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June 2014

KENTON COUNTY TRANSPORTATION PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


THE PLAN ENCOMPASSES ALL TRANSPORTATION MODES WITHIN THE COUNTY INCLUDING ROADWAY, TRANSIT, BICYCLE, PEDESTRIAN AND FREIGHT.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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t has been over a decade since the last comprehensive study of Kenton County transportation needs was conducted. Although a number of the recommendations made in 2003 have been completed, long-standing transportation needs still remain. Meanwhile, much has changed in the county, placing new demands on transportation infrastructure. The county has experienced population growth south of KY 16, land use shifts, an economic recession, and a growing elderly population. These are just a few of the changes that have created new challenges to the way people and goods travel in Kenton County. Due to these factors, the county’s leadership recognized the need to take a fresh look at Kenton County’s current and future transportation needs and how they interact with adjoining land uses. This is the primary purpose of the 2014 Kenton County Transportation Plan. Although the plan’s focus is Kenton County, the county’s leadership acknowledges that it is not an island. Sitting between Boone and Campbell counties, Kenton is positioned as the keystone in a strong economic alliance with its northern Kentucky neighbors and the entire OKI region. As such, this plan also considered the impacts of the I-71/75 corridor and the four Licking River bridges which provide linkages vital to Kenton County’s ability to connect not only to Northern Kentucky, but the entire Midwest, United States and Canadian/Mexican markets.

ABOUT OKI

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The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments (OKI) is committed to improving safe transit and transportation options across the region through collaboration, strategic planning and economic development. Each year, OKI invests approximately $40 million in federal funding for projects throughout the region. Its 117 members represent government, business and community groups from nearly 200 communities in the eight-county, three-state region. For more information, please visit www.oki.org.


Socio-EconomicFACTORS DevelopmentTRENDS Kenton County is the third most populated county in Kentucky with over 159,500 people.

Where and how people choose to live, work and play has a significant impact on existing and future transportation demand. In this plan, OKI and Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission applied population projections and demographic trends to serve as the foundation for assessing community growth patterns and multi-modal transportation needs. This plan seeks to strike a balance between existing and future needs to improve access and safety to areas of the county, especially to key employment, residential and commercial destinations. Over the past decade, the majority of residential growth has occurred south of I-275 in the cities of Independence and Erlanger, meanwhile the county’s established cities struggle to meet existing transportation challenges. During the course of developing this plan, it was determined that the residential land use areas displaying the highest potential future impact to the transportation network are located in central Kenton County in the vicinity of the KY 16 and KY 17 intersection. Nearly 4,000 acres of land could potentially be developed along the KY 16 and KY 536 corridors which would translate into over 9,000 new single-family detached households. Such an increase in households would potentially create a minimum of 86,000 additional vehicle trips per day on surrounding roads.

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Kenton County is the daytime home to approximately 61,500 employees with its key employment centers found at the crossroads of some of Northern Kentucky most congested transportation corridors.

Future Land Use Demands Future commercial and industrial areas have been identified in this plan based on information from previous plans, conversations with developers, and potential demand from new housing units. This non-residential land use analysis resulted in the identification of more than 2,600 potential industriallydeveloped acres along the U.S. 25 corridor, 250 commercial acres in the vicinity of KY 17 and KY 16, and approximately 135 redeveloped acres at junction of I-275/KY 236.

Socio-Economic Factors & Development Trends


County Transportation ASSETS Kenton County has a number of transportation advantages which make it attractive for residents and employers. 85% of TANK bus rides are to work or school and many begin and end with a walk or bike trip.

Kenton offers numerous north/south and east/west corridor travel options including: • Interstates 71/75 and 275 • Arterials: U.S. 25, KY 8, KY 1303, KY 17 and KY 16 • Collectors: KY 1072, KY 371, KY 236, KY 536 and KY 177 • Three Ohio River and four Licking River bridge crossings Kenton County residents tout the proximity of many neighborhoods to downtown Cincinnati and Covington which offer relatively short commute times in comparison to other parts of the region.

Kenton County has a strong, multi-modal transportation foundation upon which future investments can be made to connect even more communities. Bicycling, walking and bus transit provide alternatives for single-occupant vehicle travel. In addition to transportation and environmental benefits, these modes also contribute to personal health and quality of life, two very important issues heard during this planning process from residents, employers and community leaders.

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County Transportation CHALLENGES While the county’s transportation assets are strong, there are significant deficiencies which can impact mobility and safety which are key components for a high quality of life and strong economic stability.

LEGEND Peak Period Congestion

Although I-71/75 conveniently flows right through Kenton County, it is plagued by heavy, reoccurring congestion. Interstate slow-downs and emergencies, deflect thousands of commuters to alternate routes such as U.S. 25, KY 1303, KY 17 and KY 16 – thus greatly impacting mobility throughout the most developed and urbanized sections of Kenton County. As previously discussed, land use and socioeconomic demands will continue to place growing pressure for both maintenance and expansion of the transportation network especially in the center of the county where growth is anticipated, as well as all points north as commuters face their daily trips to the region’s major employment areas. Safety concerns exist for every community, however due in large part to impaired driving and speeding incidents, Kenton County ranks fifth in the state for most traffic safety problems. Unfortunately, these “human error” safety violations cannot be addressed with transportation improvements. This plan has worked to identify and address transportation related safety issues such as lack of bicycle or pedestrian accommodations, narrow travel lanes, poor geometrics, inadequate sight distances, and other physical design flaws of the roadway network.

County Transportation Assets & Challenges


The Planning PROCESS The planning process is more than a mere listing of roadway, bike, pedestrian and transit capital projects, rather it requires developing strategies for advancing the county’s long-term goals. Developing the final prioritized strategic recommendations of the Kenton County Transportation Plan was a year-long, step-by-step process.

Step 1:

Advisory Team and Public Involvement

This planning effort was directed by a sixteen member Advisory Team comprised of elected officials and professional, transportation staff from throughout the county. Thirteen of the members serve on the OKI Board of Directors. The additional members were suggested and added by Board members to compliment business, county planning and multi-modal transportation interests.

Kenton County Transportation Plan Advisory Team Members: Chair: Judge Steve Arlinghaus, Kenton County Fiscal Court Andrew Aiello, Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky Councilmember Nancy Atkinson, City of Edgewood Mayor Dan Bell, City of Taylor Mill Councilmember Thomas Cahill, City of Erlanger Mayor Sherry Carran, City of Covington Paul Darpel, Kenton County Planning Commission Rob Hans, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Mayor Marty Lenhof, City of Elsmere Mayor Mike Martin, City of Villa Hills Larry Maxey, Resident Jason Ramler, Kentucky Bicycle & Bikeway Commissioner Councilmember Christopher Reinersman, City of Independence David Spaulding, Esq., Northern Kentucky Water District Councilmember Bernie Wessels, City of Fort Wright Mayor Chris Wiest, City of Fort Mitchell In addition to the Advisory Team, vital input was received from the public. Public participation was continuous throughout the entire planning process, however two major outreach campaigns were made in Fall 2013 and Spring 2014. Every comment and question received assisted staff in creating and refining this plan.

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Step 2:

Existing and Future Conditions

Step 3:

Needs Assessment

Data on various transportation-related existing and future conditions was inventoried, updated by OKI with information from partnering agencies, and reviewed for accuracy. This comprehensive and collaborative effort generated a wealth of multi-modal transportation related performance data which was supplemented further by the Advisory Team and almost 500 individual public survey comments. Data was merged together and analyzed through a series of computer-driven and intensive, manual reviews to highlight those locations suffering from the most extensive multi-modal transportation needs.

Step 4:

Draft improvement recommendations were developed to address the specific transportation problems of each identified Needs Assessment location. Consideration was given to each recommendation, based on the enhancement and accommodation of all modes of transportation to serve the public welfare to the degree appropriate and based on the complexity of the transportation problems to be addressed.

Step 5:

After thorough study and discussion from the Advisory Team and over 350 public online views which yielded over 60 individual comments, further refinements were made to the initial draft recommendations. The Advisory Team then prioritized the list based on level of need and timing in an effort to maximize public benefit from future investments.

Draft Recommendations

Final Prioritized Plan Recommendations

The end result is a list of 65 recommendations that are separated into high, medium and low priority. The top third (22) recommendations are presented in detail due to their high priority status designation. It is noted that the remaining medium (22) and low (21) recommendations in this plan are also acknowledged as transportation needs for Kenton County.

The Planning Process


Decoursey Freight Corridor and Licking River Crossing Facilities: KY 177 (Decoursey Pike) or KY 1930 (Locust Pike) Location: - KY 1930 (Locust Pike) across Licking River to the Plum Street/Williams Way intersection - KY 1930 (Locust Pike)/Wards Lane intersection across Licking River to Rosewood Drive - KY 177 (Decoursey Pike) approximately 400 feet south of the KY 177/KY 1732 (Grand Avenue) intersection across Licking River to the Bancklick Road/Schneider Road intersection Jurisdictions: Covington, Taylor Mill, and Wilder (Campbell County)

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Existing and future data does not identify a congestion-related concern at this location.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for KY 177 exceeds state average for similar type roadways. • Crash records show heavy pedestrian and bicycle usage in residential neighborhoods located on KY 177 north of Grand Avenue and serious injuries caused from conflicts with cars and trucks. • Public comments focused primarily on safety for residential neighborhoods, narrow roadway widths and maintenance concerns for KY 177 and KY 1930 where trucks currently travel.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Progress Rail and Lally Pipe operate along KY 177 and KY 1930 south of I-275. Both businesses have voiced interest in expanding at their current locations, however poor truck access to and from I-275 provides a huge barrier to efficient operations and transport of freight materials. • South of Grand Avenue, KY 177 consists of residential properties on lots larger than one acre. • Twenty percent to 40 percent of the area is classified as low income.

MULTI-MODAL • KY 177 has 5.7 percent use by trucks which translates to an average daily volume of 153 trucks. • No TANK Fixed Bus Route service exists on KY 177 south of 45th Street. • The OKI Bike Route Guide recommends that bicyclists use caution when traveling KY 16. KY 177 is a recommended bicycling route.

Facility

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

KY 177 (Decoursey Pike) KY 1930

Urban Collector

2,700 (2010) and 5.7 percent trucks 1,400 (Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, 2012)

1.18

Local Road

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

9

Not available


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct a single connector road and bridge between KY 177 or KY 1930 and KY 9 to create a two lane roadway section comprised of two, 12-foot wide through lanes with six-foot shoulders. • Construct a 10-foot wide, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant, multiuse path on one side. • In no ranking order, three alternatives are proposed to connect KY 177 or KY 1930 with KY 9: °° Alignment option #1: KY 1930 across Licking River to the Plum Street/ Williams Way intersection °° Alignment option #2: KY 1930/Wards Lane intersection across Licking River to Rosewood Drive °° Alignment option #3: KY 177 approximately 400 feet south of the KY 177/ KY 1732 intersection across Licking River to the Bancklick Road/Schneider Road intersection

PROJECT BENEFITS

This recommendation is intended to improve east/west connectivity between KY 177 in Kenton County and KY 9 in Campbell County to support new economic development by shortening the distance from available industrial land to I-275 for truck traffic and passenger vehicles. Removal of trucks from Latonia neighborhoods will increase safety and quality of life for residents.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• All three alternatives include the construction of a new Licking River bridge crossing ranging in length from 1,034 to 1,993 feet in length. • Several short-term, less costly improvements have been examined by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and city of Covington with input from the Latonia Business Association and local residents. The consensus is that a long-term solution to freight access issues should be the focus of local, county and state resources.

COST ESTIMATE Planning

KY 1930 to Plum Street KY 1930 to Rosewood Drive KY 177 to Bancklick Road

Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

$3,000,000 $750,000

$1,000,000

$20,000,000 $24,750,000

$2,500,000 $750,000

$750,000

$16,000,000 $20,000,000

$1,500,000 $500,000

$500,000

TOTAL

$12,500,000 $15,000,000

Decoursey Freight Corridor and Licking River Crossing High Priority Recommendations


Dudley Road (KY 17 Intersection) Facility: Dudley Road Location: KY 17 (Madison Pike) intersection Municipality: Edgewood and Fort Wright

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• KY 17 is experiencing traffic congestion in the PM peak period only for the north and southbound lanes north of the intersection with Dudley Road. • KY 17 is experiencing traffic congestion in both AM and PM peak periods for the northbound lanes leading up to the Dudley Road intersection. • Dudley Road is displaying Level of Service “F” in both current (2010) and future (2040) years. • The Level of Service for KY 17 is projected to worsen from level “C” to “D” (south of the intersection with Dudley Road) and from level “D” to “F” (north of the intersection) by year 2040 without any improvements.

