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D E C E M B E R

T E L L I N G O K L A H O M A ' S S T O R Y

THROUGH ITS PEOPLE SINCE 1927

GAYLE CURRY UNKNOWN ORIGINS OKLAHOMA’S GODFATHER OF FILM: GRAY FREDERICKSON OKLAHOMA’S HIGHEST HONOR THE 2018 OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME BANQUET & INDUCTION CEREMONY G AY L O R D - P I C K E N S

MUSEUM

2018

HALL OF FAME MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: DR. JOHN MONTGOMERY


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WORLD TRUSTS.

INTEGRIS AND MAYO CLINIC. When you choose INTEGRIS, you’re not only choosing some of Oklahoma’s greatest medical minds, you’re choosing expertise that’s backed by more than 4,200 Mayo Clinic physicians and scientists. INTEGRIS is Oklahoma’s first Mayo Clinic Care Network Member, meaning our physicians work directly with Mayo Clinic physicians and scientists on complex diagnosis and treatment plans, ensuring that you always have access to the latest medical knowledge and advances.

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DECEMBER 2018 VOLUME 23 • NUMBER 3 PRESIDENT & CEO Shannon L. Rich

CONTENTS

VICE PRESIDENT Gini Moore Campbell CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE Bob Burke

D O N O R

L E V E L S

DESIGN Skip McKinstry skipmckinstry.com

Student................................ $15 Subscription......................... $35 Individualism........................ $50 Perseverance.......................$100 Pioneer Spirit...................... $250 Optimism........................... $500 Friends of the Medallion.........$1,000 Mistletoe Circle.................. $2,500 Gold Circle..................... $5,000 Constancy Circle................$10,000 Mission Partner...............$15,000 Inspiration Mission Partner.... $25,000

For additional information contact the Oklahoma Hall of Fame

MAGAZINE OF THE OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME 2 From the Chairman Gov. Bill Anoatubby

From the President Shannon L. Rich

3 Gayle Curry Unknown Origins Emma Fritz

13 Oklahoma’s Godfather of Film: Gray Frederickson Mark A. Stansberry

1400 Classen Drive Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73106 Telephone 405.235.4458 or Toll Free 888.501.2059

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E-mail info@oklahomahof.com Visit the organization's website at

OklahomaHOF.com

Unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by return postage.

Oklahoma’s Highest Honor The 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony Gini Moore Campbell

Unless otherwise noted, all images are courtesy of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. LIBRARY DISTRIBUTION MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF MAGAZINE SPONSORS STATEWIDE.

MISSION PARTNERS

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Oklahoma Hall of Fame Member Spotlight: Dr. John Montgomery Mattie Barlow

MR. AND MRS. BOB BURKE CANDOR THE CHICKASAW NATION CHOCTAW NATION OF OKLAHOMA E.L. AND THELMA GAYLORD FOUNDATION THE PUTERBAUGH FOUNDATION

The Oklahoma Hall of Fame Class of 2018, seated from left, Mo Anderson, David Rainbolt, Ree Drummond, Paul Allen, Carrie Underwood, and Jon R. Stuart with their Presenters John Davis, Clayton I. Bennett, Ladd Drummond, Dave McLaughlin, Bryan White, and David L. Boren respectively. Charlie Christian was inducted posthumously. COVER:


FROM THE

FROM THE

CHAIRMAN... Last month we celebrated the induction of seven outstanding Oklahomans with induction into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. To date, 698 of Oklahoma’s sons and daughters have received our state’s highest honor. With the first induction in 1928, the annual Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony event is one of the founding principles of this organization and held during the month of statehood. It is a tradition that has grown in scope, is the oldest of its kind in the United States, and is by far the most celebrated. Those that have been inducted reflect every field of work, cultural background, and geographic location. This year’s Honorees are Paul Allen, Enid; Mo Anderson, Waukomis; Ree Drummond, Pawhuska; David Rainbolt, Oklahoma City; Jon R. Stuart, Tulsa; Carrie Underwood, Checotah; and, inducted posthumously, Charlie Christian, Oklahoma City. The Class of 2018 is representative of the diversity that makes us the greatest state in the nation. You will learn more about this year’s Honorees and their Presenters in this issue.

Do you know someone that should be considered for induction to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame? Anyone can make a nomination, just go to OklahomaHoF.com to download a nomination form. All nominations to be considered for the Class of 2019 must be received by close of business on March 1, 2019. Please help us honor our fellow Oklahomans. Although the Oklahoma Banquet & Induction Ceremony is what we are best known for, it is just one day a year. The other 364 days we operate the Gaylord-Pickens Museum, travel the state providing education programming, host classrooms through our free field trip program, award scholarships to high school students, and publish books celebrating our rich history. It is through everything we do, 365 days a year, that allows us to achieve and celebrate our mission of telling Oklahoma’s story through its people. . Gov. Bill Anoatubby, Chairman

CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

GOVERNOR BILL ANOATUBBY ADA CHAIR-ELECT OF THE BOARD

VIRGINIA G. GROENDYKE ENID CHAIRMAN EMERITUS OF THE BOARD

MARK A. STANSBERRY EDMOND

VICE CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD - EC

PHIL B. ALBERT CLAREMORE CHIEF GARY BATTON DURANT BRUCE T. BENBROOK WOODWARD BILL W. BURGESS, JR. LAWTON NEVYLE R. CABLE OKMULGEE XAVIER NEIRA NORMAN CORPORATE SECRETARY

JENNIFER M. GRIGSBY OKLAHOMA CITY STEVE BURRAGE ANTLERS TREASURER    

CHAIRMAN APPOINTMENTS DIRECTORS AT LARGE - EC     

CLAYTON I. BENNETT OKLAHOMA CITY AMANDA CLINTON TULSA LINDA ENGLISH WEEKS NORMAN PRESIDENT & CEO

SHANNON L. RICH OKLAHOMA CITY

OklahomaHOF.com 2

PRESIDENT... As 2018 comes to a close, on behalf of the officers, directors, and staff, thank you for your support over this past year. You have made it possible for us to break attendance records, expand education programming, and make major investments in the experiences at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum, home of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. We will continue this coming year with free family programming during spring break, the summer, and fall break with story time, crafts, and games for children of all ages and free field trips for school districts throughout Oklahoma. Our educator-in-residence opportunity has added new themed tours to support Oklahoma educators in a variety of ways in the classroom. The second Saturday of every month will continue to be free to the public to explore all the Gaylord-Pickens Museum has to offer and we will feature a wide range of Oklahoma artists in the Tulsa World | Lorton Family Gallery. You can find all artists to be featured on our website at OklahomaHoF.com. Our publishing program will release a number of new titles next year. And, through our library distribution program, we will distribute books to public and school

CHAIRMEN’S COUNCIL

CALVIN J. ANTHONY STILLWATER PAT HENRY LAWTON GLEN D. JOHNSON OKLAHOMA CITY ROXANA LORTON TULSA TOM J. MCDANIEL OKLAHOMA CITY JOE P. MORAN, III TULSA LEE ALLAN SMITH OKLAHOMA CITY DIRECTORS

DEWEY F. BARTLETT , JR. TULSA BARBARA BRAUGHT DUNCAN BOB BURKE OKLAHOMA CITY ANN L. CAINE OKLAHOMA CITY STAN CLARK STILLWATER MICK CORNETT OKLAHOMA CITY TERESA ROSE CROOK EDMOND FREDERIC DORWART TULSA BOB DRAKE DAVIS GENTNER F. DRUMMOND TULSA JEFFREY T. DUNN TULSA GREG ELLIOTT CHICKASHA CHERYL EVANS TONKAWA KEN FERGESON ALTUS JOHN M. “CHIP” FUDGE OKLAHOMA CITY STEPHEN D. GROSSI TULSA JOE D. HALL ELK CITY NATHANIEL HARDING OKLAHOMA CITY

libraries at no charge to increase resources available on the history and heritage of our great state. Our Second Century Board already is planning a number of engaging opportunities for next year to increase awareness among young professionals. And, we will welcome a new group of talented Oklahoma high school students for the eleventh year to make up the 2019 Teen Board. Both of these groups continue to fundraise in support of education programming while introducing the Oklahoma Hall of Fame to new audiences. Our new outdoor addition to the Gaylord-Pickens Museum will be the Mary Eddy Jones Sculpture Park. Watch for details on this exciting new addition coming soon. If you have not been to the GaylordPickens Museum recently, please visit and let us give you a guided tour or explore on your own what has been made possible because of your generosity. Thank you, again, for your support of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. Shannon L. Rich, President & CEO

FRED HARLAN OKMULGEE EDNA MAE HOLDEN KREMLIN RHONDA HOOPER OKLAHOMA CITY RONNIE IRANI OKLAHOMA CITY KIRK JEWELL STILLWATER CATHY KEATING OKLAHOMA CITY REBECCA KEESLING TULSA MIKE LARSEN PERKINS DUKE R. LIGON WEWOKA JUDY LOVE OKLAHOMA CITY JOHN MASSEY DURANT BILL MASTERSON, JR. TULSA JOHN M. MCARTHUR LAWTON FRANK W. MERRICK OKLAHOMA CITY VICKI MILES-LAGRANGE OKLAHOMA CITY S. BOND PAYNE OKLAHOMA CITY PEGGY C. STEPHENSON TULSA CLAYTON C. TAYLOR OKLAHOMA CITY STEVEN W. TAYLOR MCALESTER STRATTON TAYLOR CLAREMORE SEAN TRAUSCHKE OKLAHOMA CITY STEVE TURNBO TULSA JIM UTTERBACK EARLSBORO R. SCOTT VAUGHN TULSA HARDY WATKINS OKLAHOMA CITY SUSAN WINCHESTER OKLAHOMA CITY ALLEN WRIGHT OKLAHOMA CITY


gayle curry UNKNOWN

ORIGINS BY EMMA FRITZ

When life gets hard and unpleasant, it is easy to let it drag you down with it. Some, however, take the hardship of life and make something beautiful, inspiring, and moving out of it. To take the ugliness life so often dishes out and to show it grace and beauty in return is exactly what Gayle Curry has done with her work in Unknown Origins. Overcome through courage and strength. Encaustic, 12� x 30�

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Curry grew up in Cromwell, Oklahoma knowing she wanted to be an artist from the age of five years old.

Her parents worked to encourage and foster the artistic nature within her. With a shortage of art in schools, her parents had her working with local artists at a young age. She made Oklahoma City home at the age of 21 after acquiring her graphic design degree, which she now puts to use in her job with the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. She has taught workshops encouraging her students to do the same she does when working: create the ugly stuff to get to the pretty stuff. She places an emphasis on the aspects of life that bring her joy: animals, nature, yoga, and pottery. Curry, though, possesses a talent that in turn brings beauty to anyone that has the opportunity to view her true passion: encaustic painting.

