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#3

REPEAT ISSUE


o.k. periodicals #3 / repeat issue – contents

O.K. Periodicals #3 REPEAT issue 2009 ISSN 1876-2395 O.K. Periodicals is initiated and published twice a year by O.K. Parking. Each periodical explores a different topic combining on- and offline media with a fresh crew and contributors. O.K. Periodicals is a result of and based on the O.K. Blog.

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www.ok-periodicals.com www.ok-blog.nl

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1-10

I WISH I MADE THAT! 17

11-20

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THE WHITE PAGES Use these pages to create/show/share your creative talent.

21-30

© O.K. Parking, Arnhem, 2009 All rights reserved. Nothing in this publication can be copied or reproduced without written permission by the publishers. The information in this book is based on material supplied by the contributors. While every effort has been made to ensure its accuracy, the publisher does not under any circumstances accept responsibility for errors or ommisions. Contact O.K. Periodicals Statenlaan 8 6828 WE Arnhem The Netherlands info@ok-periodicals.com +31(0)26 3639030 Subscription / Back issues www.ok-periodicals.com See page 112 for a special offer. Founders, research, writing, editing & graphic design William van Giessen [wvg] Joost van der Steen [jvds] Bouwe van der Molen [bvdm] Interns Marlies Peeters [mp] Søren Wibroe [sw] Contact us for an O.K. internship! Translation Pim Verhulst Thanks to all contributors. Without you this wouldn’t exist. And to Martijn Brugman.

5 Beate Pietrek 10 Common knowledge

Tags inspiration, graphic, magazine, crowdsourcing, photography, illustration, writing, design Printer GTV Paper Lessebo Design Smooth White & Smooth Ivory


o.k. periodicals #3 / repeat issue – contents

34

57

Blood Circulation

68 46

27+ 4+

TIC,TIC,TIC...

48 37

3+

10+

10

48

218-250 964

5+

80-200 16 80-612 6+ 58+ 6+

600+

Ed Gein

35-100

53 9+ 146+

300-600 17

91+

3

67

74-100 ~931

172 - 300+ 150+ 592-3500 300+

Murder as a habit? 100+

1500

1600

1700

6/5

16+

4

1400

42+

27+

1800

1900

12

2000

murder as a habit

69

38

repeat! until you get it 31-40

41-50

40

51-60

61-70

60

50

44 Bat Macumba 47 Yes No No… 49 Repeated Images

56 Repeated Images 59 Handschuhbuch

66 Reproducing Nature Käpy / Cone 67 Architectural Repettion Romance Novels


o.k. periodicals #3 / repeat issue – contents

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101

THE HUMAN PRINTER

Astronomical repetition

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75

84

r habit 71-80

81-90

91-100

101-112

103

mission to the moon

80 89

THE PLAN 97

plastic soup 76 Bloemkool 78 Archis Die Liebe 79 100 x 1% Black

83 Cycles 88 Joost Muuzse 90 Annicca

Life “Ginga” Fujifabric Poetic Reanimation Device Rabbits Videostills 96 TAZ 99 Repetitve Sayings 92 93 94 95

102 104 105 106 107 108 110

Earth Dubbelganger Science is Cycles Cycles Illustrative O.K. Festival


hidden cities – Manuel di tolve

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In the chapter ‘1. Hidden Cities’ of the novel ‘Invisible Cities’ by Italo Calvino, the city Olinda is described by Marco Polo as “a city that starts with a circle and grows by repeatingly adding circles like tree rings.” With this idea in mind Manuel Di Tolve created a robot that would visualize this growth.


hidden cities – Manuel di tolve

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common knowledge To experiment with varying accelerations over different amounts of time and onsets, one device used is a centrifuge. A long support arm swings around and around a center anchoring point -like swinging a ball on a string around your head. A container, often ball shaped, at the end of the support arm holds the equipment or personnel being tested. The ball can rotate to position the people inside at any angle to simulate the changing positioning of a cockpit during maneuvers, for example.

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What happens to the people in these testing devices? Often they throw up all over my nice equipment. Some of my test subject pilots used to have contests who could eat the worst thing to redisplay on testing day. One ate plastic bugs just for the fun he was sure to cause - then he didn’t throw up, no matter what we did to him.