SAFETY

• Although the Critical Crash Rate for Dudley Road and KY 17 in this area does not exceed state of Kentucky average, a number of crashes have occurred at the intersection involving motorists and one or more serious injuries including a 2013 fatality. • Public comments from Kenton County Public School bus drivers referred to heavy congestion and safety problems due to the steep grade of Dudley Road at the intersection. One comment stated, “this road [KY 17] always backs up in the morning and afternoon.”

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• The area has an employment density of 1,000 to 5,000 employees per square mile. • The Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission (NKAPC) anticipates an increase in approximately 75 acres of commercial uses to the east of this intersection. • Residential neighborhoods are situated along Dudley Road and range from single family homes on lots greater than one acre to four units per acre. • Approximately one quarter mile south of the intersection, there exists the potential for 73 acres of increased commercial use.

MULTI-MODAL

• There are no sidewalks or crosswalks along either road or at the intersection. • TANK fixed bus route 31X travels KY 17 and 18X uses Dudley Road. • The OKI Bike Route Guide does not recommend use of Dudley Road and cautions use of KY 17.

Facilities

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

KY 17

Minor Urban Arterial

27,900 (2006)

Less than 1

Dudley Road

Urban Collector

8,200 (2006)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

11

Less than 1


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct dual left and one dedicated right turn lanes on Dudley Road at the KY 17 intersection. Include crosswalk for west leg of Dudley Road parallel to KY 17. • Evaluate and reconstruct as necessary the north terminus of KY 17’s north- and southbound concrete median for northbound KY 17 traffic making the left turn onto Dudley Road. • Construct deceleration lane on southbound KY 17 to Thornton’s entrance. Include removing existing rumble strips located in KY 17 shoulder.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• The recommendation project will improve congestion and safety concerns for motorists. • The improvement will compliment other Dudley Road and KY 17/I-275 projects that are underway or planned (TIP-NP2, TIP 6-288, and proposed 2013 Congestion Mitigation Air Quality application).

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Dudley Road’s steep slope will require special engineering solutions and stabilization of the hillside. • Right of way from surrounding businesses will require redesign of driveways and parking areas. • There is a surface drainage problem located in the southwest corner of the intersection.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$100,000

$50,000

$100,000

$750,000

$1,000,000

Dudley Road (KY 17 Intersection)

High Priority Recommendations


I-275 Westbound Ramp Facility: I-275 Location: I-275 westbound ramp to I-71/75 southbound Jurisdictions: Erlanger and Crestview Hills

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• The OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model forecasts the Level of Service (LOS) for all interstate segments included in this recommendation to worsen by year 2040 without improvements.

SAFETY

• I-275 westbound traffic heading southbound on I-75 must first merge with I-275 eastbound traffic heading south, then merge with I-75 southbound traffic exiting to KY 236. The existing three-lane collector-distributor creates a short, dangerous weave in a highly congested area during rush hour peak periods. • Over the past three years, this collector-distributor area has been the location of one reported crash with serious injuries in 2010.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• The old Showcase Cinemas site provides 135 acres for potential commercial redevelopment. • The area has a range of housing options from two to more than 10 units per acre. • Concentrations of low income populations ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent reside in neighborhoods located on the east side of the I-71/75 corridor in this area.

MULTI-MODAL • Several TANK fixed routes utilize these interstate segments including 1X and 19X which use the exits to KY 236 from the I-75 southbound collectordistributor.

Facilities

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

I-275 WB ramp to I-75 SB I-275 EB ramp to I-75 SB I-75 SB to KY 236

Urban Interstate

29,800 (2005)

Less than one

Urban Interstate

14,200 (2005)

Less than one

Urban Interstate

8,600 (2005)

Less than one

I-75 SB

Urban Interstate

176,800 (2013)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

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Less than one


RECOMMENDATION

• Project allows direct connections from I-75 southbound to both eastbound and westbound KY 236 without merging on the collector-distributor by braiding the I-75 southbound to KY 236 ramps below the I-275 ramps. • The merging of traffic from I-275 westbound and eastbound with exiting I-75 southbound traffic will be completely eliminated. The ramps from I-275 are recommended to fly over the exit ramps for I-75. There would be a connection from the flyover to the KY 236 and Donaldson Road off ramps to allow for I-275 traffic to exit at KY 236 and Donaldson Road in Boone County.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• Utilities are not expected to be impacted. • Minimizing the weaving of motorists will reduce congestion and the potential for crashes.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• This recommendation will involve significant bridge construction. • Right of way will be minimally impacted. The former Showcase Cinemas will require full acquisition of its more than 135 acres and Pet Suites may be impacted. • The maintenance of traffic planning to keep the interchanges open through construction will be challenging. • Vertical changes will require longitudinal distance to achieve the heights and match with existing roadways. • This improvement will involve Kenton and Boone counties working in partnership with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$3,600,000

$5,000,000

$15,000,000

$26,400,000

$50,000,000

I-275 Westbound Ramp

High Priority Recommendations


KY 1072 (Highland Pike/Kyles Lane) Facility: KY 1072 (Highland Pike and Kyles Lane) Location: KY 17 (Madison Pike) to I-71/75 northbound on and off ramps Municipality: Fort Wright

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• KY 1072 serves as a critical north/south, non-interstate connection between KY 17, I-71/75 and U.S. 25. It experiences traffic congestion during peak hours. Residents state that the two-way, left turn lane north of KY 3187 greatly assists left turns onto KY 1072 during peak hours. • The TANK garage and operating center is located at the southern terminus of KY 1072 on KY 17. Heavy congestion often causes operation delays, resulting in lower on-time transit performance.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for KY 1072 south of the KY 3187 intersection exceeds state averages. • KY 1072 contains multiple residential driveways and non-signalized side street intersections. Between 2010 and 2012, there have been two reported crashes which involved a single vehicle striking and causing serious injury to a pedestrian during weekday peak congestion time while making left turns on to or off of KY 1072. Both reports state distracted driving as a factor. Fort Wright officials report frequent police ticketing of northbound high speed violations.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Preservation of the residential character, enhanced quality of life for residents, and stabilization of property values are important to the city of Fort Wright. • Diverse housing options exist from single family to multi-family, rental properties. • Elderly persons comprise 20 percent to 40 percent of the neighborhoods southeast of KY 1072.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks exist on both sides of KY 1072 to Werner Drive. South of Werner Drive, sidewalks exist only on the west side of the roadway to KY 17 due to a 400-foot landslide and steep topography. • The only signalized crosswalks spanning KY 1072 are located at the I-71/75 ramps, Henry Clay Avenue, and KY 3187 intersections. • Existing TANK fixed bus routes 5 and 30X use KY 1072 with multiple bus stops in both directions. • There are no dedicated bike facilities and the OKI Bike Route recommends use of KY 1072 south of the KY 3187 intersection, but encourages cyclists to “use caution” north of the intersection.

Facilities

KY 1072 north of KY 3187 KY 1072 south of KY 3187

Functional Class

Minor Urban Arterial Minor Urban Arterial

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

18,800 (KYTC, 2010)

1.05

27,200 (KYTC, 2011)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

15

Less than one


RECOMMENDATION

• Restripe the three-lane segment of KY 1072 from just south of the existing northbound left turn lane into the municipal building’s parking lot at KY 3187 intersection to a minimum distance of 100 feet south of Reeves Drive. The newly striped segment will consist of a southbound through lane, northbound through lane, and a center twoway, left turn lane. • Reconstruct a right turn lane from northbound KY 1072 to eastbound KY 3187 at the intersection. • Install signage to notify motorists that they are entering a residential area with reduced speed limit, pedestrians, and vehicles entering and exiting the roadway.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• The two-way, left turn lane provides safe left turns to and from every neighborhood street. • The two-way, left turn lane also removes turning vehicles out of the flow of through traffic to improve the flow of north and south bound KY 1072 traffic. • Cost of these improvements is low for the potential public benefit.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet does not support removal of the second northbound lane due to current and projected traffic volumes which may create longer queues towards KY 17. • Northbound motorists will no longer have the long, dedicated right turn lane onto KY 3187. • The alignment of Lorup Avenue and Beaumont Court and introduction of a new traffic signal was considered and found not warranted based on current traffic volumes as part of this data analysis. • There is a surface drainage problem located in the southwest corner of the intersection.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$90,000

$60,000

$50,000

$500,000

$700,000

KY 1072 (Highland Pike/Kyles Lane)

High Priority Recommendations


KY 1501 (Hands Pike) Phase I Facility: KY 1501 (Hands Pike) Location: Crystal Lake Drive to Otter Drive Jurisdictions: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Existing and future data does not identify a congestion-related concern on this roadway.

SAFETY

• Current and projected future residential growth on Hands Pike and surrounding areas along KY 17 and KY 16 will place greater travel demands on this east/west connector, thus requiring a continuation of current improvements to enhance safety. • The Critical Crash Rate for KY 1501 from Crystal Lake Drive to Tripoli Lane exceeds state averages for similar type roadways by almost one and a half. • Kenton County Public School bus drivers shared that, “Hands Pike has a dangerous curve, slippery surface, narrow lanes with deep shoulders. Nearly every time it rains, cars slip and cause accidents. The lanes need to be widened and the speed needs to be controlled with warning lights.” • Online survey response noted concern regarding pedestrian safety. “We would love to see sidewalks or berms that you could walk to pick up the litter without dire concern for being hit by flying vehicles going up and down the hill.”

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• The Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission states the potential for approximately 1,200 acres of residential development just south of the KY 1501 intersection at KY 16. Full development would yield approximately 3,300 singlefamily homes. • It should be noted that a current project (TIP 6-8307.1) is relocating KY 1501 to meet KY 17 at its junction with KY 3035 (Old Madison Pike). KY 1501 is being improved as far east as Crystal Lake Drive. • Residential neighborhoods along KY 1501 range primarily from one to four units per acre.

MULTI-MODAL

• There is no TANK Fixed Bus service. • A few short segments of sidewalks exist between Crystal Lake Drive and Otter Drive, but they are riddled with inconsistent gaps. • Two crosswalk pavement markings exist at Tamarack Drive and Otter Drive. Neither crosswalks traverse KY 1501, but rather serve for crossing at the mouths of these two residential neighborhoods. • The OKI Bike Route Guide does not recommend the entire corridor for usage.

Facility

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count* Critical Crash Rate Factor

KY 1501 (Crystal Lake Drive to Otter Drive)

Urban Collector

8,800 (2010)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

17

1.68


RECOMMENDATION

• Reconstruct KY 1501 to create two, 11-foot wide travel lanes and eight-foot shoulders (six feet paved and two feet gravel) to improve safety and eliminate any geometric deficiencies. • Construct sidewalks on both sides of KY 1501 along the entire corridor. Include American with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant curb ramps with truncated domes at drive ways and intersections. • Create crosswalks at key residential intersections (Tripoli Lane and Blue Ridge Drive) to link new or existing sidewalks on south side of Hands Pike to north side residential neighborhoods.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• Continue previous investment (TIP 6-8307.1) to improve safety for all modes along the corridor. • Eliminate geometric deficiencies for improved travel.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Additional right of way will be needed to widen lanes, create shoulders, construct sidewalks, and straighten traffic flow to minimize dangerous curves. .