We don’t know how strong we are until being strong is the only choice we have. Encaustic, 12� x 30�


Curry fell in love with encaustic when she first viewed it. With a couple of friends that had taken courses on the process of the art, Curry immediately inquired how to do it herself. Since learning, Curry has allowed the work to become her primary mode of creation. She says there is an element of surprise each time she creates a piece that cannot be found with other mediums. Inspired by nature and those closest to her, Curry has ideas in mind rather than a specific image when she begins work on a new project. She creates her pieces based on the things most predominant in her life at the moment. Each piece of work starts with an idea, but often turns into something that she did not initially picture. er Survivor,

erry Breast Canc Peace—Cousin Sh Encaustic, 6” x 6”

Encaustic is a Greek word that means “to burn in” and the practice itself is over two thousand years old, appearing throughout history around the world. It is a detailed process in which hot wax is poured onto a surface, in Curry’s case it is wood, and then manipulated to create the desired image using various tools. Curry uses pigments and oils to create the vibrant coloring her pieces often possess. The wax also allows the artist the freedom to blend the colors while it is still hot; it can be shaved off, poured on top of, or combined to manipulate the image and color it displays. ivor of le Sonny Surv Fighter—Unc x 6” Encaustic, 6”

Skin Cancer,

ken by Uterine

Georgi Fay Ta Thankful—Aunt 6” x 6” , tic us Enca

Cancer,

Over the years, Curry has learned to let the image dictate what it will be as she is creating it. Occasionally she has something specific in mind, but in general she lets the image determine the direction it will go. Curry has learned to listen to the painting and has fallen for the element of surprise that comes with this medium. When she begins a new project, she is not always certain what she is going to get from it, but allowing the wax to meld together and trusting herself to manipulate it has proved to work for Curry.

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Survivor—Cousin Larry Taken by Thyroid Cancer, Encaustic, 6” x 6”

Melting enxaustic wax to ready for painting.

Attitude—Aunt Sue Survivor of NonHodgkin Lymphoma, Encaustic, 6” x 6”

Melted wax.

She states that the wax has its own expression and life. She has learned to work with it rather than try to control it. The need to control inhibits the creativity of encaustic painting. For Curry, this work is its most beautiful and enjoyable when you learn to let go and be free when creating.

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Empower—Uncle Bobby Taken by Leukemia, Encaustic, 6” x 6”

Birchwood boards are primed with clear wax before layering color for a painting.

Having first worked in acrylic and oil paint with abstract pieces, Curry has long used art as a method to process life. For her, it is therapeutic and allows her to work her way through the obstacles and hurdles life throws around. Encaustic painting serves as the avenue in which she channels her frustrations, enjoyment, and musings of life into. Her work reflects her innermost thoughts and feelings that are often hard to put into words and even harder to come to grips with.


Melting encaustic wax on a hot plate to prepare for painting.

Gayle Curry adding dry pigment to the encaustic painting to add depth and shadows.

Gayle Curry in her studio as the 2016 Skirvin Artist In Residence.

Gayle Curry’s Unknown Origins collection is on display at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum, home

As her work progressed, Curry noted that more often than not it was the things she could not control that she more frequently found inspiration in than anything else in life. Creating work based on these things is her way of controlling them to a certain extent. Rather than allowing these circumstances to possess her being, she channeled them into something beautiful that could not only absolve her but also reach many more. When Curry faces these circumstances in which she cannot control or change them, she finds herself researching and creating imagery based on that and from there a piece develops as she allows it to take shape. The majority, if not all, of her work is about dealing with life, with its ups and downs. Because of this, Curry faces her work with a level of openness that is rare.

of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, in the Tulsa World | Lorton Family Gallery. The show will be on display through February 9, 2019.

Breath

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W

hen tragic news struck Curry’s family, it was the encaustic process she turned to. Curry’s Unknown Origins collection focuses on cancer and all that is bound to it. With titles like “Hope” and “Cancer Picked the Wrong Mother”, Curry establishes her view on the circumstances life has dealt. Each piece in the show is a reflection of someone in Curry’s life affected by cancer or about how to process the disease itself. Her vibrant colors and soft technique are encouraging to all of those viewing it; the collection establishes a positivity about the fight that one does not usually associate with cancer. She once again turned to her creations to process the events taking place in her life and created imagery that speaks to those that have survived, are fighting, and all of those touched by the horrendous circumstances of cancer. As an artist, Curry consistently asks herself if others will like what she has created. Is it pretty enough? Are the colors right? Does it say too much, or maybe too little? However, with this collection, Curry did not ask herself that. It was not about if people liked the individual works included or the collection as a whole. Unknown Origins was about her mother, her father, and all of those that cancer has touched. Curry states that part of her motivation in the production of this show was to honor those around her that have fought and continue to fight cancer, and those she has lost to the disease. In addition to honoring those in her life with Unknown Origins, Curry also produced the collection as a form of self-care. Following the multiple diagnoses of cancer within her family, the production of Unknown Origins became a form of coping and healing for her. With art being central to the way she processes circumstances, creating this collection was therapeutic

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I am strong.. Encaustic, 30” x 30”


Let your faith be bigger than your fear. Pancreatic Cancer, Encaustic, 8” x 8”

and cathartic. It was a way to understand and grasp the situation on her own terms. Curry discussed that typically with her works, she does not always have a specific idea in mind when creating her works; however, for this collection, she had specific images in mind for several of the pieces. Many of the pieces are modeled after cancer cells and were intentionally created in that manner. Although this differs from Curry’s usual process, it was deliberate. In a situation where she has little to no control over the goings on, the production of this show allowed Curry to gain some semblance of control over the circumstances facing her. Researching allowed Curry to better understand the concept, but creating the imagery gave her the ability to manipulate it the way she wanted. To create and design the image the way she wanted and needed to see it. Producing Unknown Origins was as much about honoring those around her that have been touched by cancer as it was about Curry being able to take control of a situation in which she truly has no power over the outcome. Curry also states that a positive outlook is crucial to the fight. The positivity that one possesses provides a necessary strength. The production of Unknown Origins not only works towards the positive outlook for herself, but also inspires the same for those that view the collection. Its vibrant colors and bold imagery encourages viewers to see the beauty in the piece rather than hardship and sadness of the disease itself. When viewing the collection, you notice the technique and eye catching colors. Even Curry’s titles encourage one to face something as difficult as fighting cancer or supporting someone doing so with hope and strength.

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Everyday holds the possibility of a miracle.—Encaustic, 6” x 8”

A

s an artist, Gayle Curry uses vibrant colors and techniques that encourage viewers to see the positive side of life. To focus on the good and healthy things rather than dwelling on the darkness in one’s life. This is not to say that she believes individuals will not be faced with hardship, because she knows better than most that this is not the case; however, this is to say that there is something to be said for the way in which individuals view life. Curry encourages

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Images of Phyllis Curry’s cancer cells.

Cancer Picked the Wrong Mother—Encaustic, 30” x 30”

those around her not only as an artist, but as an individual. She maintains this with an openness that many do not possess and uses her work to help herself remain positive despite life’s hardships. Her work is not only beautiful and captivating, it is also inspiring and stirring. It is perhaps one of the most encouraging instances in which a person can take what life has dealt and use their own talent to encourage themselves and those around them to keep fighting.

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YO U R

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TA BL E

I S

WA I T I N G

V I E W O U R M E N U S A N D L O C AT I O N S O N L I N E AT W W W. H A L S M I T H . C O M


Television and big screen actor John Barrymore, Jr., right, and Gray Frederickson.

Oklahoma’s Godfather of Film: Gray Frederickson By Mark A. Stansberry

Hollywood icon Harry “Gray” Frederickson, Jr. was born in Oklahoma City on July 21, 1937. He attended Nichols Hills Elementary, Casady School, and the University of Oklahoma. His father was an independent oilman and his grandfather was one of the founders of Oklahoma Natural Gas Company. Following graduation from the University of Oklahoma, Frederickson headed to Europe and attended the University of Lausanne in Switzerland. For more than a year, he traveled across Europe and wound up working for an engineering firm in Rome, Italy. Gray Frederickson, left, and Robert Redford on the set of Little Fauss and Big Halsy.

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Gray Frederickson was born in Oklahoma City and attended Nichols Hills Elementary School.

After graduating from Oklahoma City’s Casady School, Gray Frederickson enrolled at the University of Oklahoma.

The Frederickson family—Gray and wife Karen with children Tyler and Kelsey.

Gray Frederickson, left, and Jan-Michael Vincent on the set of Big Wednesday.


In the social scene, he met several film producers and directors. Several in the industry observed him driving a Maserati, so they assumed he was wealthy. Therefore, they believed he might have access to funds potentially for making movies. Although not in his plans, the result was that Gray Frederickson became interested in the world of movies. At the time, there were no film schools in Oklahoma like there are today. The closest he had been to the movie business was working at an Oklahoma City movie theater taking tickets. Frederickson produced his first film while in Italy— Nakita was released in 1963. He soon found himself in demand in the movie industry. It was in Italy that he first met Clint Eastwood when Italian movie director and legend Sergio Leone asked Frederickson to come on as production manager for The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly starring Eastwood. Frederickson and Eastwood were two of the four Americans involved with the movie; the others being actors Eli Wallach and Lee Van Cleef. Frederickson and Eastwood became lifelong friends. Eastwood offered Frederickson the role of producer of his production company, Malpaso Production. However, because Eastwood did not have funds to pay Frederickson, and Paramount had offered him a position paying $1,000 per week, he declined the offer. Frederickson joked in later years, “You don’t turn down Clint Eastwood.” At Paramount, Frederickson was teamed up with Al Ruddy, writer and creator of Hogan’s Heroes, to produce Little Fauss and Big Halsy starring Robert Redford. The executives, impressed with the duo’s commitment to time and budget, assigned them their next project—The Godfather. Francis Ford Coppola was hired as the director and Marlon Brando for the starring role of the Godfather. Initially, Coppola was not interested in the project. The book, The Godfather, which the movie is based on was published in 1969, spent sixty-seven weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Coppola was repulsed by the book. However, his business partner in American Zoetrope reminded him just how broke they and the company were. Coppola accepted the offer from Paramount following the realities set forth by his business partner—George Lucas. He wanted the film set in the 1940s. Ruddy and Frederickson searched for locations for filming, with Kansas City, Missouri, taking the lead at one point. But, Coppola had his own ideas—the movie should be filmed in New York City. Frederickson was

primarily responsible for scouting locations, his time in Italy was valuable. The filming would be split, with shooting in Italy confined to two weeks. By April, 1971, Frederickson had secured all locations and prepared a schedule for Ruddy consisting of 60+ camera days. In New York City, the producers were faced with the mob who did not like the word “mafia,” which was to be used in the film. Joseph Colombo, Jr. was head of one of New York’s Five Families—the mob. He created the ItalianAmerican Civil Rights League. His goal was to eliminate the word “mafia” from the American vocabulary. The Godfather became the target of the family. Threats began coming in, even one threat on a car’s dashboard, “Shut down the movie, or else.” It was

