owu pace, and refuse either to lag or be favourite event with the ordinary spectator, hurried. and though it is the race in which perhaps For the Quarter my advice is do your one is capable of most improvement it is best pace the whole way, reserving just the gl!nerally the least practised of any, proleast bit of " go " for the finish-that is by bably because it requires a peculiar knack. the time you feel you have just swallowed Some individual made the discovery that the poker (which occurs about r oo yards owing to the regular height of the hurdles from home) you ought to have a little space and the regular d istances between them, left for the tongs, and by the time they arc an immense advantage could be obtained finished the race should be over. I can't by " Aying " the hurdles and taking three tsridcs between each and this is now the put the matter more clearly than that.

rzt

'I

II II

I I I


THE

CANTUAR IAN.

recognized " classic style." I have seen many hurdle races, and have taken part in some, but I never yet saw " three strides" beaten by five or four or any other extempore invention. I t may be remarked " This is all right for the long legged, but what about boys of fifteen and sixteen ? " Well, there is no harm in trying, and if you stick up two hurdles ten yards apart, and persevere till you can do the three strides between them, yon will soon be able to do it all t hrough the race. If you can't do it you must wait till your little legs grow longer, and then perhaps "Baby too may ' fly ' away." Five strides are better than four, as the latter require you to "take off', for the flights from the right and left foot alternately, whereas you should always jump from the same foot. School hurdles are as a rule three or four inches lower than the correct articles (hence perhaps the phenomenal times are somet imes reads of in accounts of school sports}, so a beginner has a good chance of getting into the knack without damaging his shins. T ake off a good yard and a half in front of the hurdle, and double the foremost leg in front of your b ody, with the knee in advance and the leg placed "flat ways." The undermost leg should go as near as possible to the hurd le without touch ing it ; in fact fly ing a hurdle is nothing more or less than taking a big stride over it. The above explanation is not very lucid, but here as in most things an ounce of practice (in this case watching a good man for 17 seconds) is worth a ton of theory.

What can be said of the high jump? As far as winning the event goes the prinn pal thing to do is to get over the bar- no matter how. But surely it is worth whilt. to cultivate a good style. Tumbling ovct the bar on all fours is neither comfortabll nor graceful, and you should alight on your toes rather than in a seated position !It th~¡ end of your jump. It looks better. Nem: is here an absolute necessity. I knew two men both of whom could do sft. 6in. itt practice, but who regularly failed at sft. 2in. in public. I n their last year at Ox ford however t hey each obtained a "blue" for the event and at the I nter-Varsity sports jumped sft. 8in. and sf:. ?in. rc spectively. Resolution does wonders some times, and I have several times seen an inferior performer win an event by sheet determination. Nil fimkeudum (this is not Horace) should be the motto of every com petitor in Athletic Sports. I will conclude with a few personal rem iniscences of K. S. Sports which may in terest both past and present members uf the school. One of the best races I re member was a struggle between N. R obert son and A. H. Norris in the hurdles. T lw for mer was an excellent jumper, and thl¡ latter a good sprinter. R obertson gained a yard or two over the hurdles, wh i('h Norris picked up in the run in, and t hey ran a dead heat twice. Eventually I think Norris won by a few inches. This was in r879, in which year the performances wen all above the average. R obertson won tht. long jump with 19ft. s in., and the hij.\h


THE

CANTUARIAN.

\\II h 5ft. 3in., the latter especially being a • IJHial performance. Norris won the mile 111 under 5 minutes, and the quarter in X sees., though in the sports against the I ' C> .S. which were held in the same year h1 clicl it in 54 sees., the course being a 111111 h better one. In these sports v. theC.O.S. Wl were much more successful then in those lu·l.tl a year or two ago, as we won all the • Vl'nts bu t the open mile and the under r6 lunJ.t jump. Norris was a first rate all tound runner and had he gone to the Var11)' and taken to the running path would pwl>ably have made his mark as a "Blue." IV, ll. H a wki ns a year or so before pc:rlurmcd the feat of clearing the hole in the hmg jump, his distance being over zoft. 1'1:tdition has doubtless handed this doughty deed down even to the present ,·ncration. J .caving primreval times and coming to the middle ages, I recollect a tremendous tu">slc in the Quarter, between Hamborough ,llld G. Bolus. Each led in turn more 1han once in the the last hundred yards, .111d the former won on the tape by a few uwhcs. S. A. Dale was a very fair miler, hut sti ll better at longer distances. He H·prcsentecl Cambridge for two or three )'l':m in the cross-coun try matches. H . G. Sn ndilands ran in the prettiest style of any uf my contemporaries, and F. T. Dorman was a first rate jumper, winning both events Ill 1882 with 19ft. ?in. and sft. 4in. T he fastest .printer the school ever possessed (in my npinion) was H. 0. King who won the I !undred in r882. H e was wonderfully

smart in getting off the mark, which is half the battle in a sprint, and might have done great things if he had gone in for running after he left school. Some who are still at school may remember F . L. Perkins, who I think won the Quarter on three occasions. He was good at all distances, and in r884 had matters all his own way. Further than this, I need not go as the modern history of the King's School Atheletics may be read in the Cantuarian. On the whole a fair average has been kept up in our sports on the green, and in some years (notably in r 879) the performance were above t he usual school standards. Occasionally the times appear to be slow, but it must be remembered that the size of the green is altogether against fast times. The time of the quarter for instance I consider is usually at least three seconds longer than it would be on a properly constructed track, viz., 3 laps to a mile and no corners. What is lost in the way of time, however by holding sports on the green is fully atoned for by the beauty of the surroundings. There are few prettier sights than the Green Court in holiday attire on sport day. To cheer the despondent I will mention a curious circumstance before I close. A certain O.K.S. famous in athletic annals as a winner of an I nter-Varsity race, though he was captain of the football team and a good cricketer, never to my knowledge won an event at the school sports. This was not becanse he did not compete, as I haYe a distinct remembrance of seeing him


THE

CANTUARI AN.

perform in more than one event. His less), advocating the establishment of 1 subsequent success says a great deal for handicap having appeared in the Cantu his pluck and perseverance, which many arian, the sports committee held a meet would do well to imitate. I know of an ing to debate thereon. The question as In even more remarkable case of the same distance arose. One member pro kind, that of a boating man who strolled up posed half a mile, another a mile, up to see his College sports, and was persuad- another a quarter, when sudde nl) ed to take off his coat and put on a pair I (egotistic I) carelessly suggested of fives shoes to run in a two miles race, 6oo yards. The meeting was dumb though, as he said, he had never run a race foundered. I forget how many fainted, but in his life. T o his astonishment he won by all experienced a severe shock. Such a over too yards, and, his latent talent hav- distance had never been heard of! It W:l~ ing been brought to light, he trained for without precedent, unconstitutional, revoht the Varsity 3 miles, obtained his "blue," tionary,--almost anarchical. Yet the measurl' and ran second against Cambridge at Lillie somehow did get carried through all il'l Bridge. T he result of this is-there, I stages, the decree went for th, and a 6oo wac; on the point of quoting Horace ! You yards handicap it remains to this day. Ancl find it in I Odes 7¡ here just expressing a hope that you ma) Probably !no present King's Scholars are have a sunshining day for the sports lhH aware to whom they are indebted for the year, and that the Green Court may hl¡ 6oo yards handicap. It came about in seen at its best, I beg to sign myself, (A x B) x K.S. this way-Correspondence (signed Prize- 1

KING'S SCHOOL NATURAL HISTORY AND ARCHJEOLOGICAL SOCIETY.

I

On Saturday, February 14th, :l lecture uncommon sea birds now, has given 11 was given by 1\. H. Evan>, Esq., Fellow of name to the Sandwich tern which w. 1 Clare College, Cambridge, on "The Birds of found about here not long ago, but has nuw North and East Coasts." The lecturer gone north and is not common anywhl'r, began by remarking that here :J.t Canter- Then going up the east coast from Kl nt bury we were ncar a portion of the East there are no birds worth mentioni ng 1111 Coast, which, though it is the home of no you come to Flamborough H ead. ll tll

I


THE CANTUARIAN.

li

II

llu rc are 14 or 15 species; black-backed ull'i. a rc the commonest, but guillemots, t.twr-bills, and a fe w cormorants are also r.nmd. Guillemots' eggs varr in colour hnm brown to bluish green. On the F ame Islands terns build. There 11c 3 rocks, on the top of which guillemots lll l'Cd. T hey have no nests, and the eggs lie 1111 the bare rock, but they do not roll off bel ,tusc their pointed shape makes them turn •Pund directly they are moved. At the tuot of these rocks cider ducks build. On tlw ledges up the face of the rock there 11 1e some kittiwakes. Puffi ns are common un these islands; they build in rabbit holes md lay only one egg. T heir eggs are white u.tlurally, but get stained by the damp 1 ,nth. Lesser black-backed gulls are also l<llmd. T hey build nests like jackdaws. A ll•w shcldrakes build here. T here are some ••1rmorants on Longstone Island : where 1here is a lighthouse. Their nests are tundc of seaweed. Dotterels and oyster' .tlchcrs are found here, the latter are very t.llc, there arc only about twelve pairs in the neighbourhood at all. Common and \rd ic terns also abound. Sand grouse are sometimes see n at Flamhurough, but their nests have ne ver bee n lnund. I n the marshes redshanks breed, 1hry build among the tufts of grass and 1hl·t r nests arc exceeding!y difficult to find. Going north St. Abb's H ead is the next l'"lllt of interest. T here are a few black h tl ks here; but herring gulls are the comtnoncst birds. On the Bass Rock there are ume green cormorants and shags.

93

H ere Solan geese and gannets are first met with, a nd we do not find them again till the north coast where there are two colonies of them ; on the west coast they are quite common. After this we fi nd nothi ng more till we come to Aberdccnshire an~ there we get no new kinds, so we may pass on to the Shctlands and Orkneys. T he Great Auk was last seen in the Orkneys. At R oss ncar Lcrwick on mainland there is a cradle that runs on a rope connecting the island with a rock on whi ch 3 or 4 pains of white-tailed eagles build. This island is also inhabited by the greater black-backed gull, and by Arctic Skcuas. These skeuas are very ra re. When you approach they fly at your head in a way that looks alarming, but they do not hurt you really. They lay their eggs among ·the grass and heather without any proper nest. T his is also one of the places where the Great Skcua is found. The Great Skeua never catches fish for itself but waits till it sees another bird catch one, and then givl!s chase and takes away the fish in mid air. The black guillc:mot inhabits the Shet· lands. I t lays its eggs on the pebbles which they exactly resemble in colour, so that they arc very hard to fi nd. T he bird itself is very tame. On U nst Red-throated Plovers and the Great Skcna build. On Fowla, an island 27 mil<!s from the Shetlands, we lind kittiwakes, razor-bills, and highcrests, a kind of pctr.::l which only comes out at night.Rcd·

I!


THE

CANTUARIAN.

throated divers are also found, and the Great Northern Diver is sometimes seen, but does not build. The lecturer noticed that none of the gulls which are so common on our coasts in the summer ever build south of Perthshire. Stormy .Petrels build in the Faroe I slands. The lecturer mentioned that their eggs have a peculiar smell resembling that of musk, and passed round one that we might see and smell it for ourselves.Several

other eggs were passed round in this wa) in the course of the lecture. At the clO'>l the Headmaster thanked Mr. Evans for coming down to speak to us and made a few remarks about our collection of eggs in the Museum. The Society would like to thank Mr,. Bredin for her kind donation of various curiosities, including a Tamil book, foreign shells, eggs, birds nests, etc.

DEBATING SOCIETY. O n Saturday, March 14th, a debate was held in the New Library, when \V. A. Wigram proposed that "An insular position for a country is more desirable than an inland position." Wigram was supported by J. H. Smith, C. A. Knapp, R. J. Castley, A. H. Barlee, and F. \V. Chisolm, who expressed his hearty agreement with

the remarks that members speaking for the motion had made. The Opposition, aftc1 some discussion and delay, was led by K N.H. Spencer, and A. C. Moule, W. 1\f. Carter, and E. J. S. Athawes supported him. The Opposition all through wa~ somewhat weak, and the motion was car ried by a majority of thirteen.

PENNY READIN GS, On the 2 rst of February a Penny R eading was given in the new Library. It opened with Sullivan's glee, " The Last Night of the Year," which was tastefullJ sung. J. S. Grundy well deserved the encore with which his violin solo, " Home, sweet home," was greeted. This was followed by the solo and chorus, " Henry YIII.th's

song," in which Young's excellent voicl' showed to great advantage. His loss will be severely felt among the trebles. Mr. Field read part of "David Copperfield," which was enthusiastically applauded. AfH¡â&#x20AC;˘ this came a duet by Young and Grund) , which, needless to say. was well rendered, and was encored ; the piece was " Tnp


THE CANTUARIAN. lttp," by Marzials. Following this was the In·, "In the merry spring," and finally, " Forty years on," was sung by the School. \nothcr Penny Reading was held on \1,1fl'h 21st, in the new Library. l'ROORA:lnU:.

Violin Solo, " E ntr'ncte from 1\lig non," A. W. Wigram. R1•nding, ......... " '\V. A. Wigmm. (fl(lo ...... ''Fives song," Solo ...... '"l'om Bowling," Dibclcn H . S. S. Parker.

,,, ltoading ...... "

1\rr. Ritchie. Qun.rtott ... " Tho Ash Grove" ...... A ncient 1' II. Kingdon, J. B. Scrivener, H. S. S. Parker, G. H. Smith. 7, Uloo .. . "Yo Mariners of Englnnd," •I

I

95

W. A. Wigra m selected part of the everfresh "Pickwick Papers," which he read very cleverly, but perhaps spoke a little too fast. Parker sang " Tom Bowling" admirably, while "The Three Jolly Sailor Boys," which he sang as an encore, was thoroughly app reciated, and was decidedly the best "event" in the programme. Mr. Ritchie read some selections from Jerome K. Jerome's "Three Men in a Boat," which elicited loud laughter throughout. "The Ash Grove" followed, and the final glee was e~pecially well sung ; more spirit was thrown into it than we had been treated to for some time.

P ew·son.

God Snve the Qnel'n.

CAMBRIDGE LETTER. I t is a most pleasant duty at the beginrung of this letter to offer our heartiest conw:ttnlations to Parker and Wigram on their recent successes up here, the former 1111 gaining an open scholarship at Corpus ,111d the latter at Trinity Hall. We have hc~· n glad to welcome an increasing numltct of O.KS. to Cambridge the last two )'<':Irs and we hope that many more will lollow their example. The officers of the Canterbury Pilgrims <·.c. for the coming season are Captain, K G. Evans j Secretary, H. V. Workman j Treasurer, P. G. Peacocke ; Committee,

R. F. Elwyn, J. E. G. Hadath, H. B. Milsome, and P. A. Turnbull. The tour this year will commence on J une 2 3rd, and matches have been arranged with the Cavalry Depot, the King's School, the Old Suttonians, C.O.S., and St. Lawrence. We hope that O.K.S. from Oxford a nd elsewhere will be able to join us j any who may be able to .are requested to send in their names to H. V. Workman 15, Botolph Lane, Cambridge, before the end of May. Subscriptions will be gladly received by P. G. Peacocke, Corpus Christi College.

.I

I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

I

The Lent Races came off at the begin- the Varsity Single Fives Handicap and we ning of this month and were productive of wish him aiJ success. Carr was second in much interest; Corpus was left head, a the Freshmen's Race at the Emmanuel fact which many O.K.S. wiiJ have read Sports, and Green, besides running for tlw with pleasure. E. C. Frend was rowing Varsity against Oxford in the Hare and stroke in the Selwyn boat. The Univer- H ounds, was aiJ but first in the mile in the sity sports led us to hope that we should Selwyn Sports. be successful against Oxford, and such We hope that the O.K.S. at Oxford who proved to be the case ; especially were we have just been in for mods. have distin pleased with our victory in the three mil':!s guished themselves. Approaching triposcs after a magnificent race between Ekin and are engaging the attention of many OKS. Pease. As regards the Boat Race we I up here. cannot but condole with our crew on just We are glad to hear that the School losing after such a magnificent race ; they Sports promise to be very good this yea 1 , certainly deserve every credit for the and we hope they wiiJ be favoured with plucky and determined way in which they : fine weather and a large number of specta rowed. It was very disappointing that I tors. after so many postponements the Rugby Yours with every good wish, 1 footbaiJ match should end in a draw. O.KS. Workman has r~ached the semi-final in

I

O.K.S. COLUMN . The R ev. C. E. Lucey, rector of Mersham, K ent, asks for further subscriptions tow:1.rds the fund he is raising for a memorial in lviersham Church to Thomas Linacre, founder of the Royal CoiJege of Physicians, and physician to Henry VII and Henry VIII. Linacre was for a short time rector of :'>Iersham. He was born at Canterbury, and educated at the King's School. " •*

H. ?IIaclear has been gazetted.

H is

regiment was the Cameronians. We hav1 since heard that he has been moved int•• the East Lancashire.

•• • A. L. Turnbull has been representitw Liverpool R. U.F.C. this season with succc.;,

•• •

J. R. Inglis has been elected as one nl the eight chosen to represent the Queen Park Lawn Tennis Club, Glasgow.


THE

CANTUARIAN\

97

~==========~~

PAPER CHASE. The first paper chase this season was run on Friday, March sth, H. ?11. James R. B. Flint being the hares. ' The tart wac; from Blore's Piece, the! harc!s !calling off at about 2.30., ten minutes after thl! hounds were off. A false track at the ''cry outset was taken, but unfairly for the hare~, all the hounds "cut " to a likely place for finding it again. The track kd past the quondam Jesuits College, .md over the fields towards Broadoak. \ftcr an eight mile trot, the country being very dry, and the weather fine, the hares wok to the marshes about half a mile heyond Fordwich. Shorting, who was the ~l-ading hound, soon followed by ~Ir. Allen, had gained greatly on the hares, and might he seen in the marshes not more than zoo )'ards behind them. The hares theron, as paper was running short, let themselves be raught up, and walked in to Canterbury over the Old Park, several hou:1ds catching them up in the meantime. The course may have been altogether 1 r miles ; the track being beautifully laid with only one or two false tracks. The second paper chase was run on Thursday, March 19th ; the snow having prevented it taking place ~¡artier. On this occasion Mr. Allen and Shorting ran as hares, haYing been the first hounds in at the close of the last chase. The course was much longer than before, starting from the Old Dover Road Bridge,

.mu

and ending at the school, 'l!ia St. i\Iartin's Hill. The hares were extremely wily, and led the hounds several fats:: tracks at the very start, added to which discomfiture one or two sharp snow showers did not. bode well for the afternoon. The course led away along the Nackington Road, and then cut towards Lower Hardres, then through Barham Downs ; after which over open country towards Adisham, turning thence along by the railway to Bekesbourne and Patrixbourne, with a run in over St. Ylartin's Hill. The course, as a whole, was extremely difficult to follow, and the cold wind over the downs made it rather unpleasant for those who were "done." At a guess, it might be said to be I 5 or 16 miles, and took the hounds about 3 hours. The third paper chase was run on Tuesday, March 24th, Smith and Beynon being the hares. Rain made the start unpleasant which led from the Baths beyond Whitehall to Bigberry woods ; thence through Church woods, round again to Blean, over the further end of the Whitstable tunnel, round th~ Jesuit College and into the school by St Stephen's. Soon after the start the hounds were misled by a red herring track in a wood, and were some ten minutes in refinding the right one. A false track beyond Blean misled several hounds who failed to recover the right one again. Course about I 1 miles; time r }6 ; weather fine general!)', with several hard showers.


THE

CANTUARI AN.

REVIEW OF THE FOOTBALL SEASON. Another and even more disastrous season has to be recorded. The facts speak bc~l for themselves. The summary of results is as follows :-l\Iatches played, 9; won 1, lost 8; points for-x6 (3 goals, 7 tries); points against- 67 ( x8 goals, 13 tries)-a mo~l unsatisfactory record. We have no excuse to offer for this unfortunate state of things ; li t are not going to plead bad luck, or peculiar ideas of referees, or unfairness of a ny sort, as a reason for this bad result; but sadly confess we were not good enough to win. Ou1 prospects at the beginning of the season, though not brilliant, were sufficiently bright to lead us to anticipate a fairly good record. 'Tis true we had only 3 of the old X \ left- James, Wigram, Athawes; but we had some good material to choose from. w,. cannot complain of want of practice, for the captain was most energetic in the discharg~ of his onerous duties ; and unlike the pn~vio us season, games were punctually begun, and carried on with spirit, so t hat no fault could be found in this respect. If we m:t) venture to give any reasons for this want of success, three especially occur to us, as wt· look back upon the season's play. (x). Weak defence; with the exception of tht captain, the back division were not good at tackling opponents. (2). Casual and in accurate passi ng; ind i1·idually the hall'es and three-quarters were good, but there w:t a lack of combination and of that sharp swifl passing, which is so essential to good play. (3). Want of staying power ; in several matches we held our own well during the fiN half-hour, and then fell to pieces in the second. Our forwards, howc Yer, deserve a word of praise; they certainly showed to greater adv:mtage than in the last few years, and IH generally managed to get the better of our opponents in the scrummages. As a full account of each separate match has already appeared in the pages of the Cantuarian, wt need only remark about them here that the best contested were those with the Thanct Wanderers, with Sutton Valence and Dover Town on our own ground. The return with Sutton Valence was played under most unfavourable circumstances, their ground at the time- owing to snow- being q uite unfit for play, and our solitary victory was over Dover College (in the fi rst match), whom we succeeded in beating for the first time. The usual remarks on the differe nt members arc appended, and we close our re1·ic11 with the earnest wish that we shall have a more cheerful review to insert next season. • }.-\~ms, H.-(Captain), improved very much on last season's form, being much safer in picking up the ball, good three-quarter, runs well, but ought to learn to dodge ; good and safe collar. Made an excellent captain, and deserved more succ<:s~ than he got.


r

THE

CANTUARIAN.

99

\\ 1• 11 \~1,

W. A.-As last year the pick of the forwards ; im·aluable in the packs, a nd quick to follow up the ball. Played thoroughly hard and well throughout the season. \ r11 'wr·:s, E. J.- Capital half; plays a good game and generally very safe ; q uick on the ball and feeds well. 1 ' 11 1·.\, R. J.- Good th ree-quarter ; has no g r~at turn of speed but runs with judgment nnd works thoroughly hard. Good kick, and fai r collar. 1'\l•h. rm, H. S.-'Piays well in a loose scrummage and makes some nice dribble;. Capital kick. •\IIIII, J. H.- Good and rel iable forward ; plays a sound game and works very hard. I I•:, H.- Very fair half; plays keenly, has often times proved useful at a pinch. •IIO R'I'INc;, C. E.- Did not come up to expectation as three-quarter ; runs fast, when once off, but very slow at picking up the ball and starting. Not good at collaring. I 1 rNT, R. B. -Another good forward, very energetic and q uick on the ball. I liNT, Tl. E.- Fair forward, sometimes plays three-quarter, and occasionally makes a good run. 1 " \\\'I?ORn, J. . -P layed as extra half and was very useful behind the scrummage. Fair collar. rr.rN, H. ] .- Back ; was not very successful; lc icks too often at random, and not good at tackling. I' \IU(, R. H.- Very fair forward. II \l'rm, H . E. - Good and useful forward, played up well. l'tm, C. H. - Useful forwa rd ; played three-quarters at times, but had no speed. I 'IAI'P, C. A. - Succeeded I sacke at half-back si nce Christmas, and gave fair prom ise.

''h.

I·,

s. }

111•\'NON, F . \ r·.I\NON, H. W, l.rlwRv, R. C.

Fair forwards, filled vacant places this term only.

I

I

I

jJ


roo

------

THE

CANTU ARI AN.

FIVES. DOUBLE

FI VES

TIES.

FIRST ROUN D.

Salmon R eale Cast ley Luxmoore · D uval Slater

} }

beat {Vernon Bell

Richardson } Ridley

beat { Heacllam Stri nger

Wharton James

} beat

{ Hincks Candy (r)

Smith C ooper

Campbell Johnson SECOND

Richardson Ridley

}

Castley Lux moore

} beat

Castley Lux moore

}

beat { Donaldson Sopwith

} beat } beat

{ Parker·)<, Spencer (2) {Beynon H awes

} a bye ROU ND,

beat {Campbell J ohnson { Cooper Smith (r)

Salmon R eale

}

\ Vharton James

} a bye

bea t {Duval Slater

THIRD ROUND.

beat { Richardson Ridley

Wharton James

} beat

{Salmon R eale

FINAL.

*

Wharton J ames Not played, unavoidably.

} beat

{ Castlcy Lux moore

We forgot to mention in our last number that a fi ves' match was played between 11 school and O.K.S. at the end of last term. The game showed that the school Wt decidedly inferior, Latter and Elwyn q uite walking round \\'harton and Salmon. On Wednesday, March r8th, a fives match was played between the school and •, Augustine's. As Wharton and Salmon were unable to pl::~y, Castley and Bell took tlv 1r


THE

CANTUARi\1\.N.

101

plat cs in the 1st pair, while James and Smith played in the second. S.A.C. were not Jllllc u~ed to the courts, and an easy victory for the school resulted in both games. \nother match is being arranged with the O.K.S. for Thursday, April 2nd, in which J•u· ;1bly two pairs will be played. The ."utton \'alence Fives :\latch was unavoidably postponed this term.

SCHOOL NEWS . The Bishop of Dover held a confirmation 1111 the School on Thursday, March 12, at 1 p.m. There were between twenty and th uly candidates. The school had an halfh~tli<.lay on the following Saturday at the lli,hop's request. • • * l'hc Streatfield Prize for English Litera. tllll' has been awarded to \Y. NL Carter. l'hc subjects set were Chaucer's Prologue 111d Knight's Tale, and Shakspere's H enry \ . nnd King Lear. The subject of the , •ay was " Federation, H ome Rule, and I l .ul'al Government." The examination was 11111 over till rather later than usual.

I

•• •

The Upper Third, under the direction ul Mr. Evans, bas now a Debating Society ol it~ own, which meets every Thursday I \'Ciling.

..•

\V..: regret to record the t emporary 1kath of the Choral Society. I t is exJu·rtcd to revive in September.

..

* The following subjects have been an·

nou nccd(•) for Latin Verse Prize (Lyrics), Deuteronomy, chapter xxxii. (2) For Greek Prose, an original speech against "Perpetual Pensions." (3) For English Poem, " The last sigh of the ?.foor." (4) For English Essay "The l\Ioors in ~pain. "

•• *

The special subject for the :\Icmbcr'~ Geography Prize this year is ·'Spain." * * * H. S. S. Parker has been elected to a classical scholarship at C. C. C. Cambridge:, value £4o per annum, for two ye~r~. Thio; was the only classical scholarship awarded. * * * \V. A. Wigram has won a History Scholarship at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, value £so for one year. · .. *

*

The singing of the school songs has been revived this term with much vigour, and to the satisfaction of all. The book has been enlarged, and bound in dark blue with the school crest on the cover in gold. The second performance this term pro.


.. ....

-------------------------------------------------------------------------102

THE

-----

----~

CANTUARIAN

duced some startling revelations among 1 ruary number that the H all crests which the trebles of the choir, several of whom were lost after the concert before last r~ mistook themselves for basses appeared at the end of the Christmas term ** * * • The Rev. H. G. Sprigg p~eached in The Gymnasium Competition has been Chapel on th:,Monday and 1uesday of fixedfor Apri1 4 th.TheHeadMasterhasb..:L·n H oly week. I he H<:ad Master ad~ressed 1 kind enough to promise to gi,·e the prizes. tl:e school on the 1 hursd~y evemng and I I t is anticipated that the contest will Ill Canon Holland on the Fnday and Satur- keener t11an 1·t was 1ast year , . 1 cay. * • * .. • * The Boathouse has been considerabl) The first of the Special French Prizes, enlarged and improved. offered by Mr. Scudamore, was secured by •• C. A. Knapp. The second has been won All ideas of having sports with the C.O.S. by J. H. Smith, and H. S. S. Parker (equal). .. * had to be abandoned, owing to a death * \\'e should have mentioned in om Feb- occurring at the l:ltter school.

I

I

.

CORRESPON DENCE. S.B.-'l'hc Editors rlecline to accept any respo1rsibiU_ty conncrtea 'vilh !he OJ>inions .of t~eir ro>·resp ~ " .len '8. Name 11111l adrlre.•d onust always be 9tven, aol 'leressm•rly fo•· 1JrtbLrcalwn, bttt a~ " !fllamntec of (JOocl faith. Pe;- onnlities w !£ invoLve cellain 1·ejcdion.

THE I NSCRIPTION OVER THE DOOR IN HAJ .L. J'o tlte Editors of "THE CANTUAR I AN." DEAR SIRs,- An enquiry was made in your columns, some time past as to the inscription over the door in H all, which is nearly effaced. I believe it to be "Inquinat egregios adjuncta superbia mores." Yours truly, MOTTO.

THE BUSTS IN THE SCHOOLROO I. To tltc Edito1·s of "THE CANTUARI AN. " GI!.NTLEMEN,- May I be permitted to advocate the removal of the busts in tlw schoolroom to the New Library. The rca sons-which are obvious-are these : ( r) In their present position they are grossly abused by certain Vandals who imagi111 that they look handsomer with eyes ma1 k ed with pencil, and various other grimy nt tentions. (2) As they are now, they may,

I

I I


THE

CANTUA RI AN.

1 03

LA \V r TE:i\XIS. en by a car~less or hasty movement. (3) To tho Editors of" T HE CA:-< rt.i.\RI.-\1\." Dear Sir~, - Lawn tennis is a sport by \ s a general rule, the concentration of dec¡ orations is desirable. (I must apologise no mean.; to be disregarded, although, of for this last sentence :;ounding like a Dcbm- course it is not to he compared !n importance with cricket. Yet beside~ the times i:lg-Society mo~wn . The New Library has become the "Show taken up for cricke~ practice and matches, ruom" of the Scnool-fond part!ntsarc con- 1 then: are several hour:; to sp:nc in th..: due ted thither to wonder and admire-and, week, which might b:.: and are devoted to in my opinion, the busts are altogether in- lawn tenni ¡-and I presume there arc nmgruous with whatever eloc adorns the..: several members in th e school who might with practice be good at the 3.1m~ . Would Schoolroom walls. r do not know whether I am alone in , it not then be an additional incentive to my opinion hut I trust that I am not, and its pursuit, if tennis matci1es could be arhope that next term, we may alJ see our ranged with some of the town clubs, or :1ugust friends instalJed as the presiding with St. Augustine's College. H oping to see some frui ts from this seed . :;mii of the r ew Library. I remai n, Believe me, yours ever, yours sincerely, "P.HILOPILATOR." "PITY POOR C.-ES.-\R."

.It any moment, he knocked on!r and brok-

The following books have been added to the Library :Development of Christian Doctrine .. .. .. ........ .. .... .J. H . Newman. Verses on Various Occasions .. .. . .. .... .. .. .. .. .. .... ..... J. H . Newman. The Arian9 of the Fourth Century .. . . .. ..... .. .... . .. .). H . Newman. Callista .. .. .. ... . .. .. . . . . ....... .. ... . ..... . ..... .. . ......... J. H . Newman. H owitt's Visits to R e markable P laces . ................ . Micah Clarke ........ . . . ..... .. ... . ........... . .............. A. C. Doyle. Pet land ................ .. ........... ... .... .. . ... . ........... J. G. 'Vood. Out of Doors . .. . .. ... . .............. .. ........ .. .. .......... J. G. ' Vood. Colonel Quaritch, V.C ..................................... Rider H aggard. By England's Aid ........ .. .... .. ........ .. . ....... ..... ... G. A. Henty. Orange and Green ...... : .................. . ............... . G. A. Henty.


THE CANTUARl AN.

104

~Iaori

and Settler ...... .. .. .. .. .................. .. ........ G. A Hcnty. Children of Gibcon . .......... . . ... ....................... Dcsant. Nor'ard of the Dogger .............. .... .................. E. ]. .\lather. The Deer:;layer ............ .. .............. .. .. .. .. .... .. .. . J. F. Cooper. The Pathfinder .................... ...... ........ .......... . ]. F. Cooper. The Despot of Broomsedge Cover .. . ... . .. .. . . . . . .... .Craddock. How we got our Bible .... .......... .... ........ ........ .. Paterson Smyth. Coral R eefs, etc. . .................... . .. ... . .............. Darwin. Memoirs of Lord Melbourne ....... ........ .... .. ...... .. .Torre n~ . C::csar . .. ..... .... ... ... . ..... . ... . ....................... .. ... J. A. F roudt. Growth of the English Constitution .. . .. . . ... ... . ... ... . Freeman. T he English Constitution ............ .. ................ Bagchot. T he Law of the Constitution .. ........ .......... .. ........ A. \ '. Dicey. The American Commonwealth, z vols............ .. .... . Brycc. T he H istory of the Gro!at C ivil War, 2 vols............. Gardin~r.


THE CANTUARIAN. VOL. III.

JUNE, r8g r.

No. 5·

EDITORIAL. The incompleteness and want of finish, not to mention the brevity of our last number, already have provoked so much comment from our readers, that we may save ourLIYCS the trouble of doing more than apologising. " Q ui s'excuse, s'accuse," may be tllll', but we may fairly state that these d eficiencies were not owing to any slackness on the part of the Editors, nor to any delay on the part of the printers. I t was misfortune rnthcr than fault. But enough. It may seem a little out of place in an Editorial, but we do not think it is altogether out of place in a school paper, to make some appeal on lwholf of the school music, more especially with regard to the singing in chapel. What we find fault with is this. At present th ere may be one person, possibly two-certa1nly ru1t more-in the whole school (outside t he choir) who ever even attempts to sing. Now rtnyonc who has heard the singing on Sun day evenings in Hall, during the last two terms, ,11 any rate, cannot but feel the difference there is between the volume of sound distinguish· ,thlc in chapel and that to be heard at House prayers on Sunday evenings. The only reason 1" account for this fact, is that people are so beautifully modest and nice, in the matter of hlnring their own voice in a large building, or else it is that they imagine it to be "t'njrrt dig." Believe us, it is not the last. If the school service is a failure, who are t•J blame? " Why the choir, of course," is the answer. nut are they? Perhaps to a ttlu qt


1 06

THE

CANTUARI AN.

certain degree they are; but undoubtedly not altogether. The choir is intended to k11/ the service and not jmform it entirely. We imagine that we are right when we sny that the choir do not altogether appreciate their position, and the reason is sufficient!) obvious. It is a thoroughly bad custom, this silence, among those \Vho are not actually in the choir. The King's School's reputation, or fancied reputation, fo r Conservatism 11 an excellent thing in its way, but this kind of Conservatism demands Radical reform. We are sure that it is true that if the school were one and all, or at any rate the greater part, to sing at the services in chapel, instead of maintaining an obstinate silence, and trying to pick holes in the efforts of the choir, which we confess arc not always very brilliant, they would enjoy the service far more, and the members of that abused body would enjoy a far more unenviable position than at present. As it is, " the wretched choir" is a byword of reproach, and certainly not a slander. We hope that these few remarks have not been written altogether to no purpose, and shall anxiously wait for the result. This is not the first appeal that has been made on this subject, but we trust that it may be the last. To turn elsewither, we may presume that before this number m:lkc~ its appeamnce before the public, our eleven will have had opportunities of she\Ving the stuff that they :-~rc made of. May we be allowed to try to impress upon them all the necessity and advantage of fielding on the Green, in the evenings. It is true that there arc generally some doing so, but we should like to see nil and not only some. We will conclude by giving them our heartiest wishes for success.

KING'S SCHOOL WORTHIES, NO. VII. THOMAS LI NACRE.

" Thomas Linacre, Doctor in Medicine, J:>hysician to King H enry VIII., the tutor and friend of Sir T homas More, a nd founder of the College of Physicians." This description, short though it is, will at all events set right the somewhat hazy notions which exist in some people's minds about thaf personage; it will also be enough to show that he did not die within the last

year, as I heard an O.K.S. suggest a short time ago. I must confess that till lately he was to me little more than a name, and my sole claim to attempt an article like this i-; based on the fact of my having hastily read "The life of Thomas Linacre," by J. N. Johnson. If anybody is desirous of knowing more about this worthy, I would recom mend him to that book, as it is from that


THE

CANTUARIAN\

uurce that I have derived all my information, and it has been manifestly impossible to compress 300 pages into two or three. Thomas Linacre was born in Canterbury .1hout the year 1460. After receiving a .ound education in Latin at the Monastic S• hoot, from Selling, then headmaster, he proceeded in 1480 to Oxford, most prob.1hly to Canterbury College. I n the " J\thenae Cantabrigienses" it is said that possibly he entered Cambridge fi rst and 1hen migrated. However, this is unlikely. In 1484 he was elected Fellow of All l'iouls, and from this time began· to rise IIIlO prominence as a leader of the new •.rhool, whose more especial object was the ..tudy of the Greek language and literature. II is chief friends were William Grocyn and William Latimer, while his favourite pupil wns Sir Thomas More. H e did not remain hmg at Oxford, for soon a new line of life w:1s opened to him. In 1486 he accompanied Selling, his old master, on a mission to I taly, and thus was enabled to continue his Greek studies under Politian and I >emetrius Chalcondyles, foremost scholars uf their day. Since the fall of Byzantium, 111 1453, Italy had been overrun by men who gained their living by teaching Greek. It is to this fact that Europe, in general, and I taly, in particular, owe the revival of the study of Greek. Linacre took such advantage of t hese opportunit ies afforded hy teachers and libraries that in the poems written on his departure for England he is clcscribed as "Italica eruditione, Romano t'nge11io." He also paid great attention to

107

medicine, so much so in fact that the University of Padua conferred on him a medical degree. On returning to England he immediately went back to Oxford, and, that others might reap the benefit of his studies, began to lecture on Greek. T he most famous of his pupils at that time was Erasmus, who, as Gibbon, and many an Oxford man since has said, learnt Greek at Oxford to teach it at Cambridge. But Linacre's reputation as a scholar and a physician was by no means confined to the Universities, for in 15o r he was appointed to two most important posts-tutor to Prince Arthur, and physician to Henry VII. But Prince Arthur lived but a very short time, and on his death Linacre was able to return once more to Oxford, this time to deYote himself to medicine. On the accession of H enry VIII he was again appointed Royal Physician, and was extremely popular with the King and court generally. But he was soon to come out in a new light, namely, that of a theologian. Though advanced in years, and enjoying the highest honours in his profession, he now entered the Church and took orders. Naturally,with such friends to help him as he had at court, he had various preferments, and he held in rapid succession a prebend's stall at Wells, a canonry at ·westminster, the precentorship at St. Paul's, and in 15 10 the rectory ofWigan,whichhe held till his death. H e employed these years in making transla· tions of the various works of Galen thus com· bining his knowledge ofGreek and medicine. H is 'De T emperamentis et de Inrequali


to8

'l'I-IE

CANTUARIAN.

Temperie' was printed at Cambridge il'l 152 r, and is supposed to be the first book printed in E ngland in which Greek characters were introduced. He had contemplated a translation of Aristotle with Grocyn and Latimer to help him, but this was never carried out. H e was also good enough to write a book on "The Rudiments of Grammar," for the benefit of Princess Mary to whom he was tutor. This was a preliminary to a still larger work, on which his reputation in no small measure depends. It consisted of six books, and was called 'De E mmdala Structm路a Lah'm' Sermotlis' His services in medicine were of a still more important nature, for in 1518 he obtained letters patent from the King to found the College of Physicians, of which he was the first president. By this act he raised the science of medicine from a trade to a profession, and put a stop to indiscriminate practising by unqualified quacks. He also founded two lectures at Oxford and one at Cambridge on medicine, though I believe the latter no longer takes place. Death, which he had for some time ex-

pected, came lo him in 1524, and he wa. buried a t his own wish in St Paul's, near the north door. Of all the various witnesses to Linacre'~ scholarship I will quote but one or two. Erasmus says : " Is aught more acute, more exalted, or more refined than the judgmen\ of Linacre? " T he University of Oxfortl in an official letter called him "The new parent of the Latin tongue," while John Caius sums up his character in the follow ing words: "Vir Graece et Latino atquc in de medica Ionge eruditissimus, fraudes dolosque euire perosus ; fidus amicis ; omnibus ordinibus juxta clams." It is in fact no small boast for a school to have produced two men like Linacrc and Harvay who have exercised such a great in路 ftuence on the history of medicine in Eng路 land, and for a school, claiming as it does to be descended !rom that which was founded by Theodore for the study of Greek, to count among its worthies one like Linacre, who was to a great extent rc路 sponsible for the revival of that language in this country.

THE TREASURY BOOKS. It will no doubt be of great interest to the school to learn or read about these interesting old records of t he King's School, which are preserved in our Cathedral Library. That venerable pile seems to be a

perfect mine of instruction on the days of our early existence as a school, and one would almost wish that the sixth form, at least (if it would be too monstrous to propose the whole school), should have the


THE

CANTUARIAN. '

11m of that library. Most of the records lhnt exist about the school are to be found there; and occasionally we have managed Ill dig out a little ore for the interest of the King's Scholars, to whom they ought to be nn A D C of education. These Treasury Hooks, portions of which we propose to put 1nto print, require some explanation. In early days one of the Prebendaries of lht.: Cathedral \Vas named the Receive r, while another undertook the onerous duties urTreasurer. It was the ReceiYer's duty to ••ollcct all tithes, dues, rents and fines, or 1.1thcr to see to their being collected. When 1hey came in, they were handed on to the 'l'rcnsurer to distribute to the different ntnons, and functionaries. The interest these nccount books of the Treasurer, has lu the school is, as will be seen b elow, or In ensuing numbers, the occurrence of divc• s items connected with the school. The hooks begin after the Restoration, and have rontinued in an almost unbroken line to 1he preseat time. J~ach page has three columns, in the nccond arc the names of the functionaries IU be paid, in the third the sums they are 1 t•spectively to receive. The first originally left blank was filled with t he signature of I Ill' recipient when he received the stipend. In the case of the King's Scholars, how•·vcr, the head master has signed for some, .md the second master for others, but in the majority of cases the King's Scholars ~ is ned for themselves. In these early years, therefore, we have not merely the list, but ,,l ~o the actual autographs of the scholars,

rog

which, it may be added, compare not unfa vourably with some of a later generation. On the fly-lo:~f cf I he fil-st book after the Re3torntion is written " Steven Prescot cl:lims 5s. a q um·ter fo1· looking to the g.ollery of tho King's Scholars iu tho Sormon Honso.

The accounts begin" The treasurer's accounts from November 29th, r 66o to November 29th, r66r, Dr. Moulin being treasurer, Dr. Casaubon receiver, and Dr. Aucher, vice-dean." The first entry is a payment from the Receiver to the Treasurer of £23 2s. on November 29th. The payments come in due course after the receipts. t66o. Stipendia D D ecani Pro Termino et Praebendariorum Nativ Dom. · Thomas Turner Mr. Deane, £12 3s. 4d. Similarly "Pro Termino Annunciationis." " Pro Termine J o Baptistae." "Pro Termino Michaelis." (In a different hand) "Suma tots anni, £781 rss. od." At the St. John's audit the vice-dean's signature is appended with " 0 God, make speed to save me. 0 God, make haste to help me. Jesu y, my Lord and my God. Jo Aucher, June zsth, r687." Similar signatures occur through the books" Stipend1a Praedicatorum et Lectorum." The six preacher payments in four £150 os. od. terms

I


THE

IIO

CANTUARIAN.

£

Stipendia Minorum Canonicorum. S. Mich

4 Nat. } 5 Annun S. John £go ros. od. 6 Mich.

Sum a

Stipendia Substitutorum. (This page is slovenly, with erased notes of small sums borrowed.) Pro Term Nativ. Helen West, To Helen West a Substitute's 'H, her mark, widow, given by decree

£, s. d. 3 5 0 P ro Term Annun. To Thomas Mathews S. John- five ... S. Mich-five ... Suma

3 x6 x6

5 5 5

0

39

0

0

Stipendia Clericorum Laicorum. Nat. 8 (apparently from Midsummer), £ 7 xos. od. each 6o o 4 £3 xss. od. each 15 o Annun. S. John

12 12

0

0

o o

s. cl

45

0

u

... 210

0

(J

12

Stipendia Tibicinum. Nat. 4 £,x s s. od. Annun S. John ... And to each of them 20 shillings a-piece given by decree for their surplices S. Mich

5

0

0

5 5

0

0

0

0

4 5

0

0

0

CJ

Sum a Stipendia Magistri et Puerorum Choristarum. Term, Nativ. *Mr Pysing for his wages from Midsummer . .. 5 0 Ammn. xo Choristers £,x IO 0 Pysing 2 IO S. John, xo 10 0 Pysing 2 10 Mich., xo .. . 10 0 Pysing :1 10 Suma

75

0

0

45 45

0

0

*a Lay.cJerk.

0

0

(TO BE CONTINUED.)

42

10

0 0 0 0 0

0 0

o


THE

CANTUARIAN.

III

ATH LETIC SPORTS, 'l'hc sports took place on April 6th and 7th, on the Green Court. Last year, it will be ll'mcmbered, they were unavoidably transferred to Blore's Piece ; but this year we were ,thh.: to return to the Green. The first day gave every hope of being fine and sunny, hul nnturally enough it clouded over in the afternoon, and became cold. The second tiny was most miserable, cloudy and cold, and aboullhe middle of the events, rain came 1111 so hard that it was decided to postpone the sports till the next day, Wednesday; but ,,., the rain stopped soon after, many reasons accumulating to show the undesirability of pustponing them, it was resolved to continue them once more. The remaining events 1\l'rc run ofT, uninterrupted by rain, although of course the ground had been a good deal .lfll'CtCd. On the whole the sports might be said to be by no means inferior to last year's, although 11 is difficult to form an accurate estimate, owing to the differences of the ground. I hrowing the cricket ball was not quite so good, nor the under 16 high jump, but in , wr)•thing else we quite came up to or surpassed the results of bst year. Appended is 1 more minute account of each event. F I RST DAY.

1'/trowi11g the Cn'dut Ball.- I , H. S. S. Parker, 92 yards; 2, H. J. Cullin, 8 7 yards. This event took place on Blore's Piece at 12.30 on the xst dny. There were five competitors, but the two wi nners threw some distance ahead of the others. •. Lo11g Jump (opm).-I, C. E. Shorting, I8 ft. IO in. ; 2, W. A. Wigram. Shorting was the only competitor who took off well, all the rest took off from the ashes, and not from the board, leaving Shorting winner by about a foot. Prize given by Mr. 1Iodgson. ~- 220 Yards (Junior Scltool) - 1 . Kingdon; 2, Slater. Time 32 sees. I· Quarter Mile (under z6)-3 heats. Some very good contests wer'! shown in each heat. First heat, I, C. T. Candy; 2, A. F. C. Luxmoore. Second heal, I, H. Johnson; 2 1 T. Young. Third heat, r, H. E. Flint; 2, D G. Lenox.

t.


II 2

S· 6.

THE

CANTUARIAN.

L ong J ump Uunior School)--r, Slater, 2 , Skinner, 14 ft. 8 in. Hurdlu (open). -First heat, I, H . M. James; 2, C. H. Wharton.

Second heat, r, H . E. Stringer, 2, T. N. Micklem. 1· H urdles (under z6).- F irst heat, r, C. M. Collard ; 2 , C . T. Candy. Seconcl heat, r , R. S. Suttor ; 2, P. H . Slater. Collard led easily in the fi rst heat ; tlu second heat was a very close race. 8. Handi,ap Utmior School), 300 yards.-This race is a fresh addition to Cl\11 Sports, the prize for it being offered by Mr. Mason. I t was a good race, won h)' Ridley, in s ot sees. 9· Quarter Mile ( under I tf.).-Two heats. xst heat, x, T . \V. Spiller ; 2 , A. N. Wilson , 31 E. E. Baker. 2nd heat, r, A. J . Fenn ; z, H. Dann ; 3, T. B. Watkins. 10 . Quarter Mt'le (open).- r, C. E. Shorting; 2, F . S. Beynon. Shorting led u(l easily from the star t, followed by J ames, then Smith, then Beynon . Beynon passccl Smith and James in the second round and came in a good second. Time 62 scc,, First prize given by M r. Mason ; the second by the Mayor. II. BigltJump (under z6).- r, A. G. R ichardson; 2, R. H olmes. To avoid the usual length of time taken up by this event, choice was made beforehand on Blorc'• Piece, the best five being selected. W. H. Maundrell ran H olmes pretty close fu1 second place. All three ought to do well next year. Height 4ft. s in. Prize giw n by Mrs. R oe. 12. Handi(ap (6oo yards).- Two heats. I n the first heat, Cullin who was scratch ran excellently, passing others who had 70 or 7 s yards start, and secured third place. Hawes, So yards start, ran in firs t. T he second heat was won according to tlw starts. The first six in each were chosen for the fi nal. 13. 2 20 Yards (Junior School, under u ). -R idley again came to the front, winn in ~: with Lenox as second. 39 sees. 14. L ong jwnp (under z6).-r, H . E. Flint ; 2, T. Young; 3, A. F. C . Luxmoorc. The best five were chosen for this previously. Length r 6ft. gin. Prize given hy Mr. Ritchie, rs. IOO yards (Junior School).-rst heat, Johnson, Skinner ; znd heat, Kingdom :ICld Slater. r6. zoo yards open. t, C. E. Shorting; 2, W. A. Wigram. Time II 2-5th seconds. Wigram led : Shorting drew up towards the end and passed withm l t.:ll yards of the fi nish. Prize given by Mr. Field. 11· zoo yards (u nder z6). 3 heats. Ist heat, I, C. M. Collard ; 2, R H olmc8. 2nd heat, r, H. Johnson ; 2 A. F. Luxmoore. 3rd heat, I , H . E . Flint; 2 , D. K Lenox. I n each heat t he winner was some way ahead, the second places bcmt• more evenly contested. This event closed t he first day. Two heats for the 3 legged race were also run in intervals bet ween events, instead of being run off before-hand at Blore's Piece.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

SECOND DAY.

Quarter .A1ile (under I6),final. 1, H . E. Flint; 2, H . J ohnson; 62 sees. Flint ran J.

I• ~

(,

7 II •1

10,

11 .

1 J,

1:l·

r 4·

in excellent style, leading ahead from the start, and with an excelle nt spurt for the lnst round. Prize given by Mr. E vans. /Jig!: Jump Urmior Sc/zool). z, Slater ; 2, Jones; height, 4feet I in. roo yards (rmder I6)jinal. I, H . E. Flint; 2, D. G. Lenox; time, 12 2-5th sees. Lenox ran well for second place. IOO ya1·ds (j'tt1lior Sc!tool), final. I , Kingdon; 2, Skinner ; time, 13 3-5 sees. Kingdon led away, and managed to keep his place though closely pressed at the e nd by Skinner. J-lcgged race, ji11al. Winners-Cullin and Johnson. llnudicap (6oo yards) final. -Twelve were selected for the final of this race. t , Hawes (8o yards); 2 , Collard (42 yards); 3, Smith (5 7 yards). Cullin did his best to win a place, coming in 5th, although 40 yards behind anyone else at the start. Time, xmin. 3osecs. Prize given by Mr. Gordon. Quarte1 Mile Urmior Sc!wol).-I, K ingdon; 2, Skinner ; 3, Slater. /Jurdles (opm) final.-(xoo yards), I, H . M. James; 2, C. H. Wharton, 15secs. Prize given by Mrs. Bredin. !Jurdles (under I6) final.-x, R S. Suttor; 2, C. M. Collard. This was a very close race, Suttor being a trifle q uicker at the last hurdle. Time, q secs. Prize, given by Mr. Campbell. llig!tj'ump (opm).-x, T. Micklem, 4ft. Sins; 2, C. H . Wharton. This might have been better, had it not come on to rain hard, just as the jumping began, and had not the winner been rather handicapped by an acci dent the day before. Prize given by Dr. Blore. Qua1/er Mile (underi4)Jinal.- I , A. J. Fenn ; 2, T. W. Spiller. Spiller kept the lead the first round and a half; then F enn drew ahead, and won by some distance. Prize given by Mrs. Hamilton. Sack Race.- T his race took place in heavy rain. Lenox won easily. Rain was now falling so heavily that it was half decided to abandon the remaining events for the next day, but after half hour the rain stopped. and they were continued. /!alf .Mile (tmder I6}.-x, H. E. Flint; 2, H. Johnson. Time, 2min. 35secs. Flint as usual led all the way, in good style. The prize was given by the Sixth Form. Straugers' R nce (U 1nile).-There were 4 entries for this, Gedge leading all the way, closely followed bf Latter and Tassell. Time, 6o ~secs.


114

THE

CANTUARI AN.