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$750,000

$300,000

$4,000,000

$3,100,000

$8,150,000

Kentucky 1501 (Hands Pike) Phase I

High Priority Recommendations


KY 17 Bike Sharrows Facility: KY 17 Municipality: Covington Location: Scott and Greenup streets between East 20th Street and KY 8 (East Fourth Street) East 20th Street between Madison Avenue and Greenup Street

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Congestion data shows that KY 17 mainly experiences traffic congestion during PM peak. • The OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model projects that the Level of Service (LOS) for KY 17 corridors in Covington will worsen from current levels “B” and “C” to “F” by year 2040, if no improvements are made.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for all segments of KY 17 in downtown Covington far exceeds the state average for other similar type roadways. • Between 2010 and 2012, 11 crashes with serious injury occurred involving bicyclists and 14 involving pedestrians.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density in the project area is more than 5,000 employees per square mile. • Some of Kenton County’s most densely populated neighborhoods are located in this corridor ranging in housing densities of more than 10 units per acre. • The mix of commercial and residential uses along with densely developed parcels creates a strong need for on-street parking along KY 17. • Concentrations of elderly populations range in density from 20 percent to 40 percent at the northern end of KY 17. • Concentrations of disabled populations range in density as high as 40 percent to 60 percent in some areas along the KY 17 corridors in Covington. • Concentrations of low income populations and zero car households ranging in density from as high as 60 percent to 100 percent reside in areas of this vital north/ south corridor.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks are provided on both sides of KY 17 with crosswalks at every intersection. • TANK fixed bus routes numbers 8, 9, and 33 operate along KY 17 with frequent stops at almost every cross street. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities.

Facilities

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

KY 17 (Scott Street) KY 17 (Greenup Street) KY 17 (East 20th Street)

Principle Urban Arterial Principle Urban Arterial Principle Urban Arterial

6,400 (2006)

6.27

6,200 (2009)

5.01

5,000-14,999 (2012 estimate)

2.50

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

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RECOMMENDATION

• Paint sharrows or shared lane pavement markings along KY 17 right lanes at a distance of every eight feet or immediately following an intersection. The total length is approximately three miles. ºº For city blocks with onstreet parking, place sharrow markings at least 11 feet from the curb. ºº For city blocks without on-street parking, place sharrow markings at least four feet from the curb. ºº The sharrow markings can be placed farther into the lane than the minimum distance stated above, if the lane is too narrow for side-by-side operation of a bicycle and motor vehicle. • Install signage in several locations along the segments to alert motorists

of the roadway’s shared usage with bicyclists.

PROJECT BENEFITS • Motorist awareness of bicyclists will be improved, thereby increasing safety for all modes traveling these urban, high volume corridors.

PROJECT CHALLENGES • Due to right of way limitations and narrow lane widths, bike lanes are not recommended. • Maintenance of debris and catch basin clutter will need to be performed regularly to ensure safe bicycle travel.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Right of Way

Utilities

Construction

TOTAL

$5,000

$0

$0

$33,000

$38,000

KY 17 BIKE SHARROWS

High Priority Recommendations


KY 371 (Orphanage/Buttermilk Alignment) Facility: KY 371 (Orphanage Road and Buttermilk Pike) Location: U.S. 25 intersections to just north of Stevie’s Ridge Road Municipality: Fort Mitchell

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model forecasts the Level of Service for Orphanage to worsen from “B” to “E,” Buttermilk Pike from “B” to “F,” and U.S 25 in this segment to remain “F” in 2040. • Vehicles traveling east and westbound on KY 371 block U.S. 25 intersections causing motorists in all directions to be “trapped” and unable to proceed within a traffic signal cycle.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for Orphanage Road exceeds state average. In 2010, a pedestrian was struck and suffered injuries at the Orphanage Road/U.S. 25 intersection.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• This location boasts one of Northern Kentucky’s most vibrant and historic commercial hubs. • Numerous business driveways exist in extremely close proximity to both U.S. 25 intersections. • Future commercial growth at I-71/75 and KY 17 may add additional traffic volume to KY 371. • Diverse housing options exist from single family to multi-family, rental properties.

MULTI-MODAL

• U.S. 25 carries TANK’s most heavily used fixed bus route (1) with stops within this project area. • Signalized crosswalks exist at both KY 371 intersections at U.S. 25. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities. The OKI Bike Route Guide recommends use with caution for Buttermilk and Dixie, however Orphanage Road is not recommended for bike travel.

Facilities

KY 371 (Orphanage Road) KY 371 (Buttermilk Pike) U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway)

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

Minor Urban Arterial Minor Urban Arterial

15,000 (KYTC, 2010)

Less than 1

22,200 (KYTC, 2012)

Less than 1

Urban Collector

8,900 ( KYTC, 2011)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

21

1.74


RECOMMENDATION

• Align KY 371 (Orphanage Road) to existing KY 371 (Buttermilk Pike) and U.S. 25 intersection by construction an approximate 1,400-foot, three-lane curbed roadway with two-way left turn lane. • Include five-foot wide sidewalks on both sides. Include American with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant curb ramps with truncated domes at drive ways and new intersection. • Provide dedicated, 200-foot right and left turn only lanes on the new road for U.S. 25-bound traffic. • Close Huckleberry Hill at U.S. 25. Huckleberry Hill access at Plantation Drive will be maintained. • Transition new roadway to a two-lane section with dedicated left turn only lane at Plantation Drive. • Dead-end or cul-de-sac existing Orphanage Road just west of where the new facility will make its transition. Plantation Drive will provide access between existing and new Orphanage roads. • Remove traffic signal at the Orphanage/Dixie intersection and replace with a stop sign on Orphanage.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• Improved east/west connector between I- 71/75, U.S. 25 and KY 17 corridors all of which support numerous Kenton County population and employment centers. Enhanced traffic flow for U.S. 25. • Preservation of established businesses, consolidation of existing driveways and addition of enhanced multi-modal facilities will create a safer, more pedestrian-friendly commercial area.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Due to the steep slope on the east side of U.S. 25 and the need to provide proper sight distance, the new roadway will require substantial fill that may impact adjacent properties. • With this conceptual planning level recommendation, acquisition of approximately nine full and four partial properties may be needed which would require substantial relocation costs. • Right of way limitations and topography along Orphanage prevent the inclusion of bike lanes.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$300,000

$1,000,000

$9,000,000

$2,200,000

$12,500,000

KY 371 (Orphange/Buttermilk Alignment) High Priority Recommendations


KY 536 Construction Facilities: KY 536 (Mt. Zion, Bristow and Shaw roads) Location: Boone County Line to KY 17 (Madison Pike) – (TIP 6-162) Jurisdictions: Independence and Kenton County

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• KY 536 experiences some traffic congestion during AM and PM peak periods at three major intersections (KY 1303, KY 2045 and KY 17). • Several online survey responses referred to the problem of congestion due to the high demand for the roadway.

SAFETY

• Crash data does not identify a safety-related concern within this segment of KY 536.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Housing density along the KY 536 corridor is a majority of single family homes on one or more acres. • Concentrations of elderly ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent reside in Independence in a large area centered on KY 17 between KY 536 and KY 16. • The city of Independence has grown 65 percent from a population of 14,982 in 2000 to 24,757 in 2010. If the population growth continues to follow this dramatic trend, the city could see an additional 27,000 residents by 2040. • The Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission states the potential for approximately 9,000 new homes and 250 acres of commercial future land use potential to the south of KY 2045 along KY 536.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks only exist on a small section of KY 536 at the KY 17 intersection. • There is no TANK service along the corridor. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities. The OKI Bike Route Guide recommends cyclists use caution when traveling KY 536.

KY 536 Segments

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

Boone County Line to KY 17

Minor Urban Arterial

6,000 (2009)

Less than one

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

23


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct improvements to KY 536 between the Boone County Line and KY 17 as designed in TIP 6-162 including a multi-use path for bicyclists and pedestrians.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• KY 536 is a critical east-west route in terms of mobility, connectivity and economic vitality for Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties however, its existing conditions are substandard and disjointed. These recommendations will improve safety and mobility options for people and goods and enhance the integration and connectivity of the transportation system to support economic vitality.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• TIP 6-162 includes funding for all phases of KY 536 improvements between the Boone County Line and KY 17 except construction. Therefore, additional funding is needed to complete this segment of the project.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Right of Way

Utilities

Construction

TOTAL

$0

$0

$0

$48,000,000*

$48,000,000

* Following TIP 6-162, this cost estimate includes improvements to KY 1303 from Beechgrove Elementary School to KY 536.

KY 536 Construction

High Priority Recommendations


KY 536 Scoping Study Facilities: KY 536 (Harris, Staffordsburg, Visalia and CreekTrace roads) Location: KY 17 (Madison Pike) to the Licking River Jurisdictions: Independence and Kenton County

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• KY 536 experiences some traffic congestion during AM and PM peak periods at the KY 17 intersection. The bridge across the Licking River shows only PM peak congestion for westbound KY 536 traffic at the KY 177 intersection. • Several online survey responses referred to the problem of congestion due to the high demand for the roadway.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for KY 536 between KY 16 and KY 177 exceeds state average by more than three times that of other similar type roadways. • At the November 21, 2013 meeting held with the South Kenton Citizens Group, many residents voiced concern regarding safety on the portion of KY 536 east of KY 16 due to narrow lane width, curves and hilly terrain.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Housing density along the KY 536 corridor is a majority of single family homes on one or more acres. • Concentrations of elderly ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent reside in Independence in a large area centered on KY 17 between KY 536 and KY 16. • Concentrations of disabled populations ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent reside in the eastern portion of KY 536. • The city of Independence has grown 65 percent from a population of 14,982 in 2000 to 24,757 in 2010. If the population growth continues to follow this dramatic trend, the city could see an additional 27,000 residents by 2040. • The Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission states the potential for approximately 9,000 new homes and 250 acres of commercial future land use potential to the south of KY 2045 along KY 536. • Topography in the eastern portions of KY 536 becomes more riddled with steep grades and sharp, winding curves at the eastern end approaching the Licking River.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks only exist on a small section of KY 536 at the KY 17 intersection. • There is no TANK service along the corridor. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities. The OKI Bike Route Guide recommends cyclists use caution when traveling KY 536.

KY 536 Segments

Functional Class

KY 16 to KY 177

Major Rural Collector

KY 17 to KY 16

Urban Collector

Average Daily Traffic Count* 4,000 (Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, 2010) 2,000 (2012)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

25

Critical Crash Rate Factor Less than one 3.36


RECOMMENDATION

• Conduct a scoping study for the KY 536 corridor between KY 17 and the Licking River to identify two to three roadway alternatives, cost estimates for design, right of way, utilities, construction phases, and environmental and social red flags.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• KY 536 is a critical east-west route in terms of mobility, connectivity and economic vitality for Boone, Kenton and Campbell counties however, its existing conditions are substandard and disjointed. These recommendations will improve safety and mobility options for people and goods and enhance the integration and connectivity of the transportation system to support economic vitality.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• The section of KY 536 from KY 17 to the Licking River is particularly challenging due to topographic conditions and environmental elements which will add to project costs.

COST ESTIMATE Planning

$300,000

Design $0

Utilities $0

Right of Way $0

Construction $0

KY 536 Scoping Study

High Priority Recommendations

TOTAL

$300,000


KY 8 (Fifth Street Widening) Facility: KY 8 (Fifth Street) Location: I-71/75 northbound off ramp to U.S. 25 (Main Street) Municipality: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• KY 8 experiences traffic congestion during AM peak between the interstate and U.S. 25.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for KY 8 exceeds state average by more than seven times that of other similar type roadways. • Over the past three years, the section of KY 8 between the I-71/75 off ramp and U.S. 25 has been the location of crashes with serious injuries involving one bicyclist and one pedestrian.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density in the project area is more than 5,000 employees per square mile. • U.S. 25 provides access to Covington’s historic Mainstrasse area with shops, restaurants, bars, and single- and multi-family residences. • Concentrations of elderly, low income populations, and zero car households ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent reside in the blocks adjacent to this intersection.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks and crosswalks exist on both sides of KY 8 except for a gap on the south side between the I-71/75 off ramp and Philadelphia Street. • TANK bus routes, 1X, 2X, 17X, 28X, 42X, and the Southbank Shuttle use this segment of KY 8 and have stops at each intersection. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities and the OKI Bike Route Guide encourages cyclists to use KY 8 with caution.