Released in 1989, Gray Frederickson, left, served as executive producer of UHF, written by “Weird Al” Yankovic, right.

finally explained at a meeting with Joe Colombo that the message was clear as to the movie, it would not demean the Italian community. The family was given the opportunity to read the script. Colombo insisted that the word “mafia” be removed. The deal was made. Frederickson said, “The next day everybody opened up their doors, and our office was filled with Italian-Americans wanting parts.” From the beginning of the making of The Godfather to the end, there was a daily war of words between the management of Paramount and Frederickson and his team as to how the movie should be made—who should be cast in the movie? Where should the film locations be? One example was the making of the opening scene set of The Godfather, which cost $100,000. The desk alone had a price tag

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From left, Fred Roos, Francis Ford Coppola, and Gray Frederickson celebrated an Oscar win for The Godfather: Part II. Gray Frederickson, second from right, with, from left, Italian actor and film director Alberto Sordi, American comedian, actor, and screenwriter Bill Dana, and Italian actor and director Vittorio De Sica on the set of An Italian in America.

Gray Frederickson, left, with legendary author, screenwriter, and journalist Mario Puzo. Puzo was known for his novels about the mafia, most notably The Godfather.

of $10,000. The opening scene is very dark, not the bright pictures that were coming out of Hollywood at the time. Paramount management was furious about the darkness, they believed Brando’s voice was too soft and did not carry, and, to top it off, Brando was stroking a random cat while he spoke. At one point, Frederickson had informed Coppola that he was going to be fired by Paramount as the budget for The Godfather was $2-million. The two-year project wound up costing $6.2-million. Difficulties were experienced from the start. Coppola recalled, “The movie was a black sheep at Paramount. They didn’t like it. They didn’t like me.” Frederickson played a key role from the beginning in producing The Godfather: Part II. According to a CNN interview, when Robert De Niro landed the role of the young mob boss Vito Corelone in the 1974 film The Godfather: Part II, he said he approached it like a scientific experiment. Performing a part first played by Marlon Brando, De Niro explained, “…required serious study. I went with Gray Frederickson up to the Gulf and Western Building—which is now the Trump Tower— and went up to one of the screening rooms on the

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28th floor and had an old video camera and videotaped all of Brando’s scenes. I took all those and studied those.” De Niro went on to win an Academy Award for his performance, making Brando and De Niro the only people to win Oscars for playing the same character. Though the odds were stacked against the team, The Godfather went on to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards in 1973. In the first six months after its release, The Godfather surpassed Gone with the Wind in box office sales, a record held since 1939. Frederickson did not think there was any chance of winning an Oscar for a sequel. However, two years later in 1975, The Godfather: Part II also won the Academy Award for Best Picture. The Godfather is currently ranked number one on the American Film Institute’s Best Films of All Time. Apocalypse Now was even a bigger challenge. The film was produced in the Philippines and Frederickson was responsible for establishing the base camp for film operations. At one point during production, already weeks behind and $2-million+ over budget, filming had to be shut down for six weeks as one of the worst hurricanes in 40 years struck the coast. While Coppola took shelter near a U. S. Naval Base at Subic Bay, other members of the team were marooned in Iba on the South China Sea Coast. After days of continual rainfall, Coppola appealed for help from the military. The U. S. Navy refused as the Department of Defense had washed its hands of the movie’s intent of casting a candid, operatic glance at the recently concluded Vietnam War. Sets that have been built for the film had been destroyed and equipment either vanished or was beyond repair. Production was closed down. Frederickson and Coppola stayed another year in the Philippines, followed by close to two years of editing before the movie’s release in 1979. Apocalypse Now won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and Frederickson was nominated for another Oscar. For decades, Frederickson and Coppola had worked closely together. Their projects included The Godfather, The Godfather: Part II, Apocalypse Now, The Outsiders, and One from the Heart. During this time, Frederickson was nominated twice for Academy Awards and won the Oscar for The Godfather: Part II. The Godfather trilogy boasts nine Academy Awards and 20 Academy Award nominations. By the time The Godfather: Part III was distributed on home video, the trilogy had earned more than $1-billion. As of February 2017, according to a Tulsa World

article, there have been only 29 Oklahomans who have been winners and nominated for the Academy Award. Other winners/nominees for the Academy Award from Oklahoma include Oklahoma Hall of Fame inductees James Garner and Alfre Woodard. Besides being a part of Coppola’s American Zoetrope Studios team, Frederickson served as vice president in charge of Feature Film Production for Lorimar Productions. Regarding television, he has served as producer of The Return of Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer and the series Houston Knights. He wrote the original story for the featured film Bad Girls, a Twentieth Century Fox Film starring Andie MacDowell, Drew Barrymore, Mary Stuart Masterson, and Madeline Stowe. He was the executive producer of Weird Al Yankovic’s UHF and Rodney Dangerfield’s Ladybugs. According to the Independent Movie Data

Gray Frederickson, standing far back, and Francis Ford Coppola, second from right, with the production team of The Godfather.

Base (IMDB), he has been a producer of more than 40 films, production manager of seven films, an actor in six films, including 1941 directed by Steven Spielberg, and assistant director of one film. Five of Frederickson’s films are in the Top 100 of the American Film Institute’s Best Films of All Time—The Godfather, The Godfather: Part II, Apocalypse Now, The Outsiders, and The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. These five movies alone launched multiple actors to superstardom, including Al Pacino, Marlon Brando, James Caan, Robert Duvall, Diane Keaton, Robert De Niro, Martin Sheen, Harrison Ford, Dennis Hopper, C. Thomas Howell, Matt Dillon, Ralph Maccio, Patrick Swayze, Rob Lowe, Emilio Estevez, Tom Cruise, Diane Lane, Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach and Lee Van Cleef.

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In 2001, Gray Frederickson, left, and Mark Stansberry founded GrayMark Productions, LLC. GrayMark Productions won the Emmy for Dream No Little Dream: The Legacy and Life of Robert S. Kerr and produced five feature films.

2002 ACADEMY AWARDS I was invited by Gray to be his guest at the 2002 Academy Awards and events. We spent close to a week in Los Angeles. One of the evenings, Gray and I were having dinner when a man came from behind Gray and gave him a big bear hug. The man was actor Matt Dillon. Matt let me know how important Gray was in his career and how he helped him in his success. This was one of many times during that week I heard from actors, directors, producers, and other movie industry professionals how Gray had been an important part of their lives too. I could tell that each of them felt like Gray was their best friend. Gray carried with him the sincere Oklahoma spirit of warmth and friendliness. Through the years, I have continued to hear similar stories about Gray.

—MARK STANSBERRY

In the 1990s, Frederickson married Karen Mosier, a Hollywood Realtor. They have two grown children, Kelsey and Tyler. Frederickson wanted to raise his children in his home state of Oklahoma. He wanted to help launch the movie industry in Oklahoma. In 2000, Frederickson met Mark Stansberry at an Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce event. The two became friends and, in 2001, founded the film production company GrayMark Productions, LLC. GrayMark earned an Emmy in 2008 for the historical documentary Dream No Little Dream: The Legacy and

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Life of Robert S. Kerr narrated by Academy Award winner Keith Carradine. GrayMark also produced five feature films starring Burt Reynolds, D. L. Hughley, Gabriele Reece, Gary Busey, Tony Danza, Tom Arnold, Cliff De Young, Armand Assante, and Lou Diamond Phillips. In the early 2000s, Frederickson was instrumental in pursuing film tax incentives for films produced in Oklahoma. He was successful and many movies have been produced in Oklahoma because of those incentives. The movie industry has brought millions of dollars into the Oklahoma economy. Frederickson is the founder of Oklahoma City Community College’s film/video program, the largest in the state and serves as the artist-in-residence. Over the years, he has developed a first-class film program that covers every aspect of filmmaking, a 6,000-square-foot soundstage, and an 1,100-seat theater. With stateof-the-art film and editing equipment, Frederickson has brought Hollywood to Oklahoma. Staffed with professionals from the film industry, students already have won multiple awards, including an Emmy. In 2015, Academy Award-winning director Francis Ford Coppola joined Frederickson at the college. He chose the school to prove his concept about what he entitled “Distant Vision” and to execute a groundbreaking, proprietary cinema concept called “Live Cinema”—a movie performance piece created in real time. He spent several weeks putting his idea to work. The experimental workshop included 70 students enrolled in the special course. Directed, written, and produced by Coppola, students on the “Distant Vision” project can say they have worked under the direction of one of the greatest directors of all time. Post GrayMark, Frederickson produced over 15 films, including a documentary with Stansberry, entitled The Grand Energy Transition. The documentary was based on the book with the same title by Oklahoma Hall of Famer Robert Hefner III. Hefner’s wife, Mei Li Hefner, also served as a producer. The documentary was supported by many, including T. Boone Pickens, the late Aubrey McClendon, and Ted Turner. Each was interviewed for the documentary that was shown throughout the country, it premiered in Stansberry’s hometown of Elk City, Oklahoma, and in Washington, D.C. The documentary was narrated by Astronaut John Herrington. A major influence on bringing filmmaking and film training to Oklahoma, Frederickson’s vision for and efforts in supporting the local film industry will continue to impact generations to come.


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O

n November 15, 2018, more than 1,300 gathered in the Grand Ballroom of the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel and Convention Center to celebrate the induction of seven outstanding Oklahomans. The 91st annual Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony celebrated Paul Allen, Enid; Mo Anderson, Waukomis; Ree Drummond, Pawhuska; David Rainbolt, Oklahoma City; Jon R. Stuart, Tulsa; and Carrie Underwood, Checotah, receiving Oklahoma’s highest honor. In addition, Charlie Christian of Oklahoma City was inducted posthumously.

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THE 2018 OKLAHOMA HA

The 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Honorees, seated from left, Mo Anderson, David Rainbolt, Ree Drummond, Paul Allen, Carrie Underwood, and Jon R. Stuart. Charlie Christian was inducted posthumously.