We Are The World.jp


common knowledge

The wise make proverbs, and fools repeat them. Isaac Disraeli

Lemmings

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Echolocation, also called biosonar, is the biological sonar used by several animals such as dolphins, shrews, most bats, and most whales. The term was coined by Donald Griffin, who was the first to conclusively demonstrate its existence in bats. Two bird groups also employ this system for navigating through caves, the so called cave swiftlets in the genus Aerodramus (formerly Collocalia) and the unrelated Oilbird Steatornis caripensis. Echolocating animals emit calls out to the environment and listen to the echoes of those calls that return from various objects in the environment. They use these echoes to locate, range, and identify the objects. Echolocation is used for navigation and for foraging (or hunting) in various environments.


i wish i made that! / found on www.ok-blog.nl

–“I WISH I MADE THAT!” 17 This black & white section shows a selection of all kinds of things we wish we made. More detailed information and images about the selected items can be found on the O.K. BLOG. » www.ok-blog.nl/repeat


I WISH I MADE THAT

i wish i made that! / found on www.ok-blog.nl

Fig. I

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Fig. II

Fig. III

Fig. I Third eye pinhole camera by Wayne Martin Belger A horrific camera made out of aluminium, titanium, brass, silver, gem stones and a 150 year old skull of a 13 year old girl! wvg

Fig. II Green Porno by Isabella Rossellini A series of very short films about the sex life of bugs. bvdm

Fig. III The ruins of Detroit, Eastern Industries & Theaters ruins by Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Wonderful old buildings in decay, photographed in a beautiful way. wvg


i wish i made that! / found on www.ok-blog.nl

Fig. V

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Fig. IV

Fig. VI

Fig. IV Dirt poster by Roland Reiner Tiangco Fold out and get dirty! And it’s a good quote. wvg

Fig. V Eco_station by Brandon Blommaert Very cool visuals. The creatures are handmade placed into landscape photographs. Beautifully done! wvg

Fig. VI Synesthesia by Ian Kibbey & Corey Creasey Synesthesia is a condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualization of a color. wvg


s/s/a/w – Rosey Trickett & Agata Belcen

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Set against a background of contemporary fashion images and dressed in the styles of various decades, as interpreted by contemporary fashion: this model wears the 80s jumpsuit, and the ‘new look’ of the 40s; the 60s shift dress and 70s bat-wing; 90s grunge and 00s mix-up. While adding looks for the next image the model remained in the outfits of preceding images, layering seasons and styles until she hit the low-crotched a/w Comme climax of the 00s. What we wear now is an accumulation of what we have worn before, and our interpretation of the past is filtered through current eyes, so that the 70s flair may come back over and over, but only as each generation re-presents it.


s/s/a/w – Rosey Trickett & Agata Belcen

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cover serie – jacqueline van der horst

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bat macumba ê ê, bat macumba o


cover serie – jacqueline van der horst

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repeated images – annette bohn

Ludwighafen (Germany) 2007

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bat macumba ê ê, batman Dortmund (Germany) 2006


Blood Circulation – boy timmermans

Blood Circulation; The Deadly Manuscript of Jan Jansen ∞ »

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re:plica – Maaike van der zee & céline lamée

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bat macumba ê


re:plica – Maaike van der zee & céline lamée

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serial killers infographic – william van giessen / murder as a habit – martijn brugman

27+

Arnfinn Nesset

4+

218-250 964 Doctor Death

Monster of Pont-Rouge

Christman Gniperdoliga

5+

10+

The Zodiac Killer

Pittsburg Phil

35-100 Ted Bundy

10

80-200 16 Gilles de Rais Soap-Maker 6+ of Correggio La Vampiresa or 58+ La Mala Dona

600+

Ed Gein

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The Green River Killer

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3+ Monster of the Miramichi Scarborough Rapist