Facilities

KY 8 (Fifth Street)

Functional Class

Principle Urban Arterial I-71/75 northbound Urban Interstate ramp to KY 8

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

8,600 (2006)

Less than one

11,000 (2006)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

27

7.32


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct an approximate 900-foot, additional 11-foot wide lane on KY 8 between I-71/75 and U.S. 25. • Reconstruct five-foot wide sidewalk along new road lane to maintain pedestrian access. • Construct an approximate 230-foot long, five-foot wide new sidewalk to link existing facilities between I-71/75 off ramp and Philadelphia Street.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• A project is already underway (OKI Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) project # 6-3703) to widen KY 8 (Fourth Street) from Philadelphia to the I-71/75. This recommendation is the companion project to TIP 6-3703 which will add additional capacity and help ease traffic congestion by providing improved access between I-71/75 and downtown Covington. • By improving traffic congestion and retaining sidewalks, safety will be enhanced as well.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• This recommendation includes right of way acquisition and utility impacts.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$500,000

$600,000

$3,200,000

$4,000,000

$8,300,000

KY 8 (Fifth Street Widening)

High Priority Recommendations


KY 8 (Fourth Street) Bridge Facilities: KY 8 (Fourth Street) Location: KY 8 (Garrard Street) to the Licking River Jurisdictions: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• The bridge experiences high traffic congestion during both AM and PM peak periods. • The OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model shows the Level of Service (LOS) for Fourth Street as level “F” by year 2040 in both current (2010) and future (2040) years.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate exceeds state average for similar type roadways by almost three times. • Public comments included high concern regarding safety including insufficient crossing time and motorists not observing pedestrian traffic signal. One response noted, “I have had problems with close passing and sometimes aggressive drivers on the Licking River Bridge.” • Existing bridge has a current sufficiency rating of 45.1 and is classified as functionallyobsolete.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density in the project area is more than 5,000 employees per square mile. • Historic structures located on Garrard and Fourth streets are currently used as residential and commercial/office buildings. The existing truss bridge was built in 1936. • Established, dense urban, neighborhoods provide various housing options from single family on less than one acre lots to multi-family, rental properties of more than 10 units. • Elderly, low income populations, and zero-car households comprise 20 percent to 40 percent of the neighborhoods within a five-block radius of the Fourth Street Bridge.

MULTI-MODAL

• The bridge and sidewalk network are heavily used by pedestrians, transit riders, and bicyclists. • Sidewalks on the current bridge are very narrow making passage dangerous and difficult. • Signalized crosswalks exist at all KY 8 intersections. • Transit service does not operate currently, however TANK’s five year plan includes a fixed route with direct connection between Newport and Covington via the Fourth Street Bridge. • The OKI Bike Route Guide recommends that bicyclists use KY 8 with caution.

Facility

Functional Class

KY 8 (Fourth Street)

Principal Urban Arterial KY 8 (Garrard Street) Principal Urban Arterial

Average Daily Traffic Count*

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

29

Critical Crash Rate Factor

17,600 (Kentucky 2.80 Transportation Cabinet, 2012) 6,700 (Kentucky Less than 1 Transportation Cabinet, 2011)


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct a new, 1,300-foot long Fourth Street Bridge with four, 11-foot wide lanes with shoulders and curb and gutter. Design will consider inclusion of a truss structure to preserve historic integrity. • Bridge weight allowance and width will enable potential future use by 40-foot transit bus vehicles. • Multi-modal (bicycle and pedestrian) usage of the bridge will be included either as: °° One, 10-foot wide multi-use path constructed along the north side and one, five-foot wide sidewalk constructed along the south side of the new bridge or °° A separate 10-foot wide multi-use path structure located to the north of the existing bridge. • Create connections to Riverfront Commons and the Licking River Greenway Trail.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• This is an investment in the maintenance and multi-modal safety of KY 8 which serves as the most northern of only four bridge crossings between Kenton and Campbell counties. • Bicycle and pedestrian safety will be improved for an area where zero car households, elderly, low income, minority and disability reside and rely upon alternative modes of transportation. • Improvements will enhance the Northern Kentucky multi-modal trail network by connecting Riverfront Commons and the Licking River Greenway Trail for recreational and commuter use.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Two alternatives for accommodating future multi-modal accommodations were provided due to the challenge of funding and public support to implement this element of the recommendation. • Bridge is located within a Historic District. This factor along with a crossing of the Licking River will require special consideration and additional costs in order to preserve and address challenges. • Due to the steep slopes and environmental considerations for stabilizing riverbanks, special design and planning will be required to minimize environmental impacts.

COST ESTIMATE Alternatives

Design

Utilities

Right of Way

New Bridge with $4,000,000 $2,000,000 $2,000,000 Multi-Use Path New Multi-Use $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000 Path Bridge Only New Bridge Only $3,500,000 $1,000,000 $1,500,000

Construction

TOTAL

$5,500,000

$10,000,000

$26,000,000 $34,000,000

$24,000,000 $30,000,000

KY 536 Construction

High Priority Recommendations


KY 8 (Fourth Street Widening) Facility: KY 8 (Fourth Street) Location: U.S. 25 (Main Street) to Philadelphia Street Municipality: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• KY 8 experiences traffic congestion in both AM and PM peak periods. • The OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model forecasts the Level of Service (LOS) for KY 8 east of U.S. 25 to worsen from level “D” to “F” by year 2040, if no improvements are made.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for KY 8 east of U.S. 25 exceeds state average by almost three times. • The Critical Crash Rate for KY 8 west of U.S. 25 is two times state average for other similar type roadways.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density in the project area is more than 5,000 employees per square mile. • Concentrations of elderly, low income populations, and zero car households ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent reside in the blocks around the KY 8 corridor.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks and crosswalks exist on both sides of KY 8. • Several TANK fixed bus routes use this segment of KY 8. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities and the OKI Bike Route Guide recommends cyclists use caution.

Facilities

KY 8 (west of U.S. 25) KY 8 (east of U.S. 25)

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Principle Urban 29,800 (Kentucky Arterial Transportation Cabinet, 2010) Principle Urban 17,800 (Kentucky Arterial Transportation Cabinet, 2011)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

31

Critical Crash Rate Factor 2.00 2.93


RECOMMENDATION

• Due to the location of a major railroad bridge pier located on the northwest corner of KY 8 (Fourth Street) and U.S. 25, the following two recommendations are provided for consideration. One, not both, would be pursued as the improvement for adding one lane to KY 8: °° Option A: Create a new dedicated right turn lane from the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge to KY 8 (Fourth Street). This new turn lane will be designed to fit between two structural railroad bridge piers located on the northwest corner of the KY 8 and U.S. 25 intersection. The dedicated right turn lane will be 11 feet wide with curb and gutter. °° Option B: Install new structural support to the CSX railroad bridge and remove existing piers and footing located on the northwest corner of the KY 8 (Fourth Street) and U.S. 25 intersection. Construct a dedicated right turn lane from the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge to KY 8. • From the new, dedicated Clay Wade Bailey right turn lane, construct an approximate 450-foot additional 11-foot wide lane with curb and gutter on the north side of KY 8 to Philadelphia Street. • Reconstruct five-foot wide sidewalk and crosswalks at intersections along the north side of KY 8 between U.S. 25 and Philadelphia Street to maintain pedestrian access.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• A project is already underway (OKI Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) project number 6-3703) to widen KY 8 (Fourth Street) from Philadelphia Street to the I-71/75 on ramp. This recommendation is the companion project to TIP 6-3703 which will add additional capacity and help ease traffic congestion by providing improved access along the westbound KY 8 corridor. • By improving traffic congestion and retaining sidewalks, safety will be enhanced.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• This recommendation includes significant right of way acquisition and utility impacts. • This recommendation will require coordination with CSX railroad.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$3,000,000

$5,000,000

$5,000,000

$15,000,000

$28,000,000

KY 8 Fourth Street Widening

High Priority Recommendations


KY 8 (Third Street Intersection) Facility: KY 8 (Crescent Avenue) Location: KY 2374 (West Third Street) intersection Municipality: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• KY 8 north of KY 2374 experiences traffic congestion in both the AM and PM peak periods. KY 8 south of the intersection experiences congestion only during PM peak.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for KY 8 exceeds state average for similar type roadways. • Crash records for 2010 to 2012 show that motorists are distracted whether due to congestion, narrow road lane widths, sharp curves or hilly terrain and are not always looking for bicyclists and pedestrians that frequently also travel this area. • Public comments noted concern regarding safety for both motorists and bicyclists due to high speeds, hilly terrain heading eastbound on KY 8 and narrow travel lanes for shared modes. Also, congestion was stated as a huge problem for “It takes me longer to get from Ludlow to the expressway than the rest of my trip (including parking and walking to my office)!”

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Commuters use this intersection to travel to and from downtown Covington where employment density is more than 5,000 employees per square mile. • Established, dense urban, residential neighborhoods provide various housing options from single family on less than one acre lots to multi-family, rental properties of as many as 10 units. • Low income populations, disabled persons, and zero car households comprise 20 percent to 40 percent of the neighborhoods adjacent to this intersection.

MULTI-MODAL

• TANK Fixed Bus Route 3 travels KY 8 and uses this intersection to head eastward on Third Street. • Two TANK bus stops exist near the intersection for eastbound and westbound Route 3. • Regulated crosswalks and sidewalks exist on all three sides of the existing intersection. • The OKI Bike Route Guide recommends KY 8 to Third Street as a preferred route for bicyclists.

Facilities KY 8

KY 2374

Functional Class

Minor Urban Arterial Urban Collector

Average Daily Traffic Count*

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

33

Critical Crash Rate Factor

11,700 (Kentucky 1.44 Transportation Cabinet, 2012) 15,600 (Kentucky Less than 1 Transportation Cabinet, 2010)


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct a roundabout at the intersection. • Enhance crosswalk markings at all three access points to the roundabout and create median refuges. • Install signage for advance warning to drivers approaching the roundabout. • Paint pavement striping, arrows and other helpful directional tools to assist motorists in accommodating the roundabout and to be watchful of pedestrians and bicyclists.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• Roundabout will help ease congestion by creating free-flow traffic patterns. • Improved safety for motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists and transit riders. • Improved air quality, noise reduction and visual aesthetics for local residents and businesses will be realized by eliminating long lines of idling commuter traffic waiting to turn onto and off of KY 8.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Steep embankment to the property immediately west and adjacent to the intersection. Cut and stabilization of the hillside would be needed for additional space for roundabout. • Additional right of way will be needed from surrounding business owners which will require redesign of their access drives and parking areas. • Utility line in right of way along west side of KY 8 will require relocation. • Timing and construction of this project in lieu of desired Brent Spence Bridge improvements. Ensure no investments are made that will be changed or diminished by future Bridge construction.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$200,000

$500,000

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

$2,700,000

KY 8 Third Street Intersection

High Priority Recommendations


KY 8 Bike Sharrows Facility: KY 8 (Fourth, Fifth and Garrard streets) Location: KY 8 (Fourth Street) between Philadelphia Street and the Licking River KY 8 (Fifth Street) between KY 8 (Crescent Avenue) and Garrard Street KY 8 (Garrard Street) between KY 8 (Fifth and Fourth streets) Municipality: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Congestion data shows that Fifth Street mainly experiences traffic congestion during PM peak, whereas Fourth Street shows more extensive congestion during both AM and PM peaks. • The OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model projects that the Level of Service (LOS) for both KY 8 corridors in Covington will worsen from current levels “B” and “C” to “D” by year 2040, if no improvements are made.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for Fourth Street exceeds state average by almost three times. • The Critical Crash Rate for Fifth Street is more than eight times the state average for other similar type roadways. • Between 2010 and 2012, six crashes with serious injury occurred involving bicyclists and 13 involving pedestrians.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density in the project area is more than 5,000 employees per square mile including the IRS Center which employs approximately 4,000 people. • Concentrations of elderly, low income populations, and zero car households ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent reside in the blocks lining the KY 8 corridors. • KY 8 (Fourth Street) provides a connection west from Newport across Covington to I-75.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks are provided on both sides of KY 8 with regulated crosswalks at every intersection. • A number of TANK fixed bus routes operate along KY 8 to reach the Covington Transit Center. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities and the OKI Bike Route Guide recommends cyclists use caution when riding KY 8.