Oklahoma’s Highest Honor

ALL of FAME BANQUET & INDUCTION CEREMONY BY GINI MOORE CAMPBELL

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During dinner, the big screens provided guests with a glimpse into the education programming, activities, and opportunities made available by the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Gaylord-Pickens Museum. Patrons of the 2018 event also were recognized and former inductees of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame were honored by a Link to a Legacy. Introduced by Oklahoma Hall of Fame Chairman, Governor Bill Anoatubby, Oral Roberts University President William M. Wilson provided the invocation for the evening. The pre-show began with Gov. Anoatubby and Oklahoma Hall of Fame President and CEO Shannon L. Rich

A sell-out crowd celebrated the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony.

officially welcoming those in attendance. They thanked The Chickasaw Nation and the Stuart Family Foundation for their generosity in serving as Presenting Sponsors of the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony and recognized the 2018 Media Sponsors—The Lawton Constitution and Bill W. Burgess, Jr., The Oklahoman Media Company, and Tulsa World Media Company. In addition, they recognized Members of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in attendance and honored the three who had passed since the 2017 ceremony—Roy Clark, Nancy Frantz Davies, and Gen. Jack N. Merritt.

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Governor Bill Anoatubby, Chairman of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, and President and CEO Shannon L. Rich welcomed the crowd to the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony.

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Jayke Flaggert, center, with Oklahoma Hall of Fame Members Jane Jayroe Gamble and Becky Dixon.

Oklahoma Hall of Fame Members Becky Dixon, Class of 2016, and Jane Jayroe Gamble, Class of 2007, served as mistresses of ceremonies for the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony.

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Anoatubby and Rich also introduced Jayke Flaggert, a senior from Choctaw High School, as the recipient of the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Scholarship. In the amount of $6,000, this scholarship has been funded primarily by members of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. Flaggert will be attending the University of Oklahoma in fall, 2019. They reminded guests that they would have the opportunity to greet Honorees and their Presenters during the reception immediately following the ceremony. After a final thank you to those supporting the Oklahoma Hall of Fame by attending, the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony was underway. From Cache, 14-year-old Sarah Pohawpatchoko performed “The National Anthem.” Next, mistresses of ceremonies and members of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Becky Dixon and Jane Jayroe Gamble took the stage. The duo thanked all in attendance for joining the festivities, shared what being an Oklahoman means to them, and introduced the first of two “mission moments” highlighting programs made possible by the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. The inductions began with David L. Boren presenting Jon R. Stuart, followed by John Davis presenting Mo Anderson and Dave McLaughlin presenting Paul Allen. The posthumous induction of Charlie Christian followed with a rendition of one of Christian’s songs by Chip Henderson, musician and author of Charlie Christian: Selected Solos From the Father of Modern Jazz, and Anita Arnold and Freddy Jenkins, Christian’s cousin, accepted on the late Honoree’s behalf.


Governor Mary Fallin congratulated the Honorees and their families on receiving Oklahoma’s highest honor—induction into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

Adjunct faculty member at both Middle Tennessee State University and Columbia State College, Chip Henderson performed one of Charlie Christian’s hits following the Honoree’s posthumous induction.

The ORU Chamber Singers, under the direction of Dr. Imgyu Kang, led the crowd in “Oklahoma!”

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Inductions continued with Ladd Drummond presenting Ree Drummond, Clayton I. Bennett presenting David Rainbolt, and Bryan White presenting Carrie Underwood. Governor Mary Fallin congratulated the Class of 2018 on behalf of the State of Oklahoma before welcoming The ORU Chamber Singers to close the show with “Oklahoma!” During the Induction Ceremony, the

Oklahoma Hall of Fame’s Teen Board served as escorts, ensuring dignitaries were in place to perform their duties. The Teen Board is made up of high school students representing 12 school districts and eight counties throughout Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Hall of Fame Orchestra, under the direction of Jeff Kidwell, provided dinner music and performed during the pre-show and induction ceremony.

To celebrate the 91ST annual Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony, members of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in attendance were invited to participate in a commemorative photo.

OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME KATHRYN BARBER JANIAH BOWERS SOPHIA DARROW MYLES DEMENT LANDRY GADDY

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TEEN BOARD ESCORTS

WYATT HOOD TOBIAS JOHNSON RAY PASION SADIE RITTENBERRY STERLING SENNER

MEGAN SZYMANSKI CINDY TANG JOHNATHAN TULLY CAM WALLIS KATELYN WOODS


2018 LINK TO A LEGACY The Oklahoma Hall of Fame partnered with supporters to provide a link between the outstanding individuals inducted tonight and the legacies of those who were inducted before them through Link to a Legacy. Link to a Legacy to recognize past inductees of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame who have contributed to our state’s rich heritage. Link to a Legacy sponsors continue the preservation of our state’s heritage and the remarkable stories of each of our members by supporting

the programs of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum. Listed below are those honored with Link to a Legacy, including their years of induction and hometowns. We would like to thank each Link to a Legacy sponsor for joining us to recognize these inspiring Oklahomans once again. Each sponsor is listed below the Hall of Fame member they have chosen to honor this year.

GOVERNOR BILL ANOATUBBY | 2004 | ADA Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores HENRY BELLMON | 1976 | BILLINGS Allen Family Foundation in Honor of Gail Wynne CLAYTON I. BENNETT | 2007 | OKLAHOMA CITY BancFirst DAVID L. BOREN | 1988 | SEMINOLE H.E. “Gene” Rainbolt Jon Stuart MOLLY SHI BOREN | 2004 | NORMAN Jon Stuart MIKE D. CASE | 2013 | TULSA Jon Stuart TOM COLE | 2017 | MOORE The Chickasaw Nation NANCY FRANTZ DAVIES | 1986 | ENID Allen Family Foundation DAN DILLINGHAM | 2016 | ENID Allen Family Foundation Dillingham Insurance Keller Williams & Mo Anderson DAN LUTHER EDWARDS | 1947 | ENID Dillingham Family RALPH ELLISON | 2002 | OKLAHOMA CITY Bob and Chimene Burke CHRISTINE GAYLORD EVEREST | 2004 |OKLAHOMA CITY The Oklahoman Media Company TE ATA FISHER | 1957 | TISHOMINGO The Chickasaw Nation KEN FERGESON | 2009 | ALTUS Payne Family ADA LOIS SIPUEL FISHER | 2017 | CHICKASHA The Oklahoman Media Company GENERAL TOMMY FRANKS | 2011 | WYNNEWOOD All America Bank Keller Williams & Mo Anderson JANE JAYROE GAMBLE | 2007 | LAVERNE Keller Williams & Mo Anderson EDWARD L. GAYLORD | 1974 | OKLAHOMA CITY The Clay Bennett Family E.L. and Thelma Gaylord Foundation E.K. GAYLORD | 1930 | OKLAHOMA CITY The Clay Bennett Family E.L. and Thelma Gaylord Foundation JOHN D. GROENDYKE | 2013 | ENID Allen Family Foundation Virginia G. Groendyke and Family V. BURNS HARGIS | 2009 |STILLWATER Calvin and Linda Anthony FRANK KEATING | 2005 |TULSA Keller Williams & Mo Anderson

CATHY KEATING | 2011 | TULSA Keller Williams & Mo Anderson ROBERT S. KERR, JR. | 2003 | OKLAHOMA CITY The Kerr Foundation, Inc. ROXANA LORTON | 2001 | TULSA Jon Stuart King and Lee Kirchner MIKE LARSEN | 2015 | PERKINS The Chickasaw Nation JUDY LOVE | 2010 | OKLAHOMA CITY Keller Williams & Mo Anderson The Chickasaw Narion TOM LOVE | 2000 | OKLAHOMA CITY The Chickasaw Nation NEAL MCCALEB | 2014 | OKLAHOMA CITY Keller Williams & Mo Anderson The Chickasaw Nation TOM J. MCDANIEL | 2006 | OKLAHOMA CITY Calvin and Linda Anthony PHIL PARDUHN | 2017 | EDMOND Phil and Joan Albert WILLIAM G. PAUL | 2003 | OKLAHOMA CITY The Chickasaw Nation NANCY PAYNE ELLIS | 2005 | OKLAHOMA CITY Payne Family WILEY POST | 2004 | MAYSVILLE Bob and Chimene Burke JAY G. PUTERBAUGH | 1950 | MCALESTER The Puterbaugh Foundation CHIEF GREGORY E. PYLE | 2007 | HUGO Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma H.E. “GENE” RAINBOLT | 1999 | OKLAHOMA CITY BancFirst W.G. SKELLY | 1939 | TULSA Jon Stuart CHARLES B. STUART | 1933 | OKLAHOMA CITY Jon Stuart HAROLD C. STUART | 1983 | TULSA Jon Stuart JUSTICE STEVEN W. TAYLOR | 2009 | MCALESTER The Puterbaugh Foundation MICHAEL C. TURPEN | 2010 | OKLAHOMA CITY Keller Williams & Mo Anderson STEADMAN UPHAM | 2015 | TULSA Peggy Upham LEW O. WARD | 2010 | ENID Allen Family Foundation The Lew Ward Family RUSSELL WESTBROOK | 2016 | OKLAHOMA CITY Candor

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PAUL ALLEN enid Born and raised on the family farm in northeast Nebraska, from his parents, Claude and Laura Allen, Paul Allen learned early the values of honesty, hard work, and the respect of others. Allen worked on the farm until leaving for the University of Nebraska. After earning his business degree he was hired by the George A. Hormel Company, working in Fremont, Nebraska and Austin, Minnesota, before relocating to Oklahoma City in 1967 to manage the Hormel production plant.   Several years later he and Dave McLaughlin acquired the original Advance Meat Company in Enid, quickly making the community home.  Revenue increased from $300,000 to $3-million and a second facility opened over the next ten years. In 1990, the purchase of an existing facility provided Advance with a new stateof-the-art facility. In 2009 when a majority stake in the company was sold, Advance’s revenue exceeded $850-million and they employed more than 2,400

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nationwide. In addition, Advance was the first in Oklahoma to make corporate childcare available for nonhealthcare employees. Allen’s contributions to Enid include $1-million to launch Enid Public Schools’ $90-million bond issue; supporting Forgotten Ministries, a home for newly-released, non-violent offenders; the relocation and renovation of Enid Symphony Hall, our state’s longest-performing symphony; leading a $4-million capital campaign for the YMCA; the creation of a $2-million scholarship fund for Enid-area graduating seniors; and the construction of The David Allen Memorial Ballpark, dedicated to their late son.  The $3-million ballpark annually hosts the National Junior College Division II World Series. Allen has been inducted to the Enid Hall of Fame and was named Pillar of the Plains Citizen of the Year, among countless other honors. For more than 50 years Allen has made Oklahoma his and his family’s home. He is a proud husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather.

