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AUGUST 2 0 1 5

MAGAZINE OF THE OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME

Bert Seabourn: American Expressionist Preserving Our Architectural Heritage Hanson: Craftsmen of Music Hall of Fame Member Spotlight: Alice Brown Davis Lasting Long: Eighty Years Since WPA OHOF’s Story Through Its People OKLAHOMA HERITAGE ASSOCIATION PUBLISHING


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AUGUST 2015 VOLUME 20 • NUMBER 2 PRESIDENT & CEO Shannon L. Rich

CONTENTS

VICE PRESIDENT, PUBLICATIONS AND EDUCATION Gini Moore Campbell CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE Bob Burke DESIGN Skip McKinstry skipmckinstry.com

MAGAZINE OF THE OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME

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From the President Shannon L. Rich

Bert Seabourn: American Impressionist Marissa Raglin

9 Preserving Our Architectural Heritage Gini Moore Campbell

How does a scientist think? According to Dr. Tang, it all starts with curiosity. He asks a question. He wants to know how something works or how it can be better. You may not know it, but you think like a scientist every day. When you ask questions and try to solve problems, you are thinking like a scientist.

“In most of my adventure stories, I’m actually writing about adventures I had with Gary or about our made-up adventures.”

Te Ata had a deep voice. Part of her training was learning how to vary its sound. She could play the parts of many characters in her one-person program—a weary Indian mother, a weathered medicine man, or a young Indian princess.

BILL WALLACE

“I’d write short stories or parts of books in the evening. Then I’d read it to the class the next day. That’s how my writing career started.”

LEONA MITCHELL OPERA STAR

AUTHOR OF ADVENTURE AND ANIMAL STORIES

LE ON A MITCHE LL

“A great tradition is that of Will Rogers. He ought to be taught in the schools because of what he embodied of the best of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. He was homely as a mud fence and yet as beautiful as a sunrise over an Oklahoma field of alfalfa. There is a curious parallel between Will Rogers and Abraham Lincoln. They were rare figures we could call beloved without embarrassment.”

BILL WALLACE

OKLAHOMA CULTURAL TREASURE

Te Ata was shy around most people. But she loved to sing, dance, and act out stories.

B ILL WA LLACE

DR. JORDAN TANG

TE ATA

THINK … CREATE … DISCOVER

T E ATA

UNKNOWN

JORDAN TANG

HOOKS

OKLAHOMA’S FAVORITE SON

“My brain was not made to remember details. My brain was made to think up new ideas, create, and make connections.”

McKELLIPS

WILL ROGERS

HAILEY

“About once in every 50 years a personality is developed on the American scene whose qualities of mind and heart make such an impression upon us that most of our people in every walk of life generate an affection for him—such a man was Will Rogers.”

JOR DA N TA N G

21 Book Review

SCHUERMANN

$15 $35 $50 $100 $250 $500 $1,000 $2,000 $2,500 $3,500 $5,000 $10,000

W ILL ROGE R S

Student ....................... Subscription ................ Individualism ............... Perseverance .............. Pioneer Spirit ............... Optimism .................... Generosity .................. Legacy Circle .............. Honor Circle ............... Executive Circle ........... President’s Circle ......... Chairman’s Circle ........

BEARD

D O N O R

L E V E L S

2 From the Chairman Joe Moran III

“Once I heard Leona sing, I had a whole new appreciation for opera. I fell in love with her voice. I moved to Oklahoma City from my home in Detroit to study opera at Oklahoma City University just like she did.” DEONNA CATTLEDGE, OPERA STUDENT

“You must have tenacity—develop the hide of an elephant.”

BILL WALLACE

LEONA MITCHELL

CARL SANDBURG, POET

For additional information contact the Oklahoma Hall of Fame

1400 Classen Drive Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73106 Telephone 405.235.4458 or Toll Free 888.501.2059 E-mail info@oklahomahof.com Visit the organization's website at

OklahomaHOF.com

Unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by return postage. LIBRARY DISTRIBUTION MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE GENEROSITY OF MAGAZINE SPONSORS STATEWIDE.

MISSION PARTNERS Mr. and Mrs. Bob Burke Chickasaw Nation Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Continental Resources, Inc. James C. & Teresa K. Day Foundation Devon Energy Corporation E.L. and Thelma Gaylord Foundation INTEGRIS Health Mr. and Mrs. Duke R. Ligon Mr. & Mrs. Robert Z. Naifeh and Family The Oklahoman Media Company Phillips 66 Company Saxum

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

DARLEEN BAILEY BEARD I

A M

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

CHERYL SCHUERMANN S E R I E S

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

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A M

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

PAT I H A I L E Y S E R I E S

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A M

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

O OKKLLA AH HO OM MA A H HEERRIITA TAG GEE A ASSSSO OC CIIAT ATIIO ON N PPU UBBLLIISSH