One .Mile (op en).-x, C. E. Shorting; z, F. S. Beynon; 3, R. B. Flint. Smith led the first four rounds, but Shorting and Beynon passed him in the fifth, till' latter afterwards keeping the lead. I n the last round, Shorting put on an excellent spurt, p:lssed Beynon, and won by about 6 yards. Flint came in at his leisure, lht rest having fallen out. Time, smins, I4Secs. Prizes given by the ladies of C:mlcl bury. 16. Consolation Race (.Junior Scltool).-r, Beasley. q. Consolation Race (Ji mile).- I, Vernon. Candy made a very good race of it, by a splendid spurt, touching t he tape almost instantaneously with Vernon. At the close of the events, Mrs. E den kindly distributed the prizes from the front dour of the Bishop's house. Shorting, who had to come forward for 4 fi rst prizes (long jump, r oo yards, ;.( mile, and mile), and H. E. F lint, who had to answer for 4 first prizes fm the corresponding events (under 16), being loudly applauded. The prize giving OVl'l , the Captain called for t he usual cheers, which were warmly responded to, and the assemhl) then broke up. T he Cavalry band which we have missed so long from our sports was to have pcrfor111 ed on the second day, but arriving late, rain almost immediately drove them to shell! r, and we were deprived of the advantage of hearing much of them. I n conclusion wr should like to thank warmly those who have been so kind as to offer prizes for the sp011 , as it not only is a great help to the Sports F unds, but also shows us that we are not cnlill ly forgotten in Canterbury. 15.

CRICKET PROSPECTS. It is seldom the case that the summer term begins without a disappointment, and tht, term has been no exception to the rule. On returning we were met with the news tlmt Wharton had left us, and naturally the eleven suffers a severe loss. However, we 1111 not going to be despondent or discouraged. For many things, indeed, we have rc:l&flll to feel gratification. T he batting this term has been a distinct improvement on th1 whole, on any that was shewn at all last season. It is steady, and we have not seen nn) of that vain and rash swiping which lost us the Chartham match last year. Carter, the safest of the new hands, has played some really excellent innings. H is defenctâ&#x20AC;˘ 11 admirable, but he might put a little more vigour into some of his strokes. Shorting h.t also begun splendidly ; we sincerely hope that he will keep it up. We have also grl'ttl hopes of James, who is, as usual, playing very carefully. Castley is not quite in form '


THE ~· 1,

hut with care is sure of runs.

CANTUARIAN.

IIS

The same remark applies to Parker, who must reRichardson ought d ., to be good for runs. H is style is good, and if he takes pains, he ought to be very 11 'rul. Slater, at present, seems very much inclined to be lazy and indifferent. We t 111 ~ t that this is merely a passing distemper. Smith, Young, and Beynon, too, are r pcncd to do something in the way of scoring. Then as regards bowling. There are 1'.11 ker and Castley from last year, and Beynon of the new Jot. These tlu cc will have to bear the brunt of the attack. Besides them, Richard "" is very fair and Shorting may do well if he does not try to bowl fast. Several 11thcrs "have been known to bowl.'· As yet, we have said nothing of Cullen. Ill• is being tried as wicket keeper, and seems to have some pluck, but wants perse•Hncc. But certainly he has not yet had much experience. If he perseveres he ought to he at any rate useful, if not destructive. He has failed as a bat in trial games, more " ' less, but if he will only learn that the chief object of cricket is not always to try and I l l runs, he would do better. He may also render assistance in the bowling line, and 11 he fails in the first eleven, he ought at any rate to be useful to the second. We cannot say that the fieldi ng is very brilliant as yet, but time and pluck work ondcrs, and on the whole we prophesy, at any rate, a better season than last year's. 1 1~l year half the matches were lost through want of confidence. That kind of failure , altogether unnecessary. In conclusion we would say that it is co-operation that is l'l llcrally and mainly instrumental in winning matches. If the eleven work together 11 1th their captain and do their utmost in all three branches of the game, batting, bowling, IIlli fi elding, the proportion of matches won ought certainly to outweigh the number of lhuse lost. We append a list of the fixtures:Date. Opponents. W!tere played. Chartham. Thursday, May 28 Chartham Asylum Tuesday, June 2 S.A.C. Beverley. Barracks. Thursday, , 4 Barracks ... Beverley. Tuesday, , 9 S.A.C. Beverley. Thursday, , 11 St. Lawrence Beverley. Tuesday, , x6 Highgate School Beverley. Thursday, , r8 C.O.S. Beverley. Wednesday, , 24 Canterbury Pilgrims Beverley. Tuesday, , 30 Dover College Beverley. Thursday, July 2 C.O.S. Beverley. Tuesday, , 7 South Eastern College Beverley. T uesday, , 14 Sutton Valence School Tuesday, 28 } h 1 Beverley. Wednesday, :: 29 .. . Old King's Sc oars .. .

"'r rnbcr to play with more confidence at the beginning of an innings.


r r6

THE CANTUARIAN.

VInr FORM

'll.

THE SCHOOL XVIII.

This annual match was begun on Tuesday, May sth, and continued on the followinf: Tuesday (Thursday, the 7th being Ascension Day) and ended in a fairly easy victor) for the Sixth, by eight wickets. The XVIII. batted first and stayed at the wickets for over two hours, putting together xog. On the Sixth going in they lost half their wicket" for 43, but Smith and Carter made an excellent stand, and the lasl wicket fell al 12 1 (Smith 41, Carter 45.) The School went in again, but fared very badly before Parkr t and Castley, who disposed of them for 59, leaving the Sixth 48 to win. These run~ were easily wiped off for the loss of two wickets, and the Sixth were left victors as abov1• stated. For the School, Richardson was successful both with bat and ball, and Shortinl' also shaped well. UPPER DORMITORY v. SCHOOL. Played on Thursday, May 14th. Castley won the toss for the Upper Dormitory, anti elected to bat. The wicket was in excellent condition and all in favour of long scor1. Shorting and Castley fully reaped the advantage of this fact, and gave a lot of troubk, compiling so and 64 respectively, Newland contributing 36. The School had few regu Jar bowlers, beyond Parker, who secured seven wickets. The side was not disposed or till they had made 214, in two hours and forty minutes. The school began badly an!l lost four wickets for 24, but at the drawing of stumps had made 35 without further los\ (Flint not out 12, Parker not out u ), and thus the match was left drawn. A match \Vas arranged among the first XXII on the following Friday, which was ,, half-holiday in honour of Parker's Schol: at Corpus, and continued on Tuesday the xgth. T he sides were as follows : The five colours with the last six of the XXII v. the remain ing eleven. A very even game was the result. Smith's team 164, (Young 68, Flint 25), and ro8 for 8 wickets, and Parker's team, 140 (Shorting 87). KING'S SCHOOL v. CHARTHAl\1 ASYLUM. This match, the first of our season, was played at Chartham on May 28th, and result edina victory for the school by the narrow margin of 3 runs. Our opponents won tlu toss and decided to go in first. The wicket was very sofl: and uncertain; but the weatht•t was fine, though rather windy. Parker and Castley led off the bowling; the formt••'


THE

CANTUARIAN.

II7

• • ond ball taking a wicket. Creedican and Everett made a stand for some time, the staying in for the most of the innings. When at last bowled by Parker, he had • ur1·tl 51, having given two chances. The other wickets fell with nothing to comment on; the holt score having amounted to 92 after two hour's play. The school then went in, but the ''JII'Iling did not look bright, Carter's wickets falling almost immediately, and Flint being '1111 out in the second over. Shorting played carefully, and was eventually caught for a 11 dul innings of 24. Castley hit about freely, and his score of 19 was soon made. tum·~ played a very steady innings of 9 singles and one 3 ; but was in an evil moment VIVI'II as nm out by the Ch:utham umpire, whose eyes, we are afraid, must have a cast in llHall. The other wickets fell quickly, the total score just amounting to 95· At 5 o'clock Chartham took to the wickets again, but thanks to the excellent bowling nl l':trkcr, who took four wickets for seven runs, and Castley who took the same number 1•111 :tl :t greater expense; we had disposed of them all before six o'clock. Fur the school, only the old colours figured at all in the match. Parker took, in all, •1 witkcts for 40 runs, and Shorting, Castley, and James, did all the scoring. None of lhl' new members came off, unless we except Richardson's batting, which, though of hen l duration, showed great promise. The fielding was good throughout, a great uuprovcment in the early matches on last year's average in that line. Appended is the

l 11111ll' l

ll)fC : -

CHARTHAM

rst innings. Dr. Everett, b Beynon )Jill, c James, b Parker C reedican, b Parker l>r. Craig, run out ... Weeks, run out Quick, c Shorting, b Castley Williams, b Parker l.eFeavre, b Parker Johnstone, c Richardson, b Castley Carr, not out Manley, b Parker ... Extras

ASYLU~!.

10

0

51 10

5 0

0

2 2

3 I

8 92

2nd innings. c Young, b Parker b Castley b Castley c Beynon, b Castley absent b Parker ... not out ... c Carter, b Parker absent b Castley c Beynon, b Parker Extras ...

7 9 0

3 0

3 5

5 0

2 0

6 40


118

THE

CANTUARIAN.

KING'S SCHOOL.

W. M. Carter, b Hill ... R. B. Flint, run out C. E. Shorting, c Weeks, b Manley H. S. S. Parker, b Hill ... R. J. Castley, c Hill, b Manley H. 1\I. James, run out ... A. G. Richardson, lbw, b Hill .. . T. Young, b Creedican ... F. S. Beynon, c Quick, b Creedican J. H. Smith, c Q uick, b Hill H . J. Cullin, not out Extras ... BOWLING ANALYSIS. Ist innings of Chartham Asylum. o. M. R. w. Bowler H. S. S. P arker... I9'2 8 33 5 R. J. Castley I7 5 31 2 F. S. Beynon . . . 5 o I2 r A. G. Richardson 3 o 8 o 2nd innings of Chartham Asylnm. H. S. S. Parker. .. 8¡a 4 7 4 R. J. Castley 9 I 27 4

0

I

24

8 I9 I2

5 I

4

4 0

I7 95

ISt innings of King's School. Bowler 0. M. R. Hill ... 2I 3 3I Creedican ... I7 5 I9 Wee ks 5 o I6 Manley 6 0 I2 Hill bowled one wide.

w. II :1

0 2

OXFORD LETTER. They that go down to the river in ships have by this time recovered from the reaction that follows on the E ight's Week, and College Regattas are now in full swing. The Eight's Week itself was by no means so interesting as that festive season usually is. To begin with, the weather was as absolutely undesirable as it could possibly

be for the time of year; there was vcâ&#x20AC;˘y little of that "always afternoony" feclinu about the week of I 89x, which is expected to characterize these annual occasions, Moreover, the first seven boats on the river processed over the course night after night without any bump occurring between them B.N.C. kept their place as head of the


THE CANTUARIA

J. '

119

down for one and two terms respectively, tt vt•t for the third year in succession; then • 111\1.! New College, :Magdalen, Christ have come into residence again this term ! 'hurch, St. John's, Balliol, and H ertford. before their finals. Otherwise the list of l'hl· most successful boat was Pembroke, O.K.S. in residence is the same as given '' hirh rose from 13th to . 8th, an event last March. A. Latter (Trinity), and F. D . '' hich was accompanied by the usual cele- Sladen (Hertford). have been playing cricket for their respective colleges. The ht.llions upon the last night of the races. Turning to cricket, the weather must be former, who is by the way Secretary of his hl'ld responsible for the fact that out of College C.C., was also playing in the luur matches already played, only two have 1 Senior's Match at the beginning of the hl•cn brought to a conclusion, and those term. R. P. Atherton was 9th man for the Trinity Eight. A. H . Thompson was 1 o11dusions, alas ! decisively disastrous to 1hc 'Varsity, namely in the matches v. elected at the beginning of term, Secretary Lancashire and the M.C.C. The matches of his College Debating Society. As re.1!-~llinst the Gentlemen of England and Mr. gards the O.K.S. graduate members in 11. Philipson's XI. wereleftdrawn.The i nter- residence, it might be mentioned that W. 'Varsity cricket match, at L ords, is fixed H. Pater, the Dean of Brazenose, was examining for the English Essay (Chanl•1r june 29th and 3oth, and July xst. There is not very much to record of cellor's Medal) and the English Verse ( ). K.S. doings. It is rather late perhaps (Newdigate). I must also add that the name of the Rev. R. L. Ottley, Dean of 1o say that A. Latter, L. W. Smith, and 1\. n. Thompson were in the 2nd Class, Divinity at Magdalen was omitted from ( ' lnssical Mods. List published some weeks last terms list of graduates in residence. May, 189 1. ago. B. R. Gibson, and T . K. Ashton, hoth of Trinity, who have been reading

CAMBRIDGE L E T TER. The great event of the term, the Triposcs, are now in full swing and I would have gladly kept back my letter until I ' ould have written something about the H'sult. But since this is not to be, I may ay that the King's School this year is well

I

represented ; tl1ere are no less than five O.K.S. in for the C lassical Tripos while Longfield is in for Natural Science. The cricket season, as regards the 'Varsity XI, has been marked by good indivi. dual performance~, and on the whole by


THE

120

CANTUARIAN.

success. The match against C. I. Thorn· as much success up here as in the two pH ton's XI. was lost only by one wicket, while vious seasons since the Club was revived, after two defeats, both ':ly a narrow margin, the absence of bowling being the chitl by the Gentlemen of England and the cause ; but we are hoping to alter this 111 M.C.C., they have been credited with a the Canterbury tour, when we shall haw good victory over Yorkshire by 4 wickets. the assistance of some O.K.S. and old C. l\L Wells, the Trinity Freshman from C.O.S. from Oxford. Dulwich, has ·been doing consistently well The May races begin at the end of ncl\1 both with bat and ball and ought to be week. E . C. Frend is rowing bow in llll.. certain of his blue. Selwyn boat. S. E. Williams was xst in t lw As regards the performances of O.K.S. mile Bicycle Race between Oxford and in this line there is not mu ch to record, Cambridge. triposes having engaged the attention of With all good wishes for the success ol thol'e who play most up here, except M. J. the school eleven. Carr, who has been playing for Emmanuel Ever yours, II. The Canterbury Pilgrims have not had O.K.S.

SCHOOL NEWS . A fine new stained glass window has been put in the Parry Library, overlooking the Fives' Courts. It is modelled on the west window of St. Dunstan's Church, and bears the arms of the See, of Christ Church, and of the late Bishop. Spaces are left in it for 9 more coals of arms. It resembles in shape the window in the Hall, but is not so large.

••

* The walls of the Old Library have been re-painted, light green with dark green dado. The two class.rooms into which the Day Boys' Hall has been divided have al-

so been painted, pink with dark crimson dado- much to their improvement.

** *

C . E. Shorting has been elected to llw Sports Committee, to fill the place of (;, H. Wharton, who has left. *• *

At the end of last term there was a gymnasium competition, two prizes bein)( offered for the Upper School, two for thl' Lower. G. Lee Warner and C. H . Whnr ton won the Upper School prizes, and R. C. Lowry and R. Holmes, the Lower School.


THE

121

CANTUARIAN.

Speech Day is fixed for the 3oth of July. The O.K.S. match will be played on the two preceding days. O.K.S who wish to play should communicate with C. H . Wharton, Barham, Canterbury.

A double Tennis Tournament is being hl'ld this term. The courts are not in very wu>d condition.

•• ..

The Sixth Form, and a Fifth are going tn for the Certificate Examination at the t ntl of the term.

1

~~ --- ~ -·-·~-="" '

O.K.S. COLUMN. l I. E. Raper has passed the College of !'receptors' examination with a first class.

•• • The Rev. A. E. B. Atkinson has accept-

ed a Chaplaincy and Form Mastership at the Philberds School, Maidenhead.

.•.

C. H. Wharton has got a place as clerk in the Bank of England.

CORRESPONDENCE. V /1. - 7'/ie E<litor~ decline to acce11t any J"espo1tsibility connecte<t with the OJ1i•LioJL8 of /lie;,. ronespOll· <IC•Lis. Nam e mt<l a<Ulress •mtst al!lVays be yiuen, not nccesscL1•i'y foJ· publication, bt~~ as a (JILCIJ'rmtcc of yoo<t f uith. Pel' onntities 1u ·u invotuo ceJ·twiiL ,·ejection.

still I must plead guilty to a gross piece Of SUBSCRIPTIONS. 'l'o lite E dito1·s of "THE CANTUARIAN. " ignorance, and I thank you for enlightenDear Sirs,-Though my connection with ing me in your March number. I refer the school has been nearly identical with to your notice that " the Cantuarian is the existence of the Cantuarian, and in from September to September and uot from llpite of the fact that I was once an editor New Year's day to New Year's day." Pre(however unworthy) of that valuable paper, viously I was under the impression that it


122

THE CANTUARIAN.

was from New Year's day to New Year's stilJ a dangerous precedent. Supposl·, day, and in spite of the statement some years hence, let U $ say x89 7, t ht• to the contrary made by persons so E d itors find their affairs somewhat embar qualified to speak as your- rassed. Thanks to you, the way out ot well selves I shall adhere to that opinion the difficulty is easy. All they have to do till shown when and why the alte ration was is to insert a notice to the e ffect that the made. For that some alteration has Cantuarian year is not from Septemb:!r to been made, cannot be denied. In case of September, but from New Year's day lei any doubt, I should like to refer to pre- New Year's day. The Cantu:uian will vious notices, not very interesting perhaps, thus have scored in about 15 years, a y..:ar'~ but s till I think to the point. In the first subscriptions-a matter of £ 2 5 or so. number of all, November, r882, the fol- But, enough of this. You will, I am sure, lowing appears :- " This present number be good enough either to show me when I will be included in the next year's subscrip- am wrong, or cancel that notice which tion." Rather an unnecessary remark, one appeared in the March number. Befo re would think, if th e year ends in September. closing, I should like to draw your all en Again, in D ecember, 1883, "The subscrip- tion to the way in which the paper ha'i tions for the ensuing year should b e sent deteriorated since you ch:mged your print in, if possible (a brilliant and certain e men- ing, and how the printing has suffered in dation for the Editors " posseble" ) before consequence. This, I hope, will be rc January 2oth. "Current " would seem mediecl, as before, the Cantuarian by no more natural than " ensuing." In D ecem- means suffered by comparison with other b:!r, 1884, the E ditor announced that "the school papers in th e matter of printing, subscription will be reduced a fter this num- paper, etc. ber to s s." Surely, an awkward change in With apologies for a letter somewhat in the mid dle of a "financial year." Certain- ordinately long, ly, the list of names at the end of the March Believe me, numbers of x887, and x888, would lead me Yours truly, to suppose that I am not the only one, EX-EDITOR. suffering under this delusion. In short, you, sirs, see m to b:! solely responsible for this "conversion," and though I congratulate you on your ingenuity, if ( We print the above Jetter as it no dou bt funds were your object, still, I can see no J>Ossible just ification for so violent a expresses the natural objection'> of a grc:lt change. It was, I alJow, a brilJiant idea, number of our subscribers to a noticl' and q ui te a master stroke of finance, but g h·en in our March number. The honour


F

THE

CANTUARI AN.

1hlc Ex-editor is justly offended at such a ' ,andalous piece of knavery, but we think lu ,·utting rebukes and insinuations might l111vc hccn well spared or at least modified. t 1 was purely a mistake, and it may have t.. l l1 perhaps expressed too confidently, but 111 t>ly an ignorant secretary or editors, wl11c'h he wills, would be justified, pardon· 1111: their ignorance, in supposing the sub' 1iptions to begin and end with their yea r " l ufficc-and such an arrangement would 111 1 duubL be more c<:>nvenient. nut not 111 uffcnd against the established order of things, and not to incur the awful charge " ' such barefaced knavery, we have no wish lu ad here to the mistaken idea. But we ' "' not quite see why the charge should be I.•ld so heavily at our doors. The hon. I X·cditor will, I presume, grant that it is llltlrC important that the Secretary, to whom the supervision of the accounts is , nlrusted, should know the fixed rule, than thatthe editorsshould, whose power ofdoing h;um is con fined so to say, to mere 11pc:1king. We in this case received our 111furmation from the secretary, who in his llltn had had it handed on to him by his p1 ccl ccessor, who it will be remembered, also llt'ld that office in the hon. gentleman's yt·ar as editor. So the mistake orig inated Ill the hon. Ex-editor's year ; not that by I hi~ we reflect any blame on him himself, ltut as the mistake originated in his year, we don't see why we should be held respon· M 1hlc for wrong information the present ' c' rl'lary has had transmitted to him from his predecessor.- En.]

Al .EXANDER THE GREAT.

To 1/u Editors of " THE CANTUARIAl'\." D EAR SIRS,- ln your last number there appeare d a letter s1gned "Pity poor C::esar." If pity should be extended towards Julius Cresar much more ough t it to be felt for Alexa nder the Great ; for his bust in the hall is in far more danger of its life than any in the school-room. Surely never in his life did the great general suffer more woes and disasters than this his humble image now undergoes, with deep incisions in face and neck, splashes of ink only half erased on his countenance, the dust of ages round his base, he presents indeed a pitiable aspect. It is evident, however, that a gallant attempt has been made to remove some of the defilement, but the insults of years (to usc a tragic expression), blood will not wash out. But if blood will not, there are other articles more efficaciou~, and if the noble face which smiles benignantly beneath all its injuries were doctored by one who thoroughly understood the cleaning of such things, it would probably live to gaze with clearer sight on the insults of generations yet unborn. I should not advocate a removal to the Parry Library, as the Hall can ill spare any one of its adornments, but if the present line of conduct towards the great man is to be carried on, by all means let him be removed from those who appreciate him not. Apologising for the length and (it 111ay be) the absurdity of my letter. I remain, your's si ncerely, PRESERVATION.


THE

124

CANTUARIAN.

SCRAPS ON SPORTS. I

To tlte Editors of" THE

C ANTUARJAN. "

Dear Sirs,- Will you kindly allow me to correct a printer's error that appeared in the article on sports in Tile Crwtuaria::, I am therein credited with the absurd statement that a long jumper should practise over a hurdle placed !/tree feet from the " take-off. " Of course it should have

been eigltl feet. There are several otllll minor mtstakes in the same article (e.g , one half mile for tlu half mile), but I w11l not trouble you with a full list of them a-. they do not alter the sense to any great extent. I remain, Yours truly,

A+ B.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES . We must apologize at once for not having acknowledged in our two last numbers, our thanks for the receipt of many contemporaries, and we hope that this omission may not occur again. Of those which we have received this· term, Tlte EpsomiaJt is a very good number. 'Thoughts about light' is pithy and short - a great blessing to the readers of a school magazine. The results of the sports will be found lower down. Om· Scltool Times has an ode to Euclid, which is decidedly neat. An exciting ghost story, in which the hero mistakes his Scotch terrier for the Banshee, has a most tame conclusion, where the hero finds he has left his luggage behind him. We should not criticise th is were it not for the blood curdling title- ' A Phantom Chariot' which hardly puts in an appearance. I n 'Two tourists' troubles,' why should the Yerger

have thought"we"wantedtostealthe pulpit at Cologne, and therefore have deni..:d "' admittance. After dinner our two tourist, hunted for smells-but could only discov~-;1 seven and one doubtful-oh ! the con noissance of the writer's nostrils ! Till 'troubles' don't appear at all in th1, 1 chapter : it is long and quasi-jovial, but - ; Dr. Rime is again distinguishing him szlf in the lito::rary world, and his book arc largely advertised with testimonials in the School Paper. Tlte Gleualmond Cln·o?lide is taken up entirely with school news. The sports :tTl' dotted down below . We must thank tla Editors for sparing our nerves whit h received last term a severe shock from thl 1 'merry programme.' Tile Roffemian i:; a new arrival- from King's School, R ochester. It is a papc1, very well got up, aud there is a lot in it,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Wt· wish we could add engravings of 'I ing's School Worthies' to our accounts of

llll'ir lives.

l'lte Brigllton College 111'aga:;ine is large, '' mual ; we envy the editors the spare llti1C they must have to write it all for the p1css. Sports belo,\'. Tlte Ousel contains one of those exc:ellt•nt articles on the state of the school, so or more years ago. Few, if any, articles t .111 beat these in interest, and none is more worthy of appearing in a school paper. 'l'lte 111iltonifm has an article from one who like ourselves has tasted the joys of lhl' E. and W. Junction Railway. We hould like to corroborate his remarks on 1he pleasures of journey by it, and sbvuld hkc to add a story, th~t the guard, to put

the break on was supposed to jump out and hang on behind the train, till it came to a standstill. Tlte PlymoutlliaJl still greets us with its capital letter pictures. It is a pity that a magazine, printed on good paper, and with a good cover should be so meagre in its printed matter. Tlte .Cranbrookifm is not a good number. The Editorial, Sports, Football, and correspondence occupy 6 pages, the rest, 17 pages, is filled up with matter in no way connected with the school except as far as the author may be concerned. Tile Leodiamian contains an excellently written article on modern literature, evidently the work of a gifted author.

RESULTS OF ATHLETIC SPORTS. Cric'<ct Pulting Lo·g High Bull. Weight. Jump. Jump. yds. ft. in. f t. in. ft. in. in. ft. ECCS. sees. sees. 2 2 35 10 18 8 110 5 H 10 5-Sths 59 87 2 8 28 11 4 8t 18 2 60 2-5ths 11 2-5ths 11! 1-Sth 17 8 81 0 2 26 H 11 4-5ths 23 S-5ths 4 9l 59 18 8i 90 0 8 31 9~ 5 1 19 1-5th 59 4-5ths 11 59 2-5tbs 10 3-5ths 17 4-5ths 4 8& 18 St 97 0 7 l•:tt•om oo• 23 3 9< 1 2 1 17 0 5 2 llluunlmondt go 0 0 17 0 10 4 !15 4-5tbs 10 4-5lhs 56 5 0 l,t ~Il K 19 H 110 2 0 5 2 18 1-5th 57 4-5ths 11 lli11hgnto School 5 32 18 10 9J 0 0 4 8 ll·1-5tbs !15 62 5 14 l1 , H. C. 18 H 80 2 2 27 et 4 10 4 46 4-~tbs 55 4-5tbs 11 1-Mh 21 'l'lttt T.cys • Dulw:ch hn.d their sp , rts on Tery wet ground. t Glcnnlmond hnd their sport3 with snow on lhe ground ; no limes r re gi,·~n. ! 10:> ynrds. Ono 1\lilc. t'chool. min. sec. 5 !) llo•tlionl llrlghlon Collogo 5 20 1-5tll l 'a·nnbl'oOk oo• llulwioh Collogo• 5 Si 000

000

...

000

...

...

t :Uilo.

1<'0 yds.

Jiurdles.


126

THE

CANTUARIAN.

NOTICES. We acknowledge with thanks the receipt of subscriptions from the following :-E. Bruce, Re,·. F. H. Hall, E. B. Hawes, A. H . Miskin, H. B. Milsome, P. G. Peacocke, H. E. Raper, F. Sharman, F. Shelmerdine, and A. B. R. Wallis. •• • All back numbers of Tile Cauluarian except Nos. r, 2, 6 of vol. 1 may be ob. tained of W. H. Salmon, secretary, 1 st vol. at 2d. each, and second vol. at 4 d. each. :

Chronicle, Ley's F ortnightly, Royal Naval College Magazine, Alleynian (2), Epsomian, Our School T imes, Glenalmond Chronirlt, R offe nsian, Brighton College Magazirw, Ousel, Miltonian, Plymouthian, Cranbrook ian, Leodiensian, Cholmeleian, and the Su t ton Valence School Magazine. * •

I

•. •

All changes of address ~hould be at once notified to the Secretary, to whom also subscriptions should be addressed. •. • We beg to acknowledge the receipt of the following magazines: -Bradford College

*

N.ll. - We wish to cancel a notice print ed in our last number, saying that J /u I Cantuariau subscriptions are from Mid summer to Mid-summer. As will be sct·n above, in the correspondence, this has given rise to much objection, and see ms to havl been founded on a quite mistaken idea. j Subscriptions are from January to Janunr) , - and not, as was said, from July to July.

I


THE CANTUARIAN. Vo•~·

No. 6.

III.

EDITORIAL. We have come to the end of another School year, and though it has not perhaps been "' successful as one might have wished, either in football or cricket, yet our record in the furmcr is brightened by our victory over Dover College before Christmas, which had the double distinction of being our first victory over the College, and the only victory on uur card that season; and now our cricket season, so far as it has gone, has beet. teloriously crowned by our splendid victory over Sutton Valence on Tuesday the 14th. The l-irhool went in first and made 28o for nine wickets, of which number Parker had conllihutcd II3, of which only 14 were singles; and Slater 54, not out; the innings was lhcn declared closed, and Sutton Valence went in and were all out for 76, leaving us victorious by 204 runs. 'l'hcn, in intellectual matters we have not been behindhand. Three people have got c·holarships-Smith at Exeter, Oxford; Parker at C.C. C., Cambridge ; and Wigram al Trinity Hall. We have one First Class and two Seconds in the Classical Tripos at r:unbridge, and three 2nd Classes in Mods at Oxford, to record among the perform.mccs of the O.K.S. The four busts which stood till lately along the east side of the ~c · hool room, viz., Cresar, Cicero, and two of Augustus, have been moved into the Parry l~ibrary, and are on the top of the book shelves down one side. We are very glad to


THE

CANTUARIAN.

say that a portrait of Bishop Parry is to be placed in the room that bears hts nt\hu Particulars about this picture will be seen in a notice which we have been asked hâ&#x20AC;˘ publish with this number, and, in conclusion, we hope the appeal there made willmt d with a hearty response.

TO THE FRENCH OPERA SINGERS WHO OBJECTED TO SIN<. AT COVENT GARDEN, BEFORE WILHELM. When Greek beat Greek at Syracuse,-Their Nicias that disease enduring That laid your leader low,-the muse Taught men that war was not past curing For Euripides had written, And the smiter's hearts were smitten. Hark! underneath Plemmyrium No captive,-rather as a guest is,Balaustion bids Spartans come And weep with her for lost Alcestis. Nobler warfare was her singing Than hoplite's steel on hoplite ringing. Ye singers, quell those churls to-day That give your scruples birth and start_'em ; Discord would spoil your opera, And "Artis est celare Martem." Ave Cresar I Ars et sales Te salutant immortales I MOSSE MACDONALD


THE

<;::ANTUARIAN\

129

KINGâ&#x20AC;˘s SCHOOL WORTHIES, NO. VIII. WILLIAM GRANT BROUGHTON, BISHOP OF A USTRALIA.

Among the many heroes of th e Church m Commonwealth that the King's S chool ha~ sent forth from its gates, during its tâ&#x20AC;˘x istcnce, few if any can rival, in the Church, the name of Bishop Broughton. 1.ittlc is known and still Jess has b een written on the life of this good and quie t \OUl, so that it is difficult to find material IO work up an article on his life. But it would be a scandal for the King's School not to know anything of the life of its 1:rcatest he ro of the Church, when it has his name daily before its eyes, on the Exhibition Boards. So my readers must pardon any imperfections and deficiencies they may detect in this short sketch. Of the books in the Library, the School only pos~csses one which is at all connected with the Bishop, being a collection of some of his sermons delivered in different stages of his life. Some of these are inscribed with his own signature-and from t hese we can Unlher a slight outline of his life. William Grant Broughton was born just before the outbreak of the French Revolution, in the year q88. His early years were spent in Barnet, Her tfordshire ; and at the age of eight years he was sent to the K ing's School, winning a scholarship, nnd was here for nearly 8 years, leaving in December, 1804. As the school room hoards show, he left with the Cambridge

Exhibition, but was unable to go to college. The Marquis of Salisbury had noted the young m an, and his virtues ; and got him appointed as a clerk in the Treasury Department of the East India House. But this work was d istasteful to him, he longed to enter the Church, and it was not long before he saw his way to taking orders, 1813. H e returned to Canterbury to be trained for Cambridge, and in the following year he became a member of P embroke Hall, C ambridge. The year 1818 saw him as sixth wrangler at that University, and soon after as curate of Hartley Wespall in H ampshire. In the same year he was married in Canterbury Cathedral to the daughter of one of the city clergy. H artley Wespall was a village near to the seat of the Duke of W ellington, through whose chaplain the young curate was introduced to the Duke. H e, taking a fancy to him, offered him two preferments, the firs t, the chaplaincy of the Tower, the second, soon after, of the Archdeaconry of N ew South Wales. After due deliberation, the O.K.S. accepted this new office. H e did not fo rget the old school ; in the year r834, he took the Duke to the King's School feast, and constantly in later life kept speaking of his love for his school. Nor was this the only proof of his attachment. One of his earliest actions when he


THE

CANTUARIAN.

reached his new province was to found a sister King's School at Paramatta-a school which now is one of the largest and most influential establishments in the colony. Sir George Gipps, who was at that time Governor of New South Wales, had been at the school with the Archdeacon, and the two school brothers worked hand in hand in founding the School and the Cathedral, whose two western towers bore unmistakable signs of connection with the two western towers of our own Cathedral. His new province was the whole of Australia and Tasmania, which was then in the diocese of the Bishop of Calcutta. He reached Australia in the year 1829, and was working hard there for five years, before he returned once more to England. H e found his lot cast to a great extent among the convicts of Botany Bay. There were 25,ooo convicts there, with hardly any religious guidance. By urgent appeals to England, the Archdeacon enlisted the services of the missionary societies, and of many private individuals, with which he soon found means to double the number of the clergy out there. He saw that Australia was too large and too populous to be any longer a dependent province ; so he pressed the Church at home to make it a separate bishopric. His advice prevailed, and in 1834 he re· turned to England soon after to be consecrated as the first bishop of Australia. A college friend of his was at the same time made Archdeacon of Tasmania. The Roman Catholics had made a solid

footing in the colony before he arrived, nntl he was by no means unconscious of the •I' sponsibilty that lay on him in being tht champion of .the Church of England tu check the growth of the rival doctrin~· Sir George Gipps was at first unfavourahll to his schemes for strengthening the ChU11 h, but by a most eloquent address to tht Bishop won him over, appeaJjng to lhl fact of their being Old King's Scholars.Thl friendship formed at the School lasted II• the end of their lives. What most disheartened the Bishop wa' the want of clergy ; in fact, so few Wl''' sent out from England that he was a l mo~t in despair at times. T o stimulate religiou training in the colony, he proceeded tu found a library of excellent books, which were chiefly bought and sent out by on~ of the Eton Masters, the Rev. Edwa1tl Coleridge. His new cathedral progressed but slowly in its building, and he did not live long enough to see it consecrated Although his jurisdiction only extended over the two islands, yet his missionary zen I prompted him to visit New Zealand, even though it was not in the Queen's Domini· ons. His longings were gratified whl'll Bishop Selwyn was sent to the latter Island in 1841, soon followed by the arrival uf Bishop Nixon for T asmania. His life was an example to all the clergy of the church ; his income was only t1 poor £2,ooo a year; and of this he gave up £soo for the endowment of anothe• bishopric in Australia ; offered anothc• quarter for a third bishopric ; and


THE

CANTUARIAN.

devoted a third quarter to the clergy of the diocese. H e built for himself no grand residence, but was content with a lflcan hotel for some time, later on moving to a miserable house. H ere he lived a most 11lmple life in the midst of his family. H e luved his fellow bishops, but could not endure to think that he was their metropolitan. 1{e looked ever to St. Augustine's College, in founding which he had no small share, for a supply of helpful clergymen. In October, z8s o, he convened his suffragans 1\t Sydney, and there was formed the foundation of the Australasian Board of Missions and with a view to render easier the conditions of missionary life in the c¡olony, he drew up a plan of Synods, as yet unauthorized by home authorities. To I{Ct full sanction for this, he left for England â&#x20AC;˘852, passing via Panama. After leaving the West Indies, yellow fever attacked the c-rew, and some ten or twelve men died. The Bishop was most attentive to the sick nnd was taken ill himself for a short time, hut recovered. Once in England, he spent many days in private interviews with Churchmen and Statesmen on his new

scheme. He visited all his old places of interest, but he was suddenly seized when staying with the widow of Sir George Gipps, with bronchitis. H e lingered on for a fortnight and passed away on Sunday morning, February 2oth, being sixty-four years of age. His funeral procession was soon after passing up the Nave, bearing him to a spot side by side with his old King's School friend, Sir George Gipps. Thus died the heroic Bishop, of whom every King's Scholar ought to be, and is proud. Archdeacon H arrison alluded in touching terms in t he Cathedral on the day after his funeral to the fact that he entered the Cathedral for the first time a littl<c! child of eight, for the last time when just eight times as many years had passed over his bead. After his funeral, subscriptions for a memorial came pouring in, and as a result his torrib and figure were set up on the south side of the Nave, a Broughton scholarship was endowed at St. Augustine's, prizes in Church History were founded at the School; and a similnr tomb and figure were set up in his Cathedral of Sydney.


1 32

THE

CANTUARIAN.

THE POLITICAL THEORIES OF DANTE . "The finest works of imagination have always been produced in times of political convulsion."-J. A. SYMONDS. Yes, at such times the arts of peace are left, the hammer and anvil, the plough and the loom stand idle, men's hearts are deeply stirred. Carlisle has told us that the epoch produces the man. The wave .of human development aroused bears aloft the man of intellect and of power to make the art, the literature, the political systems .of the world. The poet then must play his part. His mind "deals with high thoughts and pure e motions," "his eye" as Shakespeare said "doth glance from heaven to earth from earth to heaven," his keen vision must d iscern the highest possibilities of man, must teach us to resist t he narrow transient and mean for aspirations lofty, comprehensive and eternal. H e shall not keep silence though he knows that past ideals have not been realised, and though he feels that his conception of moral, social and political conditions may never pass from theory to practice. Dante was a man versed in the cond uct of public affai rs, took part in the government of Florence, shared in the exile of his party, such was the fate of minorities in those troublous times. But he saw further than party strife, he was not truly Ghibelline or Guelf. I n his day freedom meant, not liberty for all, but license for

the party in power ; for the party out of office exile and confiscation of property, often imprisonment and death, now om• and now another party holding Florcnn• and inflicting these penalties. I t was thiR vindictive jealousy, this bitter partiza n feeling which drove Dante from his nl legiance to the republic. Dean ChurC'h says that "as a politician, he is filled with the thoughts prognostications and hopc'l, of the history of the day." The Romnn Empire was still existent in the mind or the man of the Middle Ages. The C:c~:11 still 'twas thought might own the wollcl, and all the hopes of the earnest unsclfiHh men of the thirtee nth century, gathcn·cl round the German representative of im perial Rome and Dante formulating thci• vague longings, conceives, once man p<••· sessing such love of peace and of justin• that sovereign power might safely rest in his hands-the right of the subject bcinl{ maintained. That the same regard fm peace and justice might control a party in power, that, in an enlightened state gove rn ment by a majority need not involve op pression of t he minority, Dante's mind wn~ not ready to believe. At the same linw we must remember that at a time when monarchy meant often despotism, in Germany the I mperial power was limited in such wise as to make it quite possihll for the Emperor to be .the upright monal( h


THE

CANTUARIA'&.

of Dante's fancy. Without discussing their curious reasoning let us extract the chief points in the De Monarchia and Convito. T o remove all the hindrances to civiliLation, the causes of unhappiness among men, Dante asserts that monarchy is necessary. There must be a Prince of the whole earth, " malum autem pluralitas principatuum." Man's physical powers, he says, are subject to the "vis intellectualis," the household is submissive to its head ; the tribe or village to its sheikh or chief. " Omne regnum in seipsum divisum desolabitur." A prince with universal undisputed sway, " possessing all, nnd not being able to desire more," holds the world in peace ; peace is man's greatest boon. But this is a great co-operative undertaking conducted not only for the benefit of the Prince but also and chiefly of that of the people. If it is not possible to divide the profits equally among these contracting parties, the larger share must go to the people. And for this end a love of justice must control every unit in the state. "0 felix hominum genus si vestros animos nmor, quo coelum regitur, regat." Men must be loyal to their fellows and to their king. " In this love the houses obtain nil they need, which being obtained, men can live happily, which is the end for which man was born." I n such quaint sentences ns these does Dante set out his argument. He assigns to provinces, cities, households, rulers who are in the service of the sovereign. " Every government deriving vigour and authority from the government

I33

of this man," all law will be originated by the Monarch. Such a vast centralization was almost realized under the Cresars but must have seemed a wild dream in the thirteenth century. Dante's Monarch is not to gain his exalted position by force or by popular election, but must be ordained by God. There are three propositions in the De Monarchire. I. Monarchire ad bene esse mundi necessaria est. I I . Roman us Populus de jure monarchire officium sibi ascivit. 11 I. Auctoritas monarchre dtpendet a Deo immediate, vel ab alio Dei ministro seu vicario. In his argument for the first, he draws his picture of an ideal national government. When he deals with the second be shows that in his belief such a government had once existed, indeed still existed. Dean Church says "The prestige of the Roman Empire was then strong, Europe still lingers on the idea, and cannot even yet bring itself to give up its part in that great monument of human power. But in the Middle Ages the Empire was still believed to exist. It was the last greatness which bad been seen in the world, and the world would not believe that it was over." Again " his passion for the heroism of Roman conquest and the ordered peace to which it brought the world, is the centre of Dante's political hope; he is no more an exiled Ghibbeline, but a patriot whose fervid imagination sees a nation rise regenerate at the touch of its rightful lord."


THE

CANTUARIAN.

For a time barbarian incursions had overthrown the Empire. But not for ever, Dante hopes. "Rome, that is lamenting, widowed, alone, and day and night exclaims, " My Cresar, why hast thou for53 ken me." "The garden of the Empire is laid waste." The Roman eagles waved supreme no longer, the conquering legions bad vanished ; the orders of chivalry, the knights of the Emperor in the thirteenth <:entury proved no match for the trained bands of the republics. The peoples of Europe were separated now into hostile kingdoms ; new dynasties had arisen; habits and institutions, lan-guages and national characteristics had developed and made the divisions permanent, even in the power which might 11ndoubtedly have been preserved and 路exercised by the Papacy. The very faults of the monarchs infected the Popes. Misusing their weapons of interdict and excommunication, proving themselves not impartial arbitrators, they proved, says Bryce, " that the holiest office may be polluted by the lusts and passions of its holder," and therefore, " the scheme of a united Christian state was not realised." No wonder then that the learned men, who could look back to the golden days of the Empire, should have "a wish to escape from the unhealthy atmosphere of clerical despotism to the rule of positive Jaw." That this tendency should find " the 路shrunken Roman Empire more fitted for the office of international judge and media.tor than it had been as a great national

power." The Emperor was to be the pre siding judge of Europe, "the fountain of international law." We read with surpriRc the argument in Dante's letter to H enry VIII. which proves the divine origin uf this Roman Empire; and the claim thM the much lauded rule of Augustus WM divinely accredited by the fact that Chn~t came then to live amongst men, and acknowledged the Roman power, and met his fore.ordained death at the hands of Roman soldiery. Strange, says路 Bryce, that the shame of one age should be the glory of another. The very Virgil, wlw taught Dante of Trojan Aeneas and led him into the shadowy presence of old world heroes in the Divina Commedin, himself lamented the fall of the Rornllf\ republic and the establishment of Oct a vinn路~ rule. Yet this Octavian is Dante's glor i ou~ example to Henry Count ofLuxemburg. The picture of an ideal state in any eye wins the admiration of imaginative mindA. Man's intellect approves a utopia in which justice and righteousness rule, in whirh everything is harmonious working for tlw common good. Alas I for the depravity u( men's hearts which follow not the "vi :~ intellectualis." The course of Europc:t n politics changed not for all the talc ul former glory. The Holy R oman Empirr sank surely from the place assigned to it by the scholar. As Dante eloquently described in sonorous phrases the dignity belonging to this ancient institution, tlw Roman Emperor drifted helplessly from his supremacy to the position of his nominnl


THE

CANTUARIAN.

va~snls, and became one of the lesser 111onnrchs of Europe. And Dante, who had Jllll his faith in intellect and in intellectual ltlcnls, died saddened and soured by dis· ppointment. Men standing by the exiles

135

I I

tomb at Ravenna are filled with pity and with grief. Sympathy is all the theorist obtains. H. W. FRESTON.

I

THE TREASURY BOOKS. The next entries arc as follows : Stipendia. 1': puerorum Schol. Gram. expulsorum Pro Term. Nativit. £ s. d. C:ivcn by consent to Barling, a scholar discharged by mistake, not being yet 14 years old 2 o o To William Beverslock's mother, poor widow, himself being discharged . . . 2 o o Then follows a list of King's scholars, each of whom received the sum of £2, with their signatures attached. The list ends up with :£ s. d. T o Mr. Moses Mapleton, for the wages of Mr. Croydon, Usherdeceased ro o o They continue : Pro. T erm. jo Dapt. Mr. Parish, Schole M~ 5 o o john Paris. Samuel Bole I o o rec. George Wren. .. I o o

£ tee. Thomas Hawkes , Wtll Manley . . . , Thomas Harris Gipps George Gibbs Gipps Simon Gibbs . . . Antony Worlich Antony Worlidge rec. Thomas Bridge rec. Robert Crayford Thomas Turner " Barthol. Lambe ",. William Cocart , Thomas Vaughan ... ., Thomas Kingsley... Wiii/Tord Robert Wilfo rd Thomas Gay . . . rec. , Thomas Knowler . . . Monings William Monins rec. Thomas Gibbon Jenkin William J enkins rec. H enden Pilcher

s. o r o x o I o o

d. o o o o o

o

o

0

0

1

I

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

o o o x o I o 1 o I o I o I o

o o o o o o o o o

T he whole list is too tedious to go through. Some of the scholars sign merely their C hristian names. T he scholars


THE CANTUARIAN. I

I

I!

were then at their proper number of fifty. It is to be observed that the first payment is for the scholars expelled ; when this occurred is questionable, but probably it happened early in the war, as not one remains on the list. A new master was appointed in March, r66I, and an usher at Michaelmas. The terminal payment was £ s. d. Magister . . . 5 o o Usher ...... 2 xo o Scholar...... I o o I t is also to be noticed that the payment to the expelled master are for two terms. Mr. Montague was apparently -schoolmaster at the expulsion, and signs in a firm hand at Christmas that the usher, Mr. Croydon, was deceased. The list for the Michrelmas term is the same as the ·One jmt given; the signatures are perhaps in some cases slightly different in spelling or form. One of the scholars, a certain Adam Spackling, signs his name, and his signature is erased, and John Paris' name substituted. This list ends with the en.try : £ s. d. Paid to Mr. Culling, Usher 2 Io o :Summa totius anni pro magt. pueris ... I 17 Io o We now pass on from the School to ·Other Cathedral foundations. Stipendia Pauperioum. £ s. d. Nat. 2 for 2 qrs. 3 6 8 6 I3 4 I I3 4 3 ll I l l 5 0 0 Ann. I2 20 0 0 1 I3 4

£

J o. Bapt. Mich.

20 20

s. d. 0

0

0

0

Summa 7I 13 Pro Ministris Servientibus. Virgiferis. Nat. Two from Midsum£ s. d. mer ... 6 0 3 0 0 Vestiariis. Two from Midsummer ... 6 13 3 6 8 Campan. Pulsatoribus Nat. Four from Midsummer ... 12 0 3 0 0 Janitoribus. Two from Midsummer ... 6 13 3 6 8 Allowed to the vergerers for their attendance 0 6

Ann.

Jo Bapt. Mich

Vest. Bell Verg Port

2

£

I I I I

4 2 2

;j

0

4

0

I

.. II

I

Summa. 31 13 4 s. d. 13 4 3 6 H IO 0 6 0 0 IO 0 3 0 0 I3 4 3 6 H

The same

,

.

IS I 3 I S l3 IS Y3

•I

" 4

Summa. 78 13 The other payments fall under the ful lowing heads :Officiarn Ordinam, including the Treasurer, Precentor, SacriRI, &c.

"

I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

137

£ s, d Officiaru Extraordinaru. For orations of six schole boyes sc. Organista. Flator. Custos Horologu. Nov. 5th o 12 o Clerks. Paper-Parchment. For bonfires the same day o 5 o To them that looke to ye Boyes in prayerAlso there was allowed for time s. ro o a quarter. writing the prayers in the King's To them that are to see there be noe walking in ye back Isles in prayer time Scboole and placing them in two tables 2 o o (2 o o per annum). The next account is To ye porter of ye NC?rthgate for candles. Reparatio Viarum Publicarum, and o o per annum. lastly Eleemosynae, including the money Materialia. given to the scholars who made orations Brick, lime, sand &c. Ligna rio. on Nov. 5th (s/·), and the same amount to F errario. the Deane's Cooke for the audit dinner. Serra tori. This is a general sketch of the yearly Plumbatori. expenses of the Cathedral. Each year, Vitrario. the same note is repeated in pretty much the Tegulatori. same form. What became of the expensive Laboratoribus. 'prayers' written in two tables, or what, Officium Sacristae. Expensae Necessarie Certae-including in fact they were, is unknown to modern 6 pair of boules and a jacke at the price generations of King's Scholars. It is equally mysterious to guess at what prayer of two guineas ; also six bagges 3/ 6. time it was that "ye Boyes" wanted The Bowling Green this year cost:looking after. £ s. d. Turf I 0 0 I t seems that there was as yet no dis0 12 0 tinction between scholars, as all received " 7 3 0 £3 a year; equivalent in value then to ", I 0 0 our present probationerships; and we also Gravel paths 15 o o Jearn that there were only two masters, the Mowing 4 o o The same year the boys had 2/6 for a H ead Master and the Usher; unless we bonfire on 29th of May and six boys had a are to suppose other masters performed shilling each for a Latin oration and ap- their tasks gratis. In x66x, John Paris parently twelve books which cost 6d. each. seems to have been superseded as Head The accounts in these parts for x6 6 o Master by a Mr. Montague ; and the are confused, but include £9 x6 4d. for Usher, Mr. Croydon, \Vho died in that the Bowling Green, and extraordinary ex- year to have been succeeded by a Mr. Culling. penses.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

CRICK ET. KING's ScHOOL v. S.A.C.

This match was played on Tuesday, June 2nd, resulting in a draw. O ur opponents won the toss, and elected to go in. Bode and Blacklock taking the wickets against Parker and Castley, bowling. Bode played an excellent game, hitting two fives, six fours, seven threes, nine twos, and singles to make up his score of 78, without giving a chance. The other four wickets fell at intervals; 'Jut about 4 o'clock rain came on su hard that it was impossible to continue the match. The following is the score as far n~ it went:S .A.C.

J . M. D . Bode, not out

78 12 5 4

H . Blacklock, b Jleynon E. H. Lea, u Castley .. . Rev, C. Coti!B, b Parker F . H . Hartley, b Parker .. . E. La.ncaâ&#x20AC;˘ter, notout... .. . Extras ... ... .. .

5 5 24

'l'otal (for four wickets)

188

BOWLING ANALYSIS.

ll. S. P a.rk, r R. J. Oa.â&#x20AC;˘tley F . S. Beynon A. G. R ichardson

0. 19 15 6 8

M. 5 6 1 1

R

W.

47

2

40 10

1

12

0

1

KING'S SCHOOL v. C AVALRY D EPOT. J UNE 4th. It was originally intended to start play at x1.30 in this match, on the Depot ground. But about that time, rain came down in torrents, and continued more or less till about 2.30. It was decided, however, to play the match out, and at about 3 o'clock our opponents took to the wickets. The ground, needless to state, was not one favourable for batting, the bowlers having it all their own way. Within three quarters of an hour, Parker and Castley had done their work for the School, the former with the excellent average of 2 runs per wicket. Milles was the only one who- saw that 'smiting' was the only way to score. H e was Jet off once in the deep field from a ' skyer,' when he had only 7 to his credit. The school went in, and fared pretty much as the Cavalry had done.


THE

1

CANTUARIAm

Parker hit freely, and was the only one to get into double figures. went down without scoring at all. Scores : -

39

The last fom wickets

CAVALRY DEPOT.

Capt. Tattersall, b Parker 3 2 Corpl. 'Viney, b Castley ... Capt. Doyne, b Castley .. 6 tl.ou. H.l\lilles, b Parker ... 14 Capt. Patten, b Castley ... 2 P te. Ricketts, b t:astl!!y .• . 0 Cap t. Lanham, b Parker... 0 Pte. Rol f, c Parker, b Castley 1 Major Ridley, b Pnrker ... .. . . 3 .Pto. Johnson, o Flint , b Castley 0 P te. Butler, not out... ... 0 Ex~ras .. . 4

not out .. . .. . .. . c Flint, b Beynon ... c and b Castley b Castley ... ... b .Parker ... ... c 11nd b Parhr c C11.1·ter, b Parker... lbw b B eynon... .. . st. Mowll, b Beyn on o J1\wes, b P urker ... b Pnrke1· ... ... Extras

0 9

1 2 1 8

... 59

Total...

.. . 85

Total

7 7 4 7 9 4

KING'S S CHOOL.

1 3 1 6 12 2 1

W . M. Carter, c )l ilies, b Rolf .. . It. B. Flint, b Ricketts... ... .. . C. E . N. Sherring, lbw, b Milles .. . P. H. Slater·, b Rolf ... ... .. . 11. S. S. Parker, b Rclf... ... .. . R. J. Castley, c Ricketts, b Rolf .. . U. M. J ames, c Rolf, b Ricketts .. .

A. G. Richardson, not out J . B . Smith, b Ricketts F . 8. Beynor., b Ricketts W. R. 1\lowll, c Lanham, b Ricketts ...

0 0 0 0

Extras

5

Toral...

... 80

BOWLING ANALYSIS.

Caval oy Dep Ot. H. S. S. Parker

lt. J . Castloy .. .

1st 0. 10 9

inning~.

M.

R.

w.