Entrepreneur and former business partner of Paul Allen, Dave McLaughlin, right, presented Allen for induction.


President & CEO of Keller Williams Realty International John Davis presented Mo Anderson for induction.

MO ANDERSON waukomis The youngest of five born to tenant farmers in rural Oklahoma, it was the hard work on the farm that shaped the work ethic of Mo Anderson. The first in her family to earn a college degree, she taught music in the public schools before entering the world of real estate. Her first Century 21 franchise quickly rose to the third-highest producing out of 7,500 locations in North America. She served on the Oklahoma Real Estate Commission, including two terms as chairman. She convinced Keller Williams Co-founder Gary Keller to expand his franchise company outside of Texas. Anderson became the regional owner for Keller Williams Oklahoma. In 1995, Anderson became the first CEO and coowner of Keller Williams International. The company is now the number one real estate franchise company in the world in size, units, and volume, growing from 45 offices and 1,800 agents to

boasting 1,000 offices and nearly 200,000 agents in 35 countries today. Currently vice chairman of the board, Anderson has been deemed one of “America’s Top 25 Influential Thought Leaders” by REALTOR Magazine and “One of Real Estate’s Most Influential People.” Anderson continues to cultivate the firm’s culture to maintain high standards of character. Known as “The Velvet Hammer” for her uncompromising values and standards, her business acumen is fueled with faith and compassion. Anderson authored A Joy-filled Life: Lessons from a Tenant Farmer’s Daughter Who Became a CEO and launched MoAnderson. com, an online mentoring community for the next generation of leaders. Anderson’s greatest legacy will be her philanthropic giving. Her local community, charitable organizations, and ministries around the world have been richly blessed by her belief that the higher purpose of business is to give, care, and share.

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CHARLIE CHRISTIAN oklahoma city Born in Bonham,Texas, Oklahoma City became Charlie Christian’s home at the age of two. From a musical family, Christian first began playing the trumpet and at age 12 was playing a cigar box guitar he made himself.When his father and brothers formed a quartet, Christian received his first real guitar as a member of the group.They played Oklahoma City clubs, including those in historic Deep Deuce, before Christian’s reputation spread and he began touring across the United States before moving to California at the age of 23. Christian had changed the way the guitar was played. He brought it to the forefront as a solo instrument, amplified its

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sound, and changed what it could do with his singlestring solo technique. Christian played with the greats including Jimmy Rushing, Count Basie, and Benny Goodman. Even today, courses on the techniques of Christian are taught in universities and studios worldwide. Carlos Santana has talked about the influence Christian had on him; B. B. King said he just wanted to be able to play like him, but never could; and the Jazz at Lincoln Center curator said he changed the sound of music forever. Who would have ever imagined that at the time of his death, at only 25, young Charlie Christian would be respected worldwide as the “Father of Bebop” and an inspiration to the greats that followed?

Anita Arnold, left, and Freddy Jenkins accepted the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Medallion on behalf of the late Charlie Christian.


Co-owner of Drumond Land & Cattle Company, rancher, and businessman Ladd Drummond presented Ree Drummond for induction.

REE DRUMMOND pawhuska Born in Bartlesville, following high school Ree Drummond headed west to the University of Southern California. However, it was a chance meeting with a local cowboy on a visit home that changed her course and brought the “Pioneer Woman” back to Oklahoma. Drummond married that cowboy and began making her home on Drummond Ranch in the beautiful Osage country. It was her adventures on the ranch and raising the couple’s three children that served as the catalyst for the Pioneer Woman blog in 2006. Three years later, her first cookbook was released— taking the number one spot on the New York Times Bestseller List. Multiple cookbooks and children’s books—featuring the family’s ranch dog and a younger version of Ree herself—have followed. Her first television appearance was on Throwdown! With Bobby Flay, in 2010. The following year, Drummond’s series, The

Pioneer Woman, debuted on Food Network. Last year, The Pioneer Woman Magazine hit the shelves. Published four times annually, the readership is rapidly increasing. In 2016, the already wellknown Pioneer Woman Mercantile opened in Pawhuska. “The Merc,” as it is commonly called by visitors, includes a restaurant, retail store, and bakery. This enterprise brings thousands of visitors from around the world to Pawhuska. Earlier this year Drummond opened The Boarding House—a boutique hotel located just down the street from The Mercantile. And, her popular and expansive line of kitchen items, including dishes, utensils, and cookware, is available at Walmart. It is the balance of work and family life that make managing a demanding schedule achievable by Oklahoma’s Pioneer Woman, Ree Drummond.

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DAVID RAINBOLT oklahoma city Oklahoma City’s David Rainbolt graduated from the University of Oklahoma and the Tulane University Graduate School of Business. After starting his banking career in Texas, he moved back home to Oklahoma in 1982 and began working to modernize the state’s banking laws. He was CFO of the founding management team of United Community Corporation and, in 1992, became chief executive officer of BancFirst, its successor company. During his 25 years as CEO, the company went public, expanded into metropolitan areas, and closed 34 acquisitions, growing from less than $700 million to over $7 billion at the time he became executive chairman in 2017. His banking career also includes serving as chairman of the Oklahoma Bankers Association during the passage of interstate banking. Outside of banking, Rainbolt has been active in nonpartisan reform efforts, including civil

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justice, criminal justice, and common and higher education issues, most recently including Step Up Oklahoma to solve the state’s budget impasse, provide higher compensation for teachers, and restructure state and county government to improve accountability. His civic involvement includes chairing the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce, Oklahoma State Chamber of Commerce, Last Frontier Council of Boy Scouts, United Way of Central Oklahoma, the Children’s Center Foundation, Downtown Oklahoma City Incorporated, and Oklahoma Bankers Association. He is currently chairman of the Dean McGee Eye Institute and is a 30-year member of the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation. With his wife Kim, Rainbolt has three sons, making him a little league baseball coach for 24 years, and two grandsons.

President of Dorchester Capital, chairman of the Oklahoma City Thunder, and a 2007 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Inductee, Clayton I. Bennett, left, presented David Rainbolt for induction.


President Emeritus of the University of Oklahoma, former Oklahoma governor and U. S. Senator, and 1988 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Inductee, David L. Boren presented Jon R. Stuart for induction.

JON R. STUART tulsa Adopted as an infant in Norway and brought home to Tulsa, Jon R. Stuart was educated in Tulsa, and at the Culver Military Academy, the University of Oklahoma, and The University of Tulsa. As chairman of the board and chief executive officer of First Stuart Corporation, Stuart is continuing in the family business. He also is the managing partner of Jon R. Stuart Interests, L.L.C., its primary focus on energy, and is a trustee for the Stuart Family Foundation. Appointed by His Royal Highness King Harald VI of Norway, Stuart serves as the Royal Norwegian Consul for Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas. Stuart served on the City of Tulsa-Rogers County Port Authority Board for more than 25 years, including five years as chairman. The Port of Catoosa’s Maritime Park is named in his honor. He has served on the Gilcrease Museum National

Advisory Board and the Committee of 100—Tulsa, as a trustee for Boston Avenue United Methodist Church and Philbrook Museum of Art, as well as the Falcon Foundation in Colorado Springs, and served on the University of Oklahoma’s Board of Regents for 14 years, opening the Transportation Operations Center while serving as chairman. Dedicated in 2011, the Stuart Foundation’s lead gift served as the catalyst for the Stuart Wing at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art on the University of Oklahoma campus. The Wing provided for an 18,000-square-foot expansion and new gallery space and administration offices. He and his wife, DeeDee, continue to make their home in Tulsa. Stuart is a fourth-generation inductee, following his great-grandfather Charles B. Stuart, inducted in 1933, grandfather W. G. Skelly, inducted in 1939, and father, Harold C. Stuart, in 1983.

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CARRIE UNDERWOOD checotah Carrie Underwood emerged from the promise of her 2005 American Idol win to become a true multi-format, multi-media global superstar, spanning achievements in music, television, and film. A seven-time GRAMMY® Award winner, she has sold 64 million records worldwide and recorded 26 #1 singles, 13 of which she co-wrote. In 2013, the Grand Ole Opry member starred as Maria von Trapp in NBC’s threehour holiday blockbuster, the Emmy®-winning The Sound of Music Live!, whose airings attracted 44 million viewers. 2018 marked her sixth season as the voice

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of primetime television’s #1 program, Sunday Night Football, and in November, she co-hosted the CMA Awards for the eleventh consecutive year. Earlier this year, she released the hit event anthem “The Champion” featuring Ludacris, which she cowrote to open Super Bowl LII and was incorporated into NBC’s coverage of the 2018 Olympic Winter Games. With the release of her sixth studio album this past September, “Cry Pretty,” which she coproduced and already has been certified gold, Underwood became the only woman to land four country albums at the top of the all-genre Billboard 200 chart.

Oklahoma native, international recording artist, GRAMMY Award winner, and songwriter Bryan White presented Carrie Underwood for induction.


2018 OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME PATRON DONORS PRESENTING SPONSORS

STUART FAMILY FOUNDATION SPECIAL THANK YOU TO

ALLEN FAMILY CHARITABLE FUND, ENID MR. AND MRS. RICHARD ANDERSON, OKLAHOMA CITY BANCFIRST, OKLAHOMA CITY JON R. STUART, TULSA MEDIA SPONSORS

AND BILL W. BURGESS, JR, LAWTON

PREMIER PATRONS

ALLEN FAMILY CHARITABLE FOUNDATION, ENID BANCFIRST, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. AND MRS. CLAYTON I. BENNETT, OKLAHOMA CITY FIRST STUART CORPORATION, TULSA CHARLIE & PEGGY STEPHENSON FAMILY FOUNDATION, TULSA JON R. STUART, TULSA HERITAGE PATRONS

PHIL B. AND JOAN M. ALBERT, CLAREMORE ALL AMERICA BANK, MUSTANG MR. AND MRS. RICHARD ANDERSON, OKLAHOMA CITY CHOCTAW NATION OF OKLAHOMA, DURANT JAMES C. AND TERESA K. DAY FOUNDATION, SUGARLAND, TX DEVON ENERGY CORPORATION, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. AND MRS. JOHN D. GROENDYKE, ENID TOM AND JUDY LOVE, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. JOHN B. TURNER, TULSA LEW WARD FAMILY, ENID