Facilities

Functional Class

KY 8 (Fourth Street) Principle Urban Arterial KY 8 (Fifth Street) Principle Urban Arterial KY 17 (Garrard St) Principal Urban Arterial

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

11,500 (2006)

8.78

6,700 (Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, 2011)

Less than 1

13,700 (2006)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

35

2.80


RECOMMENDATION

• Paint sharrows or shared lane pavement markings in right lanes of KY 8 and Garrard Street every 200 feet or immediately following an intersection. The total length of the improvement is approximately two miles. °° For city blocks with on-street parking, place sharrow pavement markings at least 11 feet from the curb. °° For city blocks without on-street parking, place sharrow pavement markings at least four feet from the curb. °° The sharrow pavement markings can be placed farther into the lane than the minimum distance stated above, if the lane is too narrow for side-byside operation of a bicycle and motor vehicle.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• Motorist awareness of bicyclists will be improved, thereby increasing safety for all modes traveling these urban, high volume corridors.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Due to right of way limitations and narrow lane widths, bike lanes are not recommended. • Maintenance of debris and catch basin clutter will need to be performed regularly to ensure safe bicycle travel.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$5,000

$0

$0

$22,000

$27,000

KY 8 Bike Sharrows

High Priority Recommendations


Licking River Greenway Trail Phase III Municipality: Covington Location: Randolph (East 8th and Garrard streets) to Austinburg Neighborhood (East 15th Street and Eastern Avenue) parks

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Although Level of Service (LOS) only measures the impact of motorized vehicles, the LOS for KY 17 (Greenup Street) is projected to worsen from level “D” to “F” by year 2040.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rates for the section of KY 17 (Greenup Street) in closest proximity to Randolph and Austinburg Neighborhood parks far exceed state safety average by more than six times for similar type roadways. Crash records from 2010 to 2012 for this portion of KY 17 show a total of six crashes involving pedestrians and two involving bicyclists. • Online survey responses included high concern regarding the physical limitations, conflict with motorized vehicles, and maintenance of roadways for safe bike travel along north/south corridors such as KY 17. One comment shared stated, “I have found the roads too dangerous (too narrow with no shoulder) and drivers too unaware and aggressive for safe biking.”

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density ranges from 1,000 to more than 5,000 employees per square mile. • Established, dense urban, residential neighborhoods provide various housing options from single family on less than one acre lots to multi-family, rental properties of 10 or more units. • Elderly, disabled populations, and zero-car households comprise 20 percent to 40 percent of the neighborhoods adjacent to the proposed Licking River Trail within biking and walking distances. • Concentrations of low income populations range as high as 100 percent in this area. • Several downtown Covington and Newport development projects have the opportunity of creating a higher demand for pedestrian and bicycle accommodations. The Jacob Price community is currently being redeveloped in the vicinity of 12th and Greenup streets. Gateway College is renovating several buildings in downtown Covington. The Ovation development in Newport is just across the Licking River.

MULTI-MODAL

• On street parking exists along much of KY 17 (Greenup Street). • Signalized crosswalks and sidewalks exist at almost every intersection along KY 17. • Numerous TANK bus stops exist on other north/south corridors running parallel to the Licking River leading into downtown Covington and the Transit Center. • The OKI Bike Route Guide recommends KY 17 as a preferred bicycle route.

Facilities

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

KY 17 (Greenup Street )

Principal Urban Arterial

6,400 (2006)

6.27

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

37


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct Phase III of the Licking River Greenway Trail which includes an approximate three quarter mile long, 10-foot wide, multi-use paved path on top of the earthen levee between Randolph and Austinburg Neighborhood parks.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• This next phase of the Licking River Trail system builds off of investments that are underway or already completed and are part of a comprehensive north/south trail plan for Northern Kentucky by the Regional Trail Alliance. • Continuation of the Licking River Trail will provide both healthy recreational facilities and introduce a safer route and mobility option for bicycling commuters traveling north/south in Kenton County.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Due to the steep slopes and environmental considerations for stabilizing riverbanks, special design and planning will be required to minimize environmental impacts. • Breaks in the earthen levee at the 12th Street Bridge present special design solutions. The path will need to descend from the levee to an elevation below the 12th Street Bridge on the east side of the levee or go around the 12th Street Bridge at street/ground-level on the west side of the levee.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Right of Way

Utilities

Construction

TOTAL

funded

completed

completed

$200,000

$200,000

Licking River Greenway Trail Phase III High Priority Recommendations


Madison Avenue / KY 17 Transit Corridor Facility: Madison Avenue/KY 17 (Madison Pike) Location: Covington Transit Center (CTC) in downtown Covington to the TANK Fort Wright Transit Hub Municipalities: Covington, Kenton Vale, and Fort Wright

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• The Madison Avenue/KY 17 corridor experiences traffic congestion during peak periods. • The OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model shows 2010 Level of Service highest between 20th Street and KY 17. Most of the corridor is forecasted to be at level “F” by year 2040. • Comments from motorists spoke of heavy congestion and lack of alternate route options.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for KY 17 from 20th Street to Latonia Avenue exceeds state average. • From 2010 to 2012, the section north of KY 16 had the highest number of crashes. Twelve crashes involved bicyclists and 28 pedestrians. Comments from bicyclists focused on travel safety due to high congestion, on-street parking and lack of dedicated bicycle facilities.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density ranges from 1,000 to more than 5,000 and some of the county’s most densely populated areas border this corridor creating a strong need for on-street parking. • Concentrations of elderly, disabled, and zero car households range in density from 20 percent to 40 percent while the number living below poverty is as high as 100 percent in some areas. • Public comments spoke of narrow lanes and proximity of buildings to the road especially at intersections which causes some difficulty in seeing oncoming traffic and making safe turns.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks exist on both sides of Madison Avenue/KY 17 from Rivercenter Boulevard to Latonia Avenue. From Latonia Avenue to KY 3187 (Kyles Lane), sidewalks exist only on the west side. • Signalized crosswalks exist at almost every intersection north of 20th Street. • TANK operates fixed routes number 7 and 33 all-day, seven days a week along the corridor. A public comment stated that Madison Avenue/KY 17 is a “key transit corridor in Kenton County.” • There are no bicycle facilities. The OKI Bike Route Guide does not recommend use from Latonia Avenue to KY 16 and cautions use from KY 1072 to Latonia Avenue and KY 16 to 20th Street. • TANK’s Fort Wright Park&Ride is located at the southeast corner of KY 17 and Highland Avenue Extension. Vehicles exit the facility less than 60 feet from KY 17. During PM peak, the volume of westbound Highland Avenue Extension traffic blocks the TANK exit, preventing buses and Park&Ride vehicles from entering the roadway which causes significant delays.

39


U.S. 25 Segments

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

3rd to 4th streets

Urban Collector

5,000-14,999 (2012 estimate)

Less than one

4th to 20th streets

Urban Minor Arterial

5,000-14,999 (2012 estimate)

Less than one

20th Street to KY 16

Urban Principal Arterial

8,300 (KYTC, 2012)

1.29

KY 16 to Latonia Avenue

Urban Principal Arterial

8,300 (KYTC, 2012)

1.61

Not available

Less than one

Latonia Avenue to Urban Principal KY 1072 Arterial

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

Madison Avenue / KY 17 Transit Corridor

High Priority Recommendations


...cont. Madison Avenue / KY 17 Transit Corridor RECOMMENDATION • Create a high-frequency, enhanced bus transit corridor between the CTC and TANK Fort Wright Bus Hub with specialized branding and operational treatments to transit vehicles and service corridors. • Improve stop design and amenities (new shelter, signage, bike racks and route information) at major intersections where transit activity is high, right of way is available, and there is public support. • On Madison Avenue, north of 20th Street, construct bus bulbs where onstreet parking is permitted at all times or by eliminating on-street parking northbound from 7:00a.m. to 9:00a.m. and southbound from 4:00p.m. to 6:00p.m at four potential intersections (Sixth, Eighth, 10th, and 20th streets). Final locations will be determined through a specific site design and planning process. • On KY 17 south of 20th Street where on-street parking is not permitted all day, construct bus bays with lengths sufficient to permit bus acceleration at seven potential locations (West 24th Street, KY 16/26th Street, Decoursey Avenue, Indiana Avenue, Ashland Avenue, Latonia Avenue, and TANK entrance). Final locations will be determined through a specific site design and planning process. • Identify intersections where traffic cycle times create long lines and install bus traffic signal priority. Streets around CTC and the KY 1072/KY 17 intersection could serve as test pilot locations. • Identify stops to be removed and consolidated in order to create spacing every three to four blocks. • Realign TANK bus routes 7 and 33 from KY 17 to Madison Avenue between 4th and 20th streets. • Coordinate route 7 and 33 schedules for service every 15 minutes peak and 30 minutes off-peak. • Paint bike sharrows every eight feet or immediately after an intersection north of Latonia Avenue. • Identify and implement enforcement and engineering improvements to prevent vehicles traveling westbound on Highland Pike Extension from blocking the TANK Fort Wright Transit Hub exit.

41


PROJECT BENEFITS • KY 17 offers mixed-use, dense, urban environment, supporting high demand for transit ridership with higher than average concentrations of low income, disabled, elderly, zero car households, and other populations that depend upon public transit for daily travel needs. • By coordinating route schedules, reducing bus stops, and increasing bus frequency and priority, waiting times will be cut in half making transit more competitive with driving and more attractive. • Eliminating parking during commuter rush hours will help improve safety for all modes. • Bus bulbs ensure that cars do not block bus stops, provide a dedicated waiting area for transit users, clear sidewalk area for pedestrians, and improve travel time and on-time performance. • Transit stations improvements at key, high volume intersections provide public/private economic development opportunities. • Buses will exit Transit Hub safely and efficiently with a painted stop bar on Highland Pike Extension.

PROJECT CHALLENGES • Additional distances between bus stops may create problems for elderly and disabled persons. • Bus bulbs may block and create slight delays for motorists while transit passengers load and unload. • Removal of on-street parking during peak times will create an inconvenience for residents. • Right of way is not available for bike lanes or other improvements. • Traffic signal prioritization is a new concept that will require public education and time.

COST ESTIMATE Element

Design

Enhanced Transit $30,000 Stop Design and Amenities Traffic and $405,000 Infrastructure Improvements (Bus Bulbs/Bays, Bike Sharrows, Traffic Signal Prioritization)

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$0

$0

$300,000

$330,000

$220,000

$55,000

$1,370,000

$2,050,000

...cont. Madison Avenue / KY 17 Transit Corridor

High Priority Recommendations


New Buffington Multi-Modal Path Facility: New Buffington Road Location: Kenton County Line to Garvey Avenue Jurisidctions: Kenton County & Elsmere

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Existing and future data does not identify a congestion-related concern at this location.

SAFETY

• In 2012, a pedestrian was struck by a car. Fortunately, no injuries were reported. A lack of sidewalks in this area forces people to walk alongside the road or in the road.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density ranges from 1,000 to 5,000 employees per square mile. • New Buffington Road primarily services industrially-zoned land uses. • Residential neighborhoods to the east in Elsmere range from one to 10 housing units per acre. • Concentrations of low income populations and disabled persons range in density from 20 percent to 40 percent in this area. • The Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission has identified the potential for 122 acres of new industrial, 27 acres of multi-family residential, 68 acres of single-family residential, and 30 acres of commercial in the immediate vicinity of this area.

MULTI-MODAL

• A robust sidewalk network exists throughout Elsmere’s residential streets. • There is no TANK service along New Buffington Road, however Route 1 operates along U.S. 25. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities, however the OKI Bike Route Guide recommends New Buffington Road as a preferred route. • Approximately 600 feet east of Vulcan Drive, New Buffington Road crosses over the railroad mainline owned by the city of Cincinnati and leased by Norfolk Southern. Approximately 28 to 36 trains a day travel this track. The bridge span is approximately 300 feet in length with two, 10-foot lanes and little or no shoulders.