Scarpuzzed

300-600

Henry Lee Lucas

BTK Killer

91+

Las Poquianchis

172 - 300+ La Bestia

150+

68

Daniel Camargo Barbosa

592-3500 Chispas 300+

The Monster of the Andes

bat macum

d r u M h a s a 100+

Pedrinho Matador

4

Big Eared Midget

Span of killings

1400

1500

1600

1700

1800

1900

2000


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Chessboard Killer

80-612

53

Blood Countess

Butcher of Rostov

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9+

dda 6+ Athens Ripper

146+

Hu Wanlin

17

Stinging Sisters

Hamamatsu 3 Deaf Killer Suicide Website Murderer

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Monster Killer

74-100 Javed Iqbal

~931

Thug Behram

r e d r ? t i b a h 16+

The Phoenix Strangler

27+

Wemmer Pan Killer

In the early 1990s Blanka Bokova, a Czech prostitute, is strangled with her own underwear in Prague. Around the same time, two other bodies of prostitutes are found in Austria, likewise strangled with their own underwear. While the murders are taking place, the perpetrator, Jack Unterweger, appears on Austrian national television. Having been released from prison only recently, after sitting out a 15-year sentence for the murder of an 18-year-old girl (strangled with her own underwear), he is the guest in a talk show. He is dressed up to the nines: nice suit, white jacket, flower in his breast pocket, black bow tie, golden jewellery. Surrounded by a handful of intellectuals, dressed as always in their dull grey and brown attire, he talks about the malleability of mankind or, to be more precise, the question whether an ex-convict can ever re-enter society. Âť

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42+ Datuk

6/5

12

The Granny Killer / the Mutilator

Bodies in Barrels murderers


murder as a habit – martijn brugman It is a hotly debated issue in Austria at the time. A majority of the Austrian elite is convinced that it is possible. Jack Unterweger is their much sought after proof in the flesh. Was it not his tormented youth that had caused all of this? Had he not conquered the murderer within during his time in prison? And while he was staying there, did he not start reading and writing: poetry, plays, children’s stories and a magnificent autobiographical novel entitled Purgatory, about his youth and his life behind bars? And had he not grown up to be the little sweetheart of the intellectuals, whose probational release they had requested themselves, with success? Unterweger played along in his nice suit with the red flower, the black bow tie, the golden jewellery. His tactics pay off. His release is just the beginning. Unterweger the intellectual – he has just started killing again – is offered a selection of jobs in the

newspaper and magazine business. He uses this opportunity to gain entrance to Vienna’s central police station, where the murder investigation is in full swing. ‘How big is the fear in Vienna?’, he asks. The fear he is wreaking himself. In the guise of a radio reporter he takes to the streets and interviews prostitutes (Unterweger: ‘How do you protect yourself?’ Prostitute: ‘Well, you can’t protect yourself because something can always happen to you on the street, whether it’s the killer that is murdering everyone or not. Something can always happen). An Austrian magazine asks Unterweger to travel to Los Angeles for five weeks, in order to fill in everyone on criminal activities in the US, especially in the field of prostitution. (At the same time, LA police find two bodies of prostitutes. Strangled, with their own underwear.) He is compromised during his stay in LA. Not by an intellectual but by a retired detective, August

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some bizarre facts & modus operandi about serial killers – william van giessen

batman

Monster of Pont-Rouge He lured his victims by posing as a photographer. Monster of Miramichi His trial featured one of the first Canadian uses of DNA fingerprinting. Scarborough Rapist He committed rapes and murders together with his wife. Ed Gein He had exhumed corpses from local graveyards and fashioned trophies and keepsakes from their bones and skin. Searching the house, authorities found: Four noses, Bone fragments, Nine death masks, A bowl made from a skull,Ten female heads with

the tops sawed off, Human skin covering several chair seats, Pieces of salted genitalia in a box, Skulls on his bedposts, Organs in the refrigerator, A pair of lips on a string. His case influenced the creation of several fictional serial killers, including Norman Bates from Psycho, Jame Gumb from The Silence of the Lambs, and Leatherface from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Pittsburg Phil He was a contract killer for Murder, Inc. in the 1930s. He killed over 30 men using a variety of methods; shooting, stabbing with ice picks, drowning, live burial and strangling rope

Ted Bundy Bundy confessed to visiting his victims’ bodies over and over again at body dump site. He stated that he would lie with them for hours, applying makeup to their corpses and having sex with their decomposing bodies until putrefaction forced him to abandon the remains. Henry Lee Lucas He flatly stated “I am not a serial killer”. BTK Killer BTK stands for “bind, torture and kill” and describes his modus operandi. The Zodiac Killer His identity remains unknown.