LEGACY PATRONS AMERICAN FIDELITY FOUNDATION, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL BURRAGE, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL D. CASE, TULSA THE CHICKASAW NATION, ADA FOUNDATION MANAGEMENT INC., OKLAHOMA CITY MR. ROBERT A. FUNK, YUKON GLOBALHEALTH, TULSA MR. TIMOTHY HEADINGTON, DALLAS, TX KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY INTERNATIONAL, AUSTIN, TX TRACY AND DAVID KYLE, TULSA MAIN STREET PARKING, OKLAHOMA CITY LARRY AND POLLY NICHOLS, OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, STILLWATER THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA, NORMAN PAYNE FAMILY, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. RICHARD L. SIAS, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. AND MRS. REGGIE WHITTEN, OKLAHOMA CITY TRACKMAKER PATRONS MR. AND MRS. RICHARD ANDERSON, OKLAHOMA CITY BANCFIRST, OKLAHOMA CITY BANCFIRST, TULSA BANK OF OKLAHOMA, TULSA BKD LLP, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. AND MRS. FRED BURKS, OKMULGEE CAMERON UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION, LAWTON CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK, ENID CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES, CATOOSA THE CHICKASAW NATION, ADA CITY OF PAWHUSKA, PAWHUSKA JOHN CHRISTNER TRUCKING, LLC, SAPULPA DILLINGHAM INSURANCE, ENID WENDY AND GENTNER DRUMMOND/ BLUE SKY BANK, TULSA MR. AND MRS. LADD DRUMMOND, PAWHUSKA THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK & TRUST OF OKMULGEE, OKMULGEE MRS. HENRY FREEDE, OKLAHOMA CITY SHANNON AND CHIP FUDGE, OKLAHOMA CITY GADDIS & GADDIS WEALTH MANAGEMENT, ADA GEORGIA-PACIFIC MUSKOGEE, MUSKOGEE MARYBETH & IKE GLASS, NEWKIRK HARD ROCK CASINO & HOTEL, TULSA IBC BANK, OKLAHOMA CITY DANIEL AND KIMBERLEE JORDAN, TULSA JORDAN INSURANCE GROUP, ARDMORE MR. AND MRS. EDWARD KELLER, TULSA KELLER WILLIAMS INTERNATIONAL, AUSTIN, TX KING AND LEE KIRCHNER, TULSA MR. AND MRS. DESMOND MASON, OKLAHOMA CITY JOE AND DARCEY MORAN, TULSA NBC OKLAHOMA, ALTUS NO MAN’S LAND FOOD, ENID OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER, OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA COUNCIL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS, OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA MEDICAL RESEARCH FOUNDATION, OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR HEALTH SCIENCES, TULSA ONE STAR REWARDS, CATOOSA

OU’S MICHAEL F. PRICE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND WEITZENHOFFER FAMILY COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS, NORMAN MR. GARY D. PARKER, MUSKOGEE PATRICK T. ROONEY/ FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF OKLAHOMA, OKLAHOMA CITY SEMINOLE STATE COLLEGE EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION, SEMINOLE TWANG, INC., NASHVILLE, TN UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA, EDMOND UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER, OKLAHOMA CITY GREGG WADLEY, OKLAHOMA CITY THE ZARROW FAMILIES FOUNDATION, TULSA PIONEER PATRONS BANK SNB, A DIVISION OF SIMMONS BANK, OKLAHOMA CITY BRUCE AND SHERYL BENBROOK, WOODWARD MR. AND MRS. BOB BURKE, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. AND MRS. STEVE BURRAGE, ANTLERS COX COMMUNICATIONS, OKLAHOMA CITY DEAN A. MCGEE EYE INSTITUTE, OKLAHOMA CITY DR. LESLIE RAINBOLT-FORBES, OKLAHOMA CITY HALL ESTILL/ SAM HEIGLE, OKLAHOMA CITY HELMERICH & PAYNE, INC., TULSA W. DEVIER PIERSON, CHEVY CHASE, MD MR. AND MRS. JOHN MASSEY, DURANT MILL CREEK COMPANIES, TULSA LARRY & MARILYN LEE/ RAM ENERGY LLC, TULSA MR. ED RUSCHA, LOS ANGELES, CA UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT, NORMAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND ARTS OF OKLAHOMA FOUNDATION, CHICKASHA UMB BANK, OKLAHOMA CITY & TULSA MRS. SUSAN WINCHESTER, CHICKASHA HOMESTEADER PATRON—$750 ASCENT RESOURCES, OKLAHOMA CITY DR. ANN AND TRACY CAINE, OKLAHOMA CITY WAYNE CARDWELL, OWASSO DR. CHERYL EVANS AND MR. TOM EVANS, ENID FACTOR 110 EVENTS, OKLAHOMA CITY MRS. JANE B. HARLOW, OKLAHOMA CITY DR. SCOTT AND DEBBIE LUCAS, EDMOND JULIE AND JOHN NICKEL, TULSA WILLIAM G. PAUL, OKLAHOMA CITY MR. AND MRS. DOYLE PHILLIPS, EDMOND JIM & KATHY STUART, SHAWNEE BRAD & SANDRA THOMPSON, EDMOND JUDGE AND MRS. RALPH THOMPSON, OKLAHOMA CITY HARDY AND KARI WATKINS, OKLAHOMA CITY JUSTICE LINDA ENGLISH WEEKS, NORMAN

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H A L L

O F

F A M E

M E M B E R

S P O T L I G H T

Dr. John Montgomery E

Dr. John Montgomery, inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 2000, was presented by Fox Wood III.

BY MATTIE P. BARLOW 36

mbodying the characteristics of pioneer spirit and optimism were almost second nature for Oklahoma Hall of Fame Member Dr. John Montgomery. His life was dedicated not only to perfecting his professional practice in Poteau, Oklahoma, but he also tirelessly served the State of Oklahoma as a civic leader throughout the second half of the twentieth century. Montgomery was born on August 11, 1917 to Louis and Amanda Montgomery. One of nine siblings, he grew up eight miles north of Henderson, Texas on a cotton farm. He, and all of his siblings, picked cotton to support the family. Montgomery claimed he could easily pick up to 400 pounds of cotton per day. During the 1920s, Montgomery accompanied his father to sell cotton in town and witnessed a moment of racial discrimination that his father turned into a memorable lesson.


His father had waited his turn in line to collect pay for their cotton haul, but when it was his turn the cashier scolded him for having stood in line in front of white farmers. He was forced to wait again, at the back of the line. Montgomery didn’t understand why his dad accepted this treatment and would always remember the explanation his father gave him. His father said he had a responsibility to be passive for the sake of his family’s safety, but that Montgomery, and his siblings, could work to correct racial injustices by getting an education and becoming proud citizens. “I never forgot that advice,” said Dr. Montgomery in a 2014 documentary, “That stayed with

attended Prairie View A&M University in Prairie View, Texas where he was an all-American football player and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture in 1940. It was also where he met his wife Doris Hightower, and the two were wed in 1944. Montgomery spent time post-graduation, 1940 to 1941, teaching at a vocational agriculture school in Dekalb, Texas. At the conclusion of that school year, he joined the United States Army Corps of Engineers on May 28, 1941 and served during World War II until 1945. Within six months of enlisting as a private he was promoted to First Sergeant. He was entrusted with taking 120 cadre men from Fort

John Montgomery and Doris, his wife of fifty-six years.

Dr. John Montgomery inspects one of his many patients during his thirty-nine year veterinarian career.

me.” And it is evident in every aspect of his work that this sentiment followed Montgomery for the rest of his life. Montgomery grew up in a time before racial integration in public schools. To further his education after the eighth grade he attended a high school for black students forty miles away from home in Marshall, Texas. After earning his high school diploma, Montgomery

Leonard Wood, Missouri to Fort Lewis, Washington to establish a headquarters and training company. During his time at Fort Lewis, he was granted furlough allowing him to travel home with Doris for a few days. They took the train, which was also transporting German prisoners of war to a different military camp. Montgomery and his wife went to the dining car for a meal

Treating the bull of his friend Fox Wood III.

In addition to farm animals, Dr. John Montgomery expanded his practice to treat domesticated pets as well, like this house cat.

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but were denied service, turned away by a waitress who was serving all of the German prisoners. His military classification was outranked by the color of his skin. For two days, the couple did not eat until the train stopped in Wyoming and Montgomery trekked through the snow to find a grocery store. After serving during World War II, Montgomery moved to Tuskegee, Alabama to further his education and earned a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

degree from Tuskegee Institute (known today as Tuskegee University) in May 1950, graduating magma cum laude. From 1950 to 1951, he was employed by the United States Department of Agriculture and assigned to the United States and Mexico Commission. He worked in Mexico City on a project attempting to eradicate hoof and mouth disease in farm animals. It was during this time that Montgomery was thinking about moving to Oklahoma to start a

Dr. John Montgomery speaks at Oklahoma State University, flanked by Governor David Boren who first appointed Montgomery to the OSU/ A&M Board of Regents.

family with Doris and open his own veterinary practice. A fellow Tuskegee graduate told Montgomery that many Oklahoma farmers were turning from crops to cattle and were desperate for animal care. When he heard that there were approximately 30,000 head of cattle in LeFlore County, he knew it was a golden opportunity. However, there were some that tried persuading him from moving to southeast Oklahoma, an area known at

Dr. John Montgomery, center back row, was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 2000.

the time as “Little Dixie”. Jim Crow laws were still the lay of the land in Poteau. When the Montgomerys arrived in 1951, they were greeted by a black woman who offered them a place to sleep and the advice of leaving in the morning because “they were in the wrong place”. Conversely, Montgomery was surprised that his reception by the white community leaders was unlike what he had been warned about, as they were quite cordial. “My customers wanted a professional service and it didn’t matter if the person providing that service was black or white,” said Montgomery in a 2007 interview.

Dr. John Montgomery was serving on the OSU/A&M Board of Regents when President George Bush Sr. gave the commencement speech at OSU’s graduation ceremony.