5

8

4

2

23

6

Cavalry DepOt . 2nd innings. 0. hl. R. 14 4 24 H. l:l. S. P11.1·ker 10 3 20 R. J. Cnstloy .. . 4•2 0 7 F . S. Boyuon .. .

KING' S SCHOOL.

B.on. M illea Pte. Rolf ... Pte. Ricketts KI NG's S cHOOL

0.

M.

.R.

w.

7

12

1 8

9 9

4

16'3

2

7

6

w. 6 2

3

1

v. ST. S T. AuGUSTINE'S C oLLEGE.-RETURN MATCH, J u NE 9 TH.

This match was played on the Beverley, on rather a nasty wicket. The College was without the services of Bode, who had suffered a severe accident two or three day.> before,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

They were the first to go in, but did not abide long. Lea played well for his 13. Sewn wickets had fallen for zx, but Marriott and Darby pulled the score up to a little mo11 respectable height. Victory for the School seemed easy, but it was not won so very eac;ily, and it was chiefly owing to the College mis-fielding that we did succeed. Shorting's ·' 1 was very useful, but was by no means faultless. We had beaten them before the secoml wicket fell, but only finally reached 6g. E.A..C. H. Blacklock, b Parker .. . ... .. . E. H. Lea, c Smith, b Castley .. . .. . H. Woodward, c Castley, b Parker Rev. C. H. Cotes, b Castley ... F. H. Hartley, b Caatley E. Lancaster, b Parker... ... Rev. M. J. Simmonds, run out H. Marl'iott, b Castley ... A. Darby, b Parkor C. J. Radford, rtm out ... N. W. Fogarty, not out Extras 'l'otal...

13 l

0 2 0 l

7 8

s 0 4

KINO's SCHOOL. W. :M. Carter, c Loa, b HartlPy .. . r. R. B . Flint, c Loa, b Woodward .. . !II C. E. N. Shorting, c Lea, b Woodwa1·d P. H. Slater, b Woodward .. . B S. S. Parkor, b Ho.l1;loy ... ... ... R. J. Oo.stley, c Simmonds, b Woodwo.rd ... II H. M. James, c Simmonds, b Woodwo.rd ... 11 A. G . Richardson, c Lea, b Woodward II J. H. Smith, c Fogarty, b Woodward Ill F . S. Beynon, b lJarby ... ·~ W. R. Mowll, not out Extras

"

40

Total.. .

. .. (l!l

BowLING ANALYSIS, H. S. S. Parker R. J. Castley ...

S.A.C. 0. 12•3 12

M. 4

2

R. 16 20

KINO'S SCIIOOL. 0. M.

w. A. Darby A. Woodward F. H. Hartley

4 4

16

20•1 9

4 8 4

R. 29 23 16

w I

7

2

- - -KING'S SCHOOL

v.

ST. LAWRENCE.

Played on the Beverley, June nth. Carter and Flint opened the innings for us, and ran up the score to z6 before Flint was bowled. The following four wickets fell for nothing remarkable, except some free hitting from Castley. Carter was run out shortly before luncheon, for a very good 30, without a chance. After luncheon Richardson and Smith were at the wickets, and the score rapidly increased, so runs being added befow Smith fell to Isacke's bowling. Beynon joined Richardson, adding 20 runs off his own bat, while Richardson knocked off another 2 5, playing in excellent style throughout The innings closed for x6g. The St. Lawrence led off with Hazlewood and Blore. A change of bO\vling was necessary before H azlewood's wicket fell with the score at 57 · Blore continued scoring rapidly, while the other wickets fell by degrees, until at the 4lh


THE

CANTUARIAN.

wicket, the score stood at I 52. .Blore, assisted by Harris and Barnes soon wiped off the requisite runs, at the call of time being not out for an excellent I39, not having Hiven a single chance. Score : KING's SCllOOL.

ST. LAWRENCE.

30 10 8

W. i\f. Curter, run out oo• ... It II. Flint, b fsacke 00 . .. • !'. 1~ . N. Shorting, b Furleyoo. II . :;, 1:). Parker, b Furley . 00 lt. ,J. Ca•tluy, c Blore, b Furley oo• II . M. JamFIS, b Abbot oo• .. . oo• II . 0 . Richard~on, c Blore, b Isacke ... ,, . II. Smith, b Isacke ... '1'. Young, c a.nd b Blore II'. fi. Beynon, b l sackeoo. W. ll.. Mowll, not out .l£xtl·as

0

16

0 38 ll6 1 20 4 7

(.). Hazlewood, c Young, b Richardson H. R. Blore, not out oo • oo• .. . R. H. Isacke, b Ca.stleyoo. ... .. . C. V. Isacke, c Carter, b Parker .. . H. Field iug, b Parker ... U. E. Harris, b P .. rker. 00 oo • li. Barnes, not out... 00. ... F. G. Oliver } G. Furley . H. E. Goulden Did not bat. C. J . L. Abbot

T otal for 5 wickets

000169

Total...

...

... 16 oo ,139 18 4 0 14 1

00.192

BOWLING AVERAGES ST. LAWRENCE.

KING' s ScHOOL.

II , n.. Blere I' 1r. . ITarris lt. II. lRacke I'

llnzlewood

11 l•'urley oo•

, . J . L.Abbot... II l•'ielding

0. 9

~1.

R.

w.

4

25

1

8 12 2 12 16 2

2 2 0 3 2 0

13 33 13 43 34 5

0 4 0 3

H. S. S. Parke1· ... R . J. Castley

...

0. ... ..: 20

F. S. Beynon 000 A. G. Richardson

18 8 8

M. 4

6 1 2

R. 63 56 39 33

w 3 1 0

1 0

---KING's ScHoOL v. HIGHGATE ScHOOL.

Played at the Beverley on June 16.

Parker won the toss, and the school batted first. The byes helped considertilly to swell the score. H ebert bowled very well, clean bowling five for 29. Highgate •untie 82 in their first innings. Greig and Hebert did most, and Parker and Castley ollv1ded the wickets. On the School going in a second lime, a rank start was made, tlui'C good men being out for 5· Parker and James improved matters a bit and later 1111 Smith hit brilliantly, but the rest did nothing, the total reaching 8o, Hebert took 11l 1he wickets at a cost of 36. Highgate were then left with I 2 2 to get to win. This llll'y did, thanks to the masterly innings of Blunt, and our poor fielding. Carter was "lt' lt hcd at point and failed to make four possible catches, none of which were excep-

c·a~tlcy was top scorer with 30, and the total reached I 23.


THE CANTUARIAN. tionally hard. It would, however, be impossible to praise Blunt's display too highly. His cutting was especially well timed and hard. Greig also played very well for twenty six. Full score and analysis : K.S. W . M. Carter, b Smith :&. B. Flint, b Hobert ... C. E. N. Shorting, b H ebert H . S. S. Parker, b Smith ... :&. J. Castley, b Crawford ... A. G. Richardson, b Hebert H. M. J ames, not out ... J . H. Smith, b Hobert... T. Yotmg, b Hobert F. S. Beynon, c Smith, b Cruwford W . R. Mowll, lbw, b C1·awford ... Extras ...

... 12 1 ... 12 ... 10 ... 30 0

9 10 0 13 0

...

... 26

Total ...

lbw, b Hebert b Hebert b IIebort c Chandler, b Hebert bHobert ... ... ... c Hoskon, b Hebert ... c Greig, b Hobert not out ... ... ... c liosken, b Hobert ... c Crawford, b Herbert lbw, b IIobort ... Extras

... 123

1

0 0

..

24

7 0 8

...

81 0 2 4 3

Total...

... 80

BOWLING ANALYSIS.

1st innings. 0.

R. A. Greig ... H. R. Heb01·t J. R. Crawford F. B. Smith ...

M.

12 2L

8·s 8

1

W.

3

.R. 15

8

29

5

22

6 27

3 2

0

H. R. Hebert R. A. Greig ... J. R. Ct·awford F. B. Smith ... S. L. Iring

2nd innings. 0. M. 13 4 4 7 2 2 1

R. w 36 10 lli 0

0 0 0

16 9 1

HIGHGATE SCHOOL.

J. R. Crawford, b Parket· ... C. C. F. Hoskou, eand b Castley ... R. H. Blunt, b Parker ... ... ... H. R. Hebert, e Boyuon, b Castley S. II. Chanlllor, b Parker R. A. Greig, c and b Parker ... S. L. Iring, c Carter, b Castley C. M. Ekins, b Castloy ... R. S. Chapman, b Parker F. B. Smith, b Castley S. V. Pearson, not out Extras ... Total

..

9 b Parker ... ... 10 lbw, b Pnt'kf:'r ... 9 not out

17 c nnd b Parker 0 b l'arkor ... .. 12 b Richardson ... 0 b Parker ... ... 0

6 7 not out

... 82

g

55 12 ... · 11

.. . 26

... 0 7

0

12

3

Extra.

1

Total for 6 wickets ... 124

0

0 0


THE

CANTUARIAN.

143

BOWLI NG ANALYSIS.

l et innings, 0. H. S. S. PMker R. J. Castle,. ...

... ...

18 18

M. R. 8 6

82 38

2nd innings. 0.

w. 6

6

H . S. S. PA.rker R. J. Castley ... F. S. Beynon ... A. G. Ricbr.rdeon ...

14 8 4 4

M. R. 1 0 0 0

57

39 12 11

w. 6 0 0 1

K I NG'S SCHOOL v. C.O.S. This match was played on the Beverley on June 18th. Wright won the toss, and went in with Cowley. Cowley at once began to hit, but he should have been caught behind the wicket when he had made 9路 Sixty-nine runs were made, before Wright was caught at third man for a carefully played 19. Uglow followed, but was bowled by Parker after making 13, and Britton followed in same bowler's next over. Laughlin was next in, and after the addition of only four runs, Cowley was caught at slip, having made 73 out of xo8 during his stay. He bad bit well for his runs, his innings including a five, a four, and twelve three's, but he should have been caught at 9 1 and again at 27. The next three wickets gave but little trouble, but Bcauclerk and Thorpe made an obstinate stand, taking the score from 132 to 158 before being separated. Both fell to catches at third man by Shorting, off Beynon. With nine wickets down for 159, the innings seemed over, but Brewer and Hudson put on 19 runs, playing very carefully. At last for the first time in the innings, Shorting was put on, and his first ball bowled Brewer, the innings clos路 mg for 178. At twenty minutes past four, we went in. Carter was caught off his glove with the score at 2, and Slater came in, and the score was raised to 26, when the last comer was bowl路 ed by Uglow. Parker was next, and looked like making a long score, but after hitting two five's and a four, and scoring 18 out of 31, he was caught in the slips, and made way for Castley, 3 for 57路 Shorting followed two overs later, for 21, and Smith did not stay long. With five down for 81, matters looked very dark, but James and Castley rose to the occasion. Castley hit splendidly, and James kept up his wicket well. With xso up it seemed that the match was in our 0 \'1'11 hands, when Castley was bowled by Wright; his 62 was invaluable, coming at a most critical time, and marred by only one chance to long off, at 6x. He hit a five, four fours, and seven threes. James, however, was left ; but off his first ball, Richardson was caught at slip and ten runs later, James succumbed to Uglow. Then the end came, Flint being brilliantly caught at the wicket, and Beynon clean bowled by the next ball, the innings closing for 166. The only reason for our defeat., was bad fielding, no less than nine catches being missed in the innings of the C.O.S. At dinner, both teams were entertained by Mr. Field, who


THE CANTUARIAN.

144

afterwards referred in a speech .to th~ appr~aching departure of Dr. Matheson, saying that he was sure that both schools, 1f at nvalry m other matters, were at all one in feeling regret that his health would not allow him to continue his duties. Score :--

c.o.s. E. \::. Wright, c Beynon, b Caatley H. 0. Cowley, c Parker, b Castley L. P. TTglow, b Parker ... T. A. Rl'itton, h Parker P. Laughlin, b Parker ... T . B. Bell, b Castley ... R. Walmsley, b Parker... H. Boanolerk, c Shorting, b Beynon ... K. Thorpe, o 8 hâ&#x20AC;˘ rting, b Beynon H. Brow..r, b Shorting .. . C. L. Hudson, not out .. . Extras Total. ..

K.S.C.

... 19 .. .

... ...

...

W. M. Corter, c Bell, b Uglow ... .. . 73 C. F.. N. Shorting, b Uglow... ... . .. 13 P. H. Slater, b Uglow ... ... ... ... 0 H. S. S. Parker, c Wright, b Uglow ... . .. 2 1<.. J. Castley, b Wright ... ... ... .. . 6 J . H . Smith, b Wright.. ... ... ... .. . 5 H. M. James, b Uglow ... ... ... ... . .. 15 A. G Richardson, o l:leauolerk, b Wright... 20 R. B. Flint, c Bell, b Wright 8 :!\1:. S. Newland, n ot out... 9 T. S. Beynon, b Wright H Extras

... 178

Total...

0 21 lll Ul Oil 4

27 0

r,

11

() 1:.1

...100

KING'S SCHOOL v. DOVER COLLEGE. This match was played on Tuesday, June 3oth, and ended in a glorious victory for the School, owing chiefly to Parker's bowling ; presenting a pleasant contract to the gloomy results recorded above. The day was a fine one, but there was a nasty wind blowinH down the Beverley across the wicket, which rather interfered with the batting. The School winning the toss, Carter and Shorting were sent in to face the bowlers and were not separated till 28 had been scored. Our wickets after this fell with incredible swift ness, the five following only contributed 16. Matters, however, improved with the advent of Richardson; Newla nd and Flint followed, 14 runs being registeed for each, the score standing 99 for 9 wickets. 48 runs were added for the last wicket, Beynon contributing 2 x, 3 fours and 3 threes, 'vhile Richardson played excellent cricket for 29 not out. The Dover College innings opened favourably, from our point of view atleasl, the first ball of Parker's taking a wicket, the innings taken generally does not call for much comment, as Parker's bowling completely mastered the batsmen, except Walkct who really played in excellent style for 29. Parker's bowling, helped by a fast wicket, played sad havoc with the rest, his analysis standing 9 for 27, all being clean bowled,


THE

145

CANTUARIAN.

Following on they scored 26 for

'l'lu; total runs scored by the College were 6g. w1ckcts. Appended are the scores : KING's

16 14

W. M. Carter, b Watkin l l ~: . N . Shorting, b Clark ... ... .. II. H. S. P urker, o Oldrey. b Walker ... lt. J . Co.stley, b Clark ... P, II. Slater, b Walker .. .

ScHOOL. :R. B. Flint, o Clark, b Walker

8 0 6 4 29

J. JT. Smith, b Walker .. . A. Q . Richardson, not out

14 14 6

s. :Newland, b Walker

.. . T . Young, run out... ... .. . F. S. Beynon, o Elwin, b Walker Extras !\! .

2

21 ... 24 ... 148

Total...

D ovER CoLLEGE. 0 b Beynon 4 o Slatet·, b Beynon 9 not out ... ... ... 6 0 29 0 0 7 8 0 7 Extras ...

I,. N. Parsons b Parker, S. H. Clark, b Parker .. . S. L . Logan, run out .. . A.. G. Knocker, b Parker C. P. Oldrey, b Parker J. A.. Walker, b Parker F. Adcock, b Parker ... S. E. Strode, b Parker H. B. St. J ohn, b Parker J . S. Ct·others, not out ... W. H. Elwin, b Parker Extras ..

Total.. .

... 0 ... 16

... 7

...

.. . ... 8

Totalfor 2 wickets

... 69

... 26

BowLING ANALYSIS.

King's School.

1:1. [[.Clark ... J . A. Walker W. Elwin 0. P. Oldrey ... J . S. Crothers A. Q. Knocker

Dover 0ollego.

l et innings.

o.

M.

:a.

w.

24

7

2

24 8

8

47 53

2

2

4 2

1

13

2

6 4

7

l et innings.

o.

M.

4 11 H. S. S. P arker ... 2 7 R. J . Caetloy 6 A. G. Richardson 2nd innings. 4 6 F. S. Beynon 1 6 H. S, S. Parker ..

R. 27 24 9

w.

8 16

2

9


THE

CANT UARIAN.

K.S.C. v. C.O.S. R ETURN. Played on the Beverley, on J uly 2nd, and resulted in a disastrous defeat for the school. Parker won the toss, and went in, but BuB's balls seemed unplayable, and 5 wicket~, including Parker, Castley and Shorting, went down for the miserable number of t 3 runs, as in the former match, J ames came to the rescue, and with Slater saved the sidu from utter downfall, raising the score to 40. After Slater was caught at the wicket, James could get no one to stay with him, a nd was last to go, just before luncheon, for a most plucky innings of 31. The innings closed for 82. Not a very glorious total on sn good a wicket. The C.O.S. began confidently, Wright hitting well. Three wicket, fell for 53 when Wright and Laughlin got together, and were not parted till 140. Wright made 85, marred by only two chances, at 37 and 56. His hits were two fives, five four H, and ten threes. Laughlin made 49, being missed at 48. His principal hits were three fours and four threes. His wickets was the last to fall. Our second innings wM a little more successful. Carter played well for his 33, and was unlucky in getting run out. Shorting and Richardson each contributed q , the latter not out, and ] ameR again played well for 14, also not out. The total was I I 2 for 6 wickets, when timtâ&#x20AC;˘ was called. K .S.C. W. i\1. Carter, o Bell, b Bull .. C. E. N. Shorting,oThorpe,bW:dght R. J . Castloy, b Bull... .. . H . S. S. Parker, b Bull .. . a. G. mcbardson, b Bull .. . P . H . Sinter, c Bell, b Bull H . M. J ames, b Wright ... ... R. U. Flint, b Wright J . H. Smith, c Bell b Bull ... F . l:i. Beynon, b Bull ... .. . W . R. Mowll, not out ... Extras ...

Total...

2 run out ... ... ... .. . 8 c Beauclerk, b t owley .. . 0 c Wright, b Cowley 1

4 20 81

6

... 33

17 2 5

o Bull, b U glow not out ... b Uglow ... not out ... i.o Uglow ...

17 9 14

8

62~ Did not bat. 0

7

Extras ...

. .. 82

Total

...

7

... ll2

c.o.s. "E. C. Wright, c Cnrter, b P arker <G. M. Comber, b C'a~tl oy L. P. Uglow, b Beynon ... H . 0. Cowley, c Richardson, b Beynon P . H . Laughlin, b Purker 'l'. B. Boll, run out ... X. J . Thorpe, ruu out ...

... 85 5 ... 14 .. 1 ... 49 . .. IS

H . C. Reauclerk, b Cnstley ... W. W . Bull, t. Parker ... A. G Brewer, lbw, b Parker C. L. Hudson, not out ... Extras

Total...

I

II II I ll

1

... 1!11


THE

CANTUARIAN:

147

SECON D ELEVEN CRICKET. The second eleven have every reason to be satisfied with themselves, and we take opportunity of congratulating them. They have played four matches and won them all, and moreover have won them well. Matches were arranged with Sevenoaks Crammar School, but our opponents subsequently found it impossible to play us. The first match was against the C.O.S. 2nd XI, and was played on the lower pitch on the lh:vcrlcy. Winning the toss Athawes elected to go in, and the side put together 69 in nhout an hour. Maundrell 26 and Young 10, being the chief scorers. On the C.O.S. 2nd XI batting, Young bowled very well taking six wickets for 20 runs. Barnes nnd T!art were the most successful scorers. With a majority of three runs our second l'lt~vcn began their second venture and knocked up 88. Young hit well for 39, and Sopw1th and C ullin were successful also. With 92 to get to win the C.O.S. went again to the wickets, but were soon disposed of for 43, Spencer getting eight wickets for 27 runs. The King's School 2nd XI. thus won by 48. thi~

K.S. 2ND XI. v. A. L. TuRNBULL's X I. This match was played on Mr. Mowll's ground, Whitfield, on June 24, and resulted in a most creditable win for the school team by 14 runs on the first innings. A great deal of rain Mr. Mowll entertained the team most hospitably after the match. fell during the day, which may in some way account for the low scoring. For the school Sopwith got six wickets for r6, and Spencer four for 14. Valpy bowled very successfully for the other side. The School fielding was very good. Scores:K.S. 2nd X I . 45¡ A. L. Turnbulls X I. 31. K. S. 2ND XI. v. DovER CoLLEGE 2ND XI. Played at Dover on June 3oth, and resulted in an easy win for the School by an innings a nd 42 runs. For us Sopwith, Etheridge, Wacher and Lowry batted best and were responsible for 95 runs o ut of 129. D over College made 46 and 41. T ennant and Kinnell being the only two to reach double figures. Spencer and Sopwith divided the bowling honours, the former taking xo for 29, the latter 9 for 48. K.S. 2ND XI . v. C.O.S. 2ND X I. Played at the Beverley on J uly 2nd. The school won by 31 on the first innings. Scores :-K.S. xo8 and 40 for 5 wickets. C.O.S. 77 and 103 for 5 wickets (innings Young made 53 in our first innings and Walmsley 71 not out in the clcclared closed). znd innings of the C.O.S.

1 1 1


THE

CANTUARIAN.

BATTING AVERAGE Rune. fl. F. Sopwith ............ ..... .

W . H. llln.undrol l.. . .. ....... .. T. Young ...................... . E. N. H. Spencer .............. . E . J . S. Athawes (Captain) H . J . Cullin ......... .......... . N. Bredin ............ ..... .... .. . M. S. Newland ................ .. H . Wachor ....................... . C. E. Etheridge ............. .. A. W. Wigram ................. . H . G. Stringer ... ............. .. W. A. Wig1·am ................. . R. C. Lowry ...... .............. .

2ND

Completed Innings.

47

7

XI, Highest Score. 14

67

7

26

103

4

15 6

53

6 2 2

11 6 12 7

12 10

3

47

81 87 12 0 38

2 2 4 8 6 2 2 3

3 85

18 11 7 0 28

Averago, 6·5 9·4 25•8 2•3 8

6 5 1•5 11.8 10.1

6.1 6 0

11

BOWLING ANALYSIS. Overs. Spencer ...... ..... . 78 Sopwith .. .... . .. 67 43 Young ....... .... .

Maidens. 22 17 28

Runs. 159 126 52

Wickets.

Average.

29 20

6·6

10

5.2

5•14

THE CANTERBURY PILGRIMS' C.C. The remarkable preponderence of O.K.S. among the Can•erbury Pilgrims this year may give special interest to the performances of the Club during the season just over ; as will be seen from the names given below only one old C.O. S. namely E. G. Evans who was captain this year, figures among the actual averages, though Hadath and F. R. Evans have played in two or three matches. During the Canterbury tour there was not a single old C.O.S. boy playing. The season which began rather disastrously, has turned out successful beyond expecta· tion. In all twelve matches have been played, of which seven have been won, 4 lost and 1 drawn in favour of the club. The 7 victories were over Corpus College, Cam. bridge, Queen's College, King's School Ely, K.S.C., Old Suttonians, C.O.S., and St. Lawrence; the four defeats were by Christ's College, Corpus, Cavendish and Sidney, while the match with the Cavalry Depot was drawn owing to the rain. In batting A. Latter, who played a splendid innings of 96 against St. Lawrence, is easily top, while in bowling E.. F. Elwyn is especially prominent. H. V. Workman has proved an efficient wicket·keeper. and in fielding A. Latter and G. F. Longfield were especially conspicuous.


THE

1

CANTUARIA

149

J,

The success of the Club is most gratifying and it is to be hoped that O.K.S. will gen. 111lly take interest in it. 1\ ppended are the batting and bowling averages :BATTI NG AVER AGES. I n nings. Nume. 6 A. f,alt~ r ............ 4 'I'. f'ollott.... ........ 4 C:. V. [Pockc ......... 11 I I . V. Wor kman ... 12 M. J. t"arr ......... 8 1 ~ . 0. Evans ...... 12 It 1•'. Elwyn 4 ' 1' , E. Mredin ...... 8 II . ll. Mil-<owe 5 D ::;, i\J. Tassell ... 7 0. F. Longfield ... 5 P ..\.. T urn bull ...

Runs. 209 92 66 149 95 75 76 22 36 25 20 12

:\lost in Innin gs. 96 41 85 37 84• 52 22 8 15 16 7 6•

Times n ot out. 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 1

Average. 41•4 28 16·2 14·9 9·5 9·8 6·10 5·2 5•1 5 4 3

The following played in Jess than four innings:W. H , Cullin, 19 6 II ; F. R . Evans, 2 13 ; E. H. Moule, 6* o 1 ; E. G. Il :tdath, 2 rs; H . S. S. Parker, 1 2 13; Rev. R. G. Hodgson, 8 x; Rev. L. H. Evans, 3; II. E. Goulden, 2*. * signifies not out. BOWLING AVER AGES. Name. H. F . Elwyn...... E. G. Evans...... A. Latter ...... ... M. J. Carr .. ...... .

Overs. 243·3 97·2 78 18

Maidens. 71 23 15 0

Runs. 618 224 232 59

Average. 8·10 10 17'11 59

Wicket s. 63 21

T he following bowled in Jess than innings :II. S. S. Parker, 8 wickets for 48 runs ; T . Collett, 3 wickets for ath, 4 wickets for 32; Rev. L . H. Evans, 2 wickets for 4·

13 1 20;

J.

E. G. H ad-


THE

CANTUARIAN.

O .K .S. COLUMN. A. Latter has been appointed captain of the Rugby team of Trinity College for next term. H e has also been made captain of the cricket of the College for next season.

1 1

I

I

•••

R. P. H awes has been rowing 7 in the Twickenham eight at Henley.

•••

E. H. Moule took a third divisision of the first class in the classical Tripos this term.

••• H. V. Workman and G. E. Green took a third class in the Tripos.

•••

•••

P. W. James was one of the representatives of St. Bartholomew's H ospital in running the mile at the I nter-Hospital Sports. H e won third place.

E. Ellam, a second div. second class ; R. F. Elwyn, a third div. second class.

1

W. Cowper has taken a classical master ship at the High School, Kingston, Jamaica.

•••

W. B. Prosser has been elected Clerk of the Peace for the County of Ke nt.

•••

The Rev. A. Vaile has been offered and has accepted the Vicarage of Exning, New market.

CORRESPONDENCE. N .B.-The Editors decline to accept any responsibiUty comoectec~ with tloe opinions of their corr6$p<·ll dents. Name mtd add1·e~s ·mu st atways be given, not !lece.~sm'ily for pubUcalion, btl 01 " guaran tee of gooct fOJith. PersonaUties wiU invoLve cer tain~ rejection.

BISHOP PARRY MEMORIAL.

Lectures, as well as for its chief purpose n• a Library, and which will preserve, I hOJll' SIRs,-T he rooms once used as Class for generations, the memory of one of 0111 R ooms for the Upper and Middle T hird kindest friends. Forms, have, by the aid of a grant of£ I so I t is hoped that in time portraits of di~ from the Parry Memorial Fund, been re- tinguished King's Scholars may be plaCl.'cl constructed as one room by the removal of there, and we have already Lord Tenterdou, the partition and ceilings. Lord T hurlow, and William H arvey ; hut The School has therefore now in the it would seem natural that one of the lh 1 Parry Library a room of some dignity and ! portraits should be that of the Bishop, whust beauty, which may be used for Concerts or name the Library bears. As one of lht

"To tlte Editors of "THE CANTUARIAN."


THE

CANTUARIAN. \

lh 1, if not the first, of the King's Scholars ~tllum the Bishop confirmed, I have conltllmtcd the large window which was placed 111 lhe Library during the Easter holidays, md T venture to appeal to Old King's Schol'" , who cherish the Bishop's memory, and pt-rially to those whom he confirmed, for 'cmtributions to the portrait. A replica of part of Professor Herkomer's JliUirait is being executed under his direcllun, and the cost will not exceed i>s. I hupc therefore that many may feel inclined 111 take part in an object of which I am rcrlnin they will approve. I shall be glad I() teceive any sums from zs. 6d. to xos. Faithfully yours, T. FIELD. P.S.-Mrs. Parry has promised to conldhute a frame to be chosen by Professor U crkomer. P.S.-1 should like to acknowledge the receipt of subscriptions, with thanks from the following :-A. G. C. Lepard, A. H. Thompson, E. J. Coorbould, T. Polebampton, G. H. Smith, A. T. Perkins, F. A. l)alc, W. H. Hopkins, R. Owen, R. F. Elwyn, A. Latter, H. S. Swithinbank, N. Roc, C. Roe, A. W. Woodruff, A. Lane, J. Philpot, B. H. Latter, F. L. Perkins, C. T. Hales, C. Bing, L. W. Smith, T. Pollard, W. G. Mosse, J. Ritchie, A. P. Hall, 11. S. Crowther, E. Ellam, F. T, Harrison, lt'. Amos, E. D. Hake, A. Gordon, A. H. Latter, H. Matheson, H. H. H. Boys, E. G. Spiers, E. H. Moule, W. G. Gates, E. B. Hawes, G. Heisch. Promised.-R. G. Glennie, C. W. Cobb, P. G. Peacocke, G.

H. Cameron, D. Jones, G. H. Cobb, Rev. E. J. Campbell. OUR FOUNDER. To the Ed£tors of" THE CANTUARIAN." GENTLEMEN.-Through some misfortune I did not receive the Cantuarian for last November till two days ago. Otherwise I would have taken an earlier opportunity to comment upon a letter bearing the above title and signed " Conservative." A few words by way of preface. We all count it a praiseworthy thing for a man to try to trace his family as far back as possible, but despise a man who claims any ancestor without proper authority. In the same way I thnik we are not acting honestly when we boast that Theodore of Tarsus was our founder and that our school is the oldest in England. For, while I quite agree with ¡'Conservative " that in spite of any arbitrary statements made by the Blue Book of the Endowed Schools Commission, we can trace our existence far beyond 1542, I must disagree with his assertion that as a matter of fact the school was founded between 668 and 6go. There never was a King's Scholar who had a greater love for his school or a greater knowledge of the antiquities of Canterbury than William Somner. Yet he never believed that the School could be the descendant of what he calls the University founded by Theodore, but on the other hand says that the earliest mention of the " School of the Poor Scholars '' belongs to 1259.

--

I

I'' c

II lc

' ~I

.-.-


THE

CANTUARIAN.

It is vexatious to have to resign one's cards, and the cards were a bit embellished belief in a hallowed tradition, but at the -the advantage blue ink has over black in same time it is foolish for us to shut our the eyes of a schoolboy is quite startlingeyes to the fact that a competent authority and hung up decently, each cubicle occu did not accept this particular tradition pant would long to be signing his name on about onr great antiquity. On the other them, they would be kept clean, and rehand if any King's Scholar could discover spectable, and would last to the desired end evidence connecting the Free School of of the :zo years For collecting such funds 1259 with Theodore's University no one may I suggest that similar measures should be adopted as those taken before, but inwould be more pleased than myself. Yours very truly. stead of exacting 3d. from people who have WILLIAM COWPER. written their names on the cubicle walls, it Kingstone, Jamaica, would be as well, for a change, to exact 6d. May 12 th. from those who have burnt their names on the old discarded cubicle partition in the CUBICLE LISTS. sick dormitory. I will answer for the readTo tire Editors o/"THE C ANTUARIAN." iness to pay, of one of those whose memorD EAR SIRs,-About five years ago an exials are burnt thereon, and whose name the -cellent custom was started which enabled authorities may on search discover to have King's Scholars to bequeath their names to the initials posterity, by the institution of cards put J. H. S. up in the cubicles, for the names of the P.S.-If this suggestion is adopted, let occupants each term, and were arranged so me advise the chosen commissioner to go as to last :zo years. Such an institution round to collect the sixpences on the first sent a death shock through the excuse of night of next term. those caught carving their names on school desks that they wished to leave a name to post scholars ; and as there seems to be THE PARRY LIBRARY. such an outcry against that custom, it is a To t/ze Editors oj"THE CANTUARIAN." pity that the cards should have been so DEAR SIRS,- ! am, with your leave, goneglected. I have not actually counted up bow many still survive-but I know that ing to make a humble suggestion to those in several cubicles they are obsolete, and in in power, of a possible means of remedying all the rest their condition is so dilapidated ~n evil, connected with the Parry Library. that few people care to sign their names on I mean the noise from outside. The whole s uch shabby things. Now if means were of the first two hours of school is spent in taken to collect funds for framing these vain by the sixth form in trying to make


THE

CANTUARIAN.

1Ito 11

voices heard either in construing or "' lwring, the obstacle being the incessant 111W going on during those two hours, 1 111 t•d by the wheels of carts:driving across 1111 mint yard. In the summer term this • vtl ns~umcs most alarming proportions, l1.1t with the din of Northgate on the one 111lt•, and this row in the mint yard on the utlllt 1 which is most audible as all the wintlnwK have to be open, to say nothing of the olnm. Could not so me arrangement be IIUidc with the trades- people of the town hy which they should drive up to the house ,11 11pccificd times, out of school. If this • CJIIld be managed we might put up with 1111' Northgate disturbances with more ••tunmmtty. Hoping that I am not asking ton much, I remain, Yoursever HTXIS.

1 53

THE PINK BOOK. THE CANTUARIAN." DEAR SIRS,-ln accordance with the promise I made in my letter to Tile Catztuaria11 of the 4th December last I have compiled for this year's calendar a thoroughly revised list, which I have en· deavoured to make as complete and accurate as possible, of the O.K.S. retaining their names on the school books. I crave indulgence from everyone with regard to mistakes or omissions that may still exist and would ask anyone finding such to do me the favour of pointing them out to me. Yours faithfully, E. G. SPIERS, Hon. Bursar. 12, New Inn, London, W. July roth, r8gr.

To the Editors of"

I

I

NOTICES. We acknowledge with thanks the receipt uf subscriptions from the following :-Rev. II. S. Swithinbank, Messrs. A. Gordon, W. N. Wightwick and R. A. Wigram.

We acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following schoolpapers :-Alleynian, Leys Fortnightly (3 no.) St. Edward's School Chronicle, Dovorian, Herefordian, Cholmeleian, Plymothian, Ousel.

The Sport's Committee would also like to thank the following for subscriptions : The Rev. T. Field, Rev. R. G. Hodgson, Rev. L. G. Mason, Rev. E. J. Campbell, Rev. L. H. Evans, R. G. Gordon, Esq., J. Ritchie, Esq., and C. Scudamore, Esq.

•••

•••

All back numbers except Nos. r, 2, 6 of Vol. r can be had from W. H. Salmon, Hon. Sec. at 4d. each. Indices of Vol. I I can also be obtained.

Ill


THE CANTUARIAN. Vo1,. III.

NOVEMBER, r 89r.

No. 7·

ED ITORIAL. The commencement of every school year is always, to a certain extent, saddened by the absence of those who have long been with us, but this year our sorrow is of a different and deeper nature, for now we miss the face of one who lor many years has been so well-known and so well-loved. The loss of Mr. Campbell, who died very suddenly during our absence from school, will be a cause for the deepest regret to masters and boys alike. ·w e have sustained, too, another loss, but one which will be but temporary, our captain owi ng to a severe illness will not be able to return this term, meantime we sincerely wish him a speedy and complete recovery. At last, as all England kno ws, justice has been done to the memory of one of the greatest men our school has ever sent forth. I n recognit ion of Marlowe's genius a statue of the :Muse Erato has been erected without the Cathedral Gates. From the memorial to an O.K.S. it is easy to pass to that of one who took such kindly interest in the welfare of onr school, and we are glad to say that the portrait of Bishop Parry is now finished and placed in the library which bears his name. An appeal from an O.K.S. for the augmentation of one of our school exhibitions will be found in our columns, and we hope that it ~~·ill be liberally responded to by those to whom it is addressed. A suggestion which has been often made is at length to be acted upon, the names of the cricket and


THE

CANTUARIAN.

football teams are to be painted on the walls of the gymnasium, the lists of names will probably commence with the year 188z, the date of the first issue of T!te Cantum¡itm. In reviewing the events of the past term we have to congratulate our eleven on a season at least more successful than that of 1:\st year-six wins, six losses, and twu draws-is a fhirly creditable record, although perhaps not so bright as might have been expected; moreover it is marred by our double defeat by the C.O.S., on the other hand, however, it is brightened by our splendid victories over Sutton Valence, Dovl'l College, and the O.K.S. The prospects of the football team we will not dwell upon but we must here congratulate the fifteen on having last year's captain, who, we are sure, will be as useful and energetic as he was last season, and whose efforts, we hope, will hl' crowned with the success they deserve.

SOULE. lâ&#x20AC;˘or the benefit of those who do not know our country and its customs, it is necessary to explain at the outset what " soulc" is. The name is given to a huge leather ball filled with bran. This is thrown into the air, and then the players who arc divided into two hostile camps, fight for the possession of it, That side wins which can secure the "soule" :md carry into the soil of a village other than that in which the game began. This practice is a last vestige of the old Celtic worship of the sun. The ball with its spherical shape represented the star ol days; it was thrown into the air as if in an attempt to make it touch that star, and when it fell, men fought for its possession, as keenly as for that of some sacred thing. The very name "soule" comes from the Celtic "heaul 'â&#x20AC;˘ (sun), the: initial aspirate of which has been

1

changed to s as in all the CCoreign word. adopted by the Romans, aud this gave "seoul" or "soule. " The game ol "soule " is now no longer practiced ex cept in the Cannes country (M. Lonvestn: constantly mentions the four-fold division of Brittany into Leon, Cormonaille, T rcg nier, and Cannes) where only is it still found in all its primitive savageness. A game of "soule " in Morbihan, is no ordinary pastime; it is a game with an clement of passion and of tragedy; with striking and strangling ; a game which allows one to kill an enemy, and not forego his Easter Sacrament, if only care is taken to strike as if inadvertently and with " an accidental blow." Again it i~ a h oliday for the country side, what sort of a holiday-God knows! It is a day on which plenary indulgence for murder is allowed. " And who is there but has someone to

I


THE ~ 111 ? "

CANTUARIAN.

As one oi the most famous •o.,,ouleus" said to me one day. Besides, luling private qua rrels, there is the enmity o f parish and parish to fall back upon ; for 1Im combatants for the possession of the " .uule " are always two neighbouring and 11\ a l villages. Often again a town will •' llll~r the lists against a rural district; and llll' n the battle is embittered wi th all the hatred of the countryman against the lllWOSman; then there is no longer merely 1he struggle of rival sides ; it is a duel of hl"l i cf~ , a battle of royalists and republicans fo ugh t out with fists and nails. Not how••vcr that this old quarrel is the outcome of political o~inions, political opinions all .dong, were· nothing but a pretext ; 11 is really bound up with the fact that the countrym an, who remains a l rf, has seen the townsman, who was once ,,., much a serf as be, attain to wealth and h ccdom ; it is the jealousy of a younger hrother, who has continued in misery .1gainst his elder, who has become a great lord. The rural revolt in 17 93, and in • 8 15 was, at bottom, less a politic.1.l or religious move ment than the issue of a hatred that had long been accumulating ngainst the privileges of the towns. The royalists were revolutionists after their la~hi on, they too would have liked to compel the general wearing of the wide brimmed hat and the linen dress, a nd this end they, like the terronists sought to attain by robbery and murder. When tlurmg the Hundred D ays, twelve thousand countrymen surrounded Pontivy, they were

1

57

followed by their wiYes who carried bags in which to carry away the booty when the town was taken. One of them carried two and on each shoulder one ; she was asked what she meant to do wit h them. "This I want she said, pointing to the smaller, to put the money in that I fi nd and that " to carry some of the gentry's heads." All the history of the ant i-republican movement is in that sentence. F or the rest nothing can better prove cur proposition than the sight of a game of " soule." It is in truth a struggle between the town and country ; a struggle in which men of all conditions take part. On this day the daintiest of young men the most pacific fathers of fhmilies are seen banded with the labourers to fight the countrymen for the 'soule ' and use their fists like E nglish lords. E ,·eryone who feels his arm strong enough to give blows and his body ha rd enough to take them, flings hi mself into t he fray. I t is like a \'Olunteer national guard taking up arms ; so plain is the instinctive feeling of each man that beneath this so called game a vital question lies, and that when the country tries its fists upon the town the real object is to test its strength and rehearse a serious revolution. When the day and the place of game have been announced, yo u see old men, women and ch ildren hurrying from every direction in t heir eagerness to see the sight. This crowd is the inevitable forerunner of the players. These are the next, they come in several detachments ; they are dressed for the most part in suits carefully made to fit


THE

CANTUARIAN.

tight, so as not to give the enemy any hold, I and they wear besides round their loins, a belt fastened with a buckle to help the m more easily. T he attitude oJ the countrymen is generally cautious and deliberate; that of the men of the town I lively, swaggwering and bold. So soon as all the pl:lycrs are assembled, the rules of the game arc read aloud ; t he prize to be presented to the victor is announced ; then the two sides withdraw to equal distances from a certain poi nt : at this point the ' soulc ' is thrown ofT, and t he st ruggle begins, at first it is confined to the worse players. The good stand aside ! T hey fold their arms and look on, and they bestow on the rivals their shouts of encouragement or their hoots of derision ; but the only part they take in the fray is now and then to give a push with their powerful hands to some group of close packed struggling players, and send t hem flying ten paces tumbled pcll mell in the dust. However, little by little, they became excited with these preliminary skirmishes ; the ' soulc ' has been constantly lost and won and is already far from the place where it ,ras thrown ofT; the boundaries of the parish are near ; there is a general feeling that it is time to interfere. T he fiercest falls on; a fi rst blow is given and simultaneously a cry is heard, now one and all arcin thc thick of thcshovi ngandstriking. nothing now is heard but cries of pain and curses and threats, and the dead dull noise that fists make bruisi ng flesh ! I n a mome nt blood is flowing, and when they sec it, t he

I

players are possessed with a kind of frantu drunkenness ; a wild beast's instinct seem~ to be aroused in these mens' hearts; thl· thirst of slaughter takes them by the throat and drives them on, and blinds their eyes ; they arc huddled together and squeezed ami wrecked across each others bodic:; : in a twinkling the players become only on1· heaving mass, above which arms are seen incessantly rising and falli ng like the h:un mers in a paper mill. At distant i nterval~ faces, white or sunburnt appear and vanish, and then arc raised again, bloody and blackened with blows. In proportion to the energy of this strange heap, it i, seen to melt away and to diminish ; for the weakest fall and it is upon their bodies that the struggle then goes on. At length the last champions of the one side and of the other are left confronted, half dead with fatigue and rough handling. T ht•n if a man has kept a little strength, is hi~ time to make ofT with the " soulc." Weak!} pursued by his exhausted rivals, he quickly reaches the border of the next village, and thereby wins the prize, for which the contest was so keen. Yet t his la<;t man is not always free from danger, it may be fatal through the unrelenting hatred of a foe; witness the case of F rangois ofPontviy, commonly known as the "Sou leur." Frangois had gained a Yery great rcputa· tionat these games, and had made hi mscll dreaded by the country folk of all the neighbouring Yi!lages. In his house, hun" up in order above his fi re-place, he had all the "soules " that he had won, and he

I I


THE

CANTUARI.\ r.

uqed to show them with the same pride thnt n l\Iohican would have thrown into the display of the scalps of his enemies that w.:re fastened about his wigwam. T hough age had lessened the vigour of Franrois he was still able to hang up every year some new Trophy by his fire-side. One man, and o nly one, had for a long tunc disputed the pre·eminence with this Krcat sou leur. This was a countryman from Kcrgrisl, named I von Marker. But Frangois had broken o ne of his ribs at a game ot 11 soule " which took place at Neulise, m x8Jo, and this had caused I von's death. II is son, Pierre Marker, had inherited the reputation of his father, but had been equally unfortunate; Frangois had put out une of his eyes at the Clegnerec match and broken two of his teeth at that of Seglien. Since that time Pierre had sworn to have his revenge. A game of " soule" took place at Sliva!, and the two rivals were there. At first, all was as usual. Franc•ois merely noticed with surprise that P ierre was careful not to approach him during the struggle. He had challenged him with 11 Come hither, royalist, let me take thy other eye ? "- but in vain. T he c·ountryman had made no reply, and had !ltayed at a distance. Frangois who had hnd a fall had been aware at once of two •ron-bound wooden shoes trampling on his lltomach, and had seen aboYe him Pierre's ~;ightlcss eye roll horribly; but by dint of hi-; own efforts and those of his friends he had quickly regained his feet. Meanwhile the night began to fall; most

1

59

of the players, worn out with fatigue, were taking their departure; some of the mo:;t desperate were left by themselves to fight for the prize. Frangois took advantage of this moment to secure the " soule " and start to run across country. H e was pursued ; but gained ground, and wns soon out of sight of the country folk. Their shouts still for some minutes reached him through the evening mist; then they came from a different direction, and faded into the distance and died away. Everyone thought that the "soule " was won, and departed. T he man of Pontiyy stopped a moment to draw breath, for his whole body was battered and aching. Never had the game been fought out with such persistence. After trying to quiet the beating of his heart by lying down on the cool earth, Frangois got up and began once more to run towards a stream, which divided the ground Stival from that of Pontivy. Already he was in sight of the willows on its banks; his heart was beating more cheerfully, he was drawing his breath more freely, when he heard behind him the peculiar soft sound that is made by the steps of a man rnnning barefooted; he turned, and saw in the gloom of the sunken path a shadowy form drawing rapidly near. Then the old " Sou leur " player was seized with fear, for he knew that he was too weak to defend himself and he was too fJr from his friends to hope for any help of them. He resolved on flight. Summoning up all the strength that was left in his torpid limbs, he made


160

THE

CANTUARI AN.

towards the stream ; but the noise of the pursuing steps d rew ever nearer ; Fra ngois could already hear the sou nd of his enemy's panting ! H e makes a last effort; he has gained the willows, his foot is already in the water. - - - T here is a sudden shout behind him ; (and he knows the voice ! ) Frangois attempts to cross wi th a single leap the short distance t hat must be cleared but stiffe ned .with weariness he falls heavily, on the pointed stones that form the bed of the river. I nstantly a knee is pressing on his chest, a nd Pierre's face is put close to his-the solitary eye, and the toothless mouth that grins appallingly ! With an instinctive motion, Frangois stretches his hand towards the left bank for this bank is the ground of P ontivy: and if he touches it he is safe; ~ut the countrymen has gripped that hand in his iron fist : " Thou art in Stival, townsman," he says : "Thou art in my power." " Let me go royalist," cries the a rtisan. " Give me the " Soule "! "There it is; now let me go' ! "Thou owcst me someth ing still, townsman." "What ? " "Thine eye ! "yelled Pierre," Thine eye !''

And with these words, his fist was dasl•cll upon the left eye of F rangois and made 11 leap from its socket. 'Let me go murderer I " Frangois cried " T hou still owest me thy teeth, tow11 111:\11, 11

And the teeth of the man of Pont i\•) fell shattered into his throat. T hereupon a raging frenzy took hold nl th e countryman. H e held the he:\d t>l Frangois under his left arm and with hi wooden shoe, held in his right hand, 111 began to batter his skull. This mu~ l certainly have lasted for some time, for tlu next day Frangois was found ncar tlu stream in a state that showed no signs " ' life. Yet such was the strength of the uld "sou leur" that he revived ; but he h:\cl '" be trepanned, and was ever after mainwcl a nd witless. Pierre was brought into the assize C'OIII l, t he only reply that he made to the II" sident's q uestions was, that " Frangois wn in Stival when he encountered him, :tml that was the way in which ' soulc' ''·• played." H e was acquitted, but the playing nf " soule " was forbidden.


THE

CANTUARIA~.

161

THE OPENING OF THE PARRY MEMORIAL LIBRARY. On Tuesday, October 13th a fter unveilthe Parry Memorial in the Cathedral, the Archbi~hop visited the School to open 1hl• ' Parry Memorial Library ' and to un, , JI the portrait of Bishop Parry. About I\ o'clock his Grace came from the C:nthedral with the Dean and Chapter and ol hers of the Cathedral Clergy and at wwc proceeded to the Library, where the ,, hool was assembled together with several l.ulics and gentlemen. A short service \1':\'l then held consisting of some responses, .1 prnyer, and the hymn ' Nun aile Danket I :ott.' After this the H ead Maste r explained that the Library had been formed by means uf the funds raised in memory of Doctor l';lrry, and that the O.K.S. had l'ubscribed lrlr the portrait of the Bishop which would hang in the room. He spoke of the interest l he Bishop had taken in the welfare of 1he school and his kindly feeling towards 1he boys. H e regretted that this tri bute to the memory of the Bishop so inadequately expressed the sentim€'nts which pn>mpted it, but that, as his Grace knew, the school was not rich. I n conclusion he a~ked his Grace to name the Library ' The l 1arry Memorial Library' and to unveil the picture. The Archbishop unveiled the picture and afterwards named the room 'The Parry ~lemorial Library. H e said, however, that Ill~

it would not be called the ' Parry Library' but simply the ' Parry' in accordance with schoolboy pmctice. His Grace, in the course of some further remarks, spoke of Bishop Parry as the ideal of an English gentleman and a perfect example for schoolboys to follow ; he specially dwelt upon his manly benignity and also reminded us of the fact that he was a descendant of one of England's greatest Arctic heroes. The Archbishop spoke of the advantages of a school library and recalled to mind the pleasant clays he had spent as a boy in the old Library in Birmingham. He said that it was unnecessary to dwell upon the advantages derived from books, since boys nowadays often preferred reading to field sports. With regard to the Head Master's remark that the school was poor he said that he only wished that were the case, since we all know the old saying ' Beati Pauperes.' After naming the Library, he begged that the H ead .£\ti aster would grant the school a half-holiday, a request which was immediately granted, whereupon the Archbishop left amid deaL ning cheers.

***

The H eadmaster wishes, through these columns, to thank those who subscribed to the portrait ; a list of them will be given in the next number.


162

THE · CANTUARI AN.

SPEECH DAY. Speech Day this year (July 3oth) passed off very auspiciously, notwithstanding that the weather had looked threatening in the early morning, a nd in fact fulfilled its threats to the extent of some heavy thundershowers at intervals during the day. The day began, as usual, with the early celebration at 7.30. Then came the H eadmaster's breakfast party; and at xo the Commemoration Service. The music chosen by the Captain was Mendelssohn's Service in A, the hymn "Onward Christian Soldiers," and the anthem, "0 rest in the Lord," in which Mr. Plant, by special request, took the solo, and elicited from many of his hearers the remark that years seemed to leave his vocal powers almost untouched. The preacher was the R evR. L. Ottley, and his sermon-though we know it is wrong to criticise sermons- was felt by all who heard it to be exactly what a speech day sermon should be. The speeches began shortly afte r twelve, and, as to the quality of the performance, the general commentary among O.K.S. and others who had seen many Speech Days, was, that the speeches were, if anything, better than ever. It may seem like faint praise to say that the actors spoke distinctly, but the careful atten•ion paid to this important point was most creditable to the performers and must have been gratifying to their assiduous instructor, Mr. Mason.

The full list of pieces and characters ., given below. I n the Shakespeare selection Parker and K napp had the two most pronr inent parts, and both realized the char:\t ters remarkably well. Parker's dignity a• the Duke of York did not, however, inter fere with his successful appearance a little later in the farcical character of" Le Malade Imaginaire." In t his piece Spencer also ditl particularly well, his accent and intonat ion being thoroughly French. I n the Latin speech which is perhaps usually the most difficult to make generally interesting, the action was well sustained throughout and Smith'!! 'asides ' were skilfully managed. Thl scene from the' Clouds' was very amusin~·· Wigram suited his role admirably, and wan irresistible as he sat cro\vned with thl· wreath, a humble inquirer after the Highu Learning. The " Heir at Law" was :tiKII a very happy selection, and was thorough ly appreciated by the audience. Spcn'' lf as Lady Duberly, and J ames as 'Dick' were both very good ; and Smith's render ing of his difficult. part (D r. Pangloss) wn~ especially creditable. 1.

"King Richnrcl II."

Act ii., Sc. iii.

Shakcspw'·'. Duk~ of Hcrcfor(l(nftcrwards

King Henry IV. ... ... C. A. KnnpJI Duke of York (his uncle) .. . B . S. S. Pm·k"• End of Northumberland ... F. S. .Doynun Hal'l'y Percy (his son) .. . ... W . l\1. C:nrt~· · Earl Be1·keloy ... R. 13. Plint Lor cl Willoug hby .. . ... '\V. 11. Srumuu Lord Ross ... C.E.Ethl•l'ioll(l'


THE CANTUARIAN.' .. l'hormio." Act v., Sc. vii., viii.

Terence.

l'hot•tnio (n. pnra~ite) ... ... J. H . Smith t 'ht't'ttt('S ... ... R. J. Ca~tley ll··tttipho (his brother) ... E.J. S.Athawes ntutitllmla (wife ofCln·emes) W.H. Salmon 1'ltt•t•mes, before he mnnied Na.nsistra.ta., It ••I ht•tm secretly mnrl'ied at Lmnuos, and I , I n tb~ughler. In ordor to keep Na.usistmtn. t thu·unt of this, Chromes and Deruipbo lmd . ht•ttH•cl to givo tho daugh ter, with a. good ""''''Y •in marriage to Phorwio.Eavingpaid the oi""''Y iuadvnuco, thoy afterwards want to be off 1h.. lt· bnq~ain, nnd to recover the money. l'ltrtt'lltio refuses, and says h o is willing to , ll't'Y out their compact. 'l'hoy th en threaten 111111 with ~~lawsuit, and so ho reveals that be I1111W11 tho whole story ab011t Lemnos. They in 1111 try Lobribohilll to secrecy. and so at last , Ill' him to drag him to justice; but to rc11111(1' himself ho calls Nausistrata. from tho "'"' .,., tllld tells her nll . .. J.o 1\fnlndo!waginni..re." Act iii., Sc.v., &c.