The Zodiac killer coined his name in a series of taunting letters he sent to the press. His letters included four cryptograms, three of which have yet to be solved. Las Poquianchis The two sisters ran Rancho El Ángel, “the bordello from hell” were they recruited and killed their prostitutes. La Bestia He drew a map in prison with the locations of skeletons that exceeded over 300. Daniel Camargo Barbosa It was said that during his imprisonment all the other prisoners were afraid of him because Camargo claimed to have


murder as a habit – martijn brugman Shenner from Salzburg. An ordinary looking man, like the ones you find in local bars, sipping at a beer. He spots the resemblance between Unterweger’s first murder in 1976 and the murdered prostitutes that keep stirring up Austria. Evidence is quick to follow. The police discover a hair of one of the murdered girls in Unterweger’s car and a piece of fabric from Unterweger’s scarf on one of the bodies. Unterweger is arrested in the US and prosecuted back in Austria for the murder of seven prostitutes. The rehabilitated killer turns out to be a serial killer. The night following the judge’s sentence, he ties his shoelaces and the string from his training suit around his neck and hangs himself. The knot he uses is similar to the knot he tied, so many times, around the necks of his victims. •

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some bizarre facts & modus operandi about serial killers – william van giessen pacts with the Devil. Arnfinn Nesset He was a nurse who poisoned his victims with Curacit, a muscle relaxing drug. Curacit becomes increasingly difficult to trace in a corpse as time passes. Christman Gnipergoliga He was caught on 21 May 1581 when 30 armed men followed his wife to his cave.There the men found Gnipergoliga’s register where he had recorded the murders of 964 people. He was sentenced to the breaking wheel on 15 June 1581. Gnipergolia lasted 9 days before dying.

Soap-maker of Corregio She murdered three women and turned their bodies into soap. La Vampiresa She was a self-styled serial killer who made her living through the sale of charms and potions made with human remains. Blood Countess Elizabeth Báthory was allegedly of bathing in the blood of virgins in order to retain her youth. Chessboard Killer Russian media have speculated that Pichushkin may have been motivated by a macabre competition with Andrei Chikatilo a.k.a. the Butcher of Rostov.

Butcher of Rostov Chikatilo was only able to achieve sexual arousal and orgasm through stabbing and slashing women and children to death. Javed Iqbal He was found guilty of the sexual abuse and murder of 100 children. This is disputed now because 26 of the children he claimed to have killed were found alive after his death. Monster Killer “Society is not my concern.” Suicide Website Murderer He lured his victims via online suicide clubs and suggesting they met and ended their lives together.

Datuk He said that he had a dream in which his father’s ghost told him to kill 70 women and drink their saliva, so that he could become a mystic healer. He buried his victims up to their waists in the ground, with heads of the victims facing his house, which he believed would give him extra power. The Mutilator MacDonald’s modus operandi was to select his victims at random, lure them into dark places, violently stabbing them dozens of times, before severing the victims’ testicles and penis.


human printer – Louise Naunton Morgan

THE

0.1Stolan Works intermittently but when running is brilliant.

0.4Naunton Only prints for a short amount of time.

0.1Naunton Fast and innacurate.

0.1Tubbs Steady and reliable.

HUMAN

0.1Stevenson Good at intricacy and complicated print.

0.1Lee Slow and accurate.

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0.1Morris Quick, efficient, yellow tends to be faint.

0.1Moutrey Slow to start but speeds up, reliable.

PRINTER

bat

The human printer reproduces images by hand. An image is broken down into four simplified images consisting of dots (known as a half-tone screen, see page 74). The four dot patterns are traced with markers in four specific colors: cyan, magenta, yellow and black. The quality of the reproductions vary according to the human used. You can become a human printer by coping the four half-tone screens of the chicken and egg that are provided on page 74. Âť www.thehumanprinter.wordpress.com 0.2Naunton Gets tired quickly but keeps going.