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In July of 1951, Montgomery established the LeFlore County Veterinary Clinic. Not only was he the first licensed veterinarian in LeFlore County, he was also the only veterinarian east from McAlester, Oklahoma to Fort Smith, Arkansas, and south from Muskogee to the Oklahoma/Texas border. To establish his practice he traveled the back roads in LeFlore, Haskell, and Latimer counties making twenty-five to thirty house calls a day. He even had clients in western Arkansas. “My pick up was my office and an audience would be waiting for me at every stop. They wanted to see what a black veterinarian could do,” said Montgomery. As his practice grew, Montgomery built a clinic behind his house and started treating house pets in addition to farm animals. Dr. Montgomery is remembered as a true pioneer in the field of veterinary medicine. He introduced the concept of preventative medicine to southeast Oklahoma farmers and assisted in controlling an outbreak of anaplasmosis, a destructive tick-borne bacterial disease in cattle. He also promoted herd certification and artificial insemination. Montgomery found time to be a mentor to young people interested in attending veterinarian school. At his clinic, he offered summer jobs and shadowing opportunities to anyone who wanted to work and learn under his tutelage. Although Montgomery found professional success in Poteau, there were still social and civic barriers to be torn down. “We couldn’t eat in any café. We couldn’t use any public accommodations like the theater. We couldn’t even wash our clothes in the washeteria. That’s how prejudiced it was,” Montgomery said in 2004 when reflecting on early 1950s Poteau. On one occasion when the Montgomerys were denied service at a diner, he decided to pay the owner a visit to discuss why they were not allowed

to eat there. The owner happened to be the wife of a client of his, and that farmer took Montgomery’s side, telling his wife that there was no reason for depriving him and his family the right to dine there. After that encounter, they were allowed to eat in the diner. In 1954, the United States Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation of schools was unconstitutional. It wasn’t long after the ruling that Montgomery turned his attention to the Poteau Public School district to ensure that the black students in the community were getting an education equal to that of the white students. At the school for black students there were two teachers trying to teach eight grades, the older grades had to be bussed to the high school for black students in Spiro because Poteau only had a high school for white students. Montgomery went to the president of the school board on a mission to integrate the entire system, the students, as well as the teachers. When the school board convened to decide on the matter, the majority voted in favor of integrating the system despite concerns from parents of black students who were wary of how their children would be treated by the white students. On June 7, 1955, Poteau became the first school district in the state of Oklahoma to integrate and lacked any setbacks as had been anticipated by parents. Interestingly, just one week prior, Governor Raymond had predicted that southeastern Oklahoma would lag years behind in integration, but because of Dr. Montgomery, the small town of Poteau led the wave of change. Soon after the integration of the public school system, Montgomery found himself fighting another cause for equality. It was Independence Day in 1956. Montgomery and his wife took two-yearold John II to the municipal swimming pool. They stood in line with other Poteau citizens on the hot summer day, but once they reached the young pool custodian at

the entrance, they were embarrassingly turned away due to the city park board instructing the young man that the pool was for white citizens only. The next day, Montgomery contacted lawyer Alpheus Varner who set up a meeting with the city park board and mayor of Poteau, all of whom were white. Varner and Montgomery insisted that all tax-paying Poteau citizens had a right to use the municipal city pool that was funded

The John W. Montgomery Multipurpose Center at Langston University was dedicated in his honor in 1990.

with city tax money. The city attorney in attendance stated that he would resign because the board had no legal ground to ban the Montgomerys or any citizens based on the color of their skin and it was illegal to continue to refuse a taxpayer access to a public facility. The board held a vote on the matter, and the majority voted in favor of allowing all citizens access to the swimming pool. Naturally, Montgomery helped organize the LeFlore County Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and served as president of the organization for fourteen years. The National chapter of the NAACP honored Montgomery with the award

35 39


Presenter Fox Wood III was one of Dr. John Montgomery’s first clients and a long-time friend.

for Outstanding Black Leaders in the Southwest. The LeFlore County Branch created a scholarship foundation in his name for students planning to attend Carl Albert State College or the University of Arkansas-Fort Smith and continues to award scholarships at an annual banquet in honor of Montgomery. Montgomery served on the Poteau City Planning Commission, was a member of the Poteau Chamber of Commerce, and chaired the Board of Deacons at Mount Calvary Baptist Church. He was a member of the Kiamichi Technology Center Board and the Oklahoma State Board of Mental Health. He served on the Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education before his appointment to the Oklahoma State University and A&M Colleges Board of Regents. Montgomery’s first term began in 1975 just as the OSU Veterinary College was facing accreditation troubles. The college was put on probation by the American Veterinarian Association (AVA) for having outdated teaching facilities. Montgomery led the charge to convince the AVA that OSU would improve the program by establishing OSU’s Veterinarian Teaching Hospital. In 1977, the college was given full accreditation largely thanks to

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the efforts of Montgomery. During his time on the Board of Regents, he served twice as chairman and chaired numerous committees. In 1981, the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine established the John W. Montgomery Endowed Scholarship. That same year, at Tuskegee University’s 100th annual spring commencement, Montgomery received the Tuskegee Veterinary Medical Distinguished Service Award. In 1982, he was awarded the Distinguished Citizenship and Service Award for a LeFlore County Citizen. The following year, in 1983, Montgomery was the recipient of the Oklahoma Veterinarian Medical Association’s Outstanding Service Award. He served on the executive board of that association and was once named Veterinarian of the Year. Though Montgomery never attended Langston University, he did work hard to improve the academic program there and helped to set up a satellite location in Tulsa. In 1985, Langston University bestowed upon Montgomery a Distinguished Honorary Alumnus Award. Five years later, in 1990, the university opened the John W. Montgomery Multipurpose Center at Langston University. Montgomery was presented with the Oklahoma Veterinarian Medical Association Presidential Award in 1992. In 1993, the NAACP bestowed another award upon Montgomery, the Presidential Service Award, and he was inducted into the Prairie View A&M University Hall of Fame. Montgomery was the recipient of the Poteau Daily News and Sun’s Lifetime Contribution Award in 1995. At OSU’s commencement ceremonies in 1996, Dr. Montgomery was honored with a Doctorate of Humane Letters. At that time, the dean of the College of Veterinarian Medicine, J.W. Alexander said, “Dr. John Montgomery is truly a pioneer in veterinary medicine and in Oklahoma

higher education. His vision and hard work were the forerunners of today’s multiculturalism and ethnic diversity.” He was only the eighth person to receive that honor in the history of the institution since its founding in 1891. In 1999, he received Leadership Oklahoma’s Lifetime Achievement Award, and in 2000 he was honored at a Black History Month luncheon hosted by the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture and recognized for his outstanding contributions to agriculture in the State of Oklahoma. Dr. John Montgomery was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 2000. Sadly, Doris passed away shortly before Montgomery received Oklahoma’s highest honor. In his acceptance remarks, Montgomery credited Doris for his life’s work, as none of his accomplishments would have been possible without her support and encouragement. His presenter and close friend, Fox Wood III, said on the night of the banquet and induction ceremony, “This man has truly climbed the mountain. And tonight, he stands at the summit a shining example of a great American and a great Oklahoman.” A documentary about the life of Dr. John Montgomery was produced by Poteau native Marlea Evans. Evans captured exclusive interview footage of Montgomery before he passed away at the age of 97 on December 5, 2014. Several times throughout the documentary, Montgomery sings the hymn “Brighten the Corner Where You Are” with such lyrics as: do not wait until some deed of greatness you may do, do not wait to shed your light afar, to the many duties ever near you now be true, brighten the corner where you are. Dr. John Montgomery’s corner of the world was Poteau, Oklahoma, and through living his life as his father had advised all those years before, his light continues to brighten the lives of those in Poteau and throughout Oklahoma.


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OHOF’S STORY THROUGH ITS PEOPLE

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Jane Jayroe signing copies of her latest book, Practice: Unleashing the Power of Faith, published by the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

Olympian Bart Conner during story time at Fall Y’All’s “Throwback Thursday” at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

During the pre-show of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony Governor Bill Anoatubby presented Shannon L. Rich with her very own Oklahoma Hall of Fame Medallion in the form of Bedre’ Chocolate, courtesy of The Chickasaw Nation.

Louise and Clayton I. Bennett celebrated the 2018 Honorees at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony.

Kyle Dillingham, left, who performed during the reception and photo for Oklahoma Hall of Fame Inductees in attendance, and H. E. “Gene” Rainbolt .

Attending the Friends of the Medallion event at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas were Amanda Clinton, Anne Greenwood, and Virginia Groendyke.

Guests gathered in the garden for games as part of Summer Thursday’s “Hoops Day” at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

Mo Anderson spoke about the importance of leadership with the Oklahoma Hall of Fame’s Teen Board during their September meeting.

Denotes Member of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame


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Oklahoma Hall of Fame President & CEO Shannon L. Rich read to guests attending the final day of Summer Thursdays at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

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Peggy and Charlie Stephenson attended the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony after hosting the Honoree and Patron Donor Reception in their home on the eve of the event.

Katherine Allen, Mark Allen, and Chrissy McLaughlin during the reception following the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony.

FOR DETAILS.

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OHOF’S STORY THROUGH ITS PEOPLE

Oklahoma Hall of Famers Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper and Thomas H. McCasland, Jr. at the Friends of the Medallion event in Dallas, Texas, on October 20th.

Guests enjoyed “Bedlam Day” during Fall Y’All at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

On October 8th Bob Burke shared the pride associated with being an Oklahoman with the Teen Board and surpised them with door prizes.

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Justice Tom Colbert participated in Summer Thursdays “Summer Send Off”, the last event for the summer of 2018.

Jane Jayroe and Miss Oklahnoma USA Triana Browne following the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony.

Staff of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame following the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony.

Justice Linda English Weeks, left, congratulated Sarah Pohawpatchoko on her performance of “The National Anthem” during the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony. Sarah attended the event with her father, Loui Pohawpatchoko, right.

Denotes Member of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame


Sixteen breweries participated in Oklahoma Born & Brewed at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum in August.

Celebrating the 2018 Honorees at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony were Sen. George Young and Dr. Gloria Anderson.

Denotes Member of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame

Tre Savage, Freddy Jenkins, Daisy Jenkins, and Chip Henderson at the reception following the 2018 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony.

Members of the cheer squads from both the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University participated in Fall Y’all in October.

Guests enjoyed the opening reception for Unknown Origins by Gayle Curry in the Tulsa World | Lorton Family Gallery of the GaylordPickens Museum.

The Second Century Board raised more than $23,000 for education programming through its annual Oklahoma Born & Brewed event.

The Rolling Thunder Book Bus provided free books to those attending Summer Thursdays on “Hoops Day.”

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OHOF’S STORY THROUGH ITS PEOPLE

Jake Rainbolt, David Rainbolt , Kim Rainbolt, Sam Rainbolt, and Kylee Rainbolt celebrated David Rainbolt’s induction to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

The Bread and Butter Band performed during the 2018 Oklahoma Born & Brewed event at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum and hosted by the Second Century Board.

Artist Gayle Curry and her mother Phyllis Curry at the opening reception for Curry’s Unknown Origins exhibit. In October, Friends of the Medallion visited the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas, to tour the facility and hear from Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper .

Dr. Ann Caine, left, and students during craft time of Fall Y’All’s “Bedlam Day.”