Moliere.

\ •·gan (malndo imnginnire) E. S. 1::. Parker ll•••·nldo (his brother) ... ... C. .d.. Knapp \I. Pu1·gon (his doctor) ... F. S. Beynon 'l'oinelto (his maid servant) E.N.H.::.pencer llt•l'llldo and 1'oinctto ha ve formed a plan to ••L a•ill of :M. Purgon. '1'bis they cany out, "'" 'l'oinotto wlth a chango of dress r epresents hoot'Kl•lf as a now do(;tor. A1·istophanes. "Clouds." Holtll'nLoa ... J . H. Smith ... H. S.S.Pa.rkor Ht'holtw ... ... W. A. Wig ram Htropsiacles Sch olars, &c. Ht.1·ops iadcs ROes to tho 'l'hiuking-Shop of ll•t<' I'I~Los , iu ot·clor to loam how to esc.1opo his olo1hfH. Afiol' somo difficulty about admittance, 1 t•holn.r Jots him outer, nnd shews him tho wumlt•rs of now-fangled sciencc,-scholnrs lo~u ki ng into tho thingR bcn<'ath the earth•luhus-maps. otc....... Then suddenly Strepllllh·~ discerns SocL·n.tes, who is up aloft lookIn~ nt Lho sun th.rough a telescope. He comes ol.,wn, nnd somewhat terrifies Strepsiades by t hn methods whot·oby ho proposes to make him 1 cholnr.

5. ''Heir at Law." Act. i., Sc. i., &c.

Colman.

Lord Dubcrly (lalo Daniel Dowlas, general clcaleL· ... W. A. ·wigrnm Lady Dnborlv (his wife) ... E.N.IJ.Spencer Dick (his son) ... H.l\1. Jnmcs Dr. Pnugloss (his tutor) ... J. H. Smith Footw11n ... ... ... ... ... M. S. Newland Scono-London-100 years ago.

After the speeches came the distribution of prizes by the Headmaster and the reading by the Dean of the resuiLs of ExaminaOf these it is unnecessary to tions. speak more particularly arc they not written in the Pink Book, which has long before this been thoroughly digested by all whom it concerns? The Dean read a short summary of the examiners reports, but the bulk of them we were, as he remarked, spared from hearing by the rules of the Oxford and Cambridge Examining Board; not, as the Headmaster explained, that there was any desire to conceal the Reports, but simply because the Board had not finished silling upon them. Then, while the universal goodwill of emancipated youth found vent in the customm·y cheers for all sorts and conditions of men (not excepting women), the com· pany dispersed, a nd the guests bidden to luncheon made their way toward > the Mint Yard. And here one of the thundershowers before alluded to did good service as a peremptory master of the ceremonies, by driving everyone straight into the Gymnasium, and so preventing the delay which so often occurs at this point in the proceedings, while people really ravenous (and who is not by 2 o'clock?) stand coyly round,


THE

CANTUARIAN.

unwilling to betray an unseemly eagerness for lunch. When we bad stretched out our hands to the good things before us, the splendid official with the cocked hat prayed for silence, and the venerable "Non nobis " was sung by Messrs. Plant and Rhodes and Dr. Longhurst. Then followed the usual toasts, each speaker being heralded by the aforesaid official's entreaty for silence. Why should I tell (as classical writers say when they mean to tell) how the H eadmaster proposed "Church and Queen," and then "The Mayor and Corporation;" how the Mayor replied and proposed "The Dean and Chapter," and how the Dean replied? Time and space would fail, if memory sen·ed, to tell of all the things that Canon Elwyn spoke of in his genial oration, carrying away his audience till eYeryone was fully persuaded that the King's School was the hub of the universe, and that if distinguished men had happened occasionally to come from any other school it was only a regrettable accident. Nor can we follow in detail the ingenious pleadings of the Hon. Bursar (Mr. Spiers) who mentioned several interesting facts connected with the history of i\'I rs. Bunce and her relations, urging them as reasons why Old King's Scholars should subscribe to the Bunce Exhibition Fund, since they were now commemorating the centenary of some of these events and the jubilee of others. Suffice it to say that his arguments proYed very conclusive; for. as our contemporaries say, "tht proceedings then terminated."

Prizes acljudgecl clt"·ing the yew· J Stl.J !II Captain'sPrizo(i\Jikhiusou). Smith, J. 11. Mathematical P1·izo (Mitchinson) ... ... ... ... Salmon, W . II Modern Languages (Mitchiosoo) ... ... ... ... Parker, H. S.l> Gorman ... ... ... ... Sopwith, S. I•' Natn~al Science( M itchinson) So~with, S. I•' Clnss•cal (BrougMon) ... ... Sm1th, J . II . Divinity (Broughton) ... ... Not t\wardt•ol History (::itt~nJoy)... ... ... Wigmm, W . \ Engli1:1h L ~tugnago and Litn' l:t.nro &Stl·catfiold) ... ~artor, 1~. 1\1 En.,hsh I oom .. . ... ... opencer, K N II La.tin Prose Compos iLion . . . Smith, J . I I . Latin Vorse Compositiou .. . Smith, J . 11 . Greek Composition ... ... Smith, J. 11 . Englis h .I!:ss 1y (Member's Pl'iz ~) .. ... ... ... ... Smith,J. U. Private Study (Edward Hloro ;>,temorinl) .. . ... . .. Smith, J . 11 . Gcogmphy (llcmber's Pt•ize) Cnrt~r, W. M. Googt·nphy (Extra Pl'izo) ... James, ll. l\1 . Dmwing ... .. . Pa •·ker, U. S. lCn sic .. . Scri vouor, J . II Form Prizes. VI. Form (Ch.i.sbnns) .. . ... Sm.ith, J. 11 . V. Form (Cill'lstmas) ... ... Flint, R. 11. V. Form ( 111 iclsunnnor) ... lliucks, '1'. t' Divinity (Canon Elwyn's) ... Wharton, V. II IV. l!'orm (t:hriatmas)... ... Chisolm, W to IV. !form ( \\1 iclsummor) ... Gaclnoy,A. \' , IV. Form (Miclsunnnor) ' (Master's) Hopkins, J. H. I liT. Form Uppor (Ohr1stmas) Dmko, J H. III. Form, Upper (tu idsmumer) ... ... Vnlpy, G. C'. III. Formtuicldlo(Christmns)} Fl\•lcnln, A .JJ ·,. o ony, . , . III, Form, 1lliddle (Midsum... Watkins, 'J'.H II mer) ... ... III. Form,Low<>r(Ohristmas) Hawes, .l. C. III. F orm, Lower (Miclsummor) ... ... ... ... ... Cox, U. W. ~I Lou·c1· School P1•izes. Divir.ity ... i\lanu<lroll, \\' II 11nthemntics ... Feuu, A ..1. Arithme tic ... ... ... ... M olony, ,J , ( '. Natural Scienceplitchioson) Campbell, J.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Il l f.,t·y ...

i\lowll,A. K. 'l'nrnbull, V. C. ''" t.ttion .. . Valpy, GC. tit 'H~'~~Jihy{~ l ember'sPrizes) Campbell, J.

r6s

t 'ot tttht·id~ro.

Ta•soll, D. S. 1\I., l:kholru· ot Christ Cbm·cb, Oxford. Mowle, H. W., Scholnrt·f C.C.C., Cawbriclgo. •vacate this J uly. Acaclcmical cmcl othc1· clisUnctio1ls gainccl the ycc"· 1890-91. Moul o, E. Il., l sb Cla s Classical Tripos, Trinity College, Camln·idgt>. Ellnm, !!;., 2nd Class Classical 'l'ripos, St. Catbol'ino's Coll<'go, Cambridge. l!;lwyn, R. F., 2ncl Class ClassicnJ Tripes, 'I'dnity Colle"'e, Cmnboidgo. Workmnn,ll. V., 3rd Class Classical Tripos, C.C.C., 'Cambridge. :kd Class Clnssical'fripos, Groen, G . E . Selwyn College, Cambridge. i .onfl olcl, G . ll., 3rcl Class Natural Science 'J'ripos, C.C.C., Cambridge. Smith, L. ,V., 2nd Class 1\Iodomtions, Trin· ity College, Oxford. Latter, A.., 2nd Class 1\fodorations, Trinity College, Oxford. 'l'l1ompson, A. ll., 2nd Class Modet·ations, St. Eclmund Hall, Oxfot·d. Smith, J. II., Haskcr Scholarship, Exeter College, Oxford. Parker, H S. S., Open Classical Scholar· ship, C.C.C., Caw bridge. Wigrnm, .A., History Scholru·sbip, 'l'rinity llall, Cambridge. i\loulo, 11. W., IncreasoofScholarshlp, C.CC. Cambddge.

l·)llnm,- E., Scholar of StCatherino'sCollege, C'ounhridgo. • J•:lwy n, R. F. Trinity, College, Caw bridge. Hm ith, L. W., Ford Student, Trinit y College. Oxfm·cl. 'l'umbnll, P. A. C.C.C., Cambridge. li nwos, 1~ . 13 ., Forcl Student,Trinity Coli ego, t>xr.. t·d.

I n Classics-G. .M. Edwards, M.A., F ollow and 'l'utor of Sidney ::iussox l.:ollego, Cambridge ; S. G . Owen, M.A., Student of Christ Church, Oxford (for Lower School). In Mathematics-H. C . 'l'hom}Json, M.A.., St uden t of Cluist Church, Oxford. I n French- !'rfons. E. P. i\lasse.

I , , n..!t ...

.Junior Dcz>a1'imcnt. I "'Ill I£., Uppot· (Ciu·istwas) Clark, C. H.

l'utttl I I ., Uppor(Midsummer) Clru·k, C. H. \loti ht•tunLtCS ... JonO$, H. A. I "' "' II., Lower (Chi·ishnns) Carrington,J.W. l o11 111 l [. Lower(hlidsumwcr) i\lasou, K. l oll'lll 1., Upper (Cbristwns ) Ridley, .A. l•'uttll 1., Upper (1\lidsunnuet·)} ~~~ ~ ?J~'c:i. F. \1 u ~k Prize ... ... Ga'op, G. A.

11

/(ina's schola1·s clcctecZ July, 1891. Ht•niors.-Fliut, It. B., Castley, R. J. ll lllt'ks, 'J'. C.-Juuiors.-Ricll!u:dson, A. G.,

\ ulpy, G. C. J ohnson, 11., Drnke, J. B., Hend1\J. Prebationers.-Clnrke, C. II. 1 ut•ington, C. W., 'Vntkins, '1'. P. H. Molony, \ D., Yates, A., C'oleman, •r. S., Dann, I I Slntot·, G. L, Frewer, G. D. 1~111, U.

Newly Elcctccl Exhibilionlws. Hmith, J . H. and Parker, H. S. S. /'o't'Hnll Ex hibitionc1'8 at the U1Live1·silies. •t.ongfiolcl, G.F., C.C.C., Cambridge. l\loulo, E. II. Scholar of '1 rinity College,

,.,r.,

,V.

EXAMINERS.


r66

THE

CANTUARIAN.

OF T H E

REV.

~.

J. CAM P B ELL, WHO

Died on Friday, August 14th, 1891, At Looe, in Cornwall. I t is a sad duty to have to record the the sudden death of one our school masters. The news must by this time have reached the ears of most O.K.S.; and all cot)nected with the school in any way must feel regret for the loss of a f.'\ce so well-known a nd beloved. We perhaps never feel the worth of a friend keenly enough, until we haYe lost one, and the death we record has cast a shadow over every spot in our school surroundings. O.K.S., of the last ten years, who visit the school again will always find a blank that can ne\·e r be re-filled, and it will be long before the time comes when his name shall only be known by the "breathing marbl e." Mr. Campbell was first known to the school twelve years ago. H a\·ing stud ied at E xeter College Oxford, he took his degrees in 1873 a nd r 8 77. His earliier intentions of entering the army had been frustrated by weak eyesight ; so his thoughts then di rected him to the church. H e was ordained deacon by

the Bishop of Exeter, in the $'Car 1875 bu t he never took priest's orders. H e had bc~· n appointed to the staff of masters al tl w new College at Westward !Io in 1873; from which he came on to the school in in 1879. H ere he took position as Senim Mathematical Master, being also Master Uf the Middle T hird Form. Besides his othc• talents he possessed a \'Cry accurat1• memory for cletnils, together with n high sense of duty, and he was never known to leave anything, once begun, unfinished, His geniality :mel kindness in and out of school hours rendered him very popular to all the school. The immediate circumstances of his death were these :-After the close of last term, he stayed in Canterbury for two reasoM, the one being that he might watch tht• cricket during the Canterbury Week, the other that he might assist the late Mt s. H olland and Dr. Sheppherd to carry out some work in refitting old stainc<!-JI:t~> windows in the Cathedral. On the Crickd


THE

' CANTUARIAN.

Week Thursday, which was a very wet

clily, he caught a chill on the Beverley, on l he next day he returned to Looe in Cornwall, his home. He was visited by a doctor, who pronounced that he had

rheumatic f<!ver : from Sunday to Thurs day night, he lay without change, but about midnight, an alteration for the worst was noticed, and he passed away about 3 o'clock on Friday morning.

31n lÂŁ1.1l:-em-o::t:ia:m. GEORGE

HERBERT

On Saturday last there passed to his rest one of those bright, lovable spirits who seem to make warm and lasting friend~;hips wherever they go. Ge01;t;e Herbert ftlnvler, son of the Rev. C. A. Fowler, now rector of Walton-in-Gordano, who was born 111 the year 1848. In his early life he had not intended to take holy orders, andaf ter leaving the King's School, Canterbury, he pa-;sed some years in a roving life abroad, first in South Americ.1. and afterwards in India, where he came under the influence of his uncle Bishop Milman of Calcutta, to whose example of self-denying devotion he loved to confess his indebtedness. After the 13ishop's death he returned to England, and nt a later age than most men entered at Oxford, where took his degree from St. John's College x88o, having obtained a place in the first class in the honour school of theology. Almost immediately after taking his degree he was ordained by the 13ishop of Lichf1eld to the curacy of Stokeupon-Trent, where he threw himself with such eager zeal into the work of that large

FOWLER .

parish that within a very few months ilL health forced him to resign his curacy. Even then the seeds of disease must have been latent in him, as from now his time, as he once said, was " spent in conjugating the verb to break down."From Stoke, after a few months' rest, he passed to Wells, and there in the life of a theological college with its happy freedom of intercourse, its close intimacies, and opportunities of helping men at the most impressionable time of their life he found the work for which he was best suited, and to which accordingly he devoted 1 the rest of his life. The bare outline is 1 soon told. Three years' steady work struggling br:wely all the while against ilL health, necessitated the resignation of his office of vice-principal Wells. After a few months of parochial work in the quiet village of Over Stowey, among the Quantock Hills, a year's complete rest and travel ;~broad seemed to have completely set him up again, and in the autumn of x885 he was able to accept an invi tat ion from Bishop John Wordsworth, then just consecrated, to

I

!


168

THE

CANTUARIAN.

take up his residence at Salisbury, and combine the offices of chaplain to the Bishop and vice-principal of the theological college. From Salisbury he passed to Leeds, sue_ ceeding Canon Worlledge as principal of the Clergy School in r887, and there the last four years of his life were passed. Blessed with a singularly receptive mind, he was able to carry away something from each place in which his lot had been cast, and the result was seen in his work at Leeds. There it seemed to his friends, he found the very sphere to suit him. The vigorous atmosphere of the great northern town, with its strong tide of Church life, was exactly what was wanted to call out alJ that was best in him. Each year he ap_ peared to grow in power, and-without losing any of that eagerness and almost daring readiness to welcome new lightsto soften in manner and gain in balance. His quick sympathies and the varied ex_ periencc of his early life gave him an insight into the thoughts and minds of the laity which was turned to good use in his preaching; and his thoughtful and original sermons quickly attracted the men of Leeds who recognised in him a preacher who could sympathise with their difficulties and speak to their hearts. Beneath a somewhat rugged exterior there was the tenderness of a woman's heart. Nothing so roused his indignation as anything approaching to cruelty or injustice, and his longing to do what was in him to remedy these led him to throw himself with hearty energy into the work C.E.T.S. and of the "Waifs and

Strays," two societies which have lost in him an active worker in their cause. In the Clergy School itself his quick and ready sympathy speedily won the affection and confidence of his pupils, while his keen and ever fresh enthusiasm for the subject of his lectures could scarcely fail to act as an intellectual stimulus on those who listened to his teaching. Scattered ovef England there are many former students or Wells, Salisbury, and Leeds to whom the news of his death will bring a keen sense Of personal loss, awakening the recollection o { that warm and loving sympathy and untiring readiness to help which was so freely extended to them. And outside the number of his pupils and those who came under the direct influence of his teaching there is a large circle of devoted friends who will sorely miss his stimulating conversation, and the eager talks (which he so dearly loved) on the latest work of the Old Testament criticism, or one of the social problems of the day, when" Thought lcrtpt out to wed with thought, Ere thought couhl wed itself with Ppcccb."

The end can scarcely be called sudden. I n the summer of last year he seemed stronger and more vigorous than he had been for same years. But in the winter the bad headaches to which he had long been subject returned, and early in the spring his medical advisers declared that disease had positively set in. H e_was sent off to Cannes, in the hope that it might be arrested. After Easter he returned, feeling rather better, and set himself with resolute courage


THE

CANTUARIAN.

to continue his work at the Clergy School. In July a visit to Dover was tried, which he hoped might give him strength to struggle on for another term, and in August he was back al Leeds, anxious once more to take up his

work. But it was not to be. After his return he seemed to get steadily worse, and and early on the morning of Saturday last God took him to Himself and gave him the rest which he so sorely needed.

CRICKET REVIEW. Judged by actual results the Cricket Season, so far as we are concerned, has been a great improvement on its immediate predecessor, and may on the whole be considered satisfactory. Of the 14 matches played, we \Von 6, and lost 6, while 2 were drawn ow¡ ing to rain. This satisfactoriness however, somewhat diminishes when we look more <'Mefully into the results. The matches which we won were those against Chartham A-;ylum, St. Augustine's, Sutton Valence, Mr. Evan's XI., Dover College, and the 0. K.S. ; those which we lost were against the Cavalry Depot, C.O.S. twice, Canterbury l'ilgrims, St. L'\wrence, and Highgate. It will at once be allow~d that the last 6 included the more interesting and important matches. \Ve are correct, we think, in saying that It is some time ago now since the C.O.S. beat us in both contests ; but had the XL shown the same form in the return as in the first, the result might. have been different. II ighgatc again were strong, and it was no disgrace to be beaten by them ; but as we were fortunate enough to gain a substantial advantage on the first innings, we ought r.ertainly to have kept it and not lost the match after all. The proverbial uncertainty CJf the noble game w:\s never more apparent than during the season just ended. At times the batting all round was exceedingly good, and proved the XL to be proficient in that department; at other times it was quite the reverse. Consequently though some really good scores were made by several of the team, the averages arc decidedly low-not one reaching :20. Allowance must of course be made owing to the slow and wet \vickets, from which we in common with the rest of the cricketing world suffered; but in some degree also the poor displays are responsible. Still, 9 of the XI. as compared with 5 last year reached double figures, and the captain, though his average this year, is not much more thnn half what it was last year, had the honour of scoring a three figure innings. The howling on the whole was creditable ; the brunt of it fell upon Parker


THE

CANTUARIAN.

and Castley. Parker's analysis is really extraord inary, showing 8 x wicket, at a cost of under 8 runs each, less than half his average last season ; and to this fine performance much of our success is due. Castley's a nalysis, though put into shade by P arker's is respectable. Beynon also has a capital average, but the number of o,¡ers he bowled arc few as compared with the other two. The fielding of the team was fa ir ; there was, how~vcr a lack of sharpness in picking up the ball a nd returning it ; and in our opinion the placing of the field could have been improved upon. In conclusion, the prospects for next year are promising. We sustain, of course, a great loss in the captain's departure, and Smith also has left ; but the other members will, we hope, he :wailablc, and the new captain, therefore ought to have a comparatively easy task. We wish him all success. PARKER, H. S. S. (captain)-Good all round cricketer. Has been very successful with the ball and his analysis is remarkable. R ather disappointing with the bat ; b rilliant hitter, but frequent ly sacrificing his wicket in his eagerness to make run~. Very fair field. CASTLEV, R. }.-Succeeds to the captaincy. Good straight bowler and most useful throughout the season. Only once shO\,-ed true form with the bat-defence weak, but can hit well. Good field. s~nTH, J. H.- Very useful bat. Hard hitter, and having a good eye could pull well; often got runs when badly wanted. Fair field. SHORTING, C. E. N.-Has not improved in batting; weak defence. Quick in tlw field, but throws in too wildly. CARTER, W. Ivi.- U seful bat-slow but steady run getter, and good defence. F air field. BEYNON, F. S.-Improved very much in bowling and might have been utilized mon¡ P oor batter. Very fair field. }A:\tES, H. M.-Very fair defence, but little powers of hitting. N ot so safe in the field as l as~ year. FLINT, R. B.-Plays with a straight bat, but without vigom. Fair defence. Poor field, RICHARDSON, A. G.-Very promising young batter, and should turn out really useful. Fair bowler and field. SLATER, P. H.-Very steady bat, but wants to put more vigour into it. Rather sleep) both at the wickets and in the field. MowLL, W. R. - K ept wicket very creditably for a first season ; should turn out rcall)' good with more practice and experience. Can't bat much at present, but 01:1)' im prove. NEWLAND, M. S.-Very fair field. H ad not many opportunities of showing his abilil) as a batter.


THE CANTUARIAN. Appended are the batting and bowling averages :BATTING AVE RAGES.

Parker, H. S. S .. .. .. Carter, W. M ........ . Smith, J. H . ........ . Slater, P. H ......... . Shorting, C. E . ... .. . Caslley, R. J ........ .. Richardson, A. G... . ivlowll, W. R ........ .. James, H. M ........ .. Flint, R. B ...... .... .. Beynon, F. S ........ . Newland, M. S... .. .. Young, T ........... ..

Runs. 294 286 I 82

144 195

x8o 143 32 120

148 8o 29

*

Completed Times Most in an innings. not out. innings. Average. IS I6 13 II IS I6 13 3 12 IS

1 I I

113

62 36 54* 43 62 38 14* 31 54

I

0

o e3 6 3 I

II

37

2

3

6

0

19.6 I 7.87 I4 13.09 13 11.25 II

Io.6 IO

9.86 6.xs 14路5 6.46

Signifies not out.

BOWLING AVERAGES.

Parker, H. S. S .... .. Beynon F. S........ .. Cast ley, R. J .. ...... . Shorting, C. E ...... . Richardson, A. G.. . .

Overs.

Maidens.

Runs.

Wickets.

Average.

272路3 69.3 2I3

90 25 55

8r

I I. I

0

I

7. 8 I 9路5 2 IS.6I 44

45

8

632 I8 r 609 44 I44

3

48

19 39

CRICKET. 111

N.D.- We must apologise for the omission of the first two of the following matches our last number. K. S. v. REV. L. H. EVAN'S XI.

Played on the Beverley on June 12th. The School batted first, on a good wicket. ( ".trlcr and Flint began the innings and the latter was not dismissed till the score stood 11l 37路 Parker succeeded him, and 82 was reached before he was caught and bowled tm n well-played 38. Smith reached double figures, and after his dismissal Young came In, but Carter was soon run out for 47, which he had made without giving a chance.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

After this, Young hit about merrily and knocked up 30 before he was caught; and the innings closed for q o. For the scratch team Blare and H arris made 79 for the lir,l wicket, of wh ich H arris made z r. Blare's innings was the feature of the batting of lu side, as he hit hard and compiled 64 in a very short time. The last four wickets tdl without a run being added, and the innings closed for I r I. The School thus can11 off the victors by 59 runs. Score :KING's

SCHOOL.

W . .M. Cm·tot·, run out ...

. .. . .. R. B. Flint, st Bn.mos, b Rlorc ... H. S . S. l:'arkor, c & b U. V. I sacko R. J. Cns~loy, b Hnn is ... ... ... H . .M. James, lbw., b Harris A. G. Richardson , b C. V. I sncko J . H. Smith, b H artis ... ... T. Young, c Money, b Evaos P. H. Slater, b Evans .. . S. F. Sopwith, b Evans .. . F. S. Beynon, not out ... Extras ... ... Total ...

0. 28 Hi

7 11

G. l

... 12 ... 38 9 2 5 12 30 2 0 2 11

R Ev . L. H. E VAN's XI. II. R. Bloro, b Parker .. . .. . ... C E. Harris, c Young, b Castloy C. V. Isacko, c C..:artor, b Parker .. . - Money, o P arker, b Cnstloy .. . W. H. B Mncs, b Parker C. J. L. Abbot, c Young, b Parker C. Scuclamoro, b Castloy -1= Alton, b Parkot· ... . .. ... Rov. L. H. Evans, b Castloy H. E . Goulden, b r.astloy '1'. E Brodin, not out .. . E xtras ... .. .

.. .170 BOWLING ANALYSIS.

King's School. C.E.llnnis C. J. L . Abbot... H . R. Bloro ... C. V. Isacko ... Rov. L. H. Evans ...

4'7

R.

G

w.

54

3

33 32 27

3 0 1 2

13

3

M. 2 1 2

. .. Il l ... !! I

n II

r; (I

(l

II ll

II II

7

Total ...

.. .Ill

Rov. L. II. Evan's XI. A. G. Richardson ... H. S. S. Parker R. J. Castloy ... ...

0. 7 13 {)

1\I. 0

3 2

R.

2G 4G 32

w 0 ll ll

KING'S SCHOOL v. CANTERB URY PILGRIMS. Played on the Beverley on June 24 th. The school batted first, but open cd disast rously, as the first wicket went down when only one had been scored . Matters Improved somewhat when Parker came in 34 was reached before he was bowled, safter having made a useful :zr. Carter made 23 and Smith zo, otherwise no douhlt figures were reached, and the innings was brought to a close for 8o. Elwyn bowled pie ndidly taking 6 wickets at a cost of 32 runs. Collett and Workman for t111 Pilgrims put on 66 for the first wicket, when Collett was bowled for 36. Workm:lll played steadily for his 37· Parker took 6 wickets for 39· Although they made Ml


THE CANTUARIAN. \ v.ood a start the Pilgrims ultimately only beat us by 39, as will be seen from the 'me below.

KING'S SCHOOL. 2nd Innings. let Innings. 23 b Elwyn .. . W. l\1 . Carter, b Elwyn 0 b Latter .. . I'. 1•:. N. Shorting, b Elwyn 21 not out .. . II , H. !). rm·ker, b Elwyn 0 not out .. . II , M. JBwcs b Elwyn... . .. 3 b Lattor ... II , ,J. Castloy, b Elwyn... . .. 3 c and b Lattor 1'. II. Slttter,c Workw&n, b Latter 4 \ . I I. Jticlllwdson, nm out .. . .. . 20 ,J, II . Smith, c Longfiolcl, b Elwyn .. 0 H. ll. Vliut, c Carr, b Collett 0 eLong!lolcl, b Elwyn M. ::1. Nowlan, not out ... ... .. . 0 1•'. H. Boynon. o 'l'assoll, b Collett .. . 6 Extl'RS HxLrns ... ... .. ....

80 CANTERBU'BoY PILGRIMS. l'. Collett, b Ca.stley ... ... ... ... H. V. Workmn.n, lbw b Richardson ... A. Latter, b Beynon ... .. . ... C. V. I sacke, c Ca.stley, b Parker R. F . Elwyn, b Parker :M. J. Carr, c Parker. b Castley ... H. B. Milsome, c Smith, b Pa1·ker D. S. .M. Tassell, b Park or ... ... G. F. Longfield, b Parkor ... . .. E. N.H. Spencer, (sub) b Parker S. F. Sopwith, (sub) not out Extras ... ... .. . ... .. . BOWLiifG 1st Innings of King's School. 0. M . R. W · lt. ll'. Elwyn ...... ... 1'1 5 32 6 A. 1~n.tto1'...... ...... ... 15 0 41 1 P. Collett ...... .... .. 2 1 1 2 2nd inn~ngs of King's School. 1-t. l!'. Elwyn ......... 6 2 11 2 l '. V. Isn.cke...... ...... 2 0 12 3 j\ . r~nttcr............... 6 1 20 2 1'. Collett....... ........ 2 2 0 0

1

4 1l

5 9 1

12

5

48 3(;

37 )

5 0 15 8 1 5 0

0

11

119 ANALYSIS. 1st Innings of Pilgrims. 0. M. R. H. S. S. Parker...... 19· 1 5 39 R. J . Cn.slloy .... .. ... 19 8 30 C. E. N. Shorting ... 6 12 A. G. Richardson . .. 7 2 10 F. S. Beynon......... 5 17

w. 6 2 1 1


174

THE

CANTUARIAN.

KING'S SCHOOL v. SOUTH EASTERN COLLEGE. An a ttempt was made to play this match on July 7th, on the Beverley but nu start could be made till after three when the College Captain elected to put us in. Carter and Flint commenced play and were not out when rain put a final stop to thc u play. Score :- Carter not out zr, Flint, not out r8, total 39¡

KING'S SCHOOL v. SUTTON VALENCE. Played on the Beverley on July 14th. This match resulted in a victory for the Scho(>l, by the fine figure of z8o runs for nine wickets as opposed to a score of 76 for ten. Tht.l credit of this victory may rest with Parker, both with bat and ball, assisted in the latll't by excellent bowling from Beynon. Our captain at last came out in the brilliant style that we bad looked for throughout the season, and his century met w1th the applause it justly deserved. H aving won the toss we sent in Flint and Carter to break the ice of the bowling , Flint was the first to leave, having, with Carter's good hitting, raised the score to 24 . Shorting followed, but d id not succeed well, his place being taken by Parker. The latter soon showed the stufi he was made of by vigorous drives to the off. Ca rter's ph1cc was soon after filled by Castley, Ja mes and Richardson in succession, Parker scoring hard meanwhile. At n3, however, one rather awkward stroke unsettled him, and h e succumbed to a catch the ensuing ball. His score comprised nine 4's, thirteen 3'11, t welve z's, and singles. Richardson was still batting well, showing some of the good style we had seen in the St. Lawrence match. His wicket eve ntually fell for 24, being out leg before. Slater, too, showed up extremely well ; we should have liked to have seen som e equally good play from him in our earlier matches. His 54 comprised:\ s, a 4, ten 3's, three z's and singles. Smith and Beynon were unlucky, but Mowll kept up his wicket, bringing up the score wi th Slater to z8o, at which P arker decided to declare the innings closed. Sutton Valence followed, but were not at all at home on our fast ground, which was rendered still more dange rous by a strong cross wind. Perks scored carefully, hm runs for some time being confined to singles ; but a sharp catch by Mowll at length diS¡ patched him. L ushington was the only other one who did anything, his total of 30 being hit up in good figures. Parker and Beynon did very well in the bowling line, the


THE \YI't ngc

CANTUARIAN

of each being at 6 runs per wicket.

lMl'imCn

Beynon's last seven overs only gave the

one three. Scores :-

K. S. \'I, M. Cnrtcr, b Hunt ... ... . .. II , 11. l<'lint, b Rowlnnda 1'. 1~. N. Shorting, cHunt, b Rowl ands 11. S. S. Pnrkor, c Perks, b Thornhill II .T. Cnatl oy, b Hunt .. . ... ... I I . M. Jn.mos, b 1Iunt ... ... . .• /1. . (1. Richardson, l bw., b Hunt ... 1' , I L Sinter, not out ,f, ll. Smith, run out 11'. ::!. Beynon, t·un out W. lt. !l!owll, not out Extt·as ...

... 22

... 8 ... 4 .. .113

. .. 8 .. . 5 ... 24 54

2 2 14 24

t SuTTON VALENCE. A.. P erl:s, ~ Mowll, b Parker .. . . .. 15 F. E. Haynes, b Parker... ... .. . 2 E . G. Lushington, e Richardson, b Beynon 30 G. R Hunt, b Parker ... .. . ... ... 3 I. S. Thornton, c Carter, b Beynon . . . 3 N. D. Simpson, e Shot·ting, b PM·ker... 6 W. E . 'r hernbill, b Parker ... ... ... 0 J . R. D. Robertson, nm out... .. . ... 0 E . F . Himmingway, at Mowll, b Beynon ... 6 H. A.. llignet t, run out ... 0 J. Rowlands, not out 0 Extt·as ... ... 11

. .. 'lo

Total ...

...280

T otal ...

BowLING ANALYSIS.

K.S. W. E. Thornhill J. Rowlo.nds ... U. lt. IIunt I, S. 'rhornton H. A. Elignott I L. D. Simpson

...

o. 21

29 23 2 4 1

M. 3 5 6 1 1 0

R.

68 95 '70 'l 15 1

w. I 1 2 4 0 0 0

SuTTON V ALE~CE. 0. 1\1. 13.4 5 H. S. S. Parker 0 8 R. J. Cnstloy ... 7 12 F. S. Beynon ...

R. 29 17 18

W. 5 0 3

K I NG'S SCHOOL v. O.K.S. The annual two day fixture was played on J uly 28th and 29th, and resulted in a brilliant victory for the school by x85 runs. This result was mainly due to the batting of Shorting, Slater and Smith on the first day, and of Carter, Flint, Smith and Parker, on the second, and to the bowling of Parker who in the whole match took r x wickets for 73 runs, doing the "hat trick" with the last three balls of the match. We


q6

THE CANTUARI AN.

were also very pleased to see so many O.K.S, down this year in pleasant contrast to the preceding year. Parker won the toss for the school, and sent in Castley and Flint. In the sccontl over Flint was given out I. b. w., and Carter did not long survive, but Shorting, the next batsman, although his innings was not faultless, gave help when most needed, and after having scored 43 was unfortunately run out. The next wickets fell rapidly until Smith joined Slater, and these two took the score from ro8 to 152, each scoring 29. Tlw last two wickets added no more runs, Latter taking two wickets for no runs. The O.K.S. then went in, the only noticeable point being Latter's brilliant inningh of 51, no one else making any stand except Isacke and T. Bredin who added 20 for Llw last wicket. For the school, Beynon was the most successful bowler, laking 4 wickets fm 23 runs. On the second day a splendid stand was made by Carter and Flint, who made 86 (()I the first wicket before being separated. Flint was the first to leave, as he was unforlu· nately run out with 54 to his credit, Carter soon followed however having played with great care, Flint's innings being perhaps the better as Carter was missed twice. After this no one made a great stand. In the second innings of the O.K.S. no one seemed able to stand up against the bowling of Parker, except perhaps Roe, who played a careful innings of 15 not out, and Copland who quickly hit up 17· In this innings Parker took 8 wickets for 25 runs ami as before mentioned did the "hat trick." Appended is the score :K.S.C. 1st Innings. W. M. Carter, c Latter, b Copland ... R. B. Flint, lbw b Copland C. E. N. Sho1·ting, run out ... H. S. S. Parko1·, b Elwyn R , J. Castloy, b Elwyn H. M. J ames, run out... A. G. Richardson, c Latter, b Copland P. H. Slater, c Latter, b Elwyn ... J . H. Smith, c and b Ln.tto1·, F. S. Deynon, b Latter · W. R. :Uowll, not out ... ... Extras ... ...

Total

8 2

43 '

7 11

2nd Innings. c Tassell, b Elwyn run out ... ... ... run out .. . .. . .. . c Latte1·, b Elwyn ... lbw., b E lwyn b Brodin ... c Latter, b Brodin .. .

u~

.. G1 J2 20 {J

u

7 9 29 c. Roo, b Brodin 29 I c Carr, bBredin 0 b Elwyn .. . 1 0 not out .. . 6 1 Extras ...

152 1

7

.,,, ....

r; 10 !lll

Total

...

2111


THE

177

CANTUARIAN. O.K.S.

2nd Innings. 51 b Castloy 0 b Pn.rkor ... 12 b Parker ... 0 b Parket· ... 8 not ont 0 c Shorting, b P 1nker 3 b Parkor ... 5 b Parkor ... 16 retirecl h u rt 7 b Parker ... 10 b Pn.rkor Extras 8

1st Innings. \. Lnttor, c Smith, b Parker H.'l'. l~ammell, b Parker, ... <;. P. Copland, e Castley, b Parker I I.E. Ryley, c Slater, b Castley ... C. li. Roo, c Cartor, b Beynon ... lt. l!'. Elwyn, run out .. . .. . .. . M. •r. Cn.n·, c Sln.ter, b Boynon .. . o\ . Brodin, r un 011t .. . ... .. . II. Isnoke, c Castley, b Beynon ... D. S. M. 'l'nssoll, b lloynon ... '1'. K Hredin, not out Extt·ns ... ... ... . ..

0

M.

R.

o.

M.

22 13

10

42

2 2

48 39 17 0

11 4 2

l

2

R.

\V.

ll

62

w.

o.

3 1

15·2 10 5

3 48 13 0 32 6 ~ 2 23 9·1 8 0 2 0 P arker bowled 2 no balls. BOWLING ANALYSIS.

1st Innings. R. F. Elwyn C. P . Copland c. B. Roo G. C. E. Ryley A. Latter A. Brodin

0 17 5 15 0 3 3 4 0 0

...

120 BOWLING .ANALYSIS , II . S. S. Parker ...... H. J. Cnstley ........ F. S. Beynon ......... C. E. N. Shorting ...

4

M.

R.

25 23 3

6 4

3

w. 8 1 0

2nd I nnings.

o.

3 3 0 0

31.4

2

7 13

13 8

M.

9 2 0 2 1

R.

w.

80 38 35

4

19 21

0 0 0 4


q8

THE

CANTUARIAN.

FOOTBALL PROSPECTS. If the opening games are at all a true forecast of the future, we have good reason to count upon a satisfactory, if not successful season. Seven of last year's team are still here, and include all last year's three-quarters, the best half, and the back. James, Castley, and Shorting all appear in good form, and with careful practice ought to prov~ dangerous. Athawes, too, is on the spot as usual, at half; and Cullen should be a usc• ful back this year, if he will be careful to avoid last season's mistakes. Another half IJ:\'1 therefore to be found ; and for this post Knapp and Candy seem to be the two from whom a choice will be made. The brothers Flint are the only two old forwards left, and H. E. may go as the fourth three-quarter. To fill the seven vacant places in the scrnm· mage is the problem which the Captain has to solve; at present Carter, Beynon, Lux moore, Cooper, Micklem, Newland, and Mowll are most conspicuous. H aving the benefitof which they have for some years stood in need-of a good coach in the person of M1 . Tripp, himself an enthusiastic player and a good forward, they ought under his guidance to improve and make the packs a really useful feature in the game ; and already there :uc signs of improvement visible. We shall need a really good team this season, if we arc to be successful, as the match list is a more important one than heretofore. The eight out and home matches with the Thanet Wanderers, Dover Town and College, and Sutton Vallence, who are all sure to be strong, can only be won by really good combined play at all points. The 0 . K. S. too, generally muster in good force. In add ition, the matches with St. Augustine's College have been revived; while in place of those with the South Eastern College we have two Folkestone Clubs to oppose, which have con siderably strengthened the card. It will therefore be no easy task to come successfully out of this ordeal. May we in conclusion suggest various points which we think should be carefully attended to:x.-The three-quarters must be very quick in picking up the ball and getting orr. They should always punt into touch in their own half. unless a good opportunity of running is open. They should always wait upon each other and combine in passing, but never pass standing still. 2.- The halves ought not to get too· near the scrummage, as they are apt to be caught before they can pass the ball. 3.- The back should be careful not to attempt to kick the ball when it is rolling; but if he has not time to pick it up, to fall on it ; and to bear in mind that a good punt into touch is most valuable.


THE

CANTUARI AN.

1 79

4.- Tackling is generally weak. Special attention should be given to this. And players should aim at collaring by the waist; and if not, by the legs. 5.-Tbe forwards are not sharp enough in following up. They ought to be on their opponents as soon as they get the ball. And when they make a rush, it should be a combined one, and not let one go by himself. 6.-Heeling out should rarely be resorted to, except in their opponents' 25. If constantly practised, the forwards have too little share in the game and throw too much work on the three-quarters; who have not sufficient time to recover their wind, and cannot therefore tackle successfully. FOOTBALL FI XTURES. DATE. OPPONENTS. GROUND. 1891. S. Augustine's. Blore's Piece. Lost Tues. Oct. 20 Dover. Tues. Won Dover College. 27 Wed. " 28 Blore's Piece. Folkestone. " 4 Thanet Wanders. Blore's Piece. '-lo71. Wed. Nov. Sutton Valence. Sutton. Tues. JO Thurs. " 12 Dover Town. Blore's Piece. " 18 Blore's Piece. Castle Hill F.C. Wed. " Sutton Valence. Blore's Piece. Wed. 25 " S. Augustine's. Blore's Piece. Thur. D ec. ro 22 Blore's Piece O.K.S. Tues. 1892." Thanet Wanderers. Ramsgate. Tues. Feb. 9 Dover Town. Dover. r8 Thurs. Tues. " 23 Dover College. Blore's Piece. I

.

"

VIRTUTE FUNCTI MORE PATRUM DUCES. J. 1!.

S~uTH.-King's Scholar. Entered the School, Sept. x884; Vlth Form, Sept., r888; Monitor, Sept, r889; Captain of School, Sept. x89o-91; President Debating Society, r890-91; Football XV., Nov., r89o; Cricket XV., r89 r ; Ed. Ca1lluarimt; Hasker Scholarship; Exeter Coli., Oxon, and xst School Exhibition.

,


r8o

THE

CANTUARI AN.

H . S. S. PARKER.- King's Scholar. E ntered the School, Jan., r886; Cricket XI, x888; Vl th. Form, Sept., x888; l\Ionitor, Sept., 1889; Captain of Cricket X I , I 890-91; Football XV., x89o; Ed. Ca7lluarian: Open Schol. Corpus Christ, Ca111 bridge, and School Exhibition. W. H . S.\LMON.-King's Scholar. Entered the School, Jan., r88 7 ; Vl th Form, j an., x889. W. A. WJGRA~r.-Entered the Senior Department, Jan. r886; Football XV., 188M, Vlth Form, r88y; Monitor, Sept., x89o; H istory Schol., T rinity Hall, Cambridg•. E. N . H. Srr>NCER.-Entered the School, Sept., x888; Vllh F orm, Jan. 189 1. C . II. WHARTON.- Entered Senior Department, Jan. , r887; Cricket XI. , r88H, goes to Bank of England. • .. • '

TENNIS TOURNAMENT. I ST ROUND.

{Smith (x) Carter } b t {Salmon Newland { b t} F inn ::)pencer } b ea Maundnll eat R idley Atbawes ea Hincks Ba{cc D m·al Sopwith } b { Vernon Shorting } b t { Castley Smith (2) ea Stringer Donaldson ear Candr (x) Beynon } a b re. Cooper ) 2ND ROUND.

Shorting } beat { Spencer Smith(2) ' Duval

Newland } beat { Sopwith Barlee Donaldson 3 RD ROU ND,

Beynon l beat { Ne wland Cooper J Barlcc Shorting } b e Smith (2) a Y · LAST ROUND. Sh~rting } beat { Beynon Sm1th (2) Cooper

Beynon } beat } i\tha111 Cooper Cartu


THE

CAr TUARIAN.

DEBATING SOCIETY. E. J. S. Athawes, On Saturday, September 26th, a debate was held in the Parry Library, when C. A. I{ napp moved that " Cremation is the most r:ttional method of disposing of the dead." C. A. Knapp, in moving, said that the '>)'stem of burial was most unsatisfactory, on account of the injurious gases generated by the animal life on a decaying body which carry the germs of disease through the air and percolate the earth ; water also received the gases. Cremation, on the other hand, has no bad smell and no noxious gases; merely resolving the body mto its component elements. I t only occupies half-an-hour, and the ashes weigh about sibs. T he cost at present is about £s, but if it become more general this would be reduced to about 3os. At present about 86,ooo tons of bone earth are imported into England yearly, the necessity for which would be, of course, obviated if cremation were employed. Cremation, be pointed out, was and bad been more popular than was at first sight apparent. The ancients with the exception of China, Judrea, and Egypt, for which there were satisfactory reasons, had all adopted it; and it would have spread¡ over Europe more bad it not been for the Christians, who believed it opposed to the doctnne of the Resurrection, although the idea made very lit~le provision for the l\lfartyrs. Cremation too now was spreading rapidly.

leading the Opposition attacked the hon. mover's statement that cremation gave off no smell whatever and quoted the Cremation at Woking about a year ago, which according to the papers was not totally devoid of smell and gave off a gas quite as unhealthy as the smell of dead bodies. The hon. member then went on to say that people as a rule like to think of their dead friends as much as possible in their lifelike form and that pleasure would even be taken away from them if they knew that they were immediately transformed into a heap of ashes. F. S. Beynon spoke second for the motion. In reference to a remark of the Leader of the Opposition he explained that the gas given off from the cinerator was collected in glass tubes and chemically destroyed. He pointed out that trees planted in cemeteries to absorb the animal matter and bad gas only partially consnmcd it, so that there was a great quantity in the air around cemetarics. As shown by the fact that in Paris nearly one-half of diseases prevalent arose in the houses around the cemeteries. The cost of cremation, apart from the expense of the cinerator which was by no means large, would be under 2s. 6d. for each body. In England, in 187o, a Cremation Society was formed in London under Sir Edward Thor-npson to further the adoption of cremation in place of


THE

CANTUARIAN.

burial owing to the saving of expense and prevention of many diseases, which was thereby obtained. W. M. Carter, speaking for the Opposi¡ tion, said that since burial in churchyards was not permitted now, cemeteries were further from towns as a rule than they used to be ; and with regard to the poisoni ng of water, if cemetaries were placed a few miles from a town, and on a lower level than that town, no such danger could arise. He also stated that in cases were death had occurred by poisoning, when there had been no suspicion at the time and no post mortem had taken place, on the arising of such suspicion, if the body had been cremated no opportunity for proving the case and bringing the murderer to justice would occur, whereas if the body had been buried it could be exhumed and the demands of justice satisfied. In reply to an observation that villas were sure to be built near cemeteries and people must liYe somewhere, he maintained that there was plenty of building room elsewhere and that people need not live ncarcemeterics if they did not wish. M. S. Newland spoke next for the motion. He began by questioning the statement of the honourable gentleman who led the Opposition in which he clain1ed that one can better remember their deceased friends in their lifelike form when they arc buried than when they are cremated. He argued that he could not see how the thought of a decomposed worm eaten mass

could make any vivid recollection of a friend's life-like form, at least not in the ordinary sense of the word life-like. He went on to say that the two main poi nts from which cremation ought to be considered were sentime nt and sanitation. 1\.s regards the first, it was true that many people shrunk from the idea of cremation on grounds of sentiment but this was to a great extent caused by ignorance. As re garded from a sanitary point of view it had been proved and would be still further proved by the honourable gentlemen sup porting the motion that cremation was far and away the most healthy and rational way of disposing of the dead. R. B. Flint, in opposing the motion, alluded to the facility with which poisoning could be carried on if cremation were universally adopted, and cited several in stances in which bodies have been exhumed with poison found in them. The medical faculty, he said, were not any too careful in giving certificates of death, and often did so in doubtful cases to avoid hurting the feelings of relations, which an i nquc~t involves. H . M. J ames, for the motion, remarked that t:ver since the year 7 so, the system of laying aside certain portions of land fo1 burial purpos~s, had been started in Eng. land. H ence he pointed out that tlw .amount of land occupied by cemctcri~s now, must be \'Cry great. And this prac. tical waste of ground, he said, might haw have been saved if cremation had been adopted by our forefathers. To prove that


THE CANTU ARIAN~ c ccmation

was gaining ground in England, lie pointed out the increase of cremation cascs at Waking this year. It J. Castley, T. C. Hincks, F. Chisholm, and A. Barlee also spoke. C. A Knapp, in closing the debate, replied that in his opinion if cremation were lhc general custom, doctors would consequently be more careful in certifying, knowIll!-( what depended on it. The opposition hnd said that bad gas would escape from c rcmatories as much as from g raves, but he denied this. I t is in man's power to make the crematories practically perfect, while it is impossible to stop the outflow of h:cd gases in cemeteries, for the clay that w.ts most useful in the decomposition of the hotly was the one which most aided the l·,rnpe of the gas. On a show of hands the motion was re· JCrtcd by the casting vote of the President. .\ nother meeting was held on Saturday (ktober 1oth, when W . M . Carter, moved that "The Expression ' Good Old T imes' is fallacious." The Hon. Mover uaid that, looked on from a general point of view the expressions was pessimistic and •chowed a feeling of thanklessness for the actions of forethought of great men in the past. Of particular advantages of the present time, he pointed out the railroads which tend :to destroy cn~ular prejudice and the cheapness and quantity of literature. C. A. Knapp, leading the opposition ,;ud that in the majority of cases it was

used on account of increased competition consequent on the present overcrowding of England ; the result of this was that labour was of course much cheaper and the struggle for life much more severe; he also said that hospitalitr was less to be seen now than in former days. Some excellent institutions had to be changed with the times. As a mat ter of p leasure he thought that railway.; by thei r very frequency destroyed muc h of their advantages. R. J. Castlcy for the motion showed that lawlessness was much more rife formerly than at present. H e also pointed out the immen'le advantages from the papers which also acted as curbs on Government5. H e mentioned the cheapness of postage. M. S. N ewland said th:tt the present sys tem of education wa; bad. E. J. S. Athawes instanced the several inventions and discoverie> of the present time and said that much more attention was paid to learning. The country was in a more peaceful and settled state. Religion was more widely spread throughout the world. T. C. Hinck-;, for the opposition, drew attention to the enervating influence of Juxuriou~ inventions. England is an agricultural nation and the old conditions were b et ter than the present since land was worth more and rents were always· paid. The best books, he said, were not generally in the reach of the poorer p eople. H . M. James for the opposition remarked o n the Chivalry of the " Good Old Days,'


THE

CANTUARIAN.

with regard to the lack of which so many letters of complaint have appeared in the papers lately. He called attention to the Tournament, a game indulged in by our ancestors, which has now totally disappeared H e remarked on the disappearance of several other good old customs, e.g. May Day, etc.

F. Chisholm drew attention to the amount of bad literature prevalent in the present day. A . Barlee also spoke for the motion. On a show of hands the President declared the motion negatived by 6 votes.

THE BURSAR' S FUND. THE BUNCE EXH IBITI O N AUGMENTATION. We have been as ked to insert the following:-

7 o Old Crmtuarirms. This Fund was established in 1865, with the object partly of affording to Old Cantuarians an opportunity of retaining their connection with the School, and partly of founding an additional Exhibition or augmenting an existing one to be held by an Old King's Scholar at the University. The former is carried out by enabling every old King's School boy to retain his name on the School books upon payment of an annual subscription of ss. to the Fund. The money thus raised fo rms an endowment fund by means of which the latter part of the object is attained-a cerpart of the income being appropriated for the E xhibition, and the surplus invested. Shortly after the Establishment of the Fund the School bcca me entitled to the benefit of a legacy of £I,ooo, bequeathed by the Will of Mrs. Anne Bunce, of Can_

terbmy, in trust to found an Exhibition to be held by an an Old King's Scholar, at one of th e Universities of Oxford or Cam bridge, to be called " the Bunce Exhioi tion." The testatrix stated in her Will that she was anxious that the Exhibition shou I d be founded in consideration of thl regard which her late husband, the Re'. John Bowes Bunce, entertained for thl" School, being the school at which he w:t educated, and of the interest he alw:~yH took in all matters connected with it, :1nd of the desire which her late son, the R ev. John Bowes Bunce, felt to found tlw same out of regard to the memory of hi" father. The income produced from the invc~t ment of this legacy amounted to about £3o, and with a view to gi,·ing the Exlu 1 bition the same pecuniary benefits as tho., enjoyed by the holders of the other Schot1l Exhibitions-their value being £so 11 was decided to augment this Exhibition to

I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

z8s

a like amount by the graut of an additional The latter can feel assured that by becomout of the Bursar's Fund. ing subscribers to the Fund they will be The income of the latter being more helping to confer a lasting benefit on their than sufficient to meet this annual pay old School, and at the same time it will be lllcnt, the successive Bursars hm·e out of a graceful recognition by them that they the surplus, and by the help of composition still owe some obligation to the school at donations, been enabled to accumulate a which they received their education, and c-apital fund which is now represented by that they desire tor c tain their connection the sum of £sso, India, £3 % anns., with it . invested in the joint names of the Head The names of Old Cantuarians retaining Maste r and the Bursar. It is hoped that their names on the books arc printed at this invested fund, which now produces the end of the School Calendar issued an.(, 16" I os. per annum towards the £2 o, nually after the summer term, and a copy will within a short time, by means of dona- of the Calendar itself is sent to each subtions and the gradually increasing surplus scriber. from subscriptions m·ailablc for investment The Bursar will be glad to receive, in he raised to such an amount as will produce lieu of or in addition to the annual subhy itself the full sum. of£ 20. scription, donations from any O.K.S. who It is suggested that upon this being ob- may be desirous of assisting the objects of tained the invested Fund might be set the Fund. Donors of £s and upwards apart and appropriated for the permanent are entitled to have their names retained augmentation of the Bunce Exhibition, and on the books during life without furthe r the future annual subscriptions would then payment. Any O.K.S. may haYe his nome restored he free to be applied towards founding or augmenting some other School Exhibition. to the books nothwithstanding any lapse ln the attai nment of this the Bursar of time since he left the school. The subearnestly hopes that all O. K. S. will co- scription becomes payable on the zst of operate. The permanent augmentation of Jan nary in each year. ERNEST GEORGE SPIERS, the Bunce Exhibition, founded as it was in H on. Bursar. memory of an O.K.S. of the last century, 12, New Inn, London, W.C. Ncems an object, which should specially appeal to the O.K.S. of the present day. .(,20


THE CANTUARIAN.

x86

THE SCH OOL. CHRISTM~S

TERM, 1891. A. C. Moule. Captain . .. R. J. Castley. Captain of Cricket .. . . . . H. M. James. Captain of Football .. . E ditors of " Tlte Cantuarian." W. M. Carter, C. A. Knapp, H. M. James. Secretary, T. C. Hincks. lltfoniton E. J. Athawes A. C. Moule C. A. Knapp W. M. Carter H. M. James (House Monitor) F. S. Beynon R. J. Castley Sports Committee. H. M. James A, C. Moule R. B. Flint W. l\I. Carter C. E. N. Shorting R. J. Castley E. J. Athawes (Secretary). D ebating Sodety. W. M. Carter. President . .. C. A. Knapp. Vice-President .. . M.S. Newland. Secretary ... COMMI TTEE:

W. M. Carter F. S. Beynon R. J. Cast ley E. J. Athawes T. C. Hincks

C. A. Knapp R. B. Flint M. S. Newland H. M. James


THE

CANTUARIAN.