Facilities

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

New Buffington Road

Urban Collector

4.800 (Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, 2012)

Less than one

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

43


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct an approximate 3,600-foot long, 10-foot wide multi-use path on one side of New Buffington Road to link existing pedestrian facilities. • Conduct a feasibility study to determine a preferred alternative for accommodating pedestrian and bicycle use of the bridge over the railroad. The study would consider several concept alternatives including, but not limited to the following: ºº Widening of existing structure For city blocks without on-street parking, place sharrow pavement markings at least four feet from the curb. ºº Construction of an attached structure ºº Construction of a separate new structure adjacent to the bridge • Construct preferred alternative for multi-modal bridge crossing as determined by a completed feasibility study. Create physical barrier between multi-modal travelers and the Kentucky State Department for Employment lot located at the northeast corner of E. Fourth St and Garrard intersection. • Include Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant curb ramps with truncated domes at drive ways and intersections. Move KY 17 northbound traffic to travel completely on Greenup St – eliminating the most northern single block usage of Garrard St.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• This improvement would expand multi-modal safety and use by expanding bicycle and pedestrian accommodations with existing paths on Garvey Avenue and Industrial Boulevard.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• The existing bridge over the railroad tracks does not allow sufficient right of way to continue construction of a multi-use path facility. A feasibility study and construction of additional right of way on or adjacent to the existing bridge will add significant cost to the project. The study and improvements to the bridge will involve Norfolk Southern Railroad who currently operates service through a lease agreement with the city of Cincinnati. • In many locations along New Buffington Road, shoulders are minimal and steep drop-offs exist immediately outside the 10-foot travel lanes. Significant fill and culverts for proper water drainage will be needed for these areas. • Due to right of way limitations and narrow lane widths, bike lanes on New Buffington Road are not recommended.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Right of Way

Utilities

Construction

TOTAL

$230,000

$400,000

$890,000

$1,520,000

$3,040,000

New Buffington Multi-Modal Path

High Priority Recommendations


Riverfront Commons Multi-Use Path Location: City of Covington’s entire Ohio Riverfront Municipality: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Existing and future data does not identify a congestion-related concern at this location.

SAFETY

• Existing crash data does not identify a motorist safety-related concern in this area

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• The Ohio River bank is experiencing erosion concerns. • Ohio River waterfront is not easily accessible for residents, employees or visitors. • There is a lack of business along the Ohio River. • There is a lack of green space in the city of Covington.

MULTI-MODAL

• Limited recreational/biking opportunities in city of Covington. • There is no connectivity for pedestrians from West Covington to downtown.

45


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct a Riverfront Commons multi-use path along the entire Ohio River waterfront in the city of Covington. • Project will split the multi-use path to provide access up and over the riverfront levee to connect to and provide access to downtown businesses, hotels and residential neighborhoods. • Project will include a retaining wall to stabilize the hillside. • Place necessary infrastructure around the Madison Overlook to accommodate relocation of existing structures and facilities. • Restore ecosystem with native plants and remove invasive species.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• The proposed Riverfront Commons provides a much needed additional pedestrian and bicycle connection between West Covington and the Licking River to extend the multi-modal commuting opportunities between Kenton and Campbell counties • A Riverfront Commons multi-use path will provide both healthy recreational facilities and introduce a safer route and mobility option for bicycling commuters traveling east/west in Kenton County. • The project addresses preservation of the natural environment through stabilization of the riverfront, removal of invasive species and restoration of native plants. • Improving access to and along the Ohio Riverfront will enhance economic development and tourism. • The Riverfront Commons path system is intended to connect with the existing and planned Licking River Trail system, thus creating a comprehensive east/west and north/south multi-modal network as supported by Northern Kentucky by the Regional Trail Alliance.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Steep slopes, environmental considerations for stabilizing riverbanks, and other needed infrastructure present special design and construction challenges which add to the project cost.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$400,000

$0

$0

$13,800,000

$14,200,000

Riverfront Commons Multi-Use Path

High Priority Recommendations


U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) Transit Corridor Facilities: U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) and Pike Street Municipalities: Covington, Park Hills, Ft Wright, Ft Mitchell, Lakeside Park, Crestview Hills, Edgewood, Erlanger, Elsmere Location: Boone County Line to Madison Avenue

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Except for Park Hills, data shows that U.S. 25 is suffering from some of the most extensive peak period congestion for Northern Kentucky roadways. • With half of the corridor already at level “F,” the OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model projects the 2040 Level of Service (LOS) all of U.S. 25 will reach level “F.” • Motorist comments spoke to the issue of heavy congestion and lack of alternate route options.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for U.S. 25 exceeds state safety average for similar type roadways. • From 2010 to 2012, Erlanger and Elsmere section had the highest number of crashes with a total of eight crashes involving bicyclists, three pedestrians, and another six were motorist-only.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density ranges from 1,000 to more than 5,000 and some of the county’s most densely populated areas border this corridor creating a strong need for on-street parking. • Elderly, disabled, and zero car households range in density from 20 percent to 40 percent. • Commercial redevelopment of approximately 17 acres in Erlanger, Gateway College is relocating to downtown Covington, increased commercial/retail demand in Park Hills, and approximately 37 acres of new residential use is expected at the old Northern Kentucky University campus.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks exist on both sides of U.S. 25 through much of the corridor. However, there are a few sections where a single sidewalk exists. The only segment with no sidewalks is located between Park Hills and Covington. Signalized crosswalks exist at almost every intersection. • U.S. 25 carries TANK’s most heavily used fixed bus route (1) averaging approximately 20 boarding passengers per service hour. The route runs between downtown Cincinnati, Covington, and Florence Mall seven days a week, with 30-minute frequency at peak and 45 to 60 minutes frequency during off-peak. Buses often experience delays due to heavy traffic. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities and the OKI Bike Route Guide recommends caution. • U.S. 25 received the greatest number of public comments with motorists focused on congestion, and bicyclists and pedestrians concerned with safety.

47


U.S. 25 Segments

Functional Class

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

Main Street to I-71/75 (Pike Street)

Urban Minor Arterial

9,500 (2011)

1.17

I-71/75 (Pike Street) to KY 1072

Urban Minor Arterial

11,800 (2006)

1.17

KY 1072 to I-71/75 (Fort Mitchell)

Urban Minor Arterial

15,000 (2006)

Less than one

I-71/75 (Fort Mitchell) to KY 371

Urban Minor Arterial

21,600 (2011)

Less than one

KY 371 to I-275

Urban Minor Arterial

15,400 (2006)

1.13

I-275 to KY 236

Urban Minor Arterial

27,500 (2010)

1.34

KY 236 to Boone County Line

Urban Minor Arterial

24,800 (2011)

1.34

U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) Transit Corridor High Priority Recommendations


...cont. U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) Transit Corridor RECOMMENDATION

• Create a high-frequency, enhanced bus transit corridor from downtown to the new Florence Transit Hub with specialized branding and operational treatments applied to vehicles and service corridors. • Improve stop design and amenities (new shelter, signage, bike racks and route information) at major intersections where transit activity is high, right of way is available, and there is public support. • Potential enhanced bus stops are proposed for Scott/Pike, Pike/Holman, KY 1072, Fort Mitchell Kroger, KY 371, KY 1303, Crestview Hills Town Center, and KY 236. • Where on-street parking is permitted at all times, construct bus bulbs by expanding the bus stop area into the parking lane or eliminate on-street parking for northbound from 7:00a.m. to 9:00a.m. and southbound from 4:00p.m. to 6:00p.m. at three potential locations (Pike Street at Russell Street, Pike and Eighth streets at Russell Street, and Montague Road). Final locations will be determined through a specific site design and planning process. • Where no on-street parking exists, construct bus bays with lengths sufficient to permit bus acceleration at sixteen potential locations (Arlington Road, St. James Avenue/Hilton Drive, Wright Summit, KY 1072 (Sleepy Hollow Road), Ashwood Circle, Fortside Drive, Expressway Plaza, Highland Avenue, KY 371/Huckleberry Hill, Lookout Farm Drive/Whitehouse Drive, Winding Way/Town Center Boulevard, entrance/exit to Dixie Heights High School/ Edgewood Road, KY 236, McAlpin/Garvey Avenues, Sunset Avenue/Main Street, and Kentaboo/Eastern Avenues). Final locations will be determined through a specific site design and planning process. • Identify intersections where traffic cycle times create long lines and install bus traffic signal priority. • Continue to implement access management improvements recommended in the June 2006 Dixie Fix Plan at every opportunity to reduce driveways and increase safety and travel time. • Coordinate TANK schedules to increase the reliability and on-time performance. In the long range, increase service frequency to 15 minutes during peak-time and 30 minutes during off-peak. • Paint sharrows along right lanes every eight feet or immediately following an intersection.

49


PROJECT BENEFITS

• Due to right of way limitations and narrow lane widths, bike lanes are not recommended. • Maintenance of debris and catch basin clutter will need to be performed regularly to ensure safe bicycle travel. • U.S. 25 offers mixed-use, dense, urban environment, supporting high demand for transit ridership with higher than average concentrations of low income, disabled, elderly, zero car households, and other populations that depend greatly upon public transit for daily travel needs. • By coordinating route schedules, reducing bus stops, and increasing bus frequency and priority, waiting times will be cut in half making transit more competitive with driving and more attractive. • Bus bulbs ensure that cars do not block bus stops, provide a dedicated waiting area for transit users, clear sidewalk area for pedestrians, and improve travel time and on-time performance. • Transit stations improvements at key, high volume intersections provide public/private economic development opportunities.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Additional distances between bus stops may create problems for elderly and disabled persons. • Bus bulbs may block and create slight delays for motorists while transit passengers load and unload. • The removal of on-street parking during peak times will create an inconvenience for residents. • Right of way is not available for bike lanes or other improvements. • Traffic signal prioritization is a new concept that will require public education and time.

COST ESTIMATE Element

Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

Enhanced Transit Stop Design and Amenities Traffic and Infrastructure Improvements (Bus Bulbs/ Bays, Bike Sharrows, Traffic Signal Prioritization)

$30,000

$0

$0

$450,000

$480,000

$695,000

$380,000

$95,000

$2,350,000

$3,520,000

U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) Transit Corridor High Priority Recommendations


U.S. 25 (Park Hills/Covington Sidewalk Gap) Facility: U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) Location: From approximately 100 feet east of Mt. Allen Road to Grays Peak Municipality: Covington and Park Hills

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• High traffic volumes use this corridor as a non-interstate route option resulting in high congestion and multi-modal safety concerns. • The OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model shows the 2010 Level of Service (LOS) for this section of U.S. 25 to be level “C.” The 2040 LOS is projected to worsen to level “F.” • Online survey responses from motorists spoke to the issue of heavy congestion, high demand for the roadway, and lack of alternate route options.

SAFETY

• Existing crash data does not identify a motorist safety-related concern in this area, however lack of sidewalks in this area forces people to walk alongside the road or in the road.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density along the U.S. 25 corridor ranges from 1,000 to 5,000 employees per square mile. • Some of Kenton County’s most densely populated areas border this corridor. Neighborhoods along the corridor range from single family to multi-family, rental properties with as many as 10 units per acre. • Concentrations of disabled and low income populations ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent are residing in this area. • The Northern Kentucky Area Planning Commission (NKAPC) states that approximately 37 acres of new residential use is anticipated at the old Northern Kentucky University campus. • NKAPC also conducted the Park Hills Dixie Study in 2010 which projected intensified commercial, residential and mixed uses along U.S. 25 in Park Hills.

MULTI-MODAL

• The only segment of U.S. 25 with no sidewalks is located between Park Hills and Covington. A well-worn path on the north side of the roadway from pedestrian use is visible. • Signalized crosswalks exist along the corridor at almost every intersection. • TANK operates Route 1 along the U.S. 25 corridor. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities and the OKI Bike Route Guide encourages cyclists to use U.S. 25 with caution. • U.S. 25 received the greatest number and most multi-modal mix (22 driving, 11 bicycling, and nine walking) of online survey comments in comparison to all other Kenton County roads. Pedestrian-related comments were concerned about safety.

Facility

U.S. 25

Functional Class

Urban Minor Arterial

Average Daily Traffic Count* 11,800 (2006)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

51

Critical Crash Rate Factor 1.17


RECOMMENDATION

• Construct an approximate 785-foot long, five-foot wide sidewalk to link existing pedestrian facilities at “The Views” development in Covington and Park Hills on the north side of U.S. 25. Include Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant curb ramps with truncated domes at drive ways and new intersection. • Include curb and gutter improvement along north side of U.S. 25.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• This improvement would expand multi-modal safety, use, and connectivity in the area.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Due to extremely steep topography, an approximate 275-foot long, six-foot high retaining wall will be necessary along a portion of the new sidewalk in order to address existing landslides. Geotechnical investigation will be required and has been included in the design cost estimate as $250,000.