0.3Naunton Quiet and a bit slow.

0.1Robinson Slow, tends to thew up the paper, smudging sometimes occurs.


human printer – Louise Naunton Morgan

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Âť


best friend – thomas boerboom

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bat macum


best friend – thomas boerboom

TIP: Name your parakeet after yourself . His name is one of the words that he’ll be hearing most often and thus be imitating first. When he starts pronouncing his own name, it will seem as if he’s addressing you personally. »

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light – levi van veluw

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“The expressionless, and almost universal face, allows the viewer to project himself onto the work.”

bat macumba ê


light – levi van veluw

85

»


untitled – joost muusze

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bat macumba ê ê, ba


the plan – inge ter schure

7:00 a.m. The alarm clock. With a head full of sleep I hit the snooze button. Not yet. 7:20 a.m. I startle awake. Sleep almost caught up on me again. But my alarm clock keeps at it. I turn myself around slowly. A sense of unease comes over me. What was today all about again? I’m sure there was something… Thoughts fall into my head like droplets, one by one. Trouble at work yesterday. I was told off by the boss because I came in late again. I grudgingly apologized to him but our little incident stayed on my mind for the rest of the day. Every day for the last five years I’ve been showing up at this stale office building with its daft colleagues, watery coffee and spongy cheese sandwiches.

Never a compliment or a pat on the back. Sweat stains, bad breath and smelly feet are my lot every day. I won’t have it any more! Enough! Basta! Time for a change! I decided to burden myself with only the most urgent of typing, answered a few questions by nagging colleagues and spent the rest of my day working on THE PLAN.

MY BIG PLAN TO CHANGE MY LIFE Here’s my to-do list: 1. Give the boss a good piece of my mind. Where does that bourgeois

oaf get the nerve to push me around all the time? Or still better, as soon as I’ve finished MY BIG PLAN I’ll walk up to him and quit my job. 2. Overindulge in booze, sex and expensive food. I’ve been a good girl for much too long. I’m going to enjoy life from now on! Be ashamed of nothing! At last I’m free to respond to my neighbour’s advances, what does it matter! 3. A great trip. Since I won’t have to worry about my job any longer, I’ll just buy a plane ticket around the world. Surfing in Australia, relaxing in Thailand, drinking wine in Argentina. I’ll come back when »

Delayed sleep-phase syndrome A chronic disorder of the timing of sleep and other daily rhythms relative to societal norms. People with DSPS tend to fall asleep some hours after midnight and have difficulty waking up in the morning. It is often mistaken for insomnia.

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LIFE – JOOST HALBERTSMA

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bat macumba ê ê, batman


“Ginga” Fujifabric – Stephon Russell

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In a karaoke box in Japan, the country where it all began in 1970, a Japanese boy sings “Ginga” by Fujifabric. Stephon Russell made pictures of this phenomenon by making pictures of the singers right in the heat of the moment.


poetic reanimation device tom gauld

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bat macumba ĂŞ ĂŞ, bat macum

Conditional Design Luna Maurer Conditional Design is introduced as a term that refers to an approach rather than a chosen media. The process is the product. Logic dictates the conditions through which the design process can take place. Constraints sharpen the perspective on the process and stimulate play within the limitations. This particular image was created by the process of Hatching. The goal of Hatching is to create as many enclosed areas as possible – and hatch them. The setup of this game, as well as a video, can be viewed at : www.conditionaldesign.org


95 rabbits Diarmuid Ó Catháin

Workers Leather factory 1 - Cairo, Egypt, 2006 Video, 02:00 min.

2:00 min Bird - Barcelona, Spain, 2005 Video, 02:00 min.

videostills nicolas bourquin The uninterrupted takes (plan-séquences) are shot with a fixed camera, without direction, staging, cutting or editing. The scenes with the workers are not prepared. The shooting takes place in their working environment and during the regular labour time. The videos can be viewed at: www.nicolasbourquin.net


repetitve sayings – iris deppe

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bat macumba ê ê, bat macumba oba Wearing out the grooves of a record.