SCHOOL NEWS . We :\rc gl:ld to welcome Mr. G. D. Tripp •I <'atus ColleJc, Cambridge. as mathe-

tll.llll':\1 m:\stcr-lhis term, also ~Ir. Longsdon 1-.xctcr Col., Oxon, who fills Mr. Scuda•u•uc's place, and l\Ir. Johnson, of Sidney, ''"ex, as music master. * * 'l'hc memorial to* Marlowe, from the • 111~1.!1 of Onslow.forcl, just outside the 1 '11 h ·dral gate, wa~ unveiled by H enry l1' ing, September r6th. It consists of ' I' cnaissancc pedestal surmounted by a h1olli.C life-size statue of a Lyric muse. There II<' also four niches in the pedestal for some ul ~larlowe's characters, Tamburlainc, 1•. \1\'.trd II., the Jew ofMalta, and Faustus; hut at present these do not appear owing tel want of funds which have not been fortheoming as readily as had been hoped ; it was also rumoured that Swinburne had promised to subscribe some lines to the ~latuc but as yet it knows them not. 111

•.. •

The replica of Professor Herkomer's picture vf Bishop Parry has been placed in the library;,bearing his name. The monument in the nave of the Cathedral was unveiled on the 13th of October . • * * We arc glad to record that the Debating ~ocicty has been vigourously taken up this term and that it is intention of the Committee to have a debate every fortnight. One was held on Saturday, September 26th on Cremation, of which details are given in :lnother column.

Great advances have been made in the room intended for the museum. The old door has been unearthed, looking down on the Rabbit Hutch, and a staircase has been erected leading thence to the museum. * • * I n rcspon~e to the wish of several correspondents we have placed the contemporary papers from other schools in the Parry Library. * * * The Cricket XI. were invited by Mrs, Bredin to tea at St. Peter's House, at the end of last term, when they spent a very pleasant evening. • * • A Football ~latch was played on September 29th, against a XV. brought by P. \V. James, in very hot weather. The School lost by 3 goals :: tries to r try. • * * Another match was played against a XV. brought by A. Bredin, in which the School also suffered defeat by 4 goals to nil. * ** It has been decided to have Theatricals at the end of this term. ** * The Archbishop opened the Parry Memorial Library, and unveiled Bishop Parry's portrait, on Tuesday, 13th October. He also obtained a half-holiday for the School. ** * The Choral Society has started afresh, with every prospect of success.


x88

THE

CANTUARIAN.

O.K .S. COLUMN. H. Isacke who left us at Christmas x8go, I against the School in the O,K.S. match and G. R. Welstead who left at Midsummer are requested to write to W. A. Wigram, x88g, passed into Sand hurst at the last J une Trinity Hall, Cambridge. exam. Isacke taking 24th place. • • • • The date of the m;tch has bee n changed • A. Bred in has passed out of Sandhurst. · to l\ronday, December 2 rst.

. ..

* *

* the entrance exam. J . Johnson has passed for the R oyal Academy of Music.

The sermon preached by 1\Ir. Ottley on Speech Day is printed in the Glnndt of • * E11gland Pulpit, of Oct. r 7th. • * * ~·he Rev. A. G. B. Atkinson has left t.he 1 [We would beg O~K. S. to send us any Phtlberds, and has accepted the semor information about themselves many; we fear curacy of St. John's••P.ortman Square. are actuated by a false feeli ng of modes•y • E. Ellam has obtained a mastership at and thus deprive us of what is probably the most interesting column in the Cantuarian the Dean's Close Sc~o.ol, Cheltenham. both for O.K.S. and the School itself] Any O.K.S. wishing to play in the match

CORRESPONDENCE . N.B.-Tho Etlilo•·s clecline to acce11l mty •·csponsibility comteclocl1dlh the 01li11ions of lhei1· ro!"Yespclt deals. l'lamc ancl aclclrc.•s mnst al1uays be given, not !lecesMwily .fo•· 7mbUcation, btd as 11 yuamnloc of yooclfailh. Pel'tO!llllilies 10i!Z iavo~vo CCl'lttin !'c.icclion.

7 o tl1e Editors of "TilE

CANTUARIAN."

necessity for candles would confer a great kindness on

Dear Sirs,-Would it not be possible to Yours, &c., have gas in the Studies. The present sysTABLE CLOTil. tem of using candles is Yerr unsatisfactory in many ways. If this were done it would undoubtedly T o l/1e Editors of "Tu E CANTUARJAN." be received with acclamation by t hose who Dear Sirs,- May I be allowed space to would use the gas, and by obviating the make a suggestion, which I am sure mu ~


THE

CANTUARIAN.

h IH' occurred to many others before now, uunl'ly, that gas should be laid on in the tllllit•s. Surely this could be managed 11 hnut :my great inconvenience to anyone. It would be a great blessing to everyone 111 1hL Studies. There is possibly this obI• 'tmn to it, that it would be tamoered 1th hy some mischievously inclined per"" ; but might not this be obviated h)· 1 ttlling it off from those who arc so 1n11Jiqh as to abuse their privileges. Yours, &c., GASOPHILOS.

I,, 1/~e Editors of "THE CANTUARIAN." I lt~AR StR,-I have been a constant ll<'I)IICntcr of the Gymnasium for the last 111 tr or two, and I think I may safely .1y, I have never been in a place th.lt more resembles a blast furnace, after pill have been at work for about five minutes. ll is true that the three gratings

in the floor by the bridge ladder-(drains or flues) ?-have nobly volunteered to cool the place a little by sending up streams of cold but not sweet air, in order to add to the general pleasure of being in there. Could not something be done in the way of windows which could be covered with wire netting or something, in case of mis siles, to make it a little more bearable. Perhaps I might venture to add that the mattresses having been left in the rain some time or other arc scarcely in a fi t state for usc. Hoping this will be seen to. I remain, Yours truly, GYMNASI UM. Ex-EDITOR,- Thanks for suggestion . The article you refer to was not published by the present Editors. Your Jetter however is far too personal and strong in expreso;ion for publication. -Eoo].

OUR CONTEM P ORARIES . The paper which most interests us is naturally one from our off-spring at the ntipocles, the organ of the King's School l':uramatla. At present, unfortunately our knowledge of the School is very scanty, but we trust soon to be able to supplement it :mel to offer our readers fuller information on the subject. They print, however, a ~mall art;cle on the King's School Canter-

bury, in which the following extraordi nary word:; mc::t on~'s eyes "There is no lack of venerable and beautiful surroundings to stimulate the minds of the scholars; but to the prosaic mind oflite modem sdtoolboy t!tese advantages an mon titan counterbala?tced by the extremely limited playground accommodation I " the italics are ours.But perhaps the King's School Parramatta


THE

CANTUARIAN.

is more entitled to pity than anger. They have no Cathedral and therefore do not know that this advantage can be counter¡ balanced by nothing on this earth. However they may as well know that our Cricket Ground is one of the best in the kingdom; indeed, preferred to any other in England by the Australians, whose authority we presume, they will not question. The A!Leyniau contains some excellent hints on football players, they devote a very

large precentage of their space to the O.A. CricketTour. The Cranbrookian calmly offers its reader;; a long cutting from Ptmc!t about La Crickette in France. We also acknowledge the receipt of the Alleynitm. Leys Fort?tightly (J). Cm1lbrookian, C/10lmeleia11, Plymotlu'n11, TVykeltamist, I orch Bennr, Buddersfield College ilfnga zi11e, Victorian.

N OTICES. \Ve beg to acknowledge with thanks the Robinson (7s. 6d.), G. J. Mullins (1os. od.), receipt of the following subscriptions to C. T. Donaldson, B. S. Spencer (7s. 6d.), the Cnntuarian: R. F . Elwyn, (7s. od.), \V. A. Wigram, Rev. R. L. Ottley (ss. od.), \V. Wrse, Bishop i\Iitchinson (7s. od.), A. D. Maughan. T. Perkins, R. Owen (ss. od.), Rev. A.M. We would remind our subscribers who Foster, R. H. Parr, E . L. Payne, (7s. od.), have not already paid that their subscrip W. T. Reid (xos. 6d.), II. Stringer, H. E. tions up to the end of 1891 are now due. i\Iorice C. P. Copland (7s. od.), R. C. Also that the Cmllttarian year will be from Bingle; (7s. od.), P. A. Turnbull. 'V. P . l September to September; hence the sub Thornton, \V. Worth, C. H. Wharton, H. scription till September, 1892 1 will be zs. 4d.


TI-IE CANTUARIAN. VoL. III.

DECEMBER, 189r.

No. 8

EDITORIAL. \Vc informed our readers in our last issue that the names of the Cricket and Football h â&#x20AC;˘:tms were about to be hung up in conspicuous positions, for the eyes of the present

.md future generations of King's scholars; and such is the case. "Rome," they say wtth truth, "was not built in a day," and this result has not been obtained without .umc trouble. Many letters found their way in this humble print, but the Sports ( 'ommittee treated them wi th disdain; many a lime also was it suggested to them, but they seemed to sleep; finally, a thrust was given by a certain 0. K.S. at the last 0 . K.S. supper. The Sports Committee woke up-though p er hap~ it is rather unjust tu say that 1/iis Sports Committee was ever asleep, since they arc all new members each ymr. However, they set to work at once, and now, al last, in answer to the many calls llll' names of the Cricket and Football teams arc to be recorded in letters of gold, and plnccd where everyone in the School may see, and keep fresh in their memories the uamcs of those who have gone before them, and fought for their School; and this will .u ld one more link to the chain that binds past King's Scholars to those of the present llltd future ages. Many and various are the ways in which, names of former scholars have been


THE

CANTUARI AN.

handed down to the present generations. A few- very few- of our number lay proudly at rest in the Cathedral, and the marble monument reminds us of those who at one time filled our places, and calls on us to imitate their example, and few King's Scholars can look on the monuments erected to the memory of Broughton or Gipps, or of the brave Colonel Mackeson, without feeling some touch of kin with the men who rest beneath. Lately, too, another monument has been erected to a great O.K.S., Marlowe, but, perhaps, the figure of a green dancing girl-or shall we say of a Lyric Muse to appease the sculptor-fails to inspire the same feelings as the memorial~ within the sacred walls of our old Cathedral ; still we claim him as an O.K.S. Some of us, probably, have recognised an old schoolfellow in tht• statue of Linacrc at the entra nce of the Royal College of Surgeons. The names on the exhibition boards in the school-room arc well known to most of the School, :and if Richard Fletcher were to walk into the Mint Yard to-day h1 would be recognised and received with open arms as the exhibitioner of x71 9· Then, too, the once much-abused " Pink Book," now carefully revised, is an invaluable m ea n~ of keepi ng O.K.S. in touch with their old School, and it tells us humbler creatures al present in the School of the achievments of these same O.K.S. There is an old boaHI nailed up in the school-room with names cut of very ancient date, and many of them appear on the exhibition boards. More recently, and so, perhaps, less sacred, are tht names of many Old King's Scholars written and cut in the lockers they used; some 111 them now celebrated whom we, of course, cannot name. Lastly, in the Old Library tables are cut many names of interest, one most conspicuous carved by the hand of .r poor fellow who was destined soon after to die by the hand of an assassin in Afghani tan. Name-culling decidedly gains by age, and many of these same can·ings may havt been atoned for at the time as fearful offences, although we of the later times gua11l them so jealously. They all, however, form links in the chain t hat binds past with pn· sent K ing's scholars, and present with future; and one more link is about to be added by recording the names of those who maintained the School's name in the Cricket and Football Field and maintained it nobly.


THE

CANT UARIAN.

193

THE LAST SIGH OF THE MOOR. " Lebt wohl, ihr Berge, ihr geliebten Oriften, I hr traulich stillen Thiiler, lebetwohl l "-Schiller. w•·ll~

the loud anthem 'neath the fretted Each from his censer swings the clouds of nrches, incense, I '"'d a11d long from the gleaming marble Now shall the sun of peace shine evermore. halls, Slowly they enter the palace's huge portals, llu11hs in each bosom wildest exultation, Each warrior's mind with wonder overflows, • I how the crescent from the rampart While on his gaze there bursts a blaze of ralls. splendour, I 111 ward l ye gallants, foin the gay pro· This is the Alhambra I stronghold of his foes. ression I I'' ; high your plumes in the sunny Tall, slender shafts, with capitals of palm Spanish air, leaves '' I the Alhambra glitters bright before Bear up with flowery crowns the architrave; you, Tall pointed windows, glowing rich with I h • ked with its gold, and jewels ncb and colour rnrc. ' Shed a soft radiance on the columned nave. I mk :tfter rank, of knights in shining Budding to life beneath their bright enarmour, chantment, \\ 1m! through the vale, in endless waves Each reedy shaft glows bright with molten of steel, fire, 1 ' ' ttcd with pennons, and sparkling H eaped with his trophies, glittering with o'er with lance points, marble, tlnw.trtl they march to the trumpets deaf- Each warrior's tomb shines like a funeral ening peal. pyre. Each shady court with cool green trees 1 11llikc lie comes with his lovely queen and rushes, beside him II 111 I l.i'erdinando, champion of the cross, Girt round with terraces and towers of stone, ll.lil I Isabella, true in love and council, •hum aloud, ye Cavaliers, your p ennons Rings with the splashing of a crystal fountain, proudly toss Blent with the songs of birds with silver tone. II .11 k I how the hymn rolls on in exultation, There 'neath the trees in the fiery Spanish 1\• deum, te laudamus," is their cry, noon-tide I • ho gives back each joyful exclamation, Softly the cool green light falls from above, I c, tc laudamus " rolls from earth to sky. Here the dark maids and. youths of White-robed priests their solemn anthem Mauritania chanting, Sang to the zhitta's notes their songs of llo .u on the cross, the emblem of their war. love.


194

THE

CANTUARIAN.

H ere noble warriors of gay Estramaduro, Castile and Arragon, Toledo and Madrid H ere shall ye tell your tales of knightly valour Tales of great Roland, Ruy Gomez and the Cid. H ere shall your daughters loose your weighty corslets, Bathing your foreheads in the fountain's wave, H ere let the trumpet yield to lute and cymbal, Valour's stout panoply to doublets brave. H ere shall the ceaseless plashing of the fountain, . Blent with the lute of silvery dulcet stram, With the sweet trilling of the tuneful song bird Waft you to dreams of rest from toil and pain. Hark I as the train the massive portal enters, Sweetly the maids their hymn of victory sing. Let us draw near and catch the strains they utter, While to the Lord their song of Praise they bring. 0 praise ye the Lord ! F or the Saracen horde I s dispersed by his sword And his servant our king. 0 Sis~ers rejoice I For the sound of his voice And the King of our choice Certain victory bring. Hail ! brave Ferdinand Thou that savest our Land From the proud H eathen band Thy praises we sing !

Noon passes on and sadly from"the city Winds to the hills a mournful train and slow Lingering oft and gazing oft behind them, While their loved city is pillaged by th~¡u foe. Build up the gate, whence passed tin Moorish chieftains Out from their homes and the sunny land of Spain Close it wi th granite, and buttresses nl marble, No human foot may linger here again. Sadly they think Empire, Sadly of Yussuf swords, Sadly they sing of forsaken, Stay let us list to words.

of the glorious MooriHh and his stout Morcsc" their homes and hearth the Moorish maiden,â&#x20AC;˘

0

Sisters lament I the A1hamlu11 is ta'en Our city is sold by a man who wn fain To barter for peace our bright Kirw dom in Spain, For peace without honour. While our best and onr bravest have died on t he plain, T o defend the loved homes we would die to regain, He chose in his palace secure to remain, Secure with dishonour. Hark I the nightingale's voice, t'is an c quisite pain To hear its sweet voice as we jOUIIll) from Spain, For it sings in the groves were we 11\;'1 r shall again Go to walk with our lovers.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

All, all are gone as the sun his course completed, Lingers it seems, ere he plunges into gloom, All save one group, who lingering on a hill-top, Gaze on the city as on a parent's tomb. f ar in the West the great red Sun is stooping, Staining the sky with lurid, crimson glow, Amber and purple hang the clouds above him, 13right gleams the city in the vale below. Catching the radiance of the lurid sun-set Gra nada gleams with bright r eflected rays. Cupolas gilded, ramparts bright with marble, One glimpse of heaven bequeathed to mortal gaze.

195

One long last look, and one last sigh of anguish, Then as the sun sinks quietly to rest, Quick from the hill-top, turn two dusky figures, Last of the band, that journeys from t he West. See l t'is the King Abdullah and his mother, Fiercely his breast with shame and sorrow burns Leaving for e ver the city of his fathers Well may he sigh, as the bitter thought returns. Ages have passed, and still that grassy hill-top Stays to remind us of the days gone by, Still called in m~mory of that sad departure, The name poet1c of the Moor's last Sigh.

OXFORD LETTER. Oxford has been for the greater part of this term in a state of flood very similar to that in which Horace describes Rome, in certain lines to be found in the second ode of Book r., with the difference that in our 1'1\SC, canoes a nd other boallike creations must be substituted for the genus piscium ; fur men who have not feared to commit their fragile bark to the waves of Port Mcadow, the 1tQfa sede of geese, haYe not unfrequent l)' found themseh¡es temporarily :;lranded on bank<; and bushes. However the waters have lately seen good to retire and confine themsel\'es to their wonted hanks.

Talking of the river, the coxswa'nLss fours were rowed on November 12-1 4, and resulted in a victory for Christ Church ; Magdalene, their opponents in the final heat, having the misfortune to run into the bank and smash an oar at the very beginning of the race. The Trial Eights race was decided on December 3, and resulted in a win for crew 2 1 after a very exciting race, by half a length. Atherton and H awes were rowing in their College Fours, and both were in the winning boat in the Trinity and B.N.C. Fours. Turning to football, the match against Cambridge will probably be a matter of


THE

CANTUARI AN

history by the time this appears in print, and your correspondent declines to prognost icate. So far the 'Varsity have won all their matches, except two at the beginning of the season. Latter, in addition to being captain of the Trinity R.U.F.C., played for the 'Varsity ' A ' team in the matches v. Wellington and Cheltenham College, and for the 'Varsity itself v. East Sheen and London Scottish. T assell and J. H. Smith have also been playing for their respective colleges. H awes has distinguished himself in the Freshmen's Sports at the beginning of term, winning the mile and running a dead heat for first place in the Quarter. Among the preachers of 'Varsity sermons this term have been the Rev. R. L. Ottley on N ovember 8, and Bishop l\litchinson the following Sunday. I t is a much to be deplored fact that the quality of the O.K.S. up here has not been corresponded to by their quantity, only one K ings' Scholar having joined those already in residence, whereas six O.K.S. have gone down, viz., F. S. A. Lowndes, B. R. Gibson, W. A. Gordon, T. K. Ashton (all of T rinity), A. H . Mis kin (Wadham), and R. C. Bingley (Keble). I may a lso take this opportunity of congratulating G. C. E. Ryley on passing the examination for the degree of Mus. Bach. H e, with Gibson, Gord'>n and Ashton, were up at

- ~=~--

I

the beginning of the term to take their degrees. While on the subject of degrees I might add that A. B. R . Wallis (Worcester) took his B.C.L. last Long Vac; a fact which, I believe, has not yet been recorded in the Cmtluariatz. Of general news, there will be two changes next term in heads of houses; Canon Paget will take Canon Liddell's place a~ Ch. Ch., who has resigned after holding the post for thirty-six years; the successor to D r. Evans, of Pembroke, who died towards the e nd of November, alter a Mastership of twentyseven years, has not at the time of writing been appointed. The first letter of the new academical year is never complete, I believe, without a list of 0 K.S. in residence, which I will therefore give here :Graduates :-W. H. P ater, Dean of Bra.c;enose ; F. H. H all, D ean of Oriel ; R. L. O ttley, D ean of Divinity at Magdalene. Undergraduates :-G. D. M. Hughes, Oriel; R. P. A therton, L. W. Smith, A. Latter, E. B. Hawes, Trinity. F. D. Sladen, H ertford. P. Hichcns, Magdalen. W. E. K itchingman, St. John'~. A. H. Thompson, St. Edmund's H all. D. S. M. Tassell, Ch rist Church. J. H . Smith, Exeter. W. H. Salmon, though not in residence is reading with a coach in Ox ford.


THE

CANTUARIAI\.r.

197

CAMBRIDGE LETTER. As there has been no Cambridge letter for the last six months or so, it is rather hard to know on what topic to start. But •1s freshmen are the chief characteristic of this term, to solve the difficulty, I will begin with them. Of these there has been the usual influx of some eight or nine hund red, but I am afraid Canterbury can r laim no more than four. Not that we ought to grumble, if, ac; I believe, only one 0. K.S. has gone to Oxford. We have lost Ellam, G. F. Longfield, Green, and Workman, so that Moule a nd Elwyn are the sole survivors of the fourth year. Moule has come up to work for the Indian civil examination, which takes place next summer. Elwyn who is at the Clergy Training School, ha~ just been in for the Casins Greek Testament prize, for which he stands an extremely good chance. The result will probably be out long before this appt.:ars in print. A Pilgrim meeting wa:. held early in the term, at which the following elections were made : -R. F. l~lwyn, Captain, for the second time, H. S. S. Parker, Secretary, P. G. P eacocke, re-elected Treasurer, l\I. J. Carr, and J. E. G. Hadath, on the committee. Tht.. prcsc n~ arrangement is that there should be an O.K.S. and a C.O.S. Captain in ailcrnate years, but it is hard to say how this rule can stand, if the C.O.S. only send up one freshman in two years and that a non-playing member. At present their

grand total is three. It has been suggested that the blazer should be altered, on the ground that the King's School element is not enough repre£ented . That is true, but if the change means a combination of K. S. blue and C.O.S. scarlet, it is to be hoped they will remain satisfied with their present one. A blazer with stripes of the same colour and width as the six-form hat ribbon was talked of, and it would be pretty enough, but besides closely resembling the colours of other clubs perhaps more important the C.O.S. might object on the score that the King's. School was represented a little too much. As to the atheltic achiem1ents of O.K.S. 1~ urn bull and Parker have been playing for Corpus, Wigram and Parr for the Hall, and Carr for Emmanuel. Frend was stroking the Selwyn Four, till they decided not to enter. Elwyn, E. H . Maule and 1\Iilsome confine themselves chiP-fly to fives, while L ongfield has joined the ever-increasing ranks of golf p!ayers. We have been unusually favoured by visits from O.K.S. latel)'. The Rev. H. l\1. Harler and L. \V. Smith were up in the long. At the beginning of this term the Rev. \V. A. Crabtree came up to at· tend a \'aledictory service at St. Benet's, before joining the C.M.S. Mission in Equatorial Africa. We were also very pleased to see once more the Rev. E . G. B. Atkinson, and B. S. Spencer, not that


THE

CANTUARIAN.

we sa'v much of the latter, as he was obliged to spend the greater part of his time in a Trinity lecture room, undergoing his ordination examination for the Durham diocese. The great event of the term has been of course, the voting on the Greek Question but vide Daily Papers. It is perhaps worth mentioning that the crowd in the SenateH ouse was the largest collection of baldheaded M. A.S. on record. They were certainly an interesting study to a ny one who has the curiosity to wonder what the present generation of undergraduates may be like thirty or forty years hence. The undergraduate community was not seriously disturbed by the controversy, but keen supporters of Greek were even to be found among those, to whom it was an insurmountable barrier between them and a degree. The Varsity Rugby Team have been very successful so far, considering there are only three old blues up. If they only keep up the form they showed against a Blackheath, a defeat (on December 16th), is by no means anticipated. Cavendish College is going to be closed after next May lerm, and has already, I believe, been sold to Peek and Frean. A

new haJI which would hold some three hundred was only opened about two years ago. The CoJlege has been in existence about I 5 years, but during that time has managed to prove itself an utter failure financially and otherwise. Before closing, we should like to take this opportunity-the first we have hadof expressing our sympathy with the school for the loss they have sustained by the death of Mr. CampbeJI. It is a loss which a visit to Canterbury alone can make us fuJly realize. We arc also ext remely sorry to hear of the illness of Mr. Gordon, and only trust that he may have a speedy recovery. The following is a list of O.K.S. in residence-freshmen in ItaEcs. C.C.C.-H. W. Moule, H. S. S. Parker, P. G. Peacocke, P. A. Turnbull. Emmanuel.-M. J. Carr, C. R. Longfield. Pembroke.-H. A. Beatson. St. Catherine's.-H. W. A. Cullin. Selwyn.-.F. Bootltby, W. Craster, E. C. Frend, D. B. Watts. T rinity.- R. F. Elwyn, H. B. Milsome, E. H. Moule. Trinity H all.- R. H. Parr, Tl//. A. T!f/ig?'am.


THE

199

CANTUARIAN.

PENNY READIN G. A penny reading was held in the Parry \lcmorial Library, on Saturday, November 11th, 189r. The programme was as folluws :l. !\l.o~.onroAL "l saw lovoly Phillis," PeaTsall.

•'Romance." H ctnsSitt. Mr. Johnson.

' ' · VIOLONCELLO SOLO

:1. JtRAl)INO

.. .. ................. ........ , .... .. .... .... .

Mr. Fiol<l. Sweet and low," .... .. Bctntby. II. P. H. Auston, W. H. Maun<lrell. H. Johnson n.nd l\lr. Johnson. f>, PIANO SoLo ... "Norma," ...... ... B ellina. 1\lr. Grundy. U. VIOLONCELLO SOLO "Caprice," w. N . J ohnso11 . Mr. J ohnson.

t

QuARTE'r ... "

7.

REAl)! NO

0.

PART

.... ........ ........ ........................ .

1\Tr. Ritchie. SoNO "Oh! hush thee, my babie,'' St,llivan. GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

Mr. Field read Drowning's "Pied Piper," and Mr. Ritchie read selections from Max O'Rell's ·• Drat the boys," both of which were loudly applauded. Mr. Johnson's violoncello solos were the success of the evening. We have to thank Mr. Grundy for accompanying Mr. Johnson and for his excellent piano solo. The Choral Society rendered the part songs very successfully. The quartet "Sweet and low" was also well and effectively sung.

FRAG : A.RCHILOCHL Yes, sorrow claims its debt of tears, my friend, Nor, while grief rankles, shall a man delight In festal joys ; the stricken find their end Overwhelm'd by swelling Ocean's thuncl'rous might. Grief fills our breast to bursting-nay, take heart I Know, friend, the Gods have given strength t' endure, Strength to be patient 'neath pains bitt'rest smart, A cure for ills which have no other cure. Each bears in turn his load; my heart, to-day, Bleeds 'neath grief's lash; to-morrow, he is fled To be another's guest; be strong, away With women's moan, silent, bow the head.

E.

w.

~r.


200

THE

CANTUARIA r.

-- __;=======--=--==-====== FOOTBALL K.S.C. v. ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE. This match was played at Blare's Piece on October 2oth, and resulted in a win for St. Augustine's by 2 goals (one drop) and one try to nil. About five minutes after the commencement of the game, James had the misfortune to sprain his knee, which com¡ pellcd him to retire. St. Augustine's also had the misfortune to lose one of their men, shortly afterwards, who sprained his ankle. No point was scored until close on half time, when Lea, dribbling the ball past Cullin, picked it up and deposited it behind the posts; this try was improved upon by Bode. H aJf.time was called soon after. On resuming, play was fairly even for the first ten minutes. But after some loose play on both sides, St. Augustine's scored another try, which however was not converted into a goal. After this, they pressed us very hard once or twice, but we managed to preve nt them crossing our goal line. Close upon time however Bode dropped a go:tl for them from the 2 5 yards flag. Thus they retired victorious by eleven points to nil. For our opponents Bode and Davies were most. conspicuous. While for us Castley at f back played excellently; and Athawes at; back played a good game. All the forwards played well, Newland being especially noticeable. The following represented the school. (Three Quarters), James, Castley, Shorting. (Half Backs) Athawes, Knapp. (Forwards) Flint, (i), Flint (ii), Beynon, Newland, Cooper, Luxmoore, Micklem, Ca ndy, Mowll. (Back) Cullin. K.S.C. v. DOVER COLLEGE. This match was played at Dover on October 26th, and resulted in a win for thl' School by 4 points to nil. Dover won the toss and elected to play with the wind which was blowing rather strongly down the field. I mmediately the ball was set in motion, play became of a very fast character, and this was kept up till the very end of the gam~:. The forwards had most of the work at first, and numerous stubborn scrimmages were held in the middle of the field, which showed that the forwards were very even!) matched in weight. The Dover forwards soon began to heel, and their three-quartet ~ became very bu~y; but they were very well watched by our backs, and were ncvct allowed to approach dangerously ncar to our gaol. Middleton by a very dodgy run took the ball from half way past our twenty five flag, but he was collared by Flint ; and the ball was soon after returned to half- way. Dover now began to press a little, and Flint made a slight mistake which might have cost us dear, had not Castley rectified it by a pun t into touch. The game was still being c arried on in our twenty five, and we were all:ht compelled to touch down in our goal. Cullin's kick from twenty five, was returned into our goal, and again we touched it dead. Cullin's kick this time landed into tom h at half way, and play for a little while wa~ sustained between our twenty five and tlw


THE CANTUARI AN. \

201

h dfway Oag. One or two dange rous rushes made by the Dover forwards were well '' llulsed. Flint by a splendid run relieved us, and took the ball from our twenty five I•• the half-way and then· punted into touch; thus giving us an advantage which we IIITCssfully held till the whistle blew for half time. After a short interval the game was again resumed. The D over kick from half w.ry, was returned to the middle of the field. Having the wind at our backs we began to press a little. I n fact Dover had to stand on the defensive during the whole of the hr '>l twenty minutes of the second half. Castley now made himself very conspicuous hy his splendid tackling. Shorting got well off out of touch once, but an appeal of not rll.light was granted. Our three quarter backs were kept busily employed for some tunc, but again and again they lost good chances, and a great deal of ground by passing lw·k too far. The passing of our opponents, it is only fair to add, was very good; but tlw strong wind blowi ng down the field, made it very difficult to pass accurately. Cast ley now won the game for us. He secured the ball at half way, and making a splendid run to tlwir twenty five, dropped a magnificent goal just before reaching their back. The " hool began to press Dover very hard, but again they lost some of their advantage by passing back too far. A free kick was awarded us for off side. Cullin made a very good tltcmpl at a goal, the ball just passing outside the post. On Dover kicking off from I wcnty five, our three quarters put in some very dangerous runs. Shorting got within ' few yards of the goal line, but was well collared by Strode. Castley a few minutes .tfl crwards almost crossed their line. Prime now relieved the College by a punt into touch. The College tried to score very hard, and for about five minutes we were pressed very much. However we managed to keep them out, and at the call of time Wl' had slightly relieved ourselves, and were gradually shoving the m back. We were thus left winners as above stated, by one drop goal (4 points) to nil. For us Castley, Ill whose splendid drop kick we owe the victory, was conspicuous for his good all round play, especially for his excellent tackling. Athawes and Knapp, both played well at half lw·k. The forwards played extremely well together, Newland being most conspicuous. l•'or our opponenl~, Strode back, l\Iiddleton a nd Knocker three quarter backs, and St. John, half back played well. Our team was as follows :-(Back) H. E. Flint, (;} backs); R. J. Castley, H. ]. Cullin, C. E. N. Shorting, (t backs); E. J. S. Athawcs, C. A. Knapp; (Forwards), R. H. Flint, F. S. Beynon, W. NJ. Carter, 111. S. Newland. T. N. Micklem, R. G. Cooper, A. F. Luxmoore, C. T . Candy, W. R. Mowll. K.S.C. v.

l\IR. E. W. MOORE'S FOLKESTONE TEAM.

This match played on Blore's Piece on October 28th resulted in a Joss for the School by 4 points (2 tries) to nil. Our opponents on our card of fixtures arc put down as Folkestone, but the Folkestone Captain found it impossible to get his team together, ~o he had to bring over a scratch team, which at his request we have called Mr. Moore's team. It is not necessary to give a long account of this match, as it was witnessed by


THE

202

CANTUARIAN.

the school. The two tries scored by our opponents were both obtained by Moore, who played a very good game, and was the most conspicuous member of our opponents' team. Our team were not very fresh, a circumstance not to be wondered at when we take into consideration their hard and well-earned v1ctory of the day before. We cannot but h elp thinking that we should have rendered a different account of ourselves, if wt• had not played immediately after another match. Our forwards although they bad not the" go" which they displayed the day before, yet played a good game against the heavy Of the other members of the team, Castley wa~ scrimmage of our opponents. noticeable for his good tackling and Cullin for his kicking. The following represented the school :-H. E. Flint, (Back); R. T. Castley, H. J. Cullin, C. E. N. Shorting, (f backs); E. J. S. Athawes, C. A. Knapp, (t backs); R. B. Flint, M. S. Newland, F. S. Beynon, W. M. Carter, T . N . Micklem, R. G. Cooper, A. F. Luxmoore, C. T . Candy, W. R. Mowll (forwards). K.S.C.

v. THANET

\V ANDERERS.

This match was played on Blare's Piece on Wednesday, November 4th, and resulted after a most exciting and evenly contested game in a victory for us by the narrow margin of 5 points to 4· The afternoon was anyth ing but pleasant, as a drizzling rain fell during the greater part of the time; but in spite of this, spectators were more numerous than usual. Play began just at 3 o'clock. For the first few minutes after the kick off the School played indifferently, and hardly seemed to be awake, with the result that a try was quickly gained by Fremlin for the Wanderers; but the place kick was unsuccessful. This early reverse thoroughly roused our XV., and for the rest o f the match t hey played splendidly. The game was chiefly a forward o ne, the wet making it difficult for the backs to hold the ball; scrummages were frequent; but we well held our own, though our opponents were much heavier. Several good runs wcr,· made by the Thanet three.quarters, but their passing (doubtless owing to the greasy ball) Our three quarters had was faulty, and frequent appeals for 'forward' were sustained. few opportunities, until Shorting availing himself of a good opening got well off, and getting past the opposing backs crossed the line close to the flag, a nd grounded the ball behind the posts. This fine run was deservedly cheered, and the cheering was renewl·d when Cullin kicked an easy gaol, thus putting us ahead. Half time was called soon after. with the baJI in our 25. The second portion of the match was even more exciting than the first, play being chiefly in our half. Not long after resuming, Lumley picked up the ball out of a loose scrummage, and running through our backs got over behind the posts. A con fident appeal was made that the ball had been collared, but the referee allowed the try. The kick at goal however failed, and we were still one point to the good. The struggle was obstinately continued, and the play became fa~t and furiou,, Our collaring throughout was very good, and the combined play of the forwards was a treat to witness. The ball was however twice sent over our lines, but no fur ther disast~r happened ; on the first occasion Athawes saved, while on the second the ball went into


THE

CANTUARIAN.

203

touch in goal. Just before time some good rushes of our forwards carried the ball into the Wanderers' half, when Athawes getting hold made a capital run, and dodging past .111 but the full back passed splendidly to Ca'itley, who owing to the greasiness of the h.1ll failed to make use of the advantage ; otherwise we should have scored again. A 111 Hate game ended as stated above. Whe n all played well, it is perhaps invidious to •mgh.: out special players. Castley was very safe behind, though he had few opportunilll'' of distinguishing himself; Athawes and Knapp d id their duty right well as halves uul collared capitally; but the chief praise is due to the forwards who (and Nt•wland was conspicuous) played beautifully together, a nd time after time rushed their more powerful opponen ts. Of the Thanet Wanderers, Adams, Fre mlin, the two t backs, and l.umley played exceedingly well. Our te:lm was as follows :-(Back), H. E . Flint, (i backs) R. J. Castley, H . J. Cullin. ( ', K N. Shorting, (~backs) E. J . S. Athawes, C. A. Knapp. (Forwards), R. B. l•'hnt, M. S. Newland, C. T . Ca ndy, W. M. Carter, F. S. Beynon, T. N. Micklem, R. I:. Cooper, A. F. C. Luxmoore, W: R , MewllJ:.V. k:ngil.<~?L K.S.C. v.

SUTTON VALENCE SCHOOL.

On Tuesday, N ovember 9th, we went out to Sutton Valence. James's knee was still lou weak for football purposes, and we were further handicapped by the absence or Knapp, whn had also injured his leg in a practice game. His place at half was filled by Candy whu played a plucky game, but naturally was not quite at home in his new position. Kingdon hll••d the vacant place forward, otherwise the team was unaltered. Sutton Valence, 111 t•·;ul of kicking off in the usual way, led off with a short kick, and a dribble which ~ 1 ~martly stopped by our forwards, the first scrimmages taking place not far from the h.11f wny line. A good run by R owlands, well stopped by C astley, followed by another It) ll unt brought t he ball well into our 25. Athawes with Benyon then brought off a '•1111hined dribble and picking up passed to Castley who handed forward. Some good ohthhling by theS.V. forwards brought the ball back into our half, but a good kick by I ullm gained us a lot of ground ; and thanks to some rather wild passing by the S. V. I • u ~ ~. and some smart tackling by Newland and Beynon the ball was worked up to llutt 25, ~ut was not destined to s tay there long, the S.V. forwards breaking away with 1 vnnd (:o mbined dribble which was stopped by Castley kicking into touch near our :l5 Uti'• S.V. then got a free kick from a fair catch, which was well returned by Cullin; "I' 1111 hnlf time the game was mostly in our half, but thanks to some good saving by I ulll tl and Athawes, no major point was scored. 'lotutt after re-starting the S. V. forwards came away with a good dribble but kicked 111111 ltiiiC'h about to yards from our goal line, and very soon afterwards one of their '""' 11ds strnggled over the line about 5 yards from the posts, the kick at goal failed. I lu tt•st of the game was, from our point of view, a melancholy spectacle ; the passing •·I tlu 1\l)mC backs, which had, so far, been rather inaccurate, grew better and better as lito ~· lllll' went. Three more goals were added before 'no-side,' and the match lost by


-------------~~ THE CANTUARIAN. 17 points to nil. But for some splendid saving by Athawes, Castley, and Cullin the score would have been much larger. Our forwards did not come off owing to their inability to dribble and stop dribbles ; our backs have not learned to pass yet, and were quite outclassed by S.V. backs who passed (i) while running at full speed and (ii) before they were coJlared. Castley, Athawes, and C uJlin deserve mention for their collaring, and forward; Beynon did some useful work. K.S. C. v. DOVER TOWN. P layed on Bla re's Piece on November r:zth. This was a well contested match throughout. The visitors won the toss and elected to play with the wind from the pavilion end-and for the first five minutes, the play was just within our ::15, where Dove• were awarded a penalty kick rather perilously near our goal,.which however was not improved upon. Some useful kicks by Caslley rel ieved his side, and the ball was carried up within a few yards of the Dover line. No point was scored on either side in the firNt _, ; but on changing ends Long one of the Dover ! backs put in some very dangerou~ runs, and eventually scored a very well desen·ed try, which however was not converted. The school again worked the ball up to the Dover lines but failed to get thro' in spite.! of some very hard work by Athawes and Castley-the game ending in a victory for Dover by :2 points (r try) to nil. Long showed up by far the best for the visitors, and heavily taxed the collaring powers of our ! backs. For the school, Castley, Athawes, :mel Candy behind, and Newland and Beynon forward, did very good service; while Micklem was very conspicuous in appropriating the ball when thrown out of touch. Our tc:uu was as follows :-(Back), H. E. Flint, (1 backs), R. J. Castley, H. J. Cullin, C. E. N. Shorting,(~ backs), E. J. S. Athawes, C. T. Candy. (Forwards), R. B. Flint, F. l;. Beynon, M. S. Newland, W. M. Carter, T. N. l\Iicklem, R. G. Cooper. E. V. Kingdom, A. F. Luxmoore, and W. R. i\Iowll. K.S.C. v. CASTLE HIL L F.C. This match played on Blare's Piece on November r8th, resulted in a Joss for tlw School by 4 points (:a tries) to nil. Castle Hill won the toss, and decided to play against the wind. A few minutes after the ball had been set in motion, owing to h bad pass made by one of our ;i backs, one of their backs got possession of the ball, and took It dangerously ncar our goal line. Fortunately, however, he was well collared by Cast ley. Thi!: seemed to wake our forwards up a bit, for they soon shoved our opponents back to the half·\vay flag. TiJI the end of half-time, play was carried on between their :25 :m<l the half-flag. The forwards had most of the game to themselves ; the ! backs not having much to do owing to the slippery state of the ground which made it almo~t impossible to run. Again and again we bad scrimmages in their 25, but notwithstan<lin14 the efforts of our f backs we were not able to score. Just before the call of ! tim~:, with


THE

CANTUARi i\.N.

205

ur. usual bad luck, we had the misfortune to Jose Flint, our best forward. He put his eft arm out at the elbow. The call of half-time found the ball in the middle of the field. On resuming, the school looked very dangerous, and seemed as if they were certain to score. Castley put in some exceedingly good runs, but owing to bad passing again, the ball was taken into our 2 5, and soon after we had to touch down in our own goal. Castley now performed a very good piece of work, punting the ball from our 25 to the half-way flag, and collaring the man who caught it. The school soon began to press again, and Castley tried his very best to score, but in vain . Once more owing to bad passing the ball was taken to our 25, and bf!ing kicked over our goal line, was touched down by T aylor one of their f backs. The try however was not improved upon. Instead of waking our forwards up, this seemed to demoralize them, for soon afterwards Castle Hill scored another try, which again was not converted. Only once again did Castle Hill look dangerous, and they probably would have scored another try if Cullin had not stopped a combined rush of their forwards, and punted into touch. The forwards now played much better, but it was too late; and when the whistle blew for time, a scrimmage was taking place at the half-way flag. Most undoubtedly the mishap which occurred to Flint put us at great disadvantage, and accounts for the loose play of the fonvards in the second half. Castley worked extremely hard for us, collaring splendidly, and making some good runs. Shorting also collared very well. Candy and Athawes (k backs) and Beynon, Newland and Luxmoore (forwards) also played well. Our team was as follows: (Back), A. G. Richardson, (! backs), R. J. Castley, H. J. Cullin, C. E. N. Shorting, (~ backs), E. J. S. Athawes, C. T. Candy, (forwards), R. B. Flint, H. E. Flint, F. S Beynon, M. S. Newland, T. N. Micklt!m, R. G. Cooper, E. V. Kingdon, A. F. C.¡ l.uxmoore, and W. R. Mowll.


zo6

THE

CANTUARIAN.

FIVES . SINGLES. OPEN. F IRST ROUND.

Castley beat Beynon Hincks beat Cullin Cooper beat Carter Stringer-a

James beat Mowll Richardson beat Duval Candy beat Lord bye.

SECOND ROUND.

Castley beat Candy Richardson beat Cooper

Hincks beat Stringer James-a bye.

THIRD ROUND.

Castley beat James

Richardson beat Hincks FINAL.

Castley beat Richardson. (FIVES : Under r6). FIRST ROUND.

Slater (r) Flint (z) Maundrell Bredin (z)

beat beat beat beat

Mowll (z) Stobart Helmore Slater (z)

\Vacher beat Fenn Candy (z) beat Hopkins Ridley beat Headlam Campbell beat Luxmoore

SECOND ROUND.

Bredin beat Trueman Campbell beat \Vacher Flint (z) beat Candy (z) Slater (r) beat Maundrell Ridley- a bye. THIRD ROUND.

Camphell beat Bredin Slater (r) beat Flint (z) Ridley-a bye. FOURTH ROUND.

Campbell beat Ridley

Slater (r)-a bye. FINAL,

Slater (r) beat Campbell.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

O.K.S. COLUMN. A. Latter played as centre t for Oxford, matches at the beginning of the

111 .L f~.:w

• •~on. * * * 1'. \V. James, and H. E. Raper, have II .n bcl'n representing their respective htHpitnls in football. * * * 'l'hc following have obtained masterlups :- T. E. R amm ell at Worcester 1 '.tt hcdral School. G. F. Longfield at I. tng's School, Pontefract. H. V. \Vorku.m at St. George's College, Eastbourne.

•• •

( :. C. Ryley has obtained his bachelorlup for music.

I I 1 1

Our apologies are due to the Rev. A. G. B. Atkinson, who has been appointed to a curacy at St. Thomas's Church Portman Square, and not at St. J ohn's as we stated in our last number.

* *

Evans has won his* colours as a forward in the Dulwich College team. * * R . R . Burch has ; lso been playing for Epsom College. * * * Owing to the fact that there will be no theatricals at the end of the term ; the O.K.S. match will be played on Tuesday, D ecember 22nd, as was arranged at first, and not on the 2 xst.

SCHOOL NEWS. l n our last number we stated that J. \\'. Longsdon, M.A., came from Exeter ( 'ullcgc Oxford, instead of St J ohn's, for 11 hit'11 we must apologise. * * It has been found* impossible to hold 1hl·atricals at the end of this term, owing "' unavoidable circumstances. Conse•llll'lllly a concert bas been arranged to 1kc their place. l\Ionday the 21st has hl'l:n fixed as the date.

In the Parry Library on November 5th, Mr. John Ellaby, of Clare College, Cambridge,recitcd selections from Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice," and pieces from other authors. M r. Ellaby it will be remembered also came down last year and recited "Julius Cresar." * *

*

T he new room which has been obtained for the museum, is gradually being arranged.


208

THE

CANTUARI AN.

On its completion it will be used as a chess room.

• *

A large addition of books has been made to the library, a full list of which will be found elsewhere. • * * J. Campbell and H. Stringer have been made members of the Committee of the Natural History Society.

* *

* received their footT he following have ball colours this term :- F. S . Beynon, C. A. Knapp, M. S. Newland, T. N . Micklem, R. G. Cooper,A. F . Luxmoore,C. T. Candy, W. R. Mowll. * * On Saturday, Oct. *31st, Mr. Whitehead R eid, gave a lecture on "Eyes," in the Parry Library.

••

* On Saturdfty, Nov. 29th, Mr. W. P. Mann gave a lecture on "Polarized Light."

* •*

We arc sorry to have to announce that Mr. Gordon has been seriously ill for the past few weeks. H e is gradually improving now however, and we hope to see him al his post before long. His place for the present has been taken , by W. C. Dale, M.A., of Trinity College, I Cambridge. I

Owing to the expense of the new room the Naturalist Society is in great need of funds, and subscriptions from any of the School or O.K.S., interested in the subject would be most thankfully received by R. G. Cooper, Hon. Sec . * * The Fives Matches* with St. Augus tine's College that were to have taken place this term, have been abandoned, owing to St. Augustine's having broken up earlier than usual, on account of the innue nza. * * * The usual (open and under 16) matches with the C.O.S. have been arranged for December 8th. at the C.O.S., and March roth, 1892, in our own Courts. * * The school will • be represented by Castley and Beynon for the open, and Slater and Campbell for the under 16. * * * The O.K.S. Fives have been fixed for December qth, when Smith and Isacke will probably represent the O.K.S. as well as Latter and Elwyn. * * * Fives Matches will probably be arranged next term with Sutton Valence and St. Augustine's College, as the former arc unable to play us this term.


THE

CANTUARI AN.

CORRESPONDENCE . V /I.-Tho Editors decline to accept any responsibility conneclecl wilh the opinions of their correspon<l· 1•1cls. Name and address ntttst a/;ways be !]iven, 110t necessarily fo1· 1mblication, bt,t as c' utummtoe of !JOOiLfaith. Pm·. onalities 1vill involve certain rejection.

To the Editors of tile "

CANTUARI AN".

Dear Sirs,- I have have heard that the photographs of the cricket and football teams 1111 some years past are at present lying 111 comparative obscmity between the ll•aves of an album, could not they be disinterred, framed and hung up in the fl ail ? I believe that it is a very general 1 ustom in public schools to hang up the phutographs of the teams, and it would ll'rtainly 'give a more finished appearance tu the bare walls if this suggestion were u led upon. Yours truly, PHOTOGR APHERS.

Northgate ! But such pleasures are not for us. Surely in this age of progress something might be done towards removing the discomfort caused to, Yours truly, THI N SHOES.

PAPER CHASES. Dear Sirs,-1 would wish to make a suggestion with regard to the Paper C hases that take place next term, and I take an early opportunity of doing so. By t he present system where the ba res run some '5 or 16 miles, while it is all right for some of t he bigger ones, the fellows of more limited powers find that the distance MINT YARD. tells heavily on them and the result is that Dear .sirs,- We hear o.f vast tracks of a great number of them are unable to go bnd bemg rendered serviceable to man· into school next day. Eve n the most kind by the drainer's art, could not this active are not free, and a paper chase Hame art be applied with advantage to the means no work that night. Now this Mint Yard ? I t is true that we have seen can hardly be called pleasure, and I would tilany drainers engaged upon, or rather suggest that t hese runs be limited to 8 or beneath, its surface, but the result is ro miles. These would be far more l:unentable. Pool upon pool, puddle e njoyable, the sma llest could freely join in upon puddle meet our gaze, and trails like wit h no fear of having to drag himself those of some watery monster cross and home, worn out, separated far from the rerross its surface. What harvest here for the rest of the hounds. These might be held makers of mud pies, those wo ndrous culin- twice a week, and be vastly more bene ficial ary triumphs of the youthful denizens of as a matter of training. T o ensure this

I


THE

210

CANTUARIAN.

the hares should show their plan before hand to some disinterested persons. I am yours, etc, PAPER CHASE.

HALL. Dear Sirs,-Might I suggest that the photographs that at present adorn the smaller frames in the overmantle in Hall should be taken therefrom and replaced by those people more nearly connected with the school ? There used to be three photographs in modest frames before the arrival of the present sple ndid ornament; could not these be put back now? Surely there are many distinguished O.K.S. whose pictures might grace the frames more fittingly ; and above all a photograph of l\Ir. Campbell, if obtainable, should be kept to help to keep alive his memory in the school. Yours, etc, HALL.

T H E PARRY LIBRARY. DEAR SrRs,-Is it not nearly time that we had a new Library Catalogue ? I do not know exactly how old the present one is, but so many new books have been added, and, I may add, old ones vanished, that it has been rendered very untrustworthy and now, to the best of my belief, the majority of people do not consult it. Might I also suggest that, ii we do have

one, a copy should be left, for convenience sake, in the Library itself. Yours truly, READER. DEAR SJRs,-In the large stained glass window in the P<u'ry Library there arc spaces for severa1 coats of arms. Three of them arc occupied by those of the Arch bishop, Bishop Parry, and the School, and I presume it is not intended to leave all the others vacant. There are several crests adorning the cover of the Cantuarian, and surely some of these might fittingly find places in the window. The Cantuarian bears the arms of Cranmer, Harvey, John Lynch, and John Boys (afterwards Dean, of Canterbury), and Archbishops Park~.:r and Winchelsea ; if some of these wcrl not considered of sufficient importance and interest to the School there are those ol Thurlow, Linacre, or Broughton. Out ol these, surely some might be selected a~ worthy of this honour. A second and very trivial point I ,vould suggest, £.c., that the busts in the Libra ry should be turned sideways instead of tht¡u present position ; in busts like these 11 great part of the effect is lost if they :111 not shown in profile. Yours, etc .. IMPROVEMENT. THE BICYCLE HOUSE. Dear Sirs,-Amongst all the recent irn provements and repairs which have bet II


THE

CANTUARIAN.

u1ulle why should the poor cyclists be iu路Kil'Cted ? The rain sim ply pours tin ough the roof of the bicycle house, and tlll'n: arc really very few places in it where lhl machines ca n stand without getting wl'l. Surely it would not cost very much 111 take very long to have this repaired, .uHI so to avoid a trouble and expense to I he owners. H oping that some speedy ~~ 路~ult may attend this letter. I am yours etc., A SUFFERER.