COST ESTIMATE Design

$350,000

Utilities

$100,000

Right of Way $50,000

Construction

$800,000

U.S. 25 Pike and Main Intersection

High Priority Recommendations

TOTAL

$1,300,000


U.S. 25 (Pike and Main Intersection) Facility: U.S. 25 (Pike Street) and U.S. 25 (Main Street) Location: U.S. 25 (Pike Street) intersection at U.S. 25 (Main Street) Municipality: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• Both legs of the intersection are experiencing traffic congestion during peak periods. • Level of Service for Main Street is projected to worsen from level “B” to “E” by year 2040, if no improvements are made

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for both roadways exceeds state average. In the case of Main Street, the rate is by almost four times the state average for other similar type roadways. • In 2012, a pedestrian suffered reportable injuries after being struck by a vehicle making a right turn onto Main Street.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• Employment density in the project area is 1,000 to 5,000 employees per square mile. • Established, dense urban, residential neighborhoods surround this intersection with minimum housing densities of four units per acre. • Concentrations of disabled populations and zero car households ranging in density from 20 percent to 40 percent reside adjacent to the intersection.

MULTI-MODAL

• Sidewalks exist on all three legs of the intersection. • Regulated crosswalks span Main Street and east side of the intersection across U.S. 25. • TANK route 1 travels U.S. 25 with a southbound stop at the Main Street intersection. • There are no dedicated bicycle facilities. The OKI Bike Route Guide considers Main Street a preferred route, but recommends cyclists use caution when traveling U.S. 25.

Facility

Functional Class

U.S. 25 (Pike Street Minor Urban Arterial U.S. 25 (Main Minor Urban Street) Arterial

Average Daily Traffic Count*

Critical Crash Rate Factor

8,100 (Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, 2012)

3.96

9,500 (2011)

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

53

1.17


RECOMMENDATION

• Reconstruct the intersection with a continuous, free flow, right turn lane for traffic from Main to southbound Pike streets and from southbound Pike to Main streets. • Introduce improvement to allow southbound Main Street traffic to turn left on to Pike Street. • Include a protected pedestrian signal and crosswalk, as well as vehicular loop detection.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• Motorist travel delay will be reduced and pedestrian safety improved. • Improved air quality, noise reduction and visual aesthetics for local residents and businesses will occur by eliminating idling commuter traffic waiting to turn onto and off of Pike and Main streets. • Connectivity between north and south sides of Pike Street will be improved • Mobility options for people and goods will be enhanced to support economic vitality.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• This improvement was partially funded with Congestion Mitigation Air Quality funds in TIP 6-3704, but additional funding is needed to complete the project. • In order to improve the intersection, it is necessary to acquire a gas station that is located on the northeast corner.

COST ESTIMATE Planning

Funded (CMAQ) Funding Needed

Design

$50,000 $0

Utilities

$200,000 $0

Right of Way

$40,000 $1,610,000

Construction

$520,000 $0

U.S. 25 Pike and Main Intersection

High Priority Recommendations

TOTAL

$810,000 $1,610,000


U.S. 42 (Clay Wade Bailey Bridge) Bike Sharrows Facility: U.S. 42 (Clay Wade Bailey Bridge) Location: Ohio River to KY 8 (Fourth Street) Municipality: Covington

EXISTING CONDITIONS CONGESTION

• The Brent Spence Bridge Options Analysis (September 2013) states that the project will have an extensive impact on travel across other river crossings due to diverted traffic. In Kenton County, the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge is noted as the crossing which will be most significantly impacted. • The bridge experiences traffic congestion in both AM and PM peak periods. U.S. 25 exhibits congestion primarily during PM peak. Despite 2013 traffic signal system retiming project, traffic routinely backs up over the crest of the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge during the peak hours. • The OKI Regional Traffic Demand Model forecasts the Level of Service (LOS) for the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge to worsen from level “B” to “F” by 2040.

SAFETY

• The Critical Crash Rate for U.S. 25 exceeds state average by almost four times. • Over the past three years, this intersection has been the location of crashes with serious injuries involving bicyclists and passenger vehicles.

LAND USE/SOCIO-ECONOMIC/ENVIRONMENTAL

• The Clay Wade Bailey Bridge provides access to downtown Cincinnati and its riverfront. Employment density in the area is more than 5,000 employees per square mile including the IRS Center which employs approximately 4,000 people. • U.S. 25 provides access to Covington’s historic Mainstrasse area with shops, restaurants, bars, and single- and multi-family residences. • Concentrations of elderly, low income, and zero car households range in density from 20 percent to 40 percent in adjacent blocks. • Several business driveways are located within close proximity to the KY 8 (Fourth Street) and U.S. 25 intersection.

MULTI-MODAL

• All TANK local fixed bus routes that serve Kenton and Boone counties use the bridge to cross the Ohio River with one exception, the Southbank Shuttle. TANK also uses U.S. 25 south of the intersection. There is an existing TANK stop at the intersection. • The Clay Wade Bailey Bridge serves as the only Ohio River crossing accommodating bicyclists in Kenton County. However, there are no dedicated bicycle facilities. The OKI Bike Route Guide considers the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge and U.S. 25 preferred routes. • Sidewalks exist on both sides of U.S. 25. A sidewalk is located on the east side of the bridge.

Facilities

Functional Class

U.S. 25 (Main Street)

Minor Urban Arterial

Clay Wade Bailey Bridge

Minor Urban Arterial

Average Daily Traffic Count*

*Source for Average Daily Traffic is OKI unless otherwise noted.

55

Critical Crash Rate Factor

15,000 (Kentucky Less than one Transportation Cabinet, 2010) , 8.8% trucks 8,100 (Kentucky 3.96 Transportation Cabinet, 2012)


RECOMMENDATION

• Paint sharrows or shared lane markings along the right hand lanes on each side of bridge every 200 feet. The length for northbound and southbound travel lanes is approximately 7.69 miles total. The sharrow markings should be placed at least four feet from the curb. • Install signage at both ends of the bridge to alert motorists of shared lane use with bicyclists. • Replace existing, estimated 60, drainage grates on the bridge with those safe for bicycles. • Consider video or microwave traffic signal detection that addresses bicycle needs.

PROJECT BENEFITS

• Motorist awareness of bicyclists will be improved, thereby increasing safety for all modes traveling these urban, high volume corridors.

PROJECT CHALLENGES

• Due to right of way limitations and narrow lane widths, bike lanes are not recommended. • Maintenance of debris and catch basin clutter will need to be performed regularly to ensure safe bicycle travel.

COST ESTIMATE Design

Utilities

Right of Way

Construction

TOTAL

$5,000

$0

$0

$22,000

$27,000

U.S. 42 (Clay Wade Bailey Bridge) Bike Sharrows High Priority Recommendations


High Priority Recommendations Recommendation Name in alphabetical order

Location/Termini

Municipality or Jurisdiction

Decoursey Freight Corridor Improvements

KY 177 connectivity to KY 9

Taylor Mill, Covington and Campbell County

Dudley Road

Intersection with KY 17

Edgewood, Fort Wright

I-275 Westbound Ramp

U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) to KY 236 (Donaldson Erlanger, Crestview Hills Highway/Commonwealth Avenue)

KY 1072 (Highland Pike/Kyles KY 17 (Madison Pike) to I-71/75 northbound Lane) on and off ramps

Fort Wright

KY 1501 (Hands Pike) Phase I

Crystal Lake Drive to Otter Drive

Covington, Taylor Mill

KY 17 Bike Sharrows

"• North/South: Scott and Greenup streets between East 20th Street and KY 8 (East Fourth Street) • East/West: East 20th Street between Madison Avenue and Greenup Street" U.S. 25 intersection with KY 371 (Buttermilk Pike) to KY 371 (Orphanage Road) north of Stevie’s Ridge Road Boone County Line to KY 17 (Madison Pike) (TIP 6-162) KY 17 (Madison Pike) to Licking River

Covington

KY 371 (Orphanage/ Buttermilk Alignment) KY 536 Construction KY 536 Scoping Study KY 8 (Fifth Street Widening) KY 8 (Fourth Street Bridge)

Fort Mitchell and Lakeside Park Independence, Kenton County Independence, Kenton County

I-71/75 northbound off ramp to U.S. 25 (Main Covington Street) KY 8 (Garrard Street) to the Licking River Covington

KY 8 (Fourth Street Widening) U.S. 25 (Main Street) to Philadelphia Street

Covington

KY 8 (Third Street Intersection) KY 2374 (West Third Street) intersection KY 8 Bike Sharrows • KY 8 (Fourth Street) between Philadelphia Street and the Licking River • KY 8 (Fifth Street) between KY 8 (Crescent Avenue) and Garrard Street • KY 8 (Garrard Street) between KY 8 (Fifth and Fourth streets) Licking River Greenway Trail East 8th and Garrard streets to East 15th Street Phase III and Eastern Avenue Madison Avenue/KY 17 Covington Transit Center to the TANK Fort Transit Corridor Wright Transit Hub New Buffington Multi-Use Kenton County Line to Garvey Avenue Path Riverfront Commons MultiEntire city of Covington Ohio Riverfront use Path U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway) "• U.S. 25 from Boone County Line to Main Transit Corridor Street • Pike Street from Main Street to Madison Avenue • West Eighth Street from West Pike Street to Madison Avenue " U.S. 25 (Park Hills/Covington From approximately 100 feet east of Mt. Allen Sidewalk Gap) Road to Grays Peak U.S. 25 (Pike and Main Intersection with Main St Intersection) U.S. 42 (Clay Wade Bailey Ohio River to KY 8 (Fourth Street) Bridge) Bike Sharrows

Covington Covington

Covington Covington, Kenton Vale, Fort Wright Kenton County, Elsmere Covington Covington, Park Hills, Fort Wright, Fort Mitchell, Lakeside Park, Crestview Hills, Edgewood, Erlanger, Elsmere

Park Hills, Covington Covington Covington


TOTAL COST ESTIMATE in 2014 dollars

Description

Transportation Mode(s)

Construct a single connector road and multi-use path.

Roadway/Freight/Bicycle/ $24,750,000 Pedestrian

Construct dual left lane and one dedicated right turn lanes including crosswalk. Construct new ramp facility for east- and westbound I-275 traffic to southbound I-71/75 to remove conflicts with southbound 1-71/75 traffic with KY 236 destinations. Restripe to retain one southbound through lane and create a dedicated northbound through lane with two-way, left turn lane. Reconstruct right turn lane from northbound KY 1072 to eastbound KY 3187. Reconstruct and create two travel lanes. Construct sidewalks and crosswalks and signage. Paint sharrows or shared lane markings.

Roadway/Pedestrian

$1,000,000

Roadway

$50,000,000

Roadway

$700,000

Roadway/Pedestrian

$8,150,000

Bicycle

$38,000

Alignment to existing road, create a three lane, curbed roadway with sidewalk. Maintain existing TANK stops.

Roadway/Pedestrian

$12,500,000

Construct improvements as designed in TIP 6-162 including multiuse path. Conduct a scoping study to identify two to three altneratives, cost estimates for design, right of way, utlities, construction, and environmental and social red flags. Construct additional lane and reconstruct sidewalk along new road.

Roadway/Bicycle/ Pedestrian Scoping Study

$48,000,000

Roadway/Pedestrian

$8,300,000

Construct a new, 1,300-foot long bridge with four, 11-foot lanes, shoulders, curb and gutter. Include 10-foot multi-use path on new bridge or via a separate facility adjacent to the bridge - based on funding availability. Create a new dedicated right turn lane, and widening and include sidewalk replacement. Construct roundabout and enhance crosswalk markings. Paint sharrows or shared lane markings.

Roadway/Bicycle/ Pedestrian

$34,000,000

Roadway/Pedestrian

$28,000,000

Roadway/Pedestrian Bicycle

$2,700,000 $27,000

Construct Licking River Greenway Trail.

Bicycle/Pedestrian

$200,000

Create a high-frequency bus transit corridor, paint sharrows or shared lane markings. Construct a multi-use path, conduct a feasibility study and construct preferred alternative for multi-modal bridge crossing. Construct a multi-use path to include retaining wall.