Astronomical repetition – Jaap Meijers

Every night again the starry sky passes by like a slowmoving film. If you know where to watch, you can see magnificent things on a clear night, even without a telescope. One of the most spectacular objects in the heavens is the international space station ISS.

Astronauts Robert L. Curbeam (USA) and Christer Fuglesang (Sweden) work to attach a new truss segment to the ISS and begin to upgrade the power grid. (NASA)

In the time the ISS space station covers one kilometer a hummingbird’s heart beats three times.

A collision with space debris of more than 1 kilogram at orbital velocities will typically destroy a spacecraft. Many of the resulting fragments will also be in the same mass range, and become an additional collision risk. It is possible that the growing amount of debris in orbit could eventually render the use of satellites, infeasible for many generations.

Day after day the space station covers the same lap around the earth at a speed of almost 28.000 kilometres per hour: 7.7 kilometres per second. Due to that incredible speed it takes the ISS a mere 91 minutes to revolve around the earth. Since the start of its routine in 1998 the station has orbited our planet more than 60.000 times. The ISS is enormous. And even now new modules are being attached to provide shelter and research facilities for astronauts. Just after the sun has set (or every time it is about to come back up) the ISS, travelling at an altitude of roughly 400 kilometres, usually catches enough sunlight to become clearly visible. Responsible are the large solar panels powering the station, which make it look like a bright star when it flies by. It is an extraordinary experience to watch the space station circulate overhead, only to spot it again half an hour later, and realize that it has covered the entire earth in the meantime. At some degrees of latitude it becomes even possible to spot the space station up to six times in one night. However, not all repetition in astronomy is this fastpaced. Astronomers have calculated that the earth has circled the center of our solar system only 23 times up until now, but then we are talking about unimaginable distances. On the level of the universe, repetition is believed to occur on an even larger scale and much slower pace. There is one theory, for example, that regards the big bang - the defining moment scientists believe gave birth to all matter, stars and planets was in fact not the very first beginning but rather just a phase in a much larger development. According to the supporters of this life-cicle theory the universe is continuously either shrinking or expanding, within an endless chain of repetitions. •

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earth – mark weaver

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bat macumba ê ê, bat macumba oba


mission to the moon – foamlab

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All over the world, people participate in a phenomenon called “historical reenactment”. Historical reenactment is a kind of roleplay in which participants attempt to recreate a certain point in history. Roman battles, Medieval games, and the American Civil War are a few events among the many reenacted by enthusiasts, who conduct their play in appropriate gear and manner. These history buffs often go quite far to attain a sense of authenticity, all in pursuit of the perfect copy of their favorite event that changed the world. The images you see here represent one such a reenactment.

Neil Armstrong, on July 20, 1969, was the first human to set foot on the surface of the Moon . Well, supposedly. There’s been rumors that the ‘small step for man, giant leap for mankind’ was never made on the actual Moon, but in a Hollywood studio which would almost make it a reenactment in itself. Whatever, wherever exactly it happened; Cocky Eek, Theun Karelse, Johannes Sterk and Elias Tieleman recreated suits, the shuttle and even the Rover, and did it all over again.


bat macumba ê ê, bat macumba oba

Passers-by are asked to pose for a photo-portrait. After being shown the picture, the subjects are asked to re-enact it and a second picture is taken. This was done to raise awareness of how one is perceived by others. Out of one-hundred subjects, a few were able to imitate themselves perfectly. » www.ikwilvanille.nl

dubbelganger – marloes jansink

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science is – claudi kessels

In the book ‘Science is…’ Claudi Kessels explores the complexity of the world through intuitive visual and textual experiments, taking the 105 dot as a starting point. Here the constellations formed by polka-dots and buttons on a skirt are meticulously mapped and dissected.


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About O.K. Periodicals A pleasantly disruptive magazine, self-published twice a year by O.K. PARKING. We show you inspiring work made by upcoming and established creative talent. Each periodical explores a different theme combining on- and offline media always resulting in an amazing source of inspiration!

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ISSN 1876-2395

9 771876 239504

ISSN 1876-2395


O.K. PERIODICALS #3 - REPEAT Preview  

Sometimes it seems we are running around in circles. Sometimes things are better second time around. Repetition can be agonizing and hypnoti...

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