DEBATES. Dear Sirs,-T he readers of your numh t路l were told at the beginning of this term thnt fortnightly debates were to be held throughout the winter. The "fortnightly'' tlcbatcs have so far consisted of two in ro weeks, and there seems no prospect of any more being held this term. On the enquiries which were made, as to why these ml entions were not adhered to, we were

BISHOP

211

told that rehearsing for the Christmas theatricals, took up nearly all the spare time of the VI. Form ; the idea of theatricals has been a bandoned, but the debates have not been renewed, and as far as can be seen, no attempt has been made to do so. It is not my business to discuss all the advantages of School debates, as everyone will agree that none of our amuse路 ments are more instructive t0 every part of the School. Lastly, I think that now the Lower School have shown everyone that they can conduct debates of their own in the most orderly manner and with the greatest success, that now they might be allowed to vote in the School debates without any fear of their deciding according to personal popularity. H oping that next term this branch of our education will not be neglected. I remain, Yours, etc, ' VOTER.

P ARRY~S

PORTRAIT.

Mr. Field acknowledges with thanks, the receipt of subscriptions for the above, from the following :-Rev. L. H. Evans, Rev. D. Jones, A. C. Moule, A. Bredin, D. S. M. Tassell, A. B. R. Wallis, R ev. R. G. Glennie, F. S. A. Lowndes, C. A. Lowndes, W. Cowper, T. E. Rammell, A. P. Blenkinsop, P. G. P eacocke, R ev. W. G. Morgan, W. Wyse, C. L. Parmiter, W. F. Cobb, M. Bell, G. D. R eisch, A. T. P erkins, G. H. Smith, ltev. A. G. C. Lepard, A. H . Thompson, E. J. Courbould, J. Polehampton, R ev. F. A. l>ale, R. Owen, R. F. Elwyn, H. Latter, R ev. H. S. Swithinbank, N. Roe, C. Roe,


212

THE

CANTUARIAN.

Rev. A. W. Woodruffe, J. Philpot, A. Low, B. H . Latter, R ev. C. T. H ales, F. L. Perkins, C. Bing, L. W. Smith, Rev. C. H. R ichards, J. Pollard, Rev. W.. G. Mossc, J. Ritchie, A. P. H all, H . S. Crowther, E. Ellam, R ev. F. J. Harrison, J. Amos, E, D. Hake, E. B. H awes, A. Gordon, A. H . Latter, H. F. Matheson, R ev. H. H. Boys, E. G. Spiers, E. H. Moule, A. L. Turnbull, and the late Rev. E. J. Campbell. Mr. Field requests anyone who is omitted in the above list to communicate with him.

The following Books have been r eceived this term:-

li

Johnson. The Normans in Europe, Stubbs. The Early Plantagenets, Lancaster and York, Gardiner. Epochs of Modern History. Gardiner. The Puritan R evolution Morris. The Age of Anne Wakeman and H assell. Constitutional Essays F reeman. Historical Geogr~phy (2 vols.) Cornewall Lewis. Use and Abuse of Political T erms Giuzot. History of Civilization (3 vols.) H istory of the Four Georges (2 vols.) J . Me Carthy. Lecky. History of the Eighteenth Century (last 4 vols.) T aswell Langmead. Constitutional History Life of Lord Beaconsfield J. A. Froudc. Fawcett. .Manual of Political Economy J eremiah } Men of the Bible Series. Ezra and Nehemiah The March to Magdala and Coomassie H. M. Stanley. British Birds Howard Saunders. The Forth Bridge From "The Engineer." Mrs. Oliphant. The Makers of Venice F or Faith and Freedom Bcsant, T he Log of the Flying Fish Collingwood. T ennyson. Demeter, etc. Kingsley. H ypatia H ereward the Wake , Cristowell BlackmOrl'. Esthen Kingslakc. A Hardy Norseman Edna Lyall.


THE

CANTUARI AN.

213

H arrison Ainsworth.

The Tower of London Old St. Paul's llluc Lights or Hot Works in the Soudan lll:lck Ivory <inscoyne Flonting Light nder the Waves Perseverance Island Sandford and Murton 'l'om Brown's School Days 'l':tles of the Border (24 vols.) llctwixt ~chool and College Who did it ? Saint Ilario Pleasure I siand

" Ballantyne.

" " " " Frazar. Hughes. Wilson. Gordon Stables.

" Marion Crawford. Stevenson.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. Again we welcome a fresh addition to list of contemporaries, one, too, from I Ill riv:\1 of the King's School, Parramatta, whu~c paper "as commented on in our In~! issue. We congratulate the Sydney ( 'hurch of England Grammar School on tlll'ir newly started paper Tile Torch Bearer ,unl wish them all success in their efforts ltuth in the editorial study and on the 11ickct field. We hope that it may long ill¡ s:-titl of them Vt'tai lampada tradunt I From the columns of Tlte Torclt Bearer II'!' glean that our offspring at Parramatta lh well to the fore in the football field. We arc glad to see the interest which the authors of Our S,clzool Times take in thcir intermediate examinations, but we .u c afraid that it is to the exclusion of tnpics of equal interest to the school.

11111

The Sutton Valenti Scllool J.fagazine has an interesting article on 'Football in the H artz' but the author seems to think that boys in England always stop playing football when it comes 011 to rai11 I I I Surely this accusation is not well founded. We also, acknowledge with thanks, thereceipt of the foltowing.-Ousel, Leodiemian,

Leys Forlni~tMiy (J), Bromsgt¡ovia1l, Glmalmond Cltronicle (2), Roflcmian, Briglttonian, Alleynian, Miltonian, Dovoriatz, Bradfield College Magazine, Epsomian, St Edward's Scllool Cllronicle, Wykelzamist, Vigomia11, Our Sclzool 'Iimes (2), Huejordirm, Plymolllian, Exonian, Tile Lily ( 2), Laurel L eaves, Tlte C:mn1 brookian.


THE CANTUARIAN.

214

NOTICES. We beg to acknowledge with thanks the folowing subscriptions to the Cantuariatz: -H. E. l\Ioffatt, J. Dixon (zos. 6d.), Rev. J. S. Sidebotham (7s.), T. E. Rammell (7s.), G. T. Drury (ros. 6d.), Rev. P. W. Looscmore (ros. 6d,), J. Gibbs, Rev. R. G.

Glennie, J. W. Longsdon, G. D. Tripp, W. C. Dale. · The Secretary would be glad if all Subscribers who have not already paid their subscriptions would pay up to September next, by the end of the Easter Term.

ACCOUNTS OF THE SPORT'S COMMITTEE. 1890-91. EXPENDITURE.

RECEIPTS. d. 19 13 5 56 10 0 .£

Brought forward Sport's subscrip~ions (School) ( Masters) ... " tie~ ontrios " Fives ... Sale of fi. ves balls ... ~thletics subs. Subs. for 6th Form prize (sports) Sale of football and cricket cards Football journeys repaid ... ... Cricket " debt..." ... ... ... Part of tennis Sale of stamps, subs. for lost cricket balls, etc.

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ..

l'J. 14 0 2 17 0

1 16 7 14 18 6

... ... ... .. . ... Total

8.

1 6 1 7 4 8 2 2 0 9

0 1

0 10

5~

3

6 6

- - -Si

...

...

.. ...

...

T otal

... 120 13

- ---

...

.£ s. d, ... 120 13 3~ •.. 117 7 7~

...

... .ta

Receipts Expenditure Balance

.. .

For the Bovodey ... ... Stationary, stamps, etc. Football and cricket journeys Sports' prizes (incln?ing fives prizes, gates, otc . . ... ... ... .. . ... .. Fivos balls Bills to Lunn (footballs) Bnss (cricket materials) ... Prentice (sacks for sports) ... .. ( "2 years) Bunco (3 years) ... ... IIobday(sawdust)(2years) J a.nett (l>a.perchases) Twyman (cricket net) Ebbs ... ... Goodhcw ...

5 8

.

... . ... .. .

.£ 8. d . 10 0 0 1 17 3 5 9 2~

17 18 0 2 17 0 2 t6 () 14 4 0 0 9 8 4 15 1

0 12 0 7 1 7 4 10 GO 3

6 6 0 ll G

-------

... 117 7 7l


\

THE CANTUARIAN. VoL. III.

MARCH, 1892.

No.9¡

EDITORIAL . .I

"Auspicio felix lotus ul attntts eat." The y~ar 1892, as far as the school is concerned, has opened very auspiciously, in which respect it is similar to last year. We allude to the scholarship for Modern History !(:lined by W. M. Carter during the holidays, at Brasenose College, Oxford. We heartily congratulate him on it, and hope that the good example set by him may be followed hy others in t he course of the year. Al though this is the beginning of another year, we miss but very few old faces, we are !{lad to say; being in this respect more fortunate than last year. For at the end of the Christmas term last year, no less than fi ve members of the football team left us, whereas this year we have lost only one. T alking of football it may not be out of place here to make a few remarks on our performances during the season which will be over before th is appears in print. At the beginning of the season, it seemed as if we should be fairly .uccessful, as we had seven old colours and also some good new material. But it was not to be so, for in the very fi rst match our captain a three quarter back injured his knee, and has not been able to play since. This disaster was only the forerunner of


216

â&#x20AC;˘

THE

CANTUARIAN.

others. For soon after we lost one of our half backs who also injured his knee. Then later on, one of the forwards had the misfortune to dislocate his lefl arm. Again one of our three quarter backs left us at the end of the term, leaving us to begin this terru with only one of the three quarter backs, with which we began the season. Lastly the one remaining three quarter back hurt his leg in the match v. Dover Coil ege this term, and was not able to play for us v. Castle Hill. Consequently in that match we had three forwards playing as three quarter backs. With such a run of ill-luck it may be imagined that our season has not been very successful. Of all the matches played we have only won two, viz., the match against Dover College at Dover, and that against the Thanet Wanderersonourownground. In the other matches we have generally only just been beaten by a few points, so that if we bad had our full team, we might have pulled off several of them easily. There is one further point with regard to the football which is worthy of mention, namely the fact that there has been an attempt to organise a 2nd XV. They have played two matches, in both of which, as will be seen elsewhere, they were unsuc cessful, chiefly however because they were inexperienced and not used to playing together. There is no reason why a 2nd XV. should not be kept up. Hitherto the 2nd XV. badge hn~ been worn only by a chosen few; but tliis term the whole fifteen badges have been award ed. It is to be hoped that this attempt to start a 2nd XV. will not be allowed to drop, but that in the future the 2nd XV. shall be conside red of as much importance as till' 2nd XI. For as the latter tends to improve our cricket, the former will undoubtedly in time time improve our football. The shields bearing the names of the cricket and football teams since the year 188J have at last been hung on the walls of the Gymnasium. The cricket teams are recordt:cl in gold on dark blue shields, and line the left-hand wall, whilst the football teams arc iu dark blue on white shields, and line the right-hand wall of the Gymnasium. A litth above the shields on each wall, a large shield is hlll1g bearing the school crest. Tlwn is one further improvement which the Sports' Committee propose making, although lill'y do not quite see their way as yet, and that is the framing of as many photographs of tlu football and cricket teams as we possess. Nothing probably will be done this term, ln1t by the end of"next term we hope to see them hanging on the walls of the Gymnasium.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

217

KING'S SCHOOL WORTHIES, NO. IX. RICHARD BOYLE, EARL OF CORK. The life and character of Boyle cannot lui to afford interest and to excite admiratum as those of a man who struggled so ltl.tvely against so many obstacles and ch~couragements, discouragements in which 1n t ~o ual spite of enemies played a large part md which were as undeserved as they were h.t~~lto bear, and a,man who finally attained I•• a position of such honour owing to his "" 11 eminent abilities and unflagging perseV• 1ancc ; that he was afterwards known by 1ht title of "The Great Earl of Cork " is a Jtt•mf, if one be n eed~d, that his talents · ,, rc of no mediocre order. lie was descended from a H e reford tmuly, being great great grandson of Ludo' 11 Boyle of Bedney in that county, and , cmd son of Roger Boyle, who had r~­ tuovctl to Faversham, and married there 1 w t, daughter of Robert Naylor of Can' ' tbury. R ichard himself, in his "True , ~t~ cmbrancer," a narative of his experi' tlt'cs, slates that he was born in Canterluuy in rs66. Of his life at the King's " hool we know little, as is indeed the , 1 · with most of our "Worthies"; of the 111111' who have appeared in these columns, It• only item of interest in the school lives •I .tny of them is apparently that William lluvcy, of blood circulation fame, was of I• 1 ty temper, and in the habit of wearing ' word among his schoolfellows l How-

ever, we know of Boyle that he was of an ambitious mind and also that both at school and at the University he was remarkable for regular habits and untiring study. He been me a scholar of Corpus Christi, Cambridge, and remained there for three years. On leaving the University he chose the Bar as his profession and became a student of Law at the Middle T emple, but finding himself without sufficient means to prosecute his studies he was compelled to abandon this and became clerk to Sir Richard Man wood, Chief Baron of the Exchequer. This employment, while it saved him from the straits of pecuniary want, was but ill fitted to such a temperament as his, and, seeing in it no prospects adequate to his ambition, he resolved to seek fresh fields for his energies and to try his fortunes in I reland. Accordingly on June 23rd, 1588, being twenty-two years of age at the time he landed in Dublin, with no definite promise of employment and as what we may in plain language call an adventurer; his whole property, he tells us, amounted to £27 3s. in money, a diamond ring and bracelet, and his wearing apparel. H e had not long to wait for he obtained employment under Government and as early as T 590 his name appears as escheator to J olm Crofton, Escheator General, and he obtained introduction to persons of high


218

THE

CANTUARIAN.

influence in the country. His employment of the Spanish King. They had not the too, under the Government, gave him slightest real proof of this a nd the chief some knowledge of public affairs which was ground that he and his frie nds offered to most valuable to him. When he was support the charge was that since Boyle twenty-nine be married Joan, daughter and had come over to I reland without any co.beiress of William Anstey of Pullborough estate he must have received assistance who, when he died four years later, left from a foreign power. This accusation was as Boyle a landed estate of £sxo per annum. unjust as it was cruelly designed, for Boyle H e remained in this employment and was always most zealous in checking the all went well for about four years, but in P apists. Boyle resolved to return to 1592 he was imprisoned by Sir William England to deny and refute these mach ina· Fitzwilliam on the charge of embezzlement. tions when a rebellion broke out in M unster From this time hjs troubles began and he which left him penniless. Seeing no pro had the misfortune to make an enemy of spect open to him in I reland be e mba rked Sir H enry Wallop who was as powerful as for England and resumed his studies at he was persistent in his attacks. After his the Bar which, it will be remembered he imprisonment for embezzlement he was had been compelled to abandon for wa nt arrested on a variety of charges at the in- of means. Before he had been long in stigation of Sir R enry; one of these was England, however, the Earl of Essex, then t hat of stealing a horse and jewel nine Lord D eputy of I reland offered him em years previously, of tills charge, however, ployment in connection with the issuing of he was acquitted by pardon. patents in that country. But his hour ol About this time the King of Spain was release from Sir H enry Wallop's attack" entertaining thoughts of invading England had not yet come : the suspicions formerly and in consequence of this the feeling in ra ised against him were again bro ught England and Ireland against the Papists forward and the case was laid before th~ naturally ran very high. Sir Henry Wallop, Queen and although Lord Essex befrientkd whose animosity towards Boyle was not him to the best of his power it was to nu lessened by the fact that al l his charges bad purpose ; he was imprisoned in the Towl 1 been refuted and his enemy had come and his papers seized and, in spite of tht scathless from his attacks, perceived a fact that nothing appeared against him Ill chance here, too good to be thrown a way, remained a prisoner till two months nftll of taking his revenge by working on the Essex' departure for Ireland ; at length feelings of people whose patriotic fervour he succeeded in obtaining an oppo rtu nlt ) often got the better of their judgment, and of clearing himself before Queen El izah~th accordingly he laid against Boyle the charge and at the conclusion of the trial Sir lien• )' of being a Papist and in the secret service found himself hoist with his own pct:u d ,


.---~----------------~----~---- r THE

CANTUARIAN.

lw was superseded and Boyle was made, a

flow days afterwards, Clerk to the Council ul Munster and before long had elapsed he wa-; appointed Justice of the Peace and of tlw Quorum for the Province. I lis marked abilities were soon re' ognised and he received further distinct1on li t· was honoured by being chosen to lllnounce to Elizabeth the tidings of a vklory over the Irish and their Spanish ,!flits near Kinsale on Dec. roth and was uh<;cquently, on the reduction of the province, despatched to give information as to the slate of the country. H e played an llllf10rtant part in puttmg down the rebellion 11ul assisted at the seige of Beerhaven ('.,~tie. Sir Walter Raleigh at this time was mxious to sell his lands in Ireland and lluylc was recommended to him as a pur• hascr by Sir George Carew and the 111.111gement was concluded by the media Itun of Sir Robert Cecil. Sir Walter lived at Youghal, a fishing village about 14 miles from Cork, and the Inhabitants still point out, with reasonable p111lc, the tree in which it is said he 11111kcd the first pipe that was smoked in l:wat Britain. lloylc purchased in all about t,2oo acres •I l.tnd in Cork,Waterford and Tipperary for I, •,ooo and made his properly very valual,lo by introducing the mechanical arts a11d 111 11111factories carried on by English setIf• • ~. and so well did this prosper that from lu own iron works alone he made a clear 1 1111 of £roo,ooo. H e, however, devoted till' larger portion of his money to the i.n-

219

terests of the country, and did much towards the strengthening and increasing of England's authority and power in I reland, by building at e normous expense bridges and harbours, while thirteen castles kept in check all manifestations of mutiny. Some idea of the value of his works may be gathered from the words of Sir Richard Cox; he writes thus : "The noble Earl of Cork, Lord High Treasurer was one of the most extraordinary persons either t hat, or any other age hath produced, with respect to the great and just acquisition of riches that he made and the public works that he began and finished for the advancement of the English interests and the Protestant religion in I reland, as churches, almshouses, free schools, bridges, castles and towns, viz. Lismore, Tallaghe (Tallow), Cloghnikilty, Innyskeene, Castleton and Bandon, which last place cost him £r4,ooo, insomuch that when Cromwell saw these prodigious improvements which he had so little expected to find in I reland, he declared that if there had been an Earl of Cork in every province it would have been mpossible for the Irish to have raised a rebellion." These services to England combined with his energy and zeal in checking the Papists marked him for speedy promotion. H e married in r6o3 Catherine, daughter of Sir George Fenton, Chief Secretary of State, and on his wedding day he received from his friend Sir Ceorge Carew, the Lord Deputy, the honour of Knighthood.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

From this time his honours came thick from the following entry in his diary; it upon him for three years afterwards he was runs thus : " This day the Earl of Strafford sworn Privy Councillor of the State of was beheaded; no man died more univcr¡ I reland ; r6r2 he was created Lord Boyle, sally hated or less lamented by the people,'' Baron of Youghal, and these titles were These words show plainly enough the feel followed by those of Viscount Dungarvon ings the Earl of Cork entertained towards and Earl of Cork. He was appointed one Strafford ; nor is it likely that his apparent of the Lord Justices of Ireland and finally reluctance in giving his evidence against in r63r he was constituted Lord High the latter at his trial was genuine and that Treasurer of Ireland. he forgave and pitied his old enemy in his H e had sufficient interest to secure this hour of danger ; probably the only feeling office as hereditary in his family, so he experienced was one of relief at his highly were his abilities esteemed that release from a man whom he must have although not a Peer of England yet he was hated and dreaded at heart. Shortly after his return from England admitted nt comilinrirts to the H ouse of whence he had gone to give evidence Lords. On the appointment of St rafford, as in this trial the rebellion of x64r broke Lord Deputy for I reland in the year follow- out. Matters looked very threatening hut ing that in which the Earl of Cork had although the outbreak was very sudden become High Treasurer the latter recog- and unexpected to many the Earl was not nised at once that he would have to fight taken by surprise for he had been prepared at once for his property. The King found from the beginning for such an emergency himself very much in need of money and and the R ebels in Munster found them Strafford found a means of enabli ng him selves checked by the Earl who hastened to obtain the necessary funds by confisca- to Youghal and s ummoned his tenants to t ing all estates to which the title was arms. So unreservedly did he devote hi~ doubtful. The Earl of Cork perceived means to checking this rebellion that, rightly that he would he one of the first to as he says in a letter to a friend, exhaustinl( suffer if an inquiry were instituted to this all his money, he was forced to sell hi~ end, and accordingly he exerted his utmost plate. The Great E arl died in Sept embeâ&#x20AC;˘, power to keep off this danger and, though openly aJ?pearing to show no opposition to r642, at Youghal and was buried within Strafford yet he was in reality the princi- the parish church there. There is erected pal factor of opposition to his Irish policy. to him a beautiful marble monument, with At the latter's trial he appeared to give his the figure of the Earl at full length in :u evidence with reluctance, but one may mour, the effigies of his two wives lying b) judge of the sincerity of this reluctance his side, and an inscription of his employ


,... THE

CANTUARIAN.

mcnt a nd titles which concludes with this distich : "Sic posui tumulum, superest intendere votis : Parce animae, carmen solvite, Christe veni." His wife, who died in 1629 was buried 111 a vault in St. Patrick's Cathedral where there is a monument erected to her with I he words "God's providence is my inlwritance," which the Earl adopted as his motto. Of his sons, three were raised to the 1'1•crage in his lifetime by Charles 1st, of whom Lord Falkland had spoken to him;

221

four of them fell in the field and three survived him, all of whom became famous. It is interesting to know too, that his brother John Boyle, who was also educated at the King's School became afterwards Lord Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross. So lived the Great Earl of Cork who, if he laid himself open to blame for the simulation he practised in his friendship to Strafford, must still excite respect and admiration tor his abilities which brought him to his high position and finally enabled him to render such valuable service to his country.

l

CONCERT. A concert was g iven by the Choral Society at the end of the Christmas T erm uudcr the able conducting of Mr. Johnson, and great praise is due to the energy 11h which the Society worked up so good a concert in so short a space of time, for until •II lun the last three weeks of the term, it had been hoped that we might have been able to I'' 111t Canterbury and O.K.S. with some more theatricals, which we have missed since • lilt But misfortune fell suddenly on one of the leading actors, in the shape of a foot1 •II mjury, and the acting had to be abandoned. So that the concert given on December 1 t, taking into consideration the difficulties it had to contend with, was really good.

I

I


THE

222

CANTUARIAN

The Gymnasium in which the concert was given was tastefully decorated by Messrs. Peacock and F. B. Kingdon. The following was the programme: PART I. PART SONG " From Oberon " ... Stevens. K. S. Choral Society. 2. PIA.NO DuET "March ~from" The Piper of R o.mel m) ......... ... NessZe?-. J. B. Scriveuor and i\lr. J ones. a. " Love wakes o.nd weeps " S. GLEES W . N. Johnson b. " Sweet and low ' ' Ba1·nby. H.P. Auston, W. H. Maundrell, .r. B. Scrivener, H. Jolmson nnd Mr. Johnson. 4. l N&TRUHKNTA.L 'l'RIO "Noveletteu " Gade. Mr. Grundy, Mr. J ohnson and Mr. Jones. 5. DuE'l'. ... " Friendship" ... Ma1·ziaZs. H. D. Reale and W. H. ~aundrell. a." .A.dagio sostenuto" 6. VIOLONOlliLLO SOLO Goltermann. b."Barlequin"Poppe?· 7. PART SoNG ... "The Potter" ... (laul, K. S. Choral Society. G { "A Lovely Night"... Chwat al. 8• L:&E B "b." The two roses" Wentet·. Mr. Price, J. B. Scrivener, Mr. J ohnson and B. J . Cullin. 9. P A.RT SONG "1'he Vikings" ... Faning. K. S. Choral Society.

1.

t

t

P A.RT II. CAROLS. •' Come, ye lofty." .............................. Eh•ru. "The First Nowell." ......... ...... T?'Ctditio?lltl. 'The Manger Throno " .................. St egg(tl/. " '. rhe Winter Night " ... Bishop Mitchinsou . ''A Virgin Unspotted" ............ T 1·aditional. SCHOOL SONGS. "St. Joles." "Euclid." "Underneath the briny sen..'' "King Willow." "Songs.'' " Forty years on.'' GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

No. r of Part I was perhaps not sung quite as Mr. Stevens intended il lu be when he composed it. But the depth of flatness to which some parts sank must bt attributed by all rational lovers of music to the state of the atmosphere. Audiences an so apt to pull faces on hearing a particularly flat murder of music, but if only they wouhl take the heat or cold ot the room into consideration, and put themselves in imagin11 tion on the stage, they would only too readily pardon these lilllh aberrations. The duet was played well, but was not quite exciting enougr fu1 an encore. The two parts of No. 3 were both performed well, the voices being wrll matched, and as both are very pretty, the effect was good; but as a kind friend whispcu·d to me, the second one was 'very sweet but rather low.' The instrumental trio playl·tl by J. Grundy, on the violin and Mr. Johnson on the 'cello with Mr. Jones at the piano was played well (so it seemed) but lacked inspiriting vivacity. The duet sung by 11 D. R eale, a new boy, and W. H . Maundrell, our alto, was the most fascinating part ul the programme, and was heartily encored. Mr. Johnson then treated the audience 111


, THE

CANTUARIAN.

223

I wo admirable 'cello pieces.

"The Potter" needs no comment except for the well known voice of Mr. R itchie, which boomed out to fill up treble pauses, while the glees which followed were beautiful. In these the Choral "iuciety were ably assisted by Mr. Price of the Cathedral Choir, as .&Ito. No. 9, the "Vikings "was a great success, after which the trebles trooped out to ' njoy the refreshments provided, in the usual manner. After the interval, came the u~ual carol portion of the programme; " Come, ye Lofty" and "A Virgin Unspotted' were carols we have not heard for some time. All were vigorously performed, the tenors .1nd basses rising manfully to the last "-Noel" of each chorus. " T he Winter Night " the well-known King's School Carol, held, as it always has held, the pre-eminence among the carols for beauty; the only one unfamiliar part in it being the absence of Mr. I :urdon. School songs followed but were rather curtailed owing to time, anyhow the l'hOol was not to be robbed of the pleasure of hearing the powerful and lusty "Follow lJp" of its Football Captain; which followed by the blessings on the Queen brought I he programme to an end, Carter calling for the usual cheers for the audience as t hey ltnoped out, the Dean and Bishop having no unfair share.

'

THE LIGAROO. It was up the Ottawa river some two hundred miles north of the Canadian 1 qutal that we fell in with Joe Sykes 1 hum. My triend and I were paddling llllll){ in a bark canoe after a day's fishing uul were just th inking we must choose a â&#x20AC;˘ 1111ping ground for the night, when we ' lii1C upon a lumber barge slowly floating ol11wn the stream. I n response to the 111 1 nation of the man in charge, we got on '"'¡"d and hauled our canoe after us, tlunking to get a lift and to save ourselves lito trouble of pitching the tent. P erhaps WI hoped he would offer us some tea. \1.1'1 1 no. So we got out our provisions and

appeased our hunger with several thick slices of bread and butter sprinkled over with brown sugar. We had nothing to drink, but we had roughed it for a week or so and were getting hardened. After a bit the man came up to have a chat, and getting communicative over his evening pipe told us several backwoods stories. Then- it was just getting dark, for the sun had set and there is no twilight in Canada, he suddenly exclaimed "Did either of you gentlemen ever see a Ligaroo ?" Without waiting for an answer he went on "I'll tell you how I saw a Ligaroo. I t was last fall or rather later : the rivers were

I


224

THE

CANTUARIAN.

frozen and I'd put up my barge and was going up to the Backwoods to fell lumber and get it ready to float down the river when the spring came. I set off with my chum Joe Sykes. Now mind what I tell you of Joe, for my story is about him. I can't exactly say he was my friend : a more ill-favoured man I never saw. But I 'll just tell you how it was. He was sweet on my sister down in Montreal and was all fixed to get spliced, when she, poor girl, took sick and died. She was a good sister to me and for her sake I couldn't be harsh to Joe. I was sorry for him too for he went melancholy like and mooned about by himself. I put in a question here to try and find out what a Ligaroo, was, but Joe Sykes' chum took no notice. He was getting mysteriously solemn and went on in an awestruck tone. "Well, we travelled up together, a good stx hundred miles and almost due north. for there's no big timber left nearer the towns. We bad a rough cold journey in our sledge and it wasn't every night we could find a house to sleep in. If we couldn't we bad just to dig a hole in the snow and light a fire and if we both went to sleep and let the fire out, it was cold." He shuddered at the recollection. " The weather didn't improve Joe's temper. He got sulkier than ever and when we reached the shanty where our gang was he'd hardly speak a civil word to me. I soon forgot that. It was no small matter to have a roof over our heads, plenty of food and

fire and a dozen or so chums. With his b:~d temper and surly looks J oe was soon unpopu lar and they told me as his pal to speak tn him and get him to beh ave better. So 1 said to him one night "Look here ) m·, you've been crossed in love and so bas many another man before you. But that's no reason why you should be so uncivil." Ami then I said, half joking like 'You know, J oe, if you go on like this we shall think you've sold yourself to the devil.' Well I never saw a man in such a passion. li t just swore he didn't want any of my intcl ference and rushed away. Next day I set off to a neighbourin11 camp for provisions as our stock was gctlinp low. It was qutte dark as I got lll'(ll our shanty and I was walking by the hor•n•,' heads to keep them quiet. There wt•rc wolves about I knew. Suddenly I saw .1 dark shadow moving among the pine lrl't I got out my knife, a weapon no baC'k woods man is ever without and waited. S1111 enough, in a moment something d:u ~ sprang at me. I took it for a wolf :tnol buried my knife deep in its shoulder. Wtt h out a sound the beast slunk away. Hmllu same instant a cold sweat broke out nil over me and I knew that I had stabhc cl not a wolf, but my pal Joe. I looked at tilt knife, 1101 a stair~ of blood was on the b/rn/1 When I got to the shanty the men :.atd I looked as if I had seen a ghost, and I told them the whole story. They wr•• rough men, my pals, and they swore ln h• revenged on Joe. After a bit he canw 111 1 gloomy as usual and wouldn't speak, n• I


THE I lwr

CANTUARIAN.

good nor bad. But one of the gang pulled his shirt down, and there, sure 1 nough, on his shoulder was the mark of the knife, but no blood. We didn't need any more. H e was kirked out and told to go to his master and we threw his coat and things after him. Now mark what I say, gentlemen. As we threw his coat after him seventeen silver •lollars fell out of the pocket, and as sure ns I 1\m sitting here I saw those seventeen dollars crawl away in the snow after their uwner. "Bah "-this in a tone of mighty tontempt-" Sell your soul for seventeen dollars I " " What do you mean ? " I questioned. " Why," said he " where could he have I(Ol that money from except from the devil. lie hadn't any when he came up with me. Ucs1des, didn't I see them crawl away?" There was no gainsaying argument of this kind. He had, too, told his story so Hcriously that we were almost awed. Here my friend broke in " But what is :\ Ligaroo?" "Why surelf, Joe Sykes, my pal," replied the bargeman. "You know a

Ligaroo is a man who sells himself to the D evil and has the power to change into a wolf at nights to revenge himself on his enemies. And the sign of a Ligaroo is that they can't bleed ; all their blood is dried up." So ended the ba rgeman's story. He either believed it or was a first-rate actor. Perhaps he was " playing it down low " on a couple of new chums. I leave it to the ftn de siecle readers of the Ca1tluarian to decide. We had plenty of time to think it over, for we found to our horror that our host's offer to " bunk us in " merely con· sisted of sweeping a part of the deck. H e went to his own bunk and left us vainly trying to get to sleep. Owing to the curvature of the deck our heads and heels were below our centres of gravity. To any one who has never tried to sleep in this position, I say emphatically, don't ! NOTE.-The word Ligaroo is a corrup· tion of the French Lottp-Garou, the werewolf or man-wolf of Saxon legends. The superstition has died out of France but has been transplanted by the French Canadians and still lives amongst the backwoodsmen.


226

THE

CANTUARIAN.

DEBATING SOCIETY. A debate was held on Saturday, January 2oth, in the Parry Library, when F. S. Beynon moved tha t " Free education was beneficial and advantageous to the country." The opposition was led by W. M. Carter. The Honourable Mover after stating the motion, declared t hat the chief advantage of Free Ed ucation was the beneficial effect it had on the poor; for before the system of Free Schools became universal, although parochial relief was given in some cases to enable the poor to send their children to school, yet many of the people refused to apply for such relief because they had a rooted objection to being, as they called it " on the parish ". H e also showed that the fact, that the United States of America had adopted and carried on the system of Free E ducation since their foundation was a sure proof of its excellence. Again when education becomes universal, Free Schools will make it so, there will be a material decrease in crime and a general improvement in the tastes, habits and pursuits of the people. And finally we shall no longer hear a~ we frequently did before the Free Education Bill was passed, of parents being summoned in the Lawcourts because they were too poor to send their children to school. W. M. Carter, who led the Opposition, said his chief objections to Free Education were the following :-Free Education necessitates education by the State and

therefore every person who receives this education is taught the same subjects in the same way since there is one body which controls the administration of State Schools ; on this account there is great probability of the loss of all originality of thought. 'M oreover many people who could really aiTord to pay for .their childrens' education wot1ld avail themselves of this welcome opportunity to have them taught free of charge. The education that appears like ly to be given seems to be greatly in excess of what is required by people of the class of those whom the Act is intended to benefi t. H. M. Ja mes for the motion, called attention to the Education Act passed in 187o, which forced the poor people lo educate their children ; saying that sinrl.' education had been forced upon them, that those who forced it on them ought to pay for it. Amongst other things he remarked upon the low wages of an which hardly ordinary working-man, enabled him to procure the ordinary necessities oflife, much less allowed of his sending his children to school. M. S. Newland, speaking third for the opposition, began by maintaining that there can be no such thing as Free Ed u¡ cation. The expen~e must be borne by somebody. The four contributory s0urccs that support education for the lower classes are taxes, local rates, voluntary subscrip.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

22 7

tions, and small weekly fees paid by the which can be better or as well done by parents of the children receiving the edu· voluntary effort, such as R eligious Guilds, cation. The additional expense incurred etc. Then with regard to the religious by this so·called Free Education would be difficulty. How can the entire population a very considerable addition to the state accept one scheme of religious teaching expenses. He then went on to state a prescribed by the State, especially when few objections to this education system. public feeling is very bitter against the First, he thought it was a general rule that State having any authority whatsoever over that the Jess one pays for a thing the Jess religious matters ? Mr. Goschen in opposone values it. Then again, as Lord Salis· ing the scheme said that the sense of family hury bad said, it was an attempt to abolish duty might be weakened by an entirely Bible teaching in our schools. Further· public education and that it was not school more, instead of educating all the lower pence which kept children from school but l'lasses it really neglected the lowest classes, the fact that foolish parents make use of which actually were most in need of edu- their children's services sooner than they l'ation. This was probably caused by the ought. fact that it was the representatives of the T. C. Hincks, for the opposition, drew manufacuring classes that were so eager attention to the irregular attendance, in· for this Free System, so as to get the upper feriority of scholars, contempt ofparents, and portion of the lower classes, skilful and re- lowering of the standard of work, charachpcctable workmen, and thus get their terising Free Schools. He also drew at· work done better and possibly cheaper. tention to the fact that Free Education i\nother objection was the education all tended to foster the idea of the State, not over England being regulated by a set the parents being responsible for the bringform and running in the same stereotype ing up of the children, and of the children J<roovc, all originality would be out of the themselves being less dependent on their question. Last, but not least, it was bor- own industry. wwcd from America, and he thought The following also spoke :-R. B. Flint • wryone would agree with him that Eng- for the opposition; T. N. Micklem, F . land is not America and English ways and W. Chisholm, and W. R . Mowll, for the motion. cu~toms bear no resemblance to those of /1 tncrica. The hon. mover in his closing speech K J. S. Athawes, speaking for the desired to refer to the statement of the Opposition, said that the contribution hon. gentleman who led the opposition, 1 1wards the cost of any article tends to it that one uniform type of Education would hdng more valued by the receiver ; and prevent originality and individuality, his 1hat nothing ought to be done by the State opinion was that there was surely not

'!

li II ~I:


THE CANTUARIAN. much development ot either in a child during the age of 5 and 13, afler which time their education was not compulsory, and in reference to the remark that Free Education would benefit the rich and middle classes who did not require it, he pointed out that they were not obliged to avail themselves of it unless they chose. Another member of the Opposition had said that people were not discontented before Free Schools were established, an opinion manifestly wrong since there was a great outcry in x885 for them. It had further been said that the remark " the less we paid for a thing the less we valued it " held good in the case of Free Schools, surely this was not the case, since, to quote an instance, public parks in London were not the less valued because they happened

to be free, and that Free Schools caused an extra expense to the Government, how could this be seeing that the expense was covered by the taxes? Lastly an honour· able gentleman had said that previously schools were maintained by voluntary effort, did he consider parents being sum moned because they were unable to send their children to school, voluntary effort. Another remark made was that when schools are Cree, people will not send thei r children, this was hardly correct since schools were just as compulsory now a, they had been. He ended by saying that if free schools were not beneficial, the pre sent government would hardly have shown themselves so incompetent as to pass the Bill. The motion was carried by one vote.

PENNY READIN G. A Penny R eading was held in the Parry Library on Saturday, F ebruary 27th. Tla two most successful events were the piano and 'cello "Romance" by Messrs. Jones arret Johnson, and Reale's song, which was very well sung. The following was the pro gramme:PART SONG " In the Merry Spring." Ravensc~·oft.

Pu.No DUBT ... "En Avant." Lui gi

Golfie~-c .

Mr. Jones and J . B. Serivenor. RE~TNG............... ............ ....................... .

F. B. Beynon.

PIANO & 'CELLO "Romance." (f1·om Gm nu Duo) Golte~·~11a,, "• Mr. Jones and Mr. Johnson. SoNG ... ... " The f:hildren' s Home." ... Co11'rll H. T. Reale. RBADING... ................ ....................... ....... .. Mr. Ritchie.

PART SoKo......... "Echoes." ............ Oalkin. PA.RT SONG.... .. " Old Neptune." ......... Qcutl GOD SA.VE THE QUEEN.


THE CANTUARIAN.

FOOTBALL. K.S.C. v. SUTTON VALENCE This match was played on Tuesday, November 24th. Thanks to the unfailing unpunctuality of the South Eastern Railway, the Sutton Valence team did not make il h appearance on the ground till 3.30. The visitors' captain won the toss, and chose the S. Stephen's end of the ground. Beynon kicked off for the school, and the ball was well returned by Perks. During the first quarter of an hour play was fairly even, ,md the ball remained in neutral territory. However, the Sutton Valence forwards who were fairly heavy for a school team, gradually worked the ball into the home twenty-five where some tight scrimmages took place; they were particularly smart in getting the 11.111 away to their three-quarters, and they would undoubtedly have scored but for the , xrcllent tackling of the school halves and three-quarters. Two ineffectual attempts 11 dropping goals gave them a couple of minors, and just before half-time after some pretty passing between Rowlands, Perks, H emingway and Hunt, the last named .câ&#x20AC;˘r.urcd a try rather far out. The attempt at goal, by Hunt, was a good one, but fell horton the bar. Half-time arrived with the score, Sutton Valence, one try, King's ~khool, nil. Sutton Valence kicked off and the ball remained in the school twenty-five. From a loose ,, rim mage the ball was smartly passed out to Shorting, who, eluding the opposing threequarters, made a fine run the length of the field and scored a try behind the posts.The placektr.k which was taken by Cullin was unfortunately a fuilure. This made the score equal-a 11 y each. SuttonValence now made strenuous efforts to get ahead, with the result that a conllnunl pressure was kept up, but thanks once more to the good defence of the home ll.lrks, their attempts for some time were unsuccessful. The passing of the Sutton Vnlence three-quarters was very quick and accurate, but one of them had a weakness for attempting to drop goals which was entirely unsuccessful. At length Rowlands secured " 11 y for them, but his attempt at goal though a fairly easy one was a failure. Sutton Valence were now a try to the good, a fact which seemed to discourage the home team .mncwhat, as the ball was often uncomfortably near their goal-line, and from a scrimmage 111 front or'the goal, Hunt grounded the ball between the posts. This time he was Mlt't'essful in kicking a goal. During the rest of the game play was chiefly confined to the forwards, but owing to the rapidly increasing darkness it was impossible to distinguish


230

THE

CANTUARIAN.

individual play. No further score resulting Sutton Valence left the field victorious by a goal and two tries, to one try. For the winners Hemingway was the pick of the forwards ; the back division .verc all good. Hunt, Rowlands and Perks being the best. For the school, Beynon, Micklem, and Cooper forwards, and Castley, Athawes and Coleridge-Smith behind, were most conspicuous. K.S.C. 2ND XV. v. 2ND XV. DOVER COLLEGE. Played at Canterbury and resulted in a win for Dover by 20 points to nil. ThiR was our first attempt to organize a :md xv., and so naturally we fared badly against ou• experienced adversaries who crossed our line 7 times. For the victors Hunter, Watt~ and Clark were conspicuous and for the School, Kingdon, Smith and Walsh.

K.S.C. v. DOVER COLLEGE. T his return match was played at Blore's Piece in fine weather on Tuesday, February 23rd. At a quarter to three Dover, having lost the toss kicked off. The kick W:l'> returned, and several loose scrimmages took place in the centre of the ground. But getting the ball from touch, H. E. F lint relieved by a short run, which resulted in a scrimmage in the Dover XXV. But the visitors gradually regained the ground thu . lost, and the ball actually passed our lines, Cullin touching down. After this the play became more even; and when Dover were again pressing Athawes the two Flints and Luxmore took the ball to the College territory. T hen Dover by their superior loose play drove us back, and Strode, dribbling the ball past our lines, secured the first try. How ever he failed to bring off a goal from the difficult position. Cullin dropped off, and after two or three exchange kicks, Castley got his first run and gained some twelve yard~. This advantage, however, we soon lost, and by some excellent passing between Hunt<·• and Middleton, the last named ran in behind the posts, and Strode converted the t•y. After this Dover still pressed hard, but did not score again before half time. O n resuming, Luxmore kicked off and the play occupied the middle ofthe field. Tlu visitors then rushed, but Cullin picked the ball up and dropped it into touch. Shortly after this, an appeal for 'off side' was given in our favour and Castley, by backing up his kick improved our position. Some loose play took the ball to the other side of tl11 ground, but Castley by a long kick into touch relieved us, and a scrimmage eventuall)• took place in front of their goal. Their superior passing however took the ball to tlu


THE

CANTUARIAN.

2JI

• • ntrc and from thence to our XXV, and though Athawes and Candy returned it to their h til as before, their passing and dribbling was too much for us, and the ball came back u nur XXV. After a foul had been given against Dover the centre once more became lw scene of action. More loose play from Dover, however, ended in one of their forwards securing a try but the kick, from an easy position, failed. c 'ullin made a fine drop off and the game was progressing in the centre when no side was called, leaving I lover victorious by a goal and two tries to nil, a result due to their superior play in the lnu;c and general smartness. The scrimmages were very equal but we seemed rather till' heavier. Strode and Middleton showed best form for the College while Cullin did l11 ;t for us. Our three-quarters did not have the ball quite as much as they ought but I :a~t lcy and Athawes played very well and Micklem was very useful in the throws out horn touch. The following were the teams:II . J. Cullin (back); R. J. Castley, H. E. Flint and F. S. Beynon, three-quarter-backs; 1•, J. S. Athawes (captain), A. R. Smith, half--backs; R. B. Flint, M. S. Newland, T. N Micklem, A. F. C. C. Luxmore, R. G. Cooper, C. T. Candy, W. M. Carter, E. V. I tngdon and C. E. Etheridge, forwards. I >over College :-A. E. Knocker (captain), back ; L. E. M. Strode, E. Middleton and I lunter, three-quarter backs; A. M. Fox and C. P. Olldrey, half-backs; P. Comber, I' F. Turner, H. H . Holden, C. D. Driver, B. A. H. Wright, G. Nathan, S. S. Logan, I' •. De Ia Pryme and G. Mellor, {forwards).

K.S. C. v. CASTLE HILL, FOLKESTONE. This match was played at Folkestone on Feb. 25th, and was a well contested game throughout, play changing from one end to the other frequently. The visitors having nn the toss, Luxmoore kicked off for the school, play being at fi rst in the centre of the lllllnd, till Kent secured the ball and passed our ! backs when he was well collared lty Cullin. After a few scrimmages Athawes made a good run a nd reached their 25 In lure he was collared. Kent again, soon after this, got away but was stopped in our 25, 1 lll'n after several scrimmages the ball was taken back to half way. H . E. Flint by some 'lr lhbling took the ball into their 25, but it was well returned by their back. F lint once nurr·c just failed to score after a good run, but he was well collared about 5 yards from th•·rr goal line, when after a few scrimmages the ball was dribbled over their line, and llll'y were forced to touch down in self defence. The kick off from 25 was well returned lty Flint,after whichAthawes and Newland played well together play remaining at half way. At this point Candy sent a high long pass out to Flint, which was intercepted by Kent,


232

THE

CANTUARIAN.

who after a dodgy run obtained a try behind the posts, which was not converted hem ever, Micklem by a sharp run out touching the ball. After the kick off from the 25 11.11 play remained in the centre for a time, then Athawes almost succeeded in scoring havtn~ pa<>£ed their f backs, but he was well stopped by their back within two yards of their lino Our scrimmage was gradually pushed back, when Kent secured the ball and looknl like scoring but was prevented by Cullin not far from our goal line. Our forwards hy degrees worked the ball backwards, but after some good passing by their three-qunrlt 1 backs Kent again scored near the touch line, but the try was not improved on. Aflt • the kick off from the XXV, some loose play resulted, and one of their forwards Parkt dribbled the ball over the line, from which a good goal was kicked by Spurway. The score at half time was a goal and and two tries to nil, in favour of our opponent 1 After the kick off at half-time some even play resulted, until Candy by a good 11111 took the ball into their XXV, which however was soon after taken back by Kent to hall way. But our forwards agai n pressed, and Athawes by a good dodgy run obtained a It) for the school near the touch line. Cullin took the kick, which failed, though it wa11 ,, good attempt. Soon after the kick off Athawes again was conspicuous by a good 11111 though he was collared by their back. The ball was then dribbled by our opponents 111 half way and our forwards again pressed but failed to score. After this some even pill) took place, till the ball was kicked behind our line and we touched down in self-defl'ntc Play continued in our XXV till Kent, from a good pass, again ran in, but the try failt d After this no further point resulted though our opponents looked several times like scottnl the game ending in their favour by a goal and three tries (II points) to one try (2 point ) For our opponents Kent was certainly the best, his nmning being especially good, al n Spurway, Packe and Torrens played well for them. For the school Athawes was far 1111 most conspicuous, working very hard all through the game. Cullin at back was also good, his kicks and collaring being sure. For the rest Beynon and H. E. F lint dltl good work. The forwards worked hard and played a good game, throuHit out. The following represented the school :- (Back), H. J. Cullin, 0· bark •), E. J. S. Athawes, A. L. Smith, (! backs), H. E. Flint, F. S. Beynon, C. T. Cantl) (Forwards) R. B. F lint, M. S. Newland, T . N. Micklem, A. F. Luxmoore, R. G. CO()Jit r, W. R . Mowll, W. M. Carter, C. E. Etheridge, E. V. Kingdon.

K.S.C. 2ND XV. v CASTLE HILL 2ND XV. This match was played on Tuesday, Feb. 25th at the same time that the fi rst \ v were playing the Castle Hill first team at Folkestone. The day was fine aud warm and


r I

THE

CANTUARIAN.

2 33

llw t urf considering the recent snow and rains in very good condition. The Castle Hill I• un won the toss, and Lord kicked off for the school from the S. Stephen's end of 1111 ground. Play during the first half was extremely even; the Castle Hill forwards .,, l l' a much heavier Jot, but the school forwards more than held their own against them. llwrc was very little play outside the scrimmage, as the forwards on both sides were very h•w in getting the ball out. Only o nce did the Castle Hill team look like scoring and 1h.tl was when Roberts had passed all our backs except Walsh, who howe~er, tackled him luwly just in front of the goal. Half time came without a point having been gained by , ttlwr side, play was still very even, and all the scoring took place in the last quarter n l nn hour. Thr::n the superior weight of the Castle Hill serums began to tell, and the ], dl was kept uncomfortably near the King's School goal line. At length Wrench got nvt•r the line far out, after a smart run but the try was a failure. After the drop out, 1 .t~tl c Hill continued to press, and a few minutes afterwards Wrench scored again for tlu m. This time the place kick was successful. No further scoring took place and lwn the whistle sounded the Castle Hill team left the field victorious by a goal "'" a try to nil. For the winners Muir, Wrench and Cripps behind, and l'11h ·rts and Wademeyer, forward, were the pick. The King's School forwards all worked It ucl. Hall and Ridley being most consoicous, while Lenox and Richardson outside •uulc most of their opportunities.

1.1

i

II

SCHOOL NEWS. It has been decided to have fives' matches

rlh Dover College for the future, the lit t match has not yet been fixed.

***

-,

'l'hc Sports will probably take p;ace on \111 r h 31st and April rst. A meeting is to '" arranged with the representatives of the 1 ( >.S. to decide upon the events and the .I rt• ·~ of the Inter-School Sports. This ull·t•ling will take place after the Fives' M 1trh with the C.O.S. bas been played.

***

' l'hc Day Boys have started a newspaper t luh this term, which promises to be a

success, Mr. Longsdon has kindly given the cases for the papers to be kept in.

***

W. M. Carter has obtained a Junior Hulme Exhibition in Modern History of £8o per annum for four years at Brasenose College, Oxford.

I!

,,

l

***

W. H. Evans passed the Preliminary Examination for Woolwich at the examination held in December last.

***

A 2nd XV. has been formed this season the following have received the badge I

I

ii

,J.


2 34

THE

CANTUARIAN.

which forms the colours of the 2nd XV. N. Walsh (back), T. C. Hincks, A. W. Wigram, A. L. Smith, (! backs) A. G. R ichardson, E. V. Kingdon, D. G. Lenox (f backs), W. M. Carter, C. E. Etheridge, 0. C. H all, E. J. Lord, J. B. Drake, F. W. Chisolm, A. H. Barlee, S. Pears (forwards) .

I am sure Mr. Campbell's friends will be glad to know that it is intended to place a small brass tablet m the Cathedral to his memory, and also to place in the Parry Library some of his photographs of Can terbury. Some small subscriptions will hl necessary for this purpose. T.F.

J.

O.K.S. COLUMN . On St. Thomas' Day A. W. Kearney and B. S. Spencer were ordained deacons and appointed, the latter to the curacy of Esh, the former to that of St. Mary's. Kensington.

'Jeen promoted from the rank of second lieutenant, to that of lieutenant.

**

***Chafy-Chafy, M.A., The Rev. W. K. W. has obtained his degree of Doctor of Divinity. *** h k h. The Rev. R. G. Glennie as ta en 1s M.A. degree and has been appointed to the P?St of resident chaplam to the Archbishop of York.* .'* San dlmrst at t he R . J. R oss passed* mto . . . November exammatJOn takmg 14th place. * A. Bredin has re:ei~ed his commission in the Prince of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regiment, and is now stationed at Portsmouth. E. W. B. Green,*** of the Royal Sussex Regiment now stationed at Dublin, has

~·.,.,

The following is an extract from a North Country paper, which gives an account ol a presentation to an O.K .S., the Rev. I<:. H. Greatorex, which took place on February 26th. INTERESTING PRESENTATIONS AT SOUTH SHIELDS. Last night a large number of ladies and gentlemen assembled in the lecture roo111 of St. Hilda's Church Institute, Waterloo Vale,. South· Shields, for theR purpose F Hofprc · 1 sentmg testunoma 1s to t 11e ev. 1 • ar cy \V"II' d th R E H G t • e ev. 1 • rea on.:x1 1 1ams an who up till a little time ago were cur:lll'~ at St. Hilda's Church. Soon after the R~v Canon Baily's removal to the parish ol Ryton, Mr. Harley-Williams received an appointment as curate at West HartlepOCJI, a nd Mr. Greatorex at Shotley Brit!,.;~ T he Vicar of South Shields, the Rev. II ,

I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

2

35

1~. Savage, presided. The Chairman were carried out most harmoniously. · having briefly opened the proceedings, (Applause). He then banded to Mr. called upon the Rev. Canon Baily to make Williams and Mr. Greatorex a beautiful gold keyless watch, each bearing a suitable the presentations. The Rev. Canon Baily said the work inscription, the gifts of the members ofthe of curates was frequently passed over congregation in commemoration of their comparatively unseen and unacknowledged, connection with the parish of St. Hilda's. because very often the incumbent gathered H e hoped they would make use of their up a great deal of credit, although it was watches in a manner that would enable thrust upon him, probably u nwillingly. them to take a proper measure of what Mr. Williams, Mr. Greatorex, and himself might be the endurance of their congrcga· had worked most harmoniously together, tions when preaching. (Laughter). and they bad never bad one serious, and The recipients in a few appropriate re· he could not remember even a trival, dis· marks returned thanks for the testimonials, agreement during the time they were con· after which several of the churchwardens nccted with the parish of St. Hilda's- spoke in feeling terms of the esteem in (applause) and in consequence he felt the which the two reverend gentlemen were parting very much when he left South held by the congregation generally. Shields for Ryton. Mr. Williams had A vote of thanks to the Rev. Canon worked with him for eight years, and Mr. Raily for making the presentation, and a ( :rcatorex for six years, and during the similar compliment to the chairman ter· whole of that period their parochial duties minated the proceedings.

1'1

CORRESPONDENCE . .V. n.- The Edito1·s decline to accept any 1·esponsibiZity connectecZ with the opinions of their C01'i'espondcn/s.

Na.mo

MUZ

aclcl•·ess nu~st altwWIJ8 be given, not necessm'iii!J fo•· pubUcation, Pe1·. onaUties wilt invo~ve ce1·tain rejection.

b1~1.

as a.

1/l~a••antec of gooclfaith.

THE MUSEUM.

J'o tile Editors of"

THE CANTUARIAN."

Dear sirs,-The Museum bas been re · opened this term in the newly-acquired room over the old gateway, and it is hoped that under its new conditions it may develop into an institution worthy of the s<"hool. May I venture to make a n appeal

through the Cantuarian to all friends of the school, on behalf of t his very important branch of our equipment. H itherto the committee have hesitated somewhat to ask for donations owing to the insufficient accommodation at their disposal, but now this difficulty bas been removed, and we are ready to provide suitable space and

I

I

I!. .i.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

proper protection for any specimens or obof general or local interest that may be entrusted to us. Among the many ways in which the museum may be assisted-! may mention that one case is to be set apart for documents and any M.S.S. etc., relating to the past history of the school or of its "worthies" which will be thankfully received and carefully kept. Our terminal income is of course very small and our expenses have lately been very heavy-any contributions of money would he most valuable to us, especially as we look forward to further additions and improvements as soon as our funds will allow of it. Any subscription or donations will be gratefully accepted and acknowledged either by R. G. Cooper or myself, . Yours truly, L. H. EVANS. We beg to acknowledge the following donations, apologising for having left many of them so long unnoticed : Mrs. Bred in, nest of bottle birds ; tamil papyrus books; Mrs. Payne Smith, 2 cases of coleoptera, a species of lobster ; Mr. Mason, a pair of razor-bills ; Mr. Dale, African assegai, arrows and other curiosities ; Coo, fossil specimen of Nautilus ; Ridley, Siamese crow, flying fox ; Athawes, young fox ; Coleman, barn owl ; F. B. Kingdon, petrified chaffinch's nest. Curiosities have also been presented by Cullin, Helmore, Mourilyan, Lenox. Subscriptions have been received from Mrs. Field (ÂŁ2), Mr. Mason, Mr. Longsdon, Mr. Tripp, Mr. Ritchie. jec~

To flte Editors of "THE CANTUARIAN." RIFLE CORPS. Dear Sirs,-Would it not be to the advantage of the school, if a rifle-corps was formed here, as I believe most public schools have one. I have beard some people say that the school is not large enough, but Rome was not built in a day, and a corps consisting of 40 or so members would not be too small. I am certain most people in the school would not object to subscribing a small amount each, to make up the sum requisite to begin with ; and I feel quite sure that there would be enough people in the school, who would join, and-what is still more necessary-stick to it. Hoping the authorities will not look unfavourably on this suggestion. I remain, Yours sincerely. VOLUNTEER. To tlze Editors of" THE CANTUARIAN." SPORTS. Dear Sirs,-! have a proposition to make that concerns our coming sports. Why should we not start our races, as iH the custom in most of the other Public Schools, by firing a pistol ? instead of the present mode, which I am sure must be a tremendous strain on the starters' voc.1l powers. Surely a second-hand blunderbuss, or some other such dangerous weapon could not be beyond the limited means of the Sports Committee. Also for the sake of variety, why should


THE

CANTUARIAN.

we not introduce a " tug-of-war" ? or somethmg of that sort. H oping to see the former suggestion carried out in the approaching sports, to which I wish the utmost success. I remain, Yours truly, AN ATHLETE.

To tlte Editors of " THE CANTUARIAN." D ear Sirs,-I should be very glad to know whether our School has a motto or not. If, by any remote chance, there is such a thing, is it so secret, that it may not on some occasions be appended to our crest, or be made known to the School in any other way? If not, although our schools and institutions are numerous, yet the stock of mottoes is still far from exhausted, and some appropriate motto could be

2

37

easily selected. Most schools of our position (I think I should not be far wrong in saying all) have a motto of some kind. Yours truly, CURIOSITY.

T o the E ditors of "THE CANTUARIAN. " D EAR SIRS,-Might I suggest that the football fifteen should be allowed to wea r their velvet caps in the town, etc. The cricket eleven have the privilege of wearing blazers and caps, distinguished by the School crest, a nd have, moreover, a special tie and a different ribbon for their straw hats. Surely, then, the football fifteen might be allowed to wear their caps as is the custom in several schools. I am, Yours-faithfully, CAPUT.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. Several of our contemporaries are not tise) Killcorn, to be obtained of all above supplementing their funds by print- chemists and medicine vendors, price only ing advertisements. From one of these the I S. T,eodiensian we glean an interesting piece The Droghedean offers a good opporof news and must offer our deepest sym- t unity for comparing the discipline in Irish pathi~s with the organist of the Leeds a nd English Schools. There are apparently T own H all who has ~a d three corns for going to be no regular Easter H olidays many years. We are, however, rejoiced to but the Headmaster offers a week to some hear that they have been completely cured s pecially favoured ones on condition ( i) after being fruitlessly attacked by many That they return to school punctually on chiropodists, by M--'s (we do not adver. the day appointed at the end of the Christ-


T HE

CANTUARIAN.

mas holidays. (ii) That each boy under- which it devotes the by no means despic takes to return on the appointed day at able share of ten pages out of a total ot thirteen. the end of the " extra " week. We acknowledge with thanks the receipt T he Huddersfield College Magazine offers us some well-known epitaphs, and of the following magazines : -Tlte Lily, others which we have not heard before. Leys Forlniglttly (J), Ousel, Alleynia1l (2), Among them is a curious I rish inscription, Hull Grammat· Scltool Gazette, Dovot•t(m, " Erected to the memory of John Phillips, Bradfield College Cht'01licle, Cltolmeleir111, accidentally shot, as a mark of affection by Soutlt Eastem College JJ1agazitte, Vis his brother." pinia1l, St. Edward's Scltool Cltronide, Tlte Ley's Fot·ln~r;htly contains little, but Epsomia11, Rotfemia1l, Elizabetltan, Clint the account of its football matches to !tam H ouse Magazi11e.

NOTIC:ES. We must apologise for t he following erWe beg to acknowledge, with thanks, rata :- In the November number, we the following subscriptions to the Ca11l11 stated that W. N. Johnson, Esq., was of aria11 :-E. W. B. Green, \V. H. Salmon, Sidney Sussex ; he comes from E m- W. J . Duval, Rev. W. F. Cobb, L. Archer, manuel. I n the December number, in Rev. G. H . Cameron (7s.), E. W. Moore the Oxford letter, the Rev. Harler should (10s. 6d.), C. H. Roc, and Mrs. Southgalc. be the Rev. H arke. Also, the name ofR. H. Parr was omitted from the list of subscribers to Bishop Parry's portrait.


THE CANTUARIAN. VoL. I II.

APRIL, 1892.

No. ro.

EDITORIAL. It has often been said that in this world it is the unexpected which most often happens, uur readers will be inclined to accept this as a truism when they observe the appearance uf two Ca11tuariatzs in such rapid succession. After the lapse of months {if two and a half months are worthy of that title) a number at length makes its appearance and another quickly follows in its wake. But man is a variable creature, and the boy in this l'aseseemstofollow the bad example set by the man.Although no doubt regularity is a virtue yet we hope that the appearance of another Cantuarian will not be regarded as a cri me, lor one thing at least we may plead in our defence,and that is that now we have once set to work 'we are only following the advice of the school motto ' Age dum agis.' This is only by the way, we must n0w take in hand the serious subjects of our daily life.:. Of these, the sports at present occupy most of our attention. This year besides um own, sports will take place between the C.O.S. and ourselves. It is now some five years ~â&#x20AC;˘nre a similar contest took place; to prevent such a gap occurring again in the future it has lll'c.:n decided to hold them every year. The articles of agreement concerning these purls will appear in our next number. It will be seen from these that the open , vents are the same as those in the last inter-school sports with the exception of the


THE

CANTUARIAN.

half-mile, which has been substituted for putting the weight; the " under sixteen" events have been increased from three to five. Before leaving this subject we wish all success to our own sports, whicb we hope will be favoured by better weather than was vouchsafed to us last year, and we hope that the school will carry all before them on the Beverley where the Inter-School Sports will take place. This year too the school has taken a new departure in gym nastics, for we are to be represented at Aldershot in the public Schools' competition, Lee-Warner and Smith arc to do duty for the school. We hope that they will be successful and that henceforth the King's School will always take part in these competitions.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF AFRICA. It was a dull grey morning as the s.s. - - - d rew near to the last port but one, to which she was bound. The captain comes up and remarks that he has never been in the harbour yet without a shower of rain falling. All eyes are gazing shorewards to catch a glimpse of the three hills which rise above the comparatively flat coast line. These hills mark the port which the captain wishes to enter early this morning. At last they come in sight; fi rst dimly, then quite clearly; then their configuration becomes confused as the steamer passes them and comes off the mouth of the harbour. Then a glorious transformation scene takes place as the harbour mouth is passed. A dull, hazy, fla t, and apparently uninteresting coast line changes almost in an instant to the most lovely scenery which man can imagine. Not a quarter of a mile from the ship, on either side are the rugged coral reefs ;

above them the most beautilully green cocoanut trees, interspersed wi th bright green grass. I t is the close of the rainy season, and everything is in its perfection of beauty. This is the picture on one side ; on the other, the town of Mombara, with the remains ¡of the Portuguese fort and new buildings for the Company. The old order changeth, giving place to new. H ere is a building, said to bear the date of its erection by Xeixas de Cabreira- 1635which marks the occupation of this part of Africa by the P ortuguese. Their method of government has failed ; the people of this land cannot be ruled with a rod of iron. And the verdict of one great ex plorer was practically this : I have seen tlw effect of Portuguese rule in many place~. and in every place the effect has been w leave the country in a worse state than it was in before. There high up above the town


THE

CANTUARIAN.

1 uul~ the representative of the new 111 do •1 ; a hospital and a house for the I 11111pany. As the bright red mortar him·~ in the sun, surely one is reminded · •I the great fact that England has made '" 1 l'lf responsible for nearly half the vast • nnt 111cnt of Africa. God has given her 1Ill land for a possession. What use shall Ill' make of it ? \nd between the two lie the huts of the ll.ttiVl' population. Time rolls on, but tlu y t hange not. But pass ove r to the 111 unland-for Mombara town is on an I ol. uul. There, one finds another town w1th native huts and shambas-as the • llltlv;ued pieces of ground are invariably • •lied-stretching for two and three miles 111111 the interior. These huts are worth a ''"'"• though they may not be inviting to • 1' 1y European to enter. Four walls hwlt of sticks, covering an area of perhaps 1'"' nty feet by thirty, form the sides. The ,,,,lis average a height of about seven feet •t the lowe5t, and twelve feet at the lul(hcst. A plastering of red earth and llrlll' finishes the walls; and they are red "' r olour. But one notices how the insects, luu, make theif houses of this material. llo 1c on the corner of some window frame oolll' sees a complete house-small and HIIIIHl, with a round hole for entrance. A lu • has taken up his abode here, a nd his hnn~c, too, is made of red earth. Or look .11 tho:;e long red lines all up t hat wall ; 1ht••e is a complete tunnel of many inches 111 length. Anyone here would say at once thllt this is the track of the white ant.

Yes, there is a resemblance in this matter between these small insects and the larger work of the Creator, which we call man. People and animals are often seen to be alike in this country. No man who has any love to his Creator can help being moved with the thought, " Can I do anything to help these people to enjoy the same blessings as I enjoy ? " To a stranger everything is novel. Every burde n is carried on the head ; men will carry as much as eighty pounds on their head for short distances. But in any other fash ion the men can carry very little. I t generally takes four men to carry a box that weighs one hundred-weight, or 112 lbs. Many reasons contribute to this. Perhaps foremost should be placed the extreme paucity of their food. A man often lives on one meal a day, and that is not eaten until the evening. When served it will often not consist of more than maize or some other grai n, and some vegetable. A little meal or fish may be added as a relish. Two meals a day are considered very good fare; and daily rations of rice, fowl and curry, without any change from day to day, is considered the best of living. European food is, as a rule, pronounced to be "sweet," but is not at all appreciated. Sick people prefer their own native food to nicely prepared English food, such as we should take . Every morning about 5.30 a.m., the work of the day begins 111 this place. All the women seem to turn out, each with an old oil tin, of the shape and size generally

li

.i.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

used for tea in England. In addition, the women will carry a smaller tin attached to a rope, and with this she draws water from the well. A man is never to be seen carrying a tin of water. But there is a more primitive fashion of drawing water practised here. From the fruit of a certain tree are made vessels to hold water-not unlike a cocoa nut shell with four holes cut in one end and the other end left hollow to hold water. Each one may hold, perha~, half a pint of water. F our, or perhaps more, of these are attached to one rope and lowered into the well. The woman skilfully plays them in the water till they

are full, and then draws them up, catching each slack of the rope as it comes up. This operation is repeated with wonderful rapidity; and many gallons of water can be got up with these small buckets in an incredibly short space of time. These are just a few hasty notes. The writer would gladly furnish a complete history of th is town, with a few notes as to what is done here. But for the present be only wishes to offer a suggestion. Why should not our school paper follow the example of other school-papers, and from time to time put forth a few gleanings from the Mission F ield ?

SUCH STUFF AS SCHOOLS ARE MADE OF. "A pun is a piece of conceit" says Addi- only t he class lists but also the name of son ; consequently the unhappy writer everyone who aSpiers to have his name approaches his subject with trepidation and perpetuated by keeping it on the School a trembling quill. H owever, his identity Books. H ow happy must he be who knows will never be known for the Editors of that in 'vhatever he does he will always be course would never commit a breach of Blest ! How unfortunate must he be confidence by disclosing his name. The whose chief characteristic is that he is Editors themselves too with the same in- Green I Perhaps not though, for he may nocent complacence with which they say that where ignorance is bliss 'tis folly " decline to accept any responsibility in to be Wyse and show that one at least is connection with the opinions of their cor- more unhappy than himself. Only one respondents" will probably decline to accept person at the School it seems could safely any blame attaching to these insulting be called Young. Another has the effronpuns. tery to put down among his other acadc The stuff that our School is made of may mica! distinctions that he is Wylie. A third readily be ascertained by a perusal of, say, ha~ been Wild since he was born last year's Pink Book which contains not and another is described as Low.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Like most Schools it possesses such necessaries as a H all, Bells and Gates and moreover for sometime indulged in the luxury of a Knocker which however is gone now. None of these are so indispe nsable lo n. School as boys. Tender hearted ••lolhcrs will feel glad perhaps that the l-;chool has not got its Burch still. We can count among our numbers Pears, l.ords, Deans, a Bishop, and even a King. llcsicles this sovereign we also had a Tanncr, but unfortunately now our Money is gone. We possessed ample material for a menagerie, a Bullock, a H art, a Roe, and I wo different specimens of the genus 1\[oulc. Our aquarium would be reprehcnlcd ':>y a Salmon, a Sturgeon, a couple uf I lakes, and a few stray Finns. For an .tvin.ry we have Cox and a Drake, and if we 111ay believe the Pink Book one or two people since they left the School have developed into "beaks." But the chief attraction in this department is undoubtedly our Peacocke ; beautiful bird that be is, he is doubly im portant as a curiosity and we might point with reasonable pride to a nr1Lural phenomenon in the shape of a Pea' orke w!to was once a Parrot. ·f hat the School is rich in land is shown •ll once, it appeared that it once possessed Spain but it does so no longer ; however, it w1ll be reassuring to the Frends ofthe School (and it has several) to know that it lately .1cquired Newland. If their land is to be ll~t·d for growing purposes would it not be .u1visn.ble to get rid of the Flints.

2 43

The scenery is really beautiful and can not fail to appeal to the artistic eye. Hill and Vaile are shown in pleasing contrast, while Mounts appear in the distance, the Dales too and a few Spiers add beauty, yet there is something wanting to complete the picture; Horace comes to our aid "A quam memento tebus i1l m·duis servare,'' of course ! there is our Lake to make it perfect. Looking in another direction the scene appears more bleak and dreary ; we pass over Moore and Fenn, through a few Longfields, an:>ther Field and come to an uninteresting spot where only a solitary Crabtree lends any appearance of life ; and as we walk on still " the sad mechanic exercise."-Hullo I what was that ! The ground on which we are walking seems to be convulsed and the Crabtree waves to and fro as if in anger; what can it be ? perhaps the pink book will tell us, let U'> look; ah yes! all mathematical, it was Lhe words "Mechanic Exercise " that angered them reminding them of many a weary hour spent in wrestling with Todhunter in which the latter often was victorious, triumphantly remaining as obscure as before, and many a prayer for someone of advanced radical views to repeal the Laws of Motion. Well, we will follow their example-what I another jerk I it must be the word " example" that has such a distasteful sound to them, we had better leave them and look fur ther on where we see an Ash and Mosse. What is this? a Fowler! Surely he is not going to Robb us of our precious Peacocke I This brings to mind another


244

THE

CANTUARIAN.

incident. It appears that on one historic used to be kept, we suppose, to cut the occasion the school had a Hunt, but how boys' hair and to shave the Masters and did it attend ? T he presence of an Ostler fellows at t he bottom of the Fifth Form. denotes that there were horses, but on in- Next we come to a Baker; Perhaps he 1s vestigation the stud consisted of a Cobb employed by a certain lady not z,ooo and a Trotter, besides a Mayor for one miles from the Mint Yard Gate, who is year; one of these was wanted for its Carr. noted for her kind generosity in giving away We sincerely trust the school was not at only zd. each, buns which could not be reduced to making use of its zd. (mispelt bought in the town for less than 1d. All Dee, in the P.B.) Buss to follow the the more is this noticeable since she could obtain fabulous amounts by selling the hounds. Naturally, we have a Cook who, whaL fresher ones as fives balls (about three of ever his culinary achievements are, was the ordinary sized penny buns would nearquite lately beaten by a Salmon. It must ly make a whole fives ball.) Those deshave been a very cautious Salmon, and we cribed as "yesterday's" would be dangerous. do not know how it had been caught, for The School enjoys plenty of Candy, and it had not been known up to that time to Cole of course is necessary though someTripp. At the very same time the Cook times the School appears to have been imhad failed to get the better of a what's-his posed upon by what was merely Blackname (we do not know how to describe stone. A Fagge is indispensable too. Of the antiquity of the School there can the animal, and so we say Watts'-his-name). A Butler and Page too figure in the list. be no doubt since we have authority for We have made an interesting discovery ; saying that Isacke, Amos, and James were As they had Beer at the School, of course educated here. And now a case for the doctors to decide. someone had to pour it out at Supper ; instead of the present arrangement of Potts We Reid in the Ca11tuaria1z that at the beginning of the qth century the · School there was a "Philpot. " had a great Boyle ; was it that that gave (N.B.-This office is now vacant). The fact that there is a Smith or two the School Payne quite recently ? But and a Carter at the School would lead us it has had a Paine of a very different to infer that there are some animah; to be and far more serious nature. It lost its shod and driven. There are no horses, so early Love, it had hardly recovered when there must be donkeys and mules. We it knew Love once more ; but a second also find a Mason and a Goldsmith, while the time it lost it. Assuredly 'twere better to London Guilds are represented by a have had Love and lost than never to have Cooper and Skinner. Another is describ· Love at all. But now we must stop if there be any ed vaguely as a "·workman. " A Barber


THE

CANTUARIAN.

Sparkes of honour left in us, to dose our readers any more with these bad puns would be to send them to premature Greaves.

245

And the School, too, is tired, and all this time has been enjoying a quiet and peaceful Knapp.

AUSTRALIA. The following lecture on the above subject was given by Mr. Longsdon on March 5th, in the Parry Library : Australia has an area of three million M quare miles, and a population of three million, that is one to the square mile, whereas in England there are six hundred to the square mile. This continent was the last to be discovered by Europeans, and was as a matter of fact the last formed as geology shows. Animal life on it is not )'Cl fully developed. The formation is ~ranite and volcanic. A curious kind of grass called Spiney or sword grass grows in the interior, which cuts through anything, and makes riding impossible wherever it grows. There are no big rivers as in other great continents; one of the biggest is the Murray, which is very shallow, and is navigated by flat bottomed boats, very different from those seen on the Rhine and other rivers. It flows into a salt marsh, :md has no outlet into the sea. Another hig river is the Darling which in the wet liC:l.SOn is in some places even a hundred (eel deep, in the summer is simply a chain of pools sometimes half-a-mile apart.

The sun shines from sixteen to eighteen hours a day, and the ground gets too hot to be touched. Dust storms from the west and north often blow for two or three days ; all the trees are withered up by them, and all the people who can, live in their cellars, and the towns have a deserted appearance. The two chief parts of the country are the East Slope and the Western Interior. The East or Pacific Slope, as it is called, is a strip of land along the east coast, about a hundred miles broad and three thousand miles long. There are not many mountains of a great height, but some are snow-capped. A great proportion of the hmd is a high plain. The rainfall is usually moderate, but sometimes there are some very heavy showers, as much as an inch of rain falling in an hour. The coast has not many river mouths. but is covered with shrubs and mangroves. There is little sand except in the bays where sharks abound. The people are very like Englishmen, and are frequently replenished by emigrants. Sydney, the most important town, built


THE

CANTUARIAN.

about a hundred years ago, was originally a convict settlement. It is now very like an English town. The next town of any importance is Paramatta, on the River Paramatta. This town has a special interest for us, for here in r832 Bishop Broughton (O.K.S.) founded the first grammar school in Australia, and gave it the name of his old school. The town of Melbourne, once called Bateman's Swamp, was founded fifty years ago by a man named Bateman. I t is now larger than Bristol. Its sudden growth is due to the fact that all the traffic in Victoria, especially wool, passes through it. The city is divided into squares by the streets, each square being one eighth of a mile in nrea ; so that a plan of the city looks something like a chess board. The squares are again divided by small lanes which are named after the big str~ets. The town is built of blue volcanic stone. About three miles from Melbourne, are Ballarat and Sandhurst, two mining towns, at which places, gold is found. The gold is obtained in two ways, either by mining, or by washing the gravel, in order to separate from it the gold which is washed out by the water. Of this alluvial gold however there is scarcely a ny left; in fact the only people who consider it worth their while washing for it are the Chinamen, who have the reputation of being able to live on almost nothing. The National Debt which isÂŁ roo a bead shows what confidence the people have in themselves.The people are good natured,and

are eager to get rich ; but as there is no competition this causes no bad feeling. The Western Interior is covered with bush, and only produces wool; there are a few rivers, and one or two salt lakes which are becoming more salt still. There is very little rain ; in fact they are sometimes five years without it. T he animals are only half developed, one of the chief being the Kangaroo. The birds do not sing, and the flowers have no smell. The men who live in these parts are just the opposite of those who dwell in the Eastern slope, and are cruel and ill-natured. This is accounted for by the bare and dry nature of the country, which causes many deaths among them, and gives them a very bad view of life. The squatters who live in this interior are men who hold large tracts of land from the Government, on certain conditions. When a new hand arrives at a squatters' station, he is generally made to ride round the sheep runs, to see that the fences are in order, which occupies him about a fortnight. The natives are one of the poorest races of men ; they live in huts made of bark leant against trees. Their national weapon is the boomerang. Their religion is peculiar to themselves, and they think that their God appears to them in different shapes. Mr. Longsdon closed his lecture, of which this is a mere summary, by reading a funny selection from an Australian poet.


II

--

THE CANTUARIAN

I'

247

FOOTBALL REVIEW. Undoubtedly the Fates have been against us at football this year, but let us try and propitiate them by not grumbling any more. Let us turn our thoughts to next year and '>CC how we can further propitiate them by improving certai n points in our play. Our advice to next year's team is-to the back, always kick into touch ; to the threequarters, pass before being collared, and while running, follow up at the side of, not 1ight behind, the man who is running; to the halves, keep out of the serum mage and feed the three-quarters ; to the forwards, watch the ball in the scrummage, break up directly the ball comes out, follow up hard but kick less hard. Generally, what we have to learn is to attack; the collaring this year was excellent all through the team, Athawes and Castley being particularly prominent, but the passing was indifferent.

l1

THE FIFTEEN. (ullin, back; generally very safe, a good kick ; played occasionally at centre threequarter, where his saving was very useful, but was not fast enough to be dangerous. Ctrstley, three-quarter; always played a hard game ; and did a tremendous amount of collaring; should run round, rather than through the opposing forwards. S!to,.liflg, three-quarter; very fast, but seldom made full use of his pace; was rather too fond of letting his man get past and then collaring from behind. Flint (2), three-quarter; not reliable; occasionally got in some good kicks. A 1/mwes, half; always worked hard, and was invaluable on the defensive. A"napp, half; only played in three matches, in which he showed great promise. Flint (r), forward; always on the ball, but kicks too hard. Newland, a good wing forward ; good dribbler. /Jeynon, a hard working forward; plays a very good game at centre three quarter. Crmdy did a lot of work in the !iCrummage and collared well ; should use his feet more. 11/owll, used his weight well in the scrummage, but slow in following up. Jllirklem, a thoroughly good forward, particularly out of touch . .luxmoore. played a hard game, but rather inclined to waste his energy by struggling when collared. Cooper, good scrummager, but does not use his feet enough. The team was considerably handicapped by having to play without its captain,

I I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

who was only able to show his ability in that capacity by his s:mnd judgment in the choice of the team. Besides the above who gained their colours, Carter played in several matches, and always played with great keenness. Etheridge also played once or twice and should be a useful forward another year. Smith filled Knapp's place at half during the latter part of the season with conspicuous success, his tackling was excellent; if he learns to pass out to the three-quarters more he should also be very useful next year. Kingdon played several times and was useful, but showed no great keenness for passing.

FIVES. The annual O.K.S. match took place on December 18th, when Castley and Beynon and Richardson and Slater represented the school, agai nst Elwyn and Latter and Parker and Ramme l!. Castley and Beynon were beaten by Elwyn and Latter, but Richardson and Slater were victorious against Parker and R ammel!.

***

The C.O.S. fives matches took place on March 1oth in our courts. Castley and Beynon, who played for the school in the open match managed to defeat Wright and Britten, who represented the C.O.S. While in the under 16 match, Slater and Maun drell easily defeated their opponents.

***

Annual fives matches have this year been arranged with Dover College, which we hope to permanently establish.

***

Two doubles were played against the S. Augustine's College on March qth, in both of which the school, who were represented by Castley al\d Beynon and Richardson and Slater, secured an easy victory.

***

On March r gth, two singles were played at D over, by Castley and Beynon, who were opposed by Strode and Nathan, in both of which we were defeated, which was in a great measure due to the shape of the Courts, which differed greatly from our own. The method of scoring also, wa<; slightly different,


THE CANTUARI AN.

2 49

PAPER CHASES . Owi•'g to the inclemency of the weather, only two paper chases have been run this We always have three at least, sometimes four; but this term we shall have to he content with two, owing partly to the weather, and partly to the shortness of the term. The first paper chase was run on March uth, Flint 11. and Cullin being hares. They ~ l.trlcd from, and came in at the School. The track went straight out to Chartham, and lllclthen came round by Nackington, and Bridge to Sturry, and then home. The h•ngth was about ten miles. This information had to be gai ned from the hares, for the I 1.tck was so badly laid that the hounds were unable to follow it, after the first few miles. T he second paper chase was run on March 22nd, Castley and Flint .r. being hares. I' he start was again made from the School. It was an awful day, as far as weather was • onccrned. Nevertheless, forty hounds started, and were able to follow the track the whok way. The d istance was about ten miles. Be) non, Etheridge and Flint 11. urived home first. l l'rm.

OXFORD LETTER. The 'Varsity came up a fortnight later due this term, owing to the previous prevalence in Oxford of a certain well· lnnwn epidemic. H ence all arrangeuwnts have been considerably interfered With, especially the Oxford letter, which would most certainly, under ordinary cir• um-;tances, have appeared in the last issue of lhl· Cantuarian . However, I shall be fortunate in being able to give you nearly til the news of the present term. 'I'he 0 .K.S. Column has already forelt.lllcd me in recording certain events in the life of the R ev. R. G. Glennie, late of I han

K eble College (which I will not th~refore repeat), and in a certain item in which :'.Ir. W. M . Carter a nd the Junior Hulme Exhibitioner of B.N.C. are indentical. The T orpids of 1892 have ceased to be a subject of prophesy in favour of a subject of history. Brasenose kept their place as head for the seventh year in s uceession, New College, Balliol, and Christ Church I, processing over the course each night without a bump. There were, on the whole, a great many changes made in the order of the boats. No less than ten colleges having improved their position, and


THE

CANTUARIAN.

some of these considerably, especially Jesus The final itself was played in a perfect who made a bump on each night except storm of wind and rain, which, however, the first. T he Trinity Torpid contained failed to damp the ardour, or, perhaps, two O.K.S.-R. P.Atherton, who stroked, much decrease the number of spectators. and E. B. H a wes, who rowed 2 for the Magdalen, with their three Blues, proved "last three nights. too strong for Trinity, and won a good The present season is mainly one of the match by 4-o. Two colleges in Oxford College sports; A. Latter and E. B. Hawes that night were illuminated by incendiary each won events in the T rinity ' meeting' zeal, not altogether praeter solitum. As (to use a daily paper term). The 'Varsity regards another, and even more important, Sports took place on the 24th and 26th of Soccer Match, which took place at Queen's March, and the list of those who are to Club a month ago, I have merely to re. run against Cambridge on the 8th of April mark, vae victis. at Queen's Club is now made up. I folThe play acted by the O.U .D.S. this low my usual habit of total abstention from year was the " Frogs " of Aristophancs. all prophecy, prognostication, or anything The acting edition was prepared by Messrs. appertaining thereto. E. B. Hawes was H ogarth and Godley of Magdalen (the the only O.K.S. running, he having enter- latter ofwhom is not wholly unknown at ed for the Quarter Mile H a ndicap, in which, Canterbury, in connection with certain though not primarily successful, he con- events which take place towards the end of siderably improved on the position of the l\Iidsummer term) ; the music wa~ penultimacy (if I may use such an expres- wntten by D r. Parry, an old Exeter man, sion) which he ocupied at the start of the who also conducted in person. The acting race. all round was distinctly good; all the actors The 'Varsity Eight made their first ap- meeting with an enthusiastic reception, the pearance on the Thames at Putney on Nekros being perhaps especially apprecia March 2 rst. The boat contains four ol.d ed. The Theatre was visited by a fire in blues, including the Cox.- Rowe, Fletcher, the week following the "Frogs," in wh irh V. Nickalls and Lonsdale. T he stroke is the whole of the inside was fairly gutted. A serious attempt is being at last made a freshman, and brother of a certain famous Cambridge stroke of some years back. to form an O.K.S. Club of those in rcsi [For further particulars and probabilities, dence. Mr. Ottley is the prime mover ul the idea; and I may take this opportunity vide Daily Papers]. The Final ' Soccer' Cup Tie was played of paying a compliment to a certain similnt u ff on the rsth of March. In the semi- club at Cambridge, by expressing a hop1 final ro\lnd, Trinity beat Exeter (4-2), that ours will attain to as high a degree ul and Magdalen beat New College (3-o). eminence as theirs. D. S. M. Tassell of


THE C'hrist

CANTUARIAN.

Church, fresh from his moderative toils in the Schools this term, has been appointed first bon. sec. m m co?l. As regards general 'Varsity news, I 1111ght mention that Dr. Liddell has been uc-cceded by Canon Paget in the Deanery of Christ Church and the Rev. B. Price, late "'l'nior Tutor, is now Master of Pembroke, t•r'rr Dr. Evans who died last term. Man' hester New College is now in process of t•n•ction close to Mansfield. T he Bampllln Lecturer of r892 is Bishop Barry, late ul Sydney. A few more items may be added which tnorc nearly concern persons connected 11 ith the School. Dr. Mitchinson, who was in the running for the Mastership of Pembroke, occupied the pulpit in the

'Varsity Church on Sexagesima Sunday. A H. Thompson is President of his college Debating Society, and W. E. Kitchingman's name was among the entries for the 'Varsity Challenge Cue. D. S. M. Tassell is the only O.K.S. at present wearing the black coat and white tie that de. note Schools generally, and in his especial case Honour Mods. T. E. Rammell, who is now at Worcester, and W. A Gordon have both visited Oxford this term. T wo King's Scholars arc also at the time of writing up for other important reasons in the shape of Scholarships. The list of O.K.S. in residence this term is the same as that giYen in the last Oxford letter."

CAMBRIDGE LETTER. Nearly everyone has departed, and which your readers probably know already. 'ambridge is given over to the fevered The two football matches have e nded 'l'ripos man and the expectant school- very satisfactorily. In both cases Oxford hunter. A Cambridge letter alone is being slightly the favourites, Cambridge wanting to make the term complete. That won. The sports and boatrace are arranged ill a harder task than it would seem ; for for April 8th and 9th. With such men as there is a \VOeful lack of news. No Canter- F leming for the hurdles and high-jump, bury man has been rowing in the Lents ; Moneypenny for the quarter and hundred, Carr is the only one who has ')een running and Ekin for the three-miles, we ought to at Fenners ; while examinations happily pull off the odd event, if not more. With have not yet disturbed our peace. If then regard to the boatrace, not being a Putney I run to fill a page of the Cantuarian, I critic I will not attempt to prophecy. All must rely solely on general news, most of I will venture is that Cambridge bas a

II


THE

CANTUARIAN.

better chance of winning than it has had since x889. The crew includes six of last year's boat. I nfluenza and skating, as elsewhere, were the chief amusements in January. T he former was not very popular and soon died out. Of course there was a rumour that we were all going to be sent down, but it never came to anything. Skating continued till some International contests were arranged, and then the ice broke up the night before they were coming off. In the end the races did take place, but on very inferior ice. At intervals throughout the term there hav<:: been advertisements of " Splendid Ice," but there has never been any worth speaking of for the last two months. The Lent races were rowed at the beginning of this month (March). F irst Trinity went ahead, with an exceptionally good boat. T his is due to the efforts of Mr. J . B. Close, an old blue of some twenty years ago, who bas devoted himself to the improvement of first T rinity rowing. Other boats that distinguished themselves were Pembroke who went up four places and

ended second, and First T rinity 4 who performed the feat of an over bump. A melancholy featu re of this term was t he extraordmary number of deaths among distinguished Cambridge men-for example, Professor Adams, the discoverer of Neptune; the President of Queens, Sir G. Paget ; and perhaps the best known of all among undergraduates, J. K. Stephen. The most recent death is that of Miss Clough, who was head ofNewnham, and had more than anyone else to do with its foundation. Before the beginning of school term, Mr. Evans and Mr. T ripp were up. We were also pleased to see Workman, B. Boothby, J. P. Frend, and Latter. Latter came over again later on to captain Trinity against Clare. On March 13th the Bishop of Dover preached the University sermon. Before closing, may I draw attention to the fact that in your apology for a misprint which occurred in the last Cambridge letter 'Oxford' was substituted for 'Cambridge'? T he original mistake was due, I have no doubt, to my bad writing, but I disclaim all responsibility for the last variation.


. TH E

CANTUARIAN. \

SCHOOL NEWS . The Gymnasium Competition took place on March 28th.

* *

sports. l\Ir. l\Iason kindly drew them up, and we take this opportunity of thanking him for the trouble he bas taken.

***

The Broughton P rize for D ivinity has been awarded to W. M. Carter.

The sports with *the C.O.S. will take place on the Beverley, on Tuesday, April 5th. The Strcatfeild Prize for English I .itcrature has been awarded to H . M. James. The subjects were Shakespeare's Julius Cresar and the Tempest, Milton's Comus, Lycidas and Samson Agonistes, .md an Essay.

... *

* interesting lecture Mr. Tripp gave a very 1111 astronomy in the Parry Library on \larch 19th.

** ~

A set of rules will appear in our next numbers, for the K.S. a nd C.O.S.

***

*** On March 1st in the Museum, Mr. Longsdon's brother played twelve of the School at Chess ; winning five and drawing two of the games. The school were represented by Mr. Ritchie, Mr. Evans, Mr. Tripp, Mr. Dale, F. S. Beynon, R. J. Castley, F. Luxmoore, A. G. Richardson, R. G. Cooper, J. B. Drake, A. H. Barlee, H . Johnson. On March 2nd, in the Parry Library he played five of t he School, and won the five games.

111

1:

I

O.K.S. COLUMN . W. H. Salmon has obtained a MatheIIHitical Exhibition at Queen's College.

** P. W. James has*been playing for St. ll .~rtholomew's H ospital in the Rugby Jo'uotball H ospital cup ties.

***

On March 12th, in the diocese of Lon¡

don, J. T. F rend, B.A., ofTrinity Colleger Cambridge, and Chichester Theological College, was ordained. He is now at St. Mary's, West minster. * * * T he Queen ~as appointed Mr. Edwin Joad, M.A., of the U niversity of D urhamr

I


THE

CANTUARIAN.

to be one of Her Majesty's Inspectors of Schools.

***

The Canterbury Pilgrims' tour this year will last from June 22nd to the 29th. Any O.K.S. desirous of playing are requested to send in their names before the end of May, to the H on. Sec., H. S. S.

Parker, Corpus Christi College, Cambridg..: . The followi ng matches have been arranged : JuNE 22. C.O.S. 23, Cavalry Depot. " 24. St. Lawrence. " '1¡ Folkestone C.C. " 28. King's School. " 29. Sutton Valence.

"

CORRESPONDENCE. N.B.-TM Editors decli11e to accept any responsibility connected with. the opinions of tMir correspon.t Bl~ls. Name and address must a~uays be given, not n~ce11ariLy for publication, bul a3 I I guarantee of aoodfaitl~. Perronalities wm involve certain t'l'jection.

:Io ll1e Editors of t!te " CANTUARIAN." time when travelling is daily on the in Dear Sirs,- It has seemed to myselt and crease. Many young fellows leave th\: others that the School Paper at present country without in the least knowing whit bet lacks an interesting branch of correspon- they are going or what they shall find. dence. Stories of far distant lands have There is vague rumour of success to hl always a fascinating interest, and the num- attained, they go out only to find evet y ber of fabulous stories of this description fond dream broken. Why ? Because they are numerous. There is more need to did not know anything reliable about the decrease than to multiply them. But there place to which they went. On the other hand, there ought to hl' must surely be a number of O.K.S. who are scattered in widely different parts of some restriction as to the nature of th ~ the earth, and who could contribute to our information. Why should not such letter paper interesting notes from abroad. These seek to point out not only matters of phy notes would supply an amount of informa- sical and natural interest, but also tho~l¡ tion, which is very much needed at this I -things which tend to the accomplishment


THE CANTUARIAN. t>f God's purpose in the creation of ll)ani.e., His own glory ? I n plain words it is the desire of myself and others that articles should be printed in the Cantum'imt from time to time, giving us news of philanthropic work and most especially of true \I i~sionary Work abroad. Will all O.K.S. who are in sy mpathy with such a movement kindly communicate with the R ev. \V. F. Cobb, x, Wash ington Road, Sheffield, from whom I shall receive their letters in due time. Yoms truly, VOICE FROM A BROAD.

THE SCHOOL l\IOTrO. To lite Editors of lite " CANTUARJAN. '' DEAR StRs,-' Curiosity ' will no doubt ht: glad to learn that we are not so behind the times as not to possess a school motto ; although certainly there has not been much of late to indicate the fact of its existence. But it was once an adorning feature ofthe ll all, for in the Crmtuarian of October, 1889, I find a complaint as to the condi1ion of the remainder of that notable inscription, we arc told that it had at one period of the term presented the following appearance : -

AGE SI~V hut that subsequently the ' agis ' expired. \Vc live in hopes that it may be restored to its prist ine complete-ness, which was ' AGE DUM AGIS.'

THE DAY BOYS. T o lite Editors of "THE CANTUAR JAN.'' DÂŁ.\R StRs,- May I be allowed in your columns to make an appeal to the day boys to prevent the growth of the reputation, which, I am afraid, they have been gaining now for some time past, of being slack in school games? Now, my opinion is that if they were to make an effort they could soon wipe out the disgrace which they have in some measure incurred. Of course, we all know that it is a more troublesome matter for a day boy than for a boarder to get up regularly to football ; he has to change either at home. and in that case he may have to hurry to be in time first for football and then for school, or else in the Day Boys' Hall, where things are not as comfortable, I grant, as they might be. But surely, if some can put up with it, all of them can, especially when they know that if they will show that improvements are needed and would bt: appreciated when made, something is certain to bt: done to improve matters. But there is no excuse to be offered for the paucity of the numbers of those who go up to football. I should doubt whether, out of a total of nearly forty boys, there were ever more than a dozen day boys up at o ne time, and the usual number could not have exceeded seven, that is to say that the average attendance was scarcely one-fifth. If the whole school had come up in the same proportion there would have been aboutfiv<! aud a lta/j fdlows on each side in the two games! The excuse


THE

CANT UARI AN.

is often made ' My people won't let me play.' Can any reason be given ,\'by the boarder's parents should allow their boys to play, more than the day boy's? Surely if they exerted a little persuasive eloquence day boys might induce their 'people ' to let them play. More enthusiasm is usually shown at cricket, but there is room for improvement yet. If we ever wish to be considered of anything like equal importance with the boarders something m ust be done towards correcting th is slackness. Our numbers certain!)• arc not 1~1uch more than half those of the boarders, but judging from the results of snowball fights, there is plenty of power and spirit in the day-boys if they only care to show it. And we ought to consider that we are allowing not only our own position to fall off in comparison with the boarders, but a lso the position of the School with other schools. While apologising for the length of this letter, I am, nevertheless, sure you will not grudge the space if only some good effect is obtained by th is protest. Believe me, Yours truly, A DAY-BOY. THE GREAT D OT QUESTION. To lite Editors of " T HE C ANTUARJAN." D EAR SIRs,-I r. the hope of getting a satisfactory a nswer fro m one of the readers of the Canluariatt on this subject, I am writ ing th i ~ letter. In the School Arms

the I has a dot over it. I am told that this dot occurs in all the ironwork in the Cathedral. Boutell in his book on Heraldry prints the dot, but then he gives small letters thus "ix"; and may not therefore be an authority on this case; the dot occurs also in windows and on School notepaper. But whoever heard of a dotted Greek Iota? As far as I can make out the only place in which the dol docs not occur is on one of the brasses in the School Chapel (South Transept), and on the cover of the Cantuarian. But the cover is hardly an authority on the subject of the rx, for surely the IX are sable, whereas the cover blazons them azure, and in ;me case the x appears as argent. Is the insertion of the dot merely a mistake of ancient heralds, or did it appear in the arms as originally granted to the Dean and Chapter of tlw Cathedral? I should be much obliged 1f any of your readers could provide me with an answer and thereby solve the question of the Dot. I remain, Yours truly,

H. D. To tlte E ditors

of

t/1e "

CAN'l'UARIA N."

D EAR S tRS,- T he present paper-ch n~l· season has been far from successful, tlu causes of which are manifold, amonK~I others I will only name badly laid tr:u·k ~, (for the weather of course, no one is to blanH) and the abolition of false tracks. T he lia ,1 of these could easily be rectified. Tlu


THE

zs 7

CANTUARIAN.

1:\st should be repealed, making the maximum limit of a fhlse track from twenty to thirty yards, and only occurring two or three times in one chase. But why they should be entirely abolished no one seems to know? They are a material help to the hares and also ha\'e the additional advantage of assisting the younger portion of the pack in picking up lost ground. I should also like to say that the sooner the new

and absurd rule of laying a track through the streets is abolished, the better. Last year we reached the ideal number of four paper chases why could we not have kept this number this year instead of going back to two? though rumour says that a third which was unanimously agreed to came to an untimely end. Yours faithfully, CANIS.

THE LIBRARY. The following bookc; have been added to the Library : Science for All (s \'Ols.) The Cause of an Ice Age Sea Monsters and Sea Birds Workers under Ground Denizens of the Deep ... The Countess of Charney The Conspirators The R egent's Daughter For James or for George The Lion of the North In Freedom's Cause John O'London Quicksilver In the Dashing Days of Old

Ball. Hartwig. Hartw1g. Hartwig. Dumas. Dumas. Dumas. Adams. Henty. Henty. Gibney. Manville Fenn. Gordon Stables.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. Our Sd10ol Times is as usual of a type has two poems entitled ' The Song of the The designed to elevate and educate the Shirt' and ' Pyjama's Hunting.' mind. There you may learn what the former although a victorious song contains Headmaster has said in the Dublilt Express the following stanza : on 'The use of Greek,' what Mr. Potter Oh shouting sisters, dear 0 watching mothers and wives, has to say on the' Value of History' and I t is not voices you're wearing out, what the Globe has to say on ' A New But human creatures' lives. Explosive'; if especially interested in the doings of Foyle, we have a lengthy report Hack-hack-hack In weariness, hunger and dirt of the intermediate examinations a nd the Weaving at once I very much dread class record of the school. All this in A shroud as well as a shirt. twelve pages (two are advertisements) and From ' Pyjama's Hunting' we ma) they actually manage to squeeze in a story or two and the account of some football perhaps be allowed to quote the following as a fair sample : matches. Tlte Leodiemiau contai ns a further adAnd they missed their confiscated Catapults the boys' compa nion dition to the epitaphs which we mentioned Catapulta--cat propeller. last month, and has a funny article on Is it to be wondered at thal after tim ' Hard Lines.' The Plymollu'allunder the heading Poetry I can write no more ?

NOTICES . We acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the following magazines : Leys Fortnigltl/y ( 2), Drogludean, Sutloll Valence School llfagaziue, En'gllton College JJ/agazine, Elizabelltan, Draconia1l, South Eastern College .Magazine, St. Edwm¡d's School Chro11icle,

Epsomian, He1'ejordia11, . Glmalmoml Clt1'01lide, Ousel, Cltolme/cia1l. We beg to acknowledge subscription from the following :-F. B. Kingdon, (' T. C. Kingdon, G. E. Jones, l\Iiss Barber, E. B. Hawes, R. Owen (ss.)


THE CANTUA RI AN . VoL. III.

No. r 1.

EDITORIAL. A Correspondent suggested in our last number that we should publish from time to time accounts of the doings of O.K.S. who are engaged in missionary work. However welcome any suggestion for increase of " copy " may be we must still pause to consider whether the proposal would be acceptable to the majority of our readers. School magatines may roughly be divided into two classes, first, those that confine themselves strictly to matters pertaining to the School, as for imtance 7/u Wykeltamist, Elizabethan, ley's FortnigMiy, and secondly, magazines that publish such articles as " An Old Boy in Siberia," " Notes on New Zealand," "Life of Shakespeare," et /zoe genus omne. Although these latter may be more interesting to the outside reader and are generally greater in bulk, nevertheless the ideal pap<!r is that which d .!al:; with m:\tters solely concerning the school. '¡ Worthie~," of course, are in place and contributions from the school itself and any article dealing with the school and its traditions in the past, these last being of mterest to all readers alike, for a love of the past is the best safeguard against degeneracy in the future. Amusing articles, too, arc admissible even if the English docs fall below the level of Macaulay, provided they are in some way connected with the s::hool, but articles of the nature of " An Old Boy in Siberia" and the like and all such


260

THE

CANTUARIAN.

extraneous matter have no right to appear in a school magazine If we take any number of the Ca1ztum¡ia1t we can judge how much of it IS read by the average O.K.S. H e probably contents himself with reading the Ed1torial, School News, O.K.S. News, the correspondence, perhaps Our Contempor aries, glances through the cricket or football accounts, skips the Debating Society, and looks in the Notices to see his own subscription acknowledged. Accounts of Fives Tics, &c., and characters of football and cricket teams are intended mainly for the playersâ&#x20AC;˘ own pleasure and perusal. The O.K.S. "Column" should be one of the best parts of the paper, but unfortunate ly the "Column" generally consists of three or four sentences. Our prayers and en treaties to O.K.S. to send us news about themselves are of no avail and we have to be satisfied with what we chance to see ourselves. This would assuredly be the proper place for letters such as "a Voice from abroad suggests." The Debating Society accounts have always been considered legitimate matter for a school paper but arc very little read. Perhaps our successors might do well to follow th(' example of a contemporary and publish the accounts of the Debating Society in the form of an article criticising the speeches of t he members. The president and Vice President might take it in turns to write this or a master or O.K.S. might do it for them. This would be an undoubted improvement on the present ~ystem . Ca1ttua1ian readers however require bulk and are not satisfied with the bare school uews and consequently the Editors greedily seize any chance to increase the number of their pages. We h:we not yet however been reduced to following the example of the Irish Editor who being forced from want of" copy" to leave two columns blank, inserted at the top "We have been obliged to leave these columns blank from pressure of other matter."


THE

CANTUARIAN.

T H E SPORTS . The School sports took place on March 3 rst a nd April rst under very favourable , unditions, viz., weather almost tropical, grass in excellent order, and a large contingent of spectators on both days, while, owing to the kindness of Colonel Russell, a military band discoursed excellent music, an improveme nt on last year when heavy rain quenched the inspiration of the musicians after the first two bars; and if the "under sixteen hurd les" was run to the familia r accompaniment of Mozart's XIIth Mass, .md only the lengt h of the programme prevented the sack race from coinciding with t :m.nuca':. N•• t •• reth, we must not forget that a band situated between an episcopal ,,. idence on one side and a deanery on the other, with Canons to left of them, C'anons to right of them, must naturally feel a weighty responsibility in the selection of their pieces. A martial air was fur ther imparted to the proceedings in another particular-the trme-honoured method of starting the races by the human voice being superseded by the usc of a dangerous-looking weapon of war, with a childrsh sound, rumoured to be the huit of monitorial depredations, and which cP.rtainly from the modest and retiring tones uf its voice seemed to have been trained rather for use in the lonely chalk-pit or behind the illicit hay-stack than in the publicity ofthe Green Court. The- heights, times and lengths of the different events were, of course, 'quite up to the average, 'and if they do not compare in all respects favourably with the phenomenal results obtained by some other schools, we may console ourselves by the reflection that our running track is a circle wtth a diameter of about so yards, that our. broad jump tloes not take place on an incline of 1 in 3, a nd that the hurdle races and Joo yards end in a solid barrier of human flesh and blood, six inches behrncl the tape, a condition of things not calculated to produce quick finishes. The results in the under r6 and Junior School events were very good and augur well for the future atlrletics of the School. Neithe r the high jump nor the long jump in tlie open competition were quite up to form, and the following comparison is instructive:High Jump (Open) 4ft. r o~ i ns. , ,. (Unde r r6) 4ft. 9~in~. , , (Junior School) 4ft. The open quarter was one of the best races, and was won by Flint 2 from Flint 1, who came in a good second- the former also carried off the open roo yards by a very few inches from Castley, and took 3rd place both in the mile and the half-rmle; whi le h1s brother ran second in both the last-mentioned events. The hurdles (under 16) produced a dead heat between Slater and Maundrell, but on a second trial fell to


THE

CANTUARI AN.

Slater. In fact, Slater and Trueman seemed to have formed a "corner" (if that is a mathematical possibility for two persons) with regard to the first prizes of the under x6 competitions. The sack race aroused the usual enthusiasm among the spectators and the entries were numerous. We should be sorry to say anyth ing in disparagement of this noble branch of athletic energy or to treat too lightly the strict training and active exercise undertaken weeks before the Sports with a view to this race-but ,,.e could not help wondering whether many of the stout limbs struggling with their self-i mposed restraints might not have found freer action and better employment in some of the more important races. The Stranger's R ace was well won by Shorting, a stranger of 4 months standing. We should like to see a larger number of entries lor this race, a nd we confess with n feelinp; of regret that so many of the O.K.S. forget to bring their running things or arc out of training. T he Open Mile brought il brilliant fi nish (if we may except the Consolation R aces) to an already successful meetmg. Beynon, whose running in the ~ mile had been much appreciated, won t his race with great ease. The style and judgment of his running and a really fine spurt well maintained were greeted with well-deserved applause. The prize-giving took place at 5 p.m. Mrs. Bredin presided over the ceremony, which took place, thanks to the we:tther, on the field of battle, and by 6 o'clock the Green Court had re-assumed its ecclesiastical aspect, marred only by sundry fragments of paper, the invariable legacy ot a crowd, and a very moderate supply of orange peel, while the genius of cricket looked wistfully down on the close cut grass eager to recover its already too long usurped domains. Our thanks are due and readily offered to Mr. Hodgson and Mr. Ritchie for kindly undertaking the duties of umpiring and to Mr. Mason for officiating as starter-(wc seldom remember any of our athletic meetings where the starts iu the short races were so accurately effected). Also to the givers of prizes and to Mr. Gray for kindly lending one of his windows for the display of the prizes and last but not least to all t hose who by their prese nce as spectators aided not a little to the interest of our athletic meeting. We append a complete list of the events and winners :J uNIOR ScHOOL.

H z;!{h Jump.-Skinner, 4ft. Yards.- 1, Skinner; 2, Hassall ; 31 Cole. Time 14 sees. 2 20 Yards.-x, Skinner. 220 Yards under II. - r , Ridley. Lon: Jump.-1, Skinner, 13ft. sin. Ct-nsolation Race.-Jones. I OO


THE

CANTUARI AN. UNDER

r6.

Hig!tJump.-r, Slater; 2, Ridley. 4ft. 9in. Long Jump.- t , Slater; 2, L enox. r6ft. 1 00 Ym·ds.- 1, Trueman, ; 2, Lenox. 12 ~sec. Quartet· Jl!lile.- r, Trueman ; 2, Maundrell. 6s~sec. Httrdles.-r, Slater; 2, Maundrell. Half Mile.-r, Trueman; 2, Chisolm; 3, Candy. 2min. 4osec. OPEN.

Tlwowing tlte Crickd Ball.-Cullin, 98yds. 2ft. EigltJump·- r, R ichardson ; 2, M icklem. 4ft. r o~ in. Lo1tg Jump.- r, Castley; 2, Beynon. 17ft. roin. I OO Ym·ds.- x, Flint 2; 2, Castley. n sec. Qua1·ter Jlfile.-r, Flint 2 ; 2, Flint. 6o~sec.; Hurdles.-x, Cl:nton; 2, Stringer. Half .Mile.-r, Beynon; 2, Flint r. ; 3, Flint 2. 2min. 22sec. Om .Mile.-r, Beynon; 2, Flint 1. j 3· Flint 2. j 4. Johnson. smin. I osec. Qum·ter Mile rmder 14.-r, D ann; 2, Kingdon 2. 7 r ~sec. Three Legged Race.-Lenox and Green. Handicap (6oo Yards).-r, Smith 1., 6oyds.; 2, Lord, 2oyds- ; 3, Slater 1., 25yds. Sack Race.-Heale 1. 6osec. Strmtgers' Race, Quarter Mile.-r, Shorting; 2, Carr. Consolation Race.-Collard.

K.S. v. C.O.S. SPORTS. These inter-school sports have now again been renewed after an interval of five years; but as has already been poi nted out, we may now look for annual contests, and we hope that these will in some way take the place of the contests in football, which seem now past revival. This competition too, ought to, and will draw out the very best energies in the school-which are perhaps a llowed to lie rusty-when the competition is confined to the school. The superiority of inter-school sports is evinced furthe r by the fact the honour to be won is not gold or silver but " merino" a nd " silk "-which take the place of the laurels of the races long gone by, and to true K.S. it w11l be a far


THE

CANTUARIAN.

greater honour to show the " zephyr " with the K.S. crest than the gold chain and locket, or any of the treasures provided by the silver.smith for our own sports. The day fixed for the sports, April s th, was a day to gladden the most insipid grumblers. Jupiter gazed upon us with a serene face during the whole performance, and there was no wind strong enongh to impede good running, in spite of the fact that the ground chosen was the Beverley. The fine weather brought a goodly throng of spectators, and both the schools interested turned up in full force, not without old boys. No band was present, but its absence could not have been regretted, since the starters were extremely prompt in getting a quick succession of events, and the excite路 ment of each dispensed with the need of any auricular pleasure. The R ev. L. G. H. Mason gave the starting signals for the school, while Mr. Watson officia ted for the C.O.S. Umpires were the R ev. R. G. Hodgson and Mr. Brcresford, while Major Doyne act<'d as referee. The races began soon after 2.45, in the following order, the course being exactly a quarter-mile round :-

I. HALE MI LE (open)- K.S., r, F. S. Beynon ;

2, R. B. Flint ; 3, R. J. Castley. C.O.S., 1, H. G. Brewer ; 2, G. M. Comber; 3, H. 0. Cowley. On the signal, the C.O.S. led off with Cowley and Brewer, the former shooting ahead some distance - but slackin路' off after 3 00 yards-while Bey non steadily caught up, passing him at the end of the til" lap. Flint and Castley came last-but the C.O.S. were evidently relying on getting ahead at the first-a nd rather over-spent themselves. Bey路 non kept the lead well in the second rou nd, running in good style, some 20 or more yards ahead - Brewer coming next in order, in fair time and trim. Flint put on a re路 markably good finish drawing ahead of Cowley and Comber in the last Ioo yards. Castley, having an eye to the xoo yards race, wisely fell out on the way. Beynon's t ime was excellent for a grass course-2 minutes, r 3 seconds.

II. HrGH J m tP (under 16)--K. S., 1, P. H. Sla ter; 2, G. A. Ridley. C.O.S., r, R. Barnes ; 2 , F. Thompson. Both of our representatives in thio; cleared more than the C. O.S. Slater, in his usual style dodging up to the posts and ambling over the bar. Rid ley jumping sideways, and conseque ntly rather up-hill. Slater had done better in our sports by 2 inches. H eight, 4ft. 7in. (open)- K.S., I, H. E. Flint; 2, R. J. Castlcy. C.O.S., x, A. W. Davies ; 2, E. C. Wright. This race we regarded as the crucial event, and so it proved ; for the C.O.S. winning it by 2 inches, eventually can1e out victors. Flint, our first string, failed to make a good start, and Davies was some d istance ahead before he got under weigh. Castley, however, drt!W up well towards the end, and only failed a dead heat by 2 inches. Time, I x sees.

III.

100 YARDS


THE

CANTUARI AN.

IV. HtGH J uMP (o!)en)-K.S., I, A. G. Richardson ; z. T. N. Micklem. C.O.S., I, E . C. Wright ; 2, F. B. B. Bell. For several rounds all went well, Richardson failing first, but recovering again. The t '.O.S. jumped in very good form, Wright being wonderfully good. Micklem fell out fust at 4ft. 9~in., which was probably due to having to run and jump up-hill, since he had dot1e sft. rin., in practice. Wright cleared sft. ~ in., but did not try higher, .thhough his style warranted a better jump. Order, Wright, sft. ~ in., Bell, Richardson, Micklem. V.

YARDS (under r6)-K.S., r, C. H. Trueman; 2, G. D . Lenox. C.O.S., r, L. H. Phillips; 2, R. Bell. Phillips shot ahead at the start, and keeping the lead, won in the excellent time of 11 1-5th sees., Lenox znd, Trueman 3rd. IOO

VI. LoNG J uMP (open)- K.S., r , R. J. Castley; 2, F. S. Heynon. C.O.S., L. P. Uglow ; 2, F. B. Bell. Each man was allowed 3 tries, B ell eventually winning, being closely seconded by Castley, who wa'> only 3ins. behind, Uglow, 3rd. Length, r8ft. 9 ~ ins. VII. QuARTER MtLE (under r6)-K.S., I, C. H. Trueman; 2, W. H . .Maundrell. C.O.S., r, L. H. Phillips; z, R. Bell. As in the roo yards race, Phillips shot ahead at a good pace, but slackened down c-onsiderably in the last 200 yards, while Trueman steadily gained, and looked like winning at the last, but just faited. Maundrell, a good 3rd. T ime, 62 ~sees. VIII. QUARTER

(open)-r, K.S., H. E. Flint; 2, R. B. F lint. C.O.S., 1, A. \V. Davies; 2, G. M. Comber. Davies set th ~ pace, running a~ a very fast rate for the first 200 yards, the two Flints keeping themselves a bit, the elder speaking comforting words of exhortation to !lectmdus on the way, with the res\llt that the latter passed Davies at the last corner, running in in grand form, R. B. following suit. Time, 58 ~sees. MILE

I X. LONG JuM P (under r6)-K.S., P. H. Slater ; G. D. Lenox. C.O.S., L. H. Phillips, R. Barnes. Won by Phillips with the good jump- I 7ft. 4ins. X. HuRDt,E RACE (open)-K.S., I, H. J. Clinton; 2, H . G. Stringer. C.O.S., r, H. G. Brewer ; 2, F. B. Bell. T his race was won easily by t he C.O.S., as we had expected, both their men drawing


THE

CANTUARIAN.

ahead after the first hurdle. Clinton and Stringer had had little or no practice at flying hurdles, and were greatly handicapped by the abnormal lowness of the hurdles in our sports, as weB as the shortness of our course. Brewer came in first-with Be11 fo11owing-Ciinton and Stringer arriving together. Time, 19 3-5ths sees. XI. HALF MILE (under 16)-K.S., 1, C. H. Trueman; 2, F. W. Chisolm; 3, H. E. Candy. C.O.S., x, H. R. Quartley; 2, R. :tv!. Evans; 3, D. P. Williams. As usual, the C.O.S. put on the1r pace at the beginning, but Chisolm's long stride enabled him easily to keep up, for the first 300 yards, after which he assumtd the lead, while the C.O.S. were not up to much in the second round. Evans and W11liams feB out-while Candy, who had been keeping himself back, put on a very good spurt, 2oo yards from goal, and ran in soon after Trueman, a good 3rd. Quartley came in 4th, a little way behind. Chisolm's stride brought him in an easy first, in 2m ins. 3 xsecs. Trueman kept up steadily for second place. XII. ONE MrLE (open)-K.S., F. S. Bey non, R. B. Flint, H. E. Flint. C.O.S., H. 0. Cowley,F. A. Britten, R. G. \Valmesley. This, the closing event, was the best-won race of the day. At the report, Britten started off ahead, with C0wley fo11owing, Beynon keeping close to the latter, and for the first round the order was Britten, Cowley, Heynon, R. B. Flint, Walmsley, H. E. Flintthe latter gradua11y falling back. In the second round the order was changed by Beynon passing Cowley, and \Valmesley Flint. In the third Beynon came to the front, Britten keeping close while the two Flints were some way behind, Walmsley fa11ing out, Beynon in the last round steadily drew ahead, and eventua11y won by some 20 yards. Britten and Cowley taking 2nd and 3rd places, some distance apart. R. B. and H. E. J lint feB out in the last round, the latter after putting on a splendid spurt, r.tther too soon ; but he had been running several times before. Time was very good : 5 minutes. It will thus be seen that the C.O.S. were victors, seeming four events to our three. One or two remarks may be added. We were perhaps at a slight disadvantage in not running in so airy a costume as our opponents. That might possibly have weakened our times, and is a faul t (if fault it be) which might be remedied another year. Secondly. It is perhaps needless to advise the Sports' Committee to see that the hurdles in our own sports in future are the regulation height. The number of flights, too, ought to be increased on Blore's Piece. People should also practice flying the hurdles and not jumping them. Thirdly, about the long jump. This is an event which wants as much practice and attention as anything. The great thing which we seem this year to have neglected is the


THE

CANTUARIAN

take-off. Last year showed a similar instance. A proper take-off is as necessary as a KOOd start for the roo yards, and requires similarly a lot of practise. One more general remark about running. P eople must learn to run on the toes, and not on the heels. Practise will effect this, and it will vastly improve the form and speed of the running. We hope that these few remarks may contribute a little to a hoped-for victory over the C.O.S. next year, when we trust that most, if not all, of our present representatives w1ll again be nble to run and jump for us-with, we hope, still better times, length and height.

Articles of Agreement for Athletic Sports /Jelwem tlte i{1'ttg'R School anrl Clergy Orpl1a1~ Scllool, botliof Uat1terbury. Kent.

At a Meeting of representative!; from the Sports' Committees of the King'.;; School, Canterbury, and the Clergy Orphan School, Canterbury, both of the County of Kent (which meeting was also attended by a Master from each of the said Schools), it was decided with the consent of the Head Masters of the two said Schools! I ).- '1hrtt ALhlotic Sports bot ween the two -:,chools shall bl! held annually. (:.!).-'!'hat tho ~aitl Sp orts shall b,\ held, if poss ible, on tho St. L1twronco Crickot Ground <H', if th.a t should IJo impossible, on the <lroon Com t in the C:tthedrnl Precin cts. (:I ).-'l'hnt tho oxp onscs for holrlin ~ such :'ports t!hllll bo shared oqunlly each year b y the Lwo :-<chools. ( I ) . - '! 'hat tho Mtlid Spor ts shall always be held in t ho E'io st School Term of eMh year. "•). 'I hat tho nctmtl dnto for such Sports in ••uch yent· shall bt> aettlrrl by the Captains of l.h~> two Schools.

(G).- 'l'hat tho events for tho Open Competition shall llo the ~:u n o each year, nnd sl·nll bo ns follows:Ono ;\Jilo ................. Flat :R~ce. llnlf 1\1 ilo Quarter i\J ilo U uudred Yards Oigh Jump. Long Jump. llurdlo Rnce. (7) .- 'l'hnt both in tho Htgh JUlllp and Long Jump Competition, oa~h competitor s hall bo allowed throo tries and no more. (8).- 'J'h •t in Ll10 Long Jump Competition tho tnko on: shnJl b o marked by n board let into tho ground, (bnt set so as J.JOt to show moro than one nnd a hnlf inches above t'ho ground), nnd Uw rnu up 10 the board shall boa gradual cinder trnck. (9).- 'l 'hnt nll l<ulcs ns regards tho 11 igb J uwp and Long Jump Competition (other than the p:n·ti~llltu·s mentioned before in Articles 7 nnd 8) ahull bo in uccordaneo with the Rules for tho O.~oford nn<l CamiJt idgo Sports.


THE

CANTUARI AN.

(10),-Thnt for tho lJurdlo Rncc, tho distance shall be one hundred o.nd twenty yards; thnt t horo shnll bo ten flights of hurdles each ton yartls apart, nud that eneh f11ght shall be three feet six inches in height. (11). - rl1at in botl1 tho Hundred Yards Competitions tho competitors shall bo separated by strings. (12)-That at tho same time as the above Com1>otitions are hold, a f urther Competition shnll be held for boys from tho same two schools, who arc \mder sixteen years of ago on tho 25th day of 1\farch in th·· year in which tho said Sports aro held. N.B. '£hat. if a boy's birthday should fn.ll on t he 25th he should bo allowed to compete. (13).-'fhat tho events for t·ompetition for such boys under sixteen years or ago shall be tho same each yenr n.nd shall bt: as follow :I:Ialf 1\lilo.................. lt'lat. Race Quarter ~1i le Hunch·cd Yards High Jump Long J u mp (14).-'rhat thoro shall be tho same Rules and arrangements for these Competitions us for the open Competitions before specified. (15.)- 'l'hat from each of t ho t.wo Schools there shall bo two compotitors for each event, except in tho Otre ~lil o and Half i\lilo (open) and tho Ualf Milo (under sixteen), when tho number of competitors shall bo three. {16) -'£hat t.ho order of all events for Com· petition (op 3n aud under sixteen) shall bo the same CMh yruw nd shall boas follows :(1) llalf ~Jilo ....... ..... Open (2) Hi~ h Jump ......... Under Sixteen (3) B undred Yurds ... Open (·~) High Jump ...... . Open (51 Hunili·ocl Yards ... Uncler Sixteen. (6) Long Jump ......... Open (7) Qua.rter Milo ......Undor Sixteen

(8) Quarter ~I ile ...... Open (0) Long Jump .. ....... Under Sixteen (10} lhtrdlo Raco...... Open (I I) Half Milo ......... Under Sixteen ( 12) One ~1 ilo ............ Open (17).-'l'bat tho Open Competition shnll lw considered quito separate in r('aults fro11t tho Competition for Boy~< under SixLeon Years of Ago. (18).-T hat only t ho W inne•· in each Evonl, either Open or for Boys uPdCI· Sixtel'n scores a. point for his School. (19).- That in case of dtacl beat fc11· first. plaoo in any Competition, the seoro shall btl half a win to each ::.ehool. (20).-That two Umpires shall be elected, o1w by each School. {21),-'T'hat two Starters shall bo IIJ>pointod, ono by ouch chool, who shall sharo n equally as possible tho starting of Llttl •ovornl races, thus:A shall Rturt B ahall stnrt. Ono :11ilo- Open. Bali l\lile- Opon. Quartet· i\1•1··.-0pon. H\trdlo Rncc-Opon 100 Y1trcls - Open. 100 Yds Un<lor Hi. Hn.lf ~lilo-Undor lti. Quarter l\Jil e-Undor Ill• (22).-That tho start. shall nlwt~ys be by r. pori of piotol. (23).- '.Vhn.t nny question bot.weon tho U011>i• I' sl1ali be settled by a Referee, whoso deciRiuu must be rinal. (23).- That >uch Referee shall be chosen l.'llt•h yesn· by tho joint decision of the rC'presc1 t.n tives from tl1e two Commit.Lees of tho lwu Schools. W tncss to tho ahovo A rticlos of Agroomou t between the two Schools, this 16th day ul ~J arch, 1892. K I NG"s SCHOOL.

'J'. Fiold, Head Master.

L.

l:L

IJ. 1\lusou. CLERGY ORPHAN SorrooL.

A• thu r W Upoott, Head 1\laster . Herbert G. Watson.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

\

COMMI'l'TEE : KINO'S SCHOOL. W . M. Cal'tcr. (Unpta.in of the School), F. S. Beynon, (Captain of the Sports), R. J c~stley, H . M. J ames, :&. B. Fli nt. E . .r. S. Athawes, H. E. Flint,

CRICKE T

CLEROY OnPHAN ScuooL. A. W. Dn,.ies, (President), E . C. Wright, (Secretary). B . llf. Brown, F . A. Uritten, W. n. L. Church, H . 0. Cowley.

P ROSPECTS .

If we had, in one word, to forecast the result of the Cricket Season, that word would be "Fair." This may appear to under-rate the School cricket; for, according to the printed card, with 8 of the old Eleven remaining (7, we think, is the more correct number, as James has unfortunately left since the season began), our prospects arc certainly hopeful and encouragi ng. If another good bowler could be found, they would be decidedly good ; but such an article is not forthcoming. N ow that the fifteen is thoroughly in practice, wt: are better able to d iscuss their merits in the different de¡ partments of the game, though at the same time the proverbial uncertainty of cricket f<>rbids us to he too confident. r. In batting the team on the whole are fairly strong ; but they will have to rely 1'hicfly on the old members, as very little fresh blood is forthcoming. Indeed the rising talent is conspicuous by its absence. The best and most useful players of last year's 2nd eleven have d isappeared from the sce ne-a decided misfortune. We can only hope that the result of our 2nd eleven engagements wj)) prove that we are mistaken. The Captain, Slater, and Beynon are at present in good form; Carter, Flint and Richardson :trc not yet up to last season's standard, but we hope they will be ere long. None of the new members appear likely to be dangerous ; but N ewland and Athawes should prove useful. 2. In bowling we confess to co nsiderable anxiety. We have but four of any pretensions whatever. Castley hitherto has been very successfut, and seems to have greatly 1111 proved on last year's form, if he ca n keep it up, he ought to be deadly. The ot her .l nrc Beynon, Richardson and Slater. A good slow bowler would be an acquisition ;


THE

CANTUARIAN.

and Toulmin, a new comer, was very favourably spoken of in Lillywhitc in this respect ; unfortunately an accident is likely to prevent his c ricket for this season. 3.-The fielding-the most important function of an eleven in our opinion, because it is that in which all can excel, if they are really keen cricketers-hitherto, as far as we have noticed, has not been as clean and good as we should li ke to see it. Many of the team are too much inclined to wait for the ball to come to them, or to Jet it pass them before they attempt to field it, instead of being on the alert and running to meet it, or try to save it from getting past them. Since writing this, we learn with great satisfaction on good authority (we are sorry we were not present) that the fielding in their first match on Ascension D ay was really first-rate. If this proves to be their habitual form, we have not much fear of the season not being successful, and we congratulate the eleven on making such a good start. We conclude these remarks by hoping that Mowll wi!l soon be able to resume his place as wicket-keeper, and keep up the promise he showed last year.

CRICKET FlXTORES. Date. Th. ll!a.y 26 31 .. Tb. Th. Juno 2 .. 8 Wed . 11 Sat. 14 ... Tu. 16 ... ·rh. 22 Wod.

.. ..

Tu. Th.

"

23 . 30 ...

" 5 ... 'l'u. July 7 .. Tb. 12 ... 'ru. 'l'u. 26 27 Wod.

J

Opponents. Castle Hill S.A..C. Col. Trueman's XI. Do,•er College ... Barracks Sutton Vnlonce School S.A.C. Highgate Sobool Canterbury Pill r ims ...

c.o.s.

St. Lawro ~oo South Et•R;cm Collogo

c.o.s

O.K.S.

..

Where played. ... Bovorley Beverloy Canterbury .. DOVOl' ... Bnrraoks Sutton Beverley llif bgn.te . . .Be' e.-Joy ... Beverley Bever loy .. Ramsgf.tl ... Beverley ... Boverloy


THE

CANTUARI AN. '

271

CRI CKET . KING'S SCHOOL v. MR. EVAN'S XI. This match was played on the Beverley on May 17th, and resul~ed in a draw. As will be seen from the score below, Slater was most successful with the bat for us, whilst Castley and Beyn..>n divided the bowling honours between them. Score :K.S. W. M. Ca•tor lJ Blo1·o ... ... ... ... ... H. B. Flint, o liiol'l'is. b Blore ... ... ... II . M. J a mes. b l:lloro ... ... ... A. G. Richat·dson, c Simmonds, b Harris ... 1'. II. Sln.tut·. b Woodward ... ... H. J . Cnstloy. c ~ immond s, b Bloro ... l<". S Boynon, b Woodward 1c:. J. Atluowcs, uot out . . . t>f. S. Nowland, c Money, b H od gson W . R. ,\lowll. b Bloro ... II. Wnchor, b llodgson... Extms T otal

...

5 17

5 7 31 14 5 15 19 0 7 2

127

:\lit. EvAN's x.r. H. D. Mouoy, b Castloy W. C. Dalo, b Beynon .. II. R. Uloro, b Cnstloy .. . W. ~lol'l'is. b Hoyuon .. . C E. Um·ris. b Cnstley .. . Rov J. Simmonds. c ~ln.tor, b Beynon R ov. '1'. 1•'iold. n ot out ... ... . .. Mr. 'I' L'iPI>, uot out... . .. Rsv. L . II. Evn.ns, b Castley ... Rev.I<.G.llodgson ~ D'd ot 1 t W. Woodwn. d ) 1 n •a · Extras

0 . .. 24 . .. 17 . .. 5 . .. 31 1 1

2

10 18

Totnl

109

KI G'S SCHOOL v. ST. LAWRENCE 2ND XI. This match wa~ played on the Beverley on l\L1y 19th, a nd resulted in a win for the ~t:hool by r 22 runs. Our first wickets went down rather fast, but Slater and Beynon Jlrovcd to be in good form, and the two were responsible for more than half our total None of their siJe except Norton a'l:i Thur~u off~red any real re;istanc<! to the howling; and Castley did the " hat trick" bowl_ing L. Rhodes, R. Rhodes, and A. Jt'agg, with three consecutive balls. We only just succeeded in winning the match, for their last man was out I. b. w. to Beynon on the very stroke of six, the time at which we had agreed to draw stumps. Score :K .S. ST. LAWRENCE. W. M . Car tor, b !iltevonson ... II. n. Flint. c Wn.nher, b Fagg II . !If. Jnmes. b Friokor... . .. A. (}, Ri··hnrdson, c HhodeR . b F ngg l'. II. Slnt<~r, c Fricker, b Hhodes .. . It .J. Castloy, b Rhodes ... ... ... II' S. Boynon, run out . .. .. . .. . 1•) •• f. At ha.weij b Rhodes ... ... M.S. Nowlu.nd. o Tate, b Stevenson ll. Wncher, b Stevenson I I. J. Cullin, not out Extras

.. . . .. .. . .. . . ..

15 Supt. Fn.rmory. lc Cndtloy ... 0 E. 'l'lnn·g-ar , o a n l b Ca.stley 2 \'1. I I. F •·•cker, b Riohn.· dson 4 F. Norton st. .Fli t, b JJeynou 61 L Rhodes, b ('nstloy .. 8 R. Rhodes, b Cnstloy

2 34

0 ... 13 1

0

57 A. F a.gg, b Castlo.v .. . . .. ... 1 E. B 'n.te. lc Cnstley ... 8 5 ... 23 ... 14

198

. .. ... H. E. F lint o Carer, b Heynon ... H \Vache•·, not out... .. J. B. :stevenson, lb"', b Beynon ... Extras Total

0

4 8 9 1

4 ...

76


THE

CANTUARIAN.

KI NG'S SCHOOL v. CASTLE H ILL. This,the first card match of the season, was played on Tuesday, May 26th,;m the Beverley. The wicket was very good, but neither side made full use of it, al though we succeeded in carrying off the match by 26 runs. The Castle Hill captain won the toss and elected to go in T he match began well for us, as with the opening ba ll of the match Castley bowled their best man. The whole side, mdeed, failed to master the bowling and were all dismissed for the poor total of 67. Castley a nd Richardson were the most successful bowlers. We opened disastrously as our first five wickets fell for 31, and t he prospect was a very gloomy one. But Castley and Beynon came to the rescue, a nd the scort had reached 51 before Castley was dismissed for 2 r, a most useful innings as it probably saved the side f1om defeat. Beynon was the 1~ext to go with 19 to his credit, a nd the same remark applies to his mnings as to Castley's. At hawes and Newland both succeeded in making double figures, and the innings closed for 93路 In their second innings Castle Hill did much better as they knocked up 93 for one wicket ; Collins and Campbell both made 32, but the latter was not out when stumps w eredra wn. Our field ing throughout t he match was very smart. The score was as follows :CASTLE HILL.

Wrench, c ~later, b .Richardson ... Collins, b ~"'as1 ley .. . ... .. . .. . H aL路dy, b Beynon ... ... ... ... Cam p' ell, c J nwcs. b Castley P och cll. c C'nst ey, b Hicbardson ... W en 路 wor t h (l ),c Slater, b Castley Butler, c .lt hawcs, b ~l ater ... W ent wor t h (2 1, c Castley, b Beynon.. . Torrens, b Rid1ardson Pi nkoy. run out Cor y Smith, n ot ou t E xtras

... ... ... 6 not out 0 c Slater, b Richardson 12

22 32

32

3 not out 0 3 14 1

12 t 1 H

67

Extras ...

.. .

...

7

93

K.S. W. i\1. r路tu ter, c a nd b Bu tler ... R. B Flint, b Butler 11. M. Jnmes. b Butler ... . .. A. G. Richardson b Campbell R. J . Castloy, b Campbell

4

3 3

a

... :n


THE

CANTUARI AN. '

273

J.> H. Slater, c CHmpbell, b Butler F. S. Beynon. c Pechell, b Butler 11. .. Newland, c t'ampbell, b Hutler .. . E. J, Athawes, c Pechell, b Cnmpbell .. . W . .lt. ~lowll, c Campbell, b Butler 11 . J. Cullin. not out Extras... ... ... ...

...

3

... 19 1~

10 0

0 lo 93

BOWLING ANALYSIR. CAS'rLl!l

H ILL-1st innin gs. 0. M. R

Jt. J. Cost ley ... A. G. Richardson

F. S. Beynon ... J . P. H. Sl .ter

11 10 5

4 4 1

20 14 10

3

0

6

w. 3 3 2 1

CASTLll HtLr.-2ud inn ings. 0. M. R. H.. J . Castley ... 11 1 28 fi A. G. Richardson 1 21 P. H . Slater 5 0 18 F. S. Beynon 6 0 24

w. 0 l

0 0

K.S.

t:ampbell Outler ...

w.

0.

i\1.

H.

lG.L

8

41

3

It:

5

3i

'i

KI NG'S SCH OOL v. ST. AUGUSTINE'S. This, our first match with the College, was played on the 3 xc;t of May. \Ve lost the toss and our opponents went in to bat. Runs came freely, chiefly off Richardson, and the marking-board showed 30 runs in a very short time. At 33 the first wicket fell, Barker havmg got the lion's share. Then a great change came over the game, the batters coming in only to be sent back directly by Beynon, who had superseded Richardson and Castley-the former being most successful- and the innings closed for 59¡ A very pleasing featu re of the innings was the capital stumping of two of the College by Mowll. Carter made a very good catch. Matters went none too f.wourable at first in our innings, as four wickets went down for 22, all cleaned bowled by Darby. Cast ley and Slater then made a valuable stand and by means of some hard hitting (though each wa~ missed) made the game safe. Later on Cullin and Athawcs had a merry time of it and aided by some loose fielding they scored 47 and 32 not out respectively ; but


T HE

274

CANTUARIAN.

Athawcs' was by far the better performance. O ur total score was x66, giving us an easy victory by 107 runs. Appended is the full score and analysis :K .S. :-;.A. C. .R.. f;. Barker, b Castley... . .. .. . 26 W . ~ I. C'~rtcr, b Darby .. . . .. 6 R. B. F h nt. b Darby .. . H . Woodward, b Beynon . .. 12 F. :-. Beynon b Darby ... C. J. Radford, h Castloy W . 8. Forstor,lbw., 1. Uoynon 0 A. 0. Richard o '· b Darby .. 0 R. J Cnstley, 1, Darby ... R . Marriot.st.1\Jowll b Beynon .. . 4 P II . S at-·r . o Simmonds, b Wallaco Rev 1\J J . Simmonds. b Beynon ... . .. 0 H . !IJ. James. b Forster ... N. W . Fogarty st. MoiVII, h Beynon ... 3 ~I. "· Nowlmd, b Darby A. Darby. b Castley .. . .. . . .. 0 B. J. Athn.wcs. not out A. Groves, not out... ... . .. 0 H J. Cullin, st B1u·ker b E'oga 1·ty ... C. W . W n. lace, c (Jartet·, b BPynon 0 W . ]{, ~ l owll, bRadford 0 . OrifllthR, run out 1:1 Ext.rns Ext ras

I

0 ... ll ... G ...

I)

... 28 ... )2

... ...

7 7 3:.!

... +i• ... 0 ... 1:1

59

BOW LING ANALYSI S.

K.S.

S..A .C.

O.M. RW. R. J . Castley ... A. G. R ichardson .. . F. 8. Beynon . .. .. .

.J

10 5 13 2 0 20 0 8 1 18 6

H. Woodward A. Darby C. W. Wn.Jlaco

W. H Forstet· G. Griffiths ... N. W. l<,ogarty C J Radford

Darby bowleu two wides.

..

0. i\1. :R. \\ 13 0 4:i 0 16 4 42 ll G 0 20 •J. on 1 0 8 2 0 8 L·2

0

I

I I

v I I

Forster and Radford each bowled a wide.

K I NG'S SCHOOL v COL. T RUEMAN'S XI. I n this match, played on Thursday June 3rd, at m ean, we suffered a signal defeat, our sid·~ scoring only 38 runs. I n the face of such a collapse, it is more profitabk· and dignified to seek for reasons than excuses. Heavy rain had made t he wicket slow, and rather" sticky," so that both patience and caution were necessary. Now our fellows or some of them, hit out wi th the temerity that is dear to the heart of the much counselling bowler. Result:-Two of them stumped and six caught; and an excellent analyses for the opponents. The fielding which went somewhat to pieces afte rward~, was at first good, and Newland's quickness on the ball at short-leg and cover more than once attracted attention. As to the batting, Carter began steadily, a nd Castley made a clean hit over the railway before he was lured out of his ground. Athawes would 1111


THE

275

CANTUARIAN.

tlou~)t have stayed longer, if he had remembered lo keep his right leg steady. For our opponents, Blore's 27 was an example of judgement and caution which we might have imitated ; and Harris' 38 was made in good style. Retrs analysis deserves attention. The weather was so unpropitious all the morning that we had grave doubts about starting for Blean. H owever, a break in the clouds and no doubl too, the recollection of former visits there which Colonel and Mrs. Trueman had made so pleasant, finally decided us; a nd thanks to the kindness and hospitality of our hosts, added to a glorious 11unny evening, we were all thoroughly glad of the decision, in spite of our ill success in the 'cricket field.

COL. 'J 'RUI<.:M.AN'S XI. fl. R. llloro, c Flint. b Beynon .. . W. C. Dnlo, c Cm·tor, b Beynon .. . (). JJ nrris, not out ... ... . .. .. . I I. Pt·cston, b l'nstloy . .. . .. .. . Rolf. b Ca~tloy... ... ... ... ... ... H. D . .\lono,r, c Castloy, b Richardson 11. Bar nos n ot out .. . .. . .. .. . .. . Maj or Wilson ( C. Truownn [roland did not bat. W. Locket· Uyes und Leg-byes 13, wides 1 ..

KING'S SCHOOL. W. l\1. Cnrtor. c Pt·cston, J, Rolf ... 5 1 R B. }<' lint, b Rclf.. .. as F s. Roynon. c 'l't·uemnn, I. R olf u. G. Richnrdson, c i\lonoy h Blorc 4 R. J. Cnstloy, st fJnrncs, b Rolf .. . 27

I

17 1

9 II. M. Jn.mes, c nnd b Relr ... .. . f> P. 11. Slutr.r, c PrePIOn. b Rel£ .. . E. J. S . .Athnwes, c Trueman, b Bloro hl . S. Nowlnn<l, •t. Hn.ncs, b Bloro H J . Cullin, nnt out W. R . .\1owll, b Bloro .. . 14 Ryes 2 Log-byes 1 .. . .. . .. .

(j

0 'j,

l 10

0 0 7 3 4 0

3

38

119

• Innin gs declared closed. BOWLING ..l ,\LYSIS. K. :;. I I. R. Til oro

Kelf

CoL.

'l'L,UE~IAN 's

xt.

OMRW 12·3 3 19 4 R. J Custloy ... .. . 12 6 16 6 A. G. 'Rtcha.rdson... ... ... ... F. ~. Beynon .. . .. . ... P. H. ::ilator .. . ... ... ... ... Slntor bowled 1\ wide.

OMRW 21 6 30 2 13 S 30 1 13 3 22 2 10 0 24

0

OXFORD LETTE R . Another summer term has almost flown, as only summer terms do fly. The eights' week is over; the 'Varsity Home Cricket Matches, and last but certainly in some

people's estimation not least, the Fmal S~hools will probably be over before this letter appears in print. To the three O.KS. in this year-F. D. Sladen, R.P.


â&#x20AC;˘ THE

CANTUARIAN.

Atherton and P. S. Hichens we wish all they wish most for themselves in the way of papers and classes. Cricket seems to form the first and most natural topic to decant upon. The usual trial matches at the beginning of the term have all been played, and have mainly disclosed considerable batting power, but nothing very extraordinary in the bowling line. There arc seven of last years XL still up, of whom last year's captain Mr. J ardine is not at present able to play owing to schools. His place bas been taken by Mr. Palairet, well-known in Somerset cricket. Places have been found for two freshmen N!r. Fry, who may get his triple blue, and Mr. Phillips of Rossall and Exeter. Both are good bats and the former can also bowl. The first match was played against a strong team of gentlemen, and lost by 10 wickets; but this was compensated for by a win over Lancashtre after a most exciting finish by seven runs. Other matches on tour arc Lancashire, Sussex and the M.C.C. ; and as usual the Tnter-'Varsity match at Lords, beginning on the last day of June, brings the season to a close. The Eights' Week of 1892 was far more exciting than is usual, owing to the gr~at number of bumps made, of which there were no less than twenty-three. The week began on May 19th, and was favoured with very fair weather throughout-Magdalen went ahead, bumping B. N.C. on the second night: B.N.C. thus losing the headship which they have held for the last three years.

Other successful boats were Bailiol, Pembroke, K cblc, Queen's, Univ., Trinity, Wadham, Lincoln's, and St. Edmund Hall. Many, and perhaps most of the crews are above the average this year, which augurs well for H enley R ega tta on July sth and 7th. 0. K.S. have been engaged in their usual divers pursuits; the most noteworthy of which arc that A. Latter, who is captain of the Trinity C.C., was playing in the Seniors' Match, and has a very good average for college matches; and R . P. Atherton was rowing stroke in the Trinity Eight, E. B. Hawes bemg ninth man for the same. D. S. Tassell got a Second in Mods, being perhaps as close a shave for a first as possible. We were very glad to see Mr. and Mrs. Hodgson who were up fora week at the beginning of term. G. J. H. Mullins was up also for a few days about the same time. Rum our says that Mr. Ritchie was seen on the Banbury Road, though, as far as I know,Rumour has not yet been definitely corroborated. The Rev. A. G. B. Atkinscn was up for his M.A. degree. The special interest of this term as regards O.K.S. has been the formation of a regular club. The first meeting was held in Mr. Ottley's rooms at Magdalen in April; and it was there settled that the C lub should meet once a fortnight in differe nt rroembers' rooms, and that a badge, as regards which a certain latitude of choice is allowed, should be worn. D. S. M. Tassell is secretary of the Club, which, as is almost needless to add, is for purely social purposes.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

277

CAMBRIDGE LETTER. The last two months have seen \'arious inter-'Varsity cont~sts, the result<; of which have been fairly even. Of the boat-race the Jess is said the better, both because every body knows about it, and because Cambridge did not win. Cambridge can C"On~ole itsellin th..: thought that it won the sports for the sixth year in succession. Of the other contests the fencing match is perhaps the most interesting because of its novelty. Oxford won; but that was ex· pccted as at present there is no organized dub up here. The cricket match seems more open now that Woods and MacGreg· or have gone down. I must congratulate Parker on playmg in the Freshmen's match, and hope that next year he may be tned for the 'Varsity. The Canterbury Pilgrims have not pros· p.:recl so tar this term. That is not very wonderful when it is taken into considera· tion that there are only about six O.K S. in residence who got their first XI. colours at school. Their chief mainstays are Parker, who is secretary, and Elwyn, who is once more devoting himself to his ardous post as captain. Tole May races begin on June Ioth.

Frend is rowing 7 in the Selwyn boat, Trinity Hall with Rowlatl at stroke arc head of the river, and probably will keep there, though First Trinity, it is said, will press them hard. The usual function of conferring honorary dcgrees will be rendered more interest· inf{ this year by the presence of the Duke of Edinburgh, and by his instalation of the Duke of Devonshire as Chancellor. Dr. Verrall has written an ode to com· memorate the eve nt which Dr. Stanford has set to music. Aoo; the Chancellor took his degree in mathematics, and the ode is written in Latin, it is doubtful whethe r he will full y appreciate it. We were very pleased to sec )fr. and Mrs. Hodgson at the beginning of the term, and Mr·. Field a little later on. E. L. P ayne helped the Pilgrims in a couple of matches, but I am afra1d not cven then did they win them. I t is to be hoped that they will have a successful week at Canterbmy. I must congratulate Athawes on his scholi and only wish others had done likewise.


THE

CANTUARIAN,

SCHOOL NEWS . E. J. S. Athawes has been elected to an open classical scholarship at St. Catherine's College, Cambridge.

***

F. Norton, Esq., from Jesus College, Cambndge, has taken Mr. Allen's place as a Master in the Junior School.

***

shot, is very creditable. We ought to do better still next year, as we shall most probably have the same two who went up this year.

*** There has been some talk about getting up Squash ties this term; but nothing has been done as yet,

*>'f

-!(¡

The Day Boys have made more improvements in their Hall this term. They have put up a very handsome overmantel. It is altogether different from the one in the Boarders' Hall.

H. M. James has passed the Army Preliminary Examination, and W. R. Mowll has passed the Pre liminary Examination for the Law.

***

The Mathematical Prize has been awarded to S. S. Cook, and a Mathematical Senior Scholarship to vV. H. Evans.

In the Gymnasium Competition which took place at the end oflast term, Athawes (2) proved to be the best of the under sixteen com petitors, although he was closely followed by R eale r, and Ridley. LeeWarner easily won the 0pen ; Smith being second.

*** Lee Warner and Smith went to Aldershot to represent the School in the Public Schools' Gymnasium Competition. Twenty one schools competed, of which Lee Warner and Smith defeated five, thus giving us the sixteenth place, which, considering it is the first time that we have competed at Alder-

***

**¡ :;. The Broughton Divinity and the Private Study prizes have been awarded to W. M. Carter, whilst the German Prize has been won by T. N. Micklem, and the French Prize by G. F. Carter.

***'

At the end of last term Canon Hutchinson, who accompanied the Archbishop on his tour in North Africa, and who has lately been made an Honorary Canon of lhe Cathedral, very kindly gave us an in teresting and instructive lecture on Algiers.


THE

CANTUARIAN.

O .K.S.

2 79

COLUMN.

The names of the Rev. R. G. Glennie, and A. Latter appear in the list of those who are to play for the Oxford Athletics this season.

We omitted to state in our last that Captain W. Tenison of the Manchester Regiment has been gazetted Major.

•*

1f

*·i(o* W. Pugin Thornton has been gazetted to the Royal East Kent Mounted Rifles. ~urgeon-Lieutenant

*oil-

*'

D. S. M. T assell of Christchurch, Oxford, has gained a second class in H onour Moderations. ,.,.*-*· Captain C. E. Wyncoll has been ap. pointed Deputy Assistant Adjutant General.

H. S. S. Parker was playing in the Cambridge Freshmen's Match.

*.*

Kenneth Mackenzie has two pictures in the Royal Academy this year. ~.:

*'Ito O.K.S. wishing to play in the O.K.S. match on July 26th and 27th are requested to send in their names to C. E. N. Short· ing, Broseley, Shropshire.

*NUGAE. This is the title of a bright little book hy H. E. Moffatt, M.A., an O.K.S., which we can recommend to all our readers. It consists of translations of nursery rhymes nnd others into rhyming Latin. I t is very cleverly and smartly written throughout while the jingles are very catching and pleaRing to the ear ; the only pity being that there arc not more of them. It is very difficult to choose any particular verses from among them but we quote one or two. I'll tell you a story Of Jack a Manory And now my story's begun.

I'll tell you another Of Jack and his brother. And now my story is done. is rendered thus

Qua11quam animus memi11isse hor·ret luctuque ?'ifttgit. Incipiam. Fabulam dico De Balbo am ico. Hactenus praefatio. Alteram narro De gemino caro. Explicit : narratio.


.280

THE

CANTUARIAN.

"Cock-a-doodle-do " is thus given. Gallo gallinaceo Nunc est concinendum Dominae Miserae Eheu non inventum. Quid fiet potatio ? Pilleolum maesto Domino non praesto. Domino Miscro Q uid est opus gesto? â&#x20AC;˘ Little Billee" too which has already found

an expounder in the Greek tongue, is very good. Hickory, Dickory, Dock ! begins thus Hie ore dicere docere Oportet rem mirandum; However these are only a few gems from the mine and we advise our readers to purchase the book and see the rest for themselves. *Nugae ; by H. E. Moffatt, M.A. E. Johnson, Trinity Street, Cambridge.

LIMERICA CANTUARIENSIA. Three fellows who lived at the Grange Used to say "It's remarkably strange" "How our company's sought," "We are popular" they thought, Now, there's always a fire at the Grange.

There once was a lad who Jay yawning Some hours after day had been dawning, "This is glorious " he said, "I'll stop always in bed" But he now signs his name in the morning.

*** A venturesome youth thought "yes" This roller's too light, I guess, "I'll jump on it " he said * * * * * When they put him to bed He wished it weighed a bit Jess.

I n a paper chase once a slow pair Said " Making short cuts is quite fair" "We never need hurry," So they loitered at Sturry, But got home in front of the Hare.

*** A Boarder once murmered " Alack " " That the calendar might be put back ! " "To excuse composition" "Is a Saints Day's Mission " â&#x20AC;˘' And four Saints' Days occur in the Vac.

A sharp Monitor heard a youth say "I can't find my "baccy" to-day." " You've been smoking " he said But the youth shook his head; H e ref<!rred to Euripides' play. C. A. K.

***

***


THE

CANTUARIAN.

28 L

TENNIS DOUBLE TIES. Beynon H eale (z) Luxmoore Maundrell Smith Glen me Kingdon Barlec Hincks Watkins Athawes (1) } H ealc (x)

}

v.

} }

\ ',

v.

}

v.

}

v, v.

{ Davidson Athawes (z) Carter ( 1) { Ler.ox Micklem { Candy (1) Dale { Lee-Warner Newland { Drake

f Cast ley

1

Hopkins

CORRESPONDENCE. N.B.-Tite EditOI'B cleclvne to accept any 1'esp011sibiLity comtectect 1vW1 the opinion& of tilt iT conesp md

enls.

Name ancl

ccddTe~s ,,~ust

gttllTantec of goocl.f,ith.

alttvays be !1i11en, not necessa1·i/.1J ,fo1· tmblicatioll , bu' us a Pe1·sonatities 1uill. inuolt·e Ul'ioin 1·ejectio1l.

THE SPORTS' COMMITTEE.

To the Edito1·s of" THE CANTUARIAN.

"

Sirs,-Are the Sports' Committee elected for any other purpose than that of handing round programmes at the sports? I ask this question in all seriousness. Numbers of letters appear in the Cattluarian making suggestions for their consideration, but absolutely no notice is taken of them. The members of the Sports' Committee, I presume, read them in a vague sort of way, never dreaming that they themselves ought to give

them a second thought more than anyone else, and consequently when they meet {and goodness only knows when they do meet) they are simply a number of ir responsible ciphers who come together with no object in view, and go away quite ~atisfied with themselves that they have achieved that object. I would ask some member to tell me anything• they have ever done. Of course, in all these remarks I make exception of the Secretary, who does all the work there is, and it is no light task. But the rest arc useless. I t


THE

CANTUARIAN.

took exactly setli!ll years to get them to make any move in putting up the names of the football and cricket teams in the C~ymnas ium. In the las t number of the Cnntuaria11, for instance, there was a suggestion about a tug-of-war and a ribbon for the football team. I would suggest that say, the President should run through the Canlua1'iau correspondence, since it has started, and then call a meeting to discu~s all of the suggestions ; or let the Canlt/a1'ian editors send lht: letters they receive on such subjects straight to the Sports' Committee for considerati<>n. I would suggest thal Masters should be asked to preside, so as at least to have the semblance of a formal meeting, where one person had the intention of doing something. Perhaps different masters might preside at different seasons, since some who arc keen on football might not care to have anything to do with the cricket arrangements. I am, Sirs, Yours in disgust, c. A. K.

To t/u Edito1's of "THE

CAN'l'UARIAN."

Dear Sirs,- As a member of the Sports Committee I wish to take up the defence of that much maligned body. A short time ago I cama across the following sentence in one of the essays of H erbert Spencer, he says, "Of the many ways in which common sense inferences about social affairs are flatly contradicted by events, one of the most curious is the way in which the

more things improve the louder become tbe exclamations about their badness." I think that this saying is applicable in many ways to the present question {though I hope the Sports Committee is not in such a bad way as the s tate of social affairs), for on C.A.K.'s own showing, the Sports Committee- that is the present members of the Sports Committee-have succeeded in getting up the names of lhc Football and C ricket T e:uns, which, accord ing to him, 1 ought lo havt: been done by the members ol the Committee seven years ago. So it is all the more to the honour of the present members that it is done now. Again, he says that. the only member of the Sports Committee who has any work is the secretary. Here again he is at fault, for he takes into account neither (1) The Cricket Captain (2) The Football Captain (3) The Captain of the Games. All of these have many duties to perform, so that of the seven members four (not merely one) have something definite to do. With regard to proposals made last term those definitely discussed were the use of a pistol for the sports and the tug of war, the others certainly have not bee n, as the meetings of the Sports Committee at the e nd of l~st term were chiefly occupied in d iscussion of the various points in the rules for the sports with the C.O.S. This took a considerable time although they were drawn up by Mr. Mason.in the first place. I think I have said e nough to show that the Sports Committee does something and that all its members do not hold a sinecure

I


THE

CANTUARIAN\

office. The suggestions offered in the letter under discussion shall be put before the Sports Committee. I am, yours etc., A MEMBER OF THE SPORTS COMMITTEE.

To 1/u Editors of" THE

CAN TUARIAN."

D ear Sirs,-There has lately been a discussion about wearing Football caps in the town and elsewhere, as is the custom at very many schools. But from certain remarks I should imagine that more than one memb er of the XV. would be glad of some improvement, however small, in our colours, if indeed they can be so called. For instance the school has a crest which is displayed on our first XI. colours and hinttd at on the 2nd XI. caps. Why should the same not appear also on our Football caps. Surely it would tend to show the benighted inhabitants ofthis city that we arc not wearing " our father's cast off smoking apparel," as seems to be the general idea at present. The jersey also would bear improvement and about five years ago, members of the XV. besported themselves in striped stockings to match the jersey. On enquiring some little time ago why our colours (?) were not improved, I was informed that what was good enough for our predecessors was good enough for ourselves. Could anything be more sleepy

than this ? If not, why don't we play in togas or some other a ntiquated costume ? Everyone rejoiced to see a second XV. started last season ; this evidently caused a marked improvement in the play of the school in general, and with a view to encourage this, could not a cap of some sort be arranged for the :md XV. ? The bad luck of the School XV. last season was attributed to the fact that the XV. were not properly backed up in practice. Smcly 2nd XV. colours, including a cap, would tend to bring out that stuff, which will be necessary to make up the XV. in future years. Hoping the Sports Committee will, with others interested in this, sec their way to bring about some improvement before next football season, I remain, dear sirs, Yours DEUS LUDORUM.

I

To tl1o Editors

if "THE CANTUARIAN."

Dear Sirs,-! am sure th~ readers of the

Cantuaria11 will thank me for reminding them of an ancient and praiseworthy custom which seems in some danger of dying out. The school library, which is a good one, was founded exactly r9o years ago by gifts of ~oys, masters, and other friends of the school. Quite a large proportion of the older books have been acquired in this way. From the start the library has depended upon the voluntary


THE

CANTUARIAN.

subscriptions and still does so. I n some cases Old King's Scholars afler a successful career have thought again of their old school, like the fi rst Lord T enterden, who was a large donor. Many books have been given by boys leaving school and I fi nd sume presented by the monitors collectively. I t is only in quite recent times that this custom has ceased. There seem to me reasons for wishmg

to revive it. It is a graceful recognition of the long enjoyment of the library if a boy gives a book on leaving. And when the book chosen represents the donor's tastes, the interest ~!specially to succeeding generations, is increased. A list of desirable books would be drawn up from which choice could be made. THE LIBRARI AN.

THE L IBRARY. The following new books have been added to the Library : Wood's Natural History, 3 vols. C lerke's History of Astronony in 1he XI Xth. certury. Starland Sir Robert Ball. Science and Practice of Photography. Photograph} in a Nutshell. Boswell's Life of Johnson, 3 vols. Bartlett. Familiar Quotations Farrar. Eric } S. Winifred John Law } Ainsworth. P reston 1.'1ght Lord Mayor of London Dante, translated by Cary. Poems of 0. \V. H olmes. J efferies. R ed Deer Athletic Handbooks :-Cricket. F ootball. H ockey. Swimming


THE

CANTUARIAN.

OUR CONTEMPORARIES. fhe last two numbers of the A lleynia11 Me specimens of the perfection of a school paper; if one aims at having nothing in 1t, except what is directly connected with the School ; for the only article of any description is a few Elegiacs on the departure of one of the masters from the School. We also notice that they are able to get on without the Editorial, it must be a real holiday being an editor of ~ul'h a School l\Iagazine. 111e Plymolltian also dispenses with an Editorial and substitute some (non· original) parodies of well-known poems, the two chief ones are the ' Heathen 1•assee' and another on the same subject, ,, parody on Hood's " Bridge of Sighs. " The latest addition to the mass of sc·hool magazines, or the latest we have •cccived is the Elthamiall, which appears to have succeded a former periodical, enlJtlcd the Novicvucian. We hope the new '~apling' will enjoy a longer life than its predecessor and ' Esto Perpetua.' In the P auline we notice what appears

to us a very good practice, and that is in the account of their sports they give the winners and times for some years back. This must be interesting to the school, and makes the comparison of the sports with former years so much easier to most peo· pic. \Vc hope that plan may be adopted by us next year. Tl1e Sout!t·Easlem College JJ1agazim 1 gives the information that their blazers this year arc very dazzling to opposing 1 team~, and produce averages of so to roo on the part of the wearers. It is to be hoped when we meet them that the individual members won't secure so high an average. We are not to be dazzled by the blazers though. 1 We beg to acknowledge, with thanks, 1 the receipt of the following magazines:Laroe! Leaves, Leys FortniglitLy (J), il1aid· stonia11, Drogludiall, Cranbrookia11, D ovor1 ian, Ottsel (2) ~lialvemian (2), Our Sc/1ot · Times, Ghoimdia11, Exom'tm, St. Ed· ward's Scltool Gllromde (2}, Eliznbel!tnn, Cltall1am House, Glmalmond.

NOTIC:ES. We beg to acknowledge the following to the Cantuarian :-H. W. !•'reston, H . V. Workman (8s.), Dr. Longhurst ( ros. 6d.), R ev. W. G. Mosse, R. G. Cooper. ~ubscriptions

l n the last number in the article ·Such stuff as schools are made of' " boys " should have been "Boys"

Profile for OKS Association

The Cantuarian November 1890 - June 1892  

The Cantuarian November 1890 - June 1892