Bus Transit

$2,380,000

Bicycle/Pedestrian

$3,040,000

Bicycle/Pedestrian

$14,200,000

$300,000

Create a high-frequency, enhanced bus transit corridor. Provide Bus Transit/Bicycle specialized branding and operational treatments. Improve bus stop design and amenitites. Include bike sharrows.

$4,000,000

Construct sidewalk and include curb and gutter improvements.

Pedestrian/Roadway

$1,300,000

Reconstruct intersection with continuous, free flow, right turn lane and improve traffic signals. Paint sharrows or shared lane markings. Install signage, replace drainage grates and consider traffic signal detection.

Roadway

$1,610,000

Bicycle

$18,000


Medium Priority Recommendations Recommendation Name in alphabetical order

Location/Termini

Municipality or Jurisdiction

I-71/75 Bus on Shoulders Brent Spence Bridge to Boone County Line

Covington, Fort Wright, Fort Mitchell, Erlanger

19th Street from Augustine to Jefferson Bromley-Crescent Springs Amsterdam Road to Highwater Road Road Edgewood Park & Ride Freedom Park area at corner of Thomas More Parkway and Dudley Road KY 1303 (Crestview Hills Crestview Hills Mall Road to Thomas Mall/Thomas More More Parkway Alignment) KY 1501 (Hands Pike) III Edwin Drive to KY 16

Covington Bromley, Crescent Springs

KY 1501 (Hands Pike) Phase II KY 16 Widening Phase I

Otter Drive to Edwin Drive

Covington, Taylor Mill

KY 2047 to KY 536 (Harris Pike)

Independence, Kenton County

KY 17 Access Management KY 2045 (McCullum Pike) Widening KY 2047 (Senour Road) Sidewalk Gap KY 236 (Commonwealth) Widening

KY 1072 (Highland Pike) to KY 3070 (Howard Litzler Drive) East from Old Madison Pike for approximately 1,900 feet Sycamore/Clover Ridge Subdivision to KY 16 Baker Street to U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway)

Fort Wright

KY 3187 Intersection Improvements KY 371 (Buttermilk) Corridor Improvements KY 371 (Orphanage) Sidewalk Gap Licking River Greenway Trail Waterline Bridge Old Turkeyfoot Sidewalk Gap Rail Transit Right of Way Acquisition

Highland Place/Highland Pike to Farrell Drive I-71/75 ramps to High Street/ Buttermilk Crossing Stevie’s Ridge Road to Jerry’s Lane

Fort Wright

Licking River crossing near Summit Drive Autumn Road to 300 feet north

Covington

Downtown Covington along the I-71/75 corridor to I-275 and the Boone County Line Boone County Line to KY 1303 (Turkeyfoot Road) KY 236 (Commonwealth) to Hallam Avenue

Covington, Park Hills, Fort Wright, Fort Mitchell, Crescent Springs, Erlanger Independence

U.S. 25 (Hallam to Edgewood)

Hallam Avenue to Edgewood Road

Erlanger, Edgewood

U.S. 25/KY 1072 (Dixie/ Kyles Intersection)

Ashwood Circle to KY 1072 (Sleepy Hollow Road) and I-71/75 interchange to U.S. 25

Fort Wright

Richardson Road U.S. 25 (Commonwealth to Hallam)

59

Edgewood Crestview Hills Covington, Taylor Mill

Independence Covington Erlanger

Crescent Springs and Fort Mitchell Fort Mitchell

Elsmere

Erlanger


TOTAL COST ESTIMATE in 2014 dollars

Description

Transportation Mode(s)

Bus on left shoulder of 1-71/75

Bus Transit

Conduct traffic study, retime and optimize traffic signals. Reconstruct to create a two lane section and create a multiuse path. Construct a park & ride facility with shelter or waiting area, expand parking. Construct a new road. Construct new northbound dual left turn lanes and right turn lanes. Include sidewalks.

Roadway $500,000 Roadway/Bicycle/ $12,760,000 Pedestrian Bus Transit $1,000,000

Reconstruct and create two travel lanes. Construct sidewalks and crosswalks and signage. Reconstruct and create two travel lanes. Construct sidewalks and crosswalks and signage. Reconstruct to create a five lane section with four through lanes for two-way left turns and dedicated left turn lane. Construct sidewalk and bike lanes. Create cross access frontage roads, construct nontraversable median with dedicated left turn lanes. Reconstruct and widen. Construct a multi-use path.

Roadway/ $4,750,000 Pedestrian Roadway/ $6,870,000 Pedestrian Roadway/Bicycle/ $63,200,000 Pedestrian

Construct a sidewalk

Roadway/ Pedestrian

Roadway

$50,000

$9,990,000

$6,700,000

Roadway/Bicycle/ $5,000,000 Pedestrian Pedestrian $1,500,000

Construct a five lane section four through lanes and dedicated left turn lane. Construct a multi-use path. Construct a dedicated right turn lane and left turn lane. Align intersection and create a three-lane section with left turn lanes and new sidewalks. Right in/right out access. Three lane roadway with a twoway left turn lane connection and sidewalks. Install a sidewalk.

Roadway/Bicycle/ $14,000,000 Pedestrian Roadway/ Pedestrian Roadway/ Pedestrian Pedestrian

$8,250,000

Construct Licking River Greenway Trail.

Bicycle/Pedestrian

$1,700,000

Construct a sidewalk.

Pedestrian

$160,000

Approximate 11 miles of right of way and rail infrastructure be acquired.

Rail Transit

$40,000,000

Reconstruct and widen to three lanes including two, twoway left turn lanes. Restore crosswalk Reconstruct to create a five lane section with two-way left turn lane. Replace existing railroad bridge. Sidewalks and paint sharrows or shared lane markings Reconstruct center two-way left turn lane and dedicated left-turn lane. Sidewalks and paint sharrows or shared lane markings. Reconstruct existing intersection, construct two, dedicated left turn lanes, apply access management, reconstruct sidewalks and paint sharrows or shared lane markings.

Roadway/ $24,500,000 Pedestrian Roadway/Bicycle/ $18,000,000 Pedestrian

$1,850,000 $175,000

Roadway/Bicycle/ $990,000 Pedestrian Roadway/Bicycle/ $23,000,000 Pedestrian


Low Priority Recommendations Recommendation Name in alphabetical order

Location/Termini

Municipality or Jurisdiction

CS 2085 (Wayman Branch Road)

1000 feet north of KY 1501 to New KY Covington, Taylor Mill 16 (Old Taylor Mill Road)

CS 6147 (Highwater) Widening Horsebranch Road Multiuse Path KY 1303 (Turkeyfoot) Bike Sharrows KY 1303 (Turkeyfoot) MultiUse Path and Bike Sharrows KY 14 (Bracht Piner Road) KY 14 (Rich Road)

Amsterdam Road to BromleyCrescent Springs Road Thomas More Parkway to KY 371 (Orphanage Road) Dudley Road through the I-275 interchange I-275 interchange to U.S. 25

Villa Hills, Bromley

Kenton County Kenton County

KY 16 Widening Phase II

U.S. 25 to KY 17 Approximately 1,765 feet east of KY 17 to KY 177 KY 536 (Harris Pike) to KY 17

KY 16 Widening Phase III

KY 17 to U.S. 25 (Dixie Highway)

Kenton County

KY 17 (Hempfling Road Intersection) KY 17 (Moffett Road Intersection) KY 17 Multi-use Path

KY 3072 (Hempfling Road) to Spillman Road Bird Road to KY 2042 (Moffett Road)

Kenton County

KY 371 (Orphanage) Multimodal Improvements U.S. 25 (Boone to Grant county lines) U.S. 25 (KY 14 Intersection) Western Kenton/Eastern Boone County Freight Access Study

Jerry’s Lane to KY 17 (Madison Pike)

Crestview Hills Crestview Hills, Edgewood Lakeside Park

Kenton County

Kenton County

Kenton County, Independence, Erlanger, Covington, Fort Wright KY 1829 (Richardson Road) KY 1303 to KY 3035 and from KY 3035 Independence, Erlanger to KY 17 KY 2042 (Moffett) Widening KY 17 to Martin Road Kenton County Phase I KY 2042 (Moffett) Widening Martin Road to KY 2042 (Kenton Kenton County Phase II Station Road) to KY 177 KY 2045 (Independence) KY 536 (Bristow Road) to Old Independence Widening Madison Pike KY 2373 (Crescent Springs) Just north of I-71/75 overpass to Riggs Erlanger Sidewalk Gap Avenue

61

KY 371 (Orphanage Road) south to KY 16

Fort Wright

Boone County Line to Grant County Kenton County Line KY 14 (Bracht Piner Road) intersection Kenton County Approx 900 acres of industriallyKenton County zoned land south of Maher Road, west of Banklick Road, and north of KY 16


TOTAL COST ESTIMATE in 2014 dollars

Description

Transportation Mode(s)

Reconstruct to create two-foot travel lanes and construct a multi-use path

Roadway/Bicycle/ $22,500,000 Pedestrian

Reconstruct and widen. Install guard rails as needed.

Roadway/Bicycle/ $16,000,000 Pedestrian Bicycle/Pedestrian $1,990,000

Construct a multi-use path, install signage. Paint sharrows or shared lane markings and install signage. Install a multi-use path, paint sharrows or shared lane markings. Install signage. Reconstruct and widen. Reconstruct and widen. Install guard rails as needed.

Bicycle

$13,500

Bicycle/Pedestrian

$2,507,000

Roadway Roadway

$23,000,000 $77,060,000

Reconstruct to create a five lane section with four through lanes for two-way left turns and dedicated left turn lane. Construct sidewalk and bike lanes. Reconstruct to create a five lane section with four through lanes for two-way left turns and dedicated left turn lane. Construct sidewalk and bike lanes. Construct new roadway intersection angle with two dedicated left turn lanes. Construct two-lane section of roadway intersection and two dedicated, left turn lanes. Construct a multi-use path, paint crosswalk pavement markings, install signage and apply access management treatments.

Roadway/Bicycle/ $33,900,000 Pedestrian

Reconstruct create two lanes. Construct a multi-use path Reconstruct and widen. Install guard rails as needed.

Roadway/Bicycle/ $54,000,000 Pedestrian Roadway $13,500,000

Reconstruct and widen. Install guard rails as needed.

Roadway

Reconstruct and widen. Construct a sidewalk or multiuse path. Construct a sidewalk, conduct feasibility study and construct preferred alternative for multi-modal bridge crossing. Install signage for bicyclists. Install sidewalks

Roadway/Bicycle/ $17,400,000 Pedestrian Bicycle/Pedestrian $3,650,000

Reconstruct and widen to create 3-lanes. Include purchase of right of way for future trail. Construct two lane section of new roadway Conduct a joint planning study between Boone and Kenton counties to examine options for improving freight connectivity.

Roadway/Bicycle/ $31,500,000 Pedestrian Roadway $4,600,000 Planning Study $150,000

Roadway/Bicycle/ $45,100,000 Pedestrian Roadway

$300,000

Roadway

$300,000

Bicycle/Pedestrian

$16,500,000

Bicycle/Pedestrian

$69,000,000

$425,000


513.621.6300 | 513.621.9325 (FAX) | www.oki.org Robyn Bancroft, AICP Project Manager

/okiregional

/okircog

With adoption by the OKI Board of Directors, recommendations from this plan will be considered for inclusion in the fiscally-constrained OKI Regional Transportation Plan. In order to be eligible to receive federal funding, recommendations must be included in the fiscally-constrained OKI Regional Transportation Plan. In order to respond to any changing transportation needs, this Kenton County Transportation Plan may be amended at any time by action of the OKI Board of Directors.

Acknowledgements

OKI would like to express the deepest appreciation to the members of the Advisory Team for their commitment to public service and this year-long endeavor. Without each member’s guidance and constant help, this plan would not have been possible. Furthermore, we would also like to acknowledge with much appreciation the crucial role of the KYTC District 6 and NKAPC staff. KYTC’s professionalism and transportation expertise is unsurpassed. The OKI region is fortunate to have such talented resources, and friends, so close at hand. NKAPC’s tenacity and collaborative spirit balanced land use planning with transportation reality.

Kenton County Transportation Plan  

The plan encompasses all transportation modes within the county including roadway, transit, bicycle, pedestrian and freight. Although the pl...

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