The two weeks of Fall Y’All provided story time, crafts, and games for guests of all ages. Denotes Member of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame

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OKLAHOMA CITY

TULSA*

Friends of the Medallion have a shared interest in preserving and telling the stories of extraordinary Oklahomans. Their support sustains the 91-year tradition of recognizing accomplished Oklahomans with the state’s highest honor–induction into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. Just as the symbols that make up the Hall of Fame medallion reflect and celebrate Oklahoma’s rich heritage, so do the donors who make up this group. Their commitment to sharing the inspiring stories of their fellow Oklahomans allows the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Gaylord-Pickens Museum to create educational and inspiring programs to share our unique stories and instill state pride. We appreciate each of the donors listed below who make a commitment to our mission by giving at a leadership level.

MISSION PARTNERS | $25,000+ Mr. and Mrs. Bob Burke

OKLAHOMA CITY

Simmons Charitable Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Mick Cornett

Chancellor and Mrs. Glen Johnson

Phil Parduhn

BENTONVILLE, AR

Jared Stigge

Bill and Carol Crawford

Mr. Kenny Kautz

Homer Paul

Candor

Taylor Wade

Mr. and Mrs. Chad Dillingham

The Honorable and Mrs. Frank Keating

Mr. William G. Paul

OKLAHOMA CITY

The Chickasaw Nation

MISTLETOE CIRCLE | $2,500 Becky Brandhorst

Mr. Sonny Wilkinson

Mr. Everett Dobson

OKLAHOMA CITY

Paycom

OKLAHOMA CITY

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Burrage

Cassie Wood

Frederic Dorwart

TULSA

E.L. and Thelma Gaylord Foundation

Melinda Compton

Mr. Bob Drake

TULSA

The Puterbaugh Foundation

Ms. Alexis Daniels

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick F. Drummond

SULPHUR

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Durrett

PERKINS

OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA CITY ADA

DURANT

OKLAHOMA CITY MCALESTER

Walton Family Foundation

OKLAHOMA CITY ANTLERS

EDMOND

MIDWEST CITY

Amanda Dietz

CONSTANCY CIRCLE | $10,000 Bill W. Burgess, Jr.

EDMOND

Mr. Robert A. “Bob” Funk

TULSA

Hal Smith Restaurants

ALTUS

Mr. Joe D. Hall

EDMOND

LAWTON

OKLAHOMA CITY NORMAN ELK CITY

Inasmuch Foundation OKLAHOMA CITY

Peggy Kates

OKLAHOMA CITY

Reba McEntire

NASHVILLE, TN

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meinders OKLAHOMA CITY

Oklahoma City Community Foundation OKLAHOMA CITY

The Oklahoman Media Company OKLAHOMA CITY

R.A. Young Foundation DALLAS, TX

GOLD CIRCLE | $5,000 Allen Family Charitable Foundation EDMOND

Governor and Mrs. Bill Anoatubby ADA

Anschutz Foundation DENVER, CO

Central Liquor Company, Owned and Operated by the Naifeh Family OKLAHOMA CITY

Cresap Family Foundation OKLAHOMA CITY

Devon Energy Corporation OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Grigsby EDMOND

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Groendyke ENID

Mr. Fred Hall

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. Timothy C. Headington DALLAS, TX

James C. & Teresa K. Day Foundation SUGAR LAND, TX

Ms. Shannon L. Rich

Michael and Pam Dillinger PURCELL

Wendy and Gentner Drummond Mr. and Mrs. Ken Fergeson Jana Filson

Foundation Management, Inc. OKLAHOMA CITY

Mrs. Henry Freede

OKLAHOMA CITY

Tracey Gentile

WASHINGTON

Mr. Tim Good EDMOND

Helmerich & Payne Inc. TULSA

Jeni Hendricks PAWHUSKA

Richard L. and Diane Hooper YUKON

Kimberly K. Horning NORMAN

Makayla Hunter and Nicholas Stephens OKLAHOMA CITY

Tracy and David Kyle TULSA

Joe and Sara Lansdown EDMOND

The Merrick Foundation OKLAHOMA CITY

Sarah Moll

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Moran III TULSA

Mustang Fuel Corporation OKLAHOMA CITY

Oklahoma State University Foundation STILLWATER

Ms. Brittney Orr ADA

Ms. Rainey Pittman

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. H.E. “Gene” Rainbolt OKLAHOMA CITY

Mrs. Jennifer Shipley EDMOND

OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA CITY EDMOND

THE VILLAGE

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. James Young

OKLAHOMA CITY

FRIENDS OF THE MEDALLION | $1,000 Phil B. and Joan M. Albert CLAREMORE

Mrs. Susan Alman EDMOND

American Fidelity Foundation OKLAHOMA CITY

OKLAHOMA CITY FREDERICK ENID

OKLAHOMA CITY TULSA DAVIS

PAWHUSKA

OKLAHOMA CITY

Carl and Susan Edwards OKLAHOMA CITY

Greg and Paige Elliott CHICKASHA

Encore Medical Services OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. and Mrs. Calvin J. Anthony

Tom & Cheryl Evans

Bank of Oklahoma

Christy and Jim Everest

Dewey & Victoria F. Bartlett, Jr.

Andrea Madison Fitzgerald

Mark Beffort

Fred Jones Family Foundation

Bruce and Sheryl Benbrook

Chip and Shannon Fudge

Charles and Cassandra Bowen Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert “Gib” Gibson

STILLWATER

OKLAHOMA CITY TULSA

OKLAHOMA CITY WOODWARD

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mrs. Barbara Braught DUNCAN

Braum’s Ice Cream & Dairy Store OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. and Mrs. Tony Brooks OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. & Mrs. Steve M. Brown NICHOLS HILLS

ENID

OKLAHOMA CITY NORMAN

OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA CITY

Ike and Marybeth Glass NEWKIRK

Stephen D. Grossi TULSA

The Harold Hamm Foundation OKLAHOMA CITY

Nathaniel & Amanda Harding OKLAHOMA CITY

Fred and Kellie Harlan

Mr. S.M. Brown

OKMULGEE

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mrs. Jane B. Harlow

Robert and Karen Browne Family Fund

NICHOLS HILLS

Leslie Sue Healey

Ann and Tracy Caine

Whitney Hicks

Chris and Gini Moore Campbell

H.T. and Edna Mae Holden

Joanna M. Champlin

Ms. Rhonda Hooper

Ms. Kristin Chenoweth

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Huckabay

Chesapeake Energy Corporation

Melody Hughes

Mr. Barry Chisley

Mrs. Caroline C. Huffines

Ms. Amanda Clinton

Humphreys Fund I, LLC

Dean Andrew M. Coats

Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Jewell

Mr. Luke Corbett

Mr. and Mrs. Carlos E. Johnson

NICHOLS HILLS

OKLAHOMA CITY EDMOND

OKLAHOMA CITY NORMAN

OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA CITY CATOOSA

OKLAHOMA CITY EDMOND

DAVIS

MOORE

KREMLIN

OKLAHOMA CITY MUSTANG EDMOND

ABILENE, TX

OKLAHOMA CITY STILLWATER

OKLAHOMA CITY

OKLAHOMA CITY YUKON

Marilyn and Ed Keller Mr. and Mrs. King Kirchner Mr. Bill Lance Mr. and Mrs. Mike Larsen Larry and Marilyn Lee, RAM Energy LLC TULSA

Lindsay LeFleur EDMOND

Mr. David LeNorman

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. and Mrs. Duke R. Ligon OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. and Mrs. Dave R. Lopez EDMOND

Roxana and Robert Lorton TULSA

Mr. and Mrs. John Massey DURANT

Bill and Julie Masterson OWASSO

Mr. John McArthur and Ms. Karla Oty LAWTON

Mary and Jeff McClean SIMPSONVILLE, KY

Tom and Brenda McDaniel OKLAHOMA CITY

George A. Meiwes

OKLAHOMA CITY

Frank and Debbi Merrick OKLAHOMA CITY

Honorable Vicki Miles-LaGrange OKLAHOMA CITY

Mill Creek Lumber & Supply Company TULSA

EDMOND EDMOND

OKLAHOMA CITY OKLAHOMA CITY

S. Bond Payne and Lori Payne

Mr. and Mrs. W. DeVier Pierson CHEVY CHASE

ARDMORE OKLAHOMA CITY

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. and Mrs. David Rainbolt

TULSA

Susan Winchester

EDMOND

Remerge of Oklahoma County, Inc. OKLAHOMA CITY

Renfro Family Foundation

CHICKASHA

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Wright EDMOND

PONCA CITY

Mr. Frank C. Robson CLAREMORE

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Ross NICHOLS HILLS

Richard L. Sias

OKLAHOMA CITY

Lee Allan Smith

OKLAHOMA CITY

Sooner Healthcare Executives, Inc. OKLAHOMA CITY

Charles and Peggy Stephenson Family Foundation TULSA

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Switzer NORMAN

Mr. Stratton Taylor CLAREMORE

Republic Bank & Trust NORMAN

RSM US LLC

Mrs. Robert Z. Naifeh

OKLAHOMA CITY

Linda and Xavier Neira

OKLAHOMA CITY

Jamie Nolen-McElyea

NORMAN

Norick Investment Company

EARLSBORO

OGE Energy Corp.

OKLAHOMA CITY

Oklahoma County Bar Association

TULSA

OKLAHOMA CITY

T. D. Williamson

Jack C. Rawdon and Dr. Andrea Key

EDMOND

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mr. & Mrs. G. Rainey Williams Jr.

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mullin Plumbing West Division, Inc.

OKLAHOMA CITY

Laurie Williams

Presbyterian Health Foundation

NORMAN

EDMOND

NORMAN

NORMAN

Roderick Polston

Mount St. Mary High School No.95

OKLAHOMA CITY

Hardy and Kari Watkins Justice Linda Weeks

OKLAHOMA CITY

VENICE, CA

MOORE

Mr. Gregg Wadley

OKLAHOMA CITY

Jasmine and Melvin Moran OKLAHOMA CITY

Blake and Donna Wade

Kemisha Peterson

OKLAHOMA CITY

SEMINOLE

OKLAHOMA CITY

OKLAHOMA CITY

Mollman’s Culligan Water OKLAHOMA CITY

Viking Minerals

Ed Ruscha

Brad and Sandra Thompson Doug and Ranet Tippens Mr. Sean Trauschke

Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Turpen University of Oklahoma Foundation Dr. Jim Utterback Shannee Vaughn

Mr. R. Scott Vaughn

OKLAHOMA CITY

With questions, please contact Bailey Gordon at 405.523.3207 or bg@oklahomahof.com. This list represents donors making unrestricted contributions as of July 18, 2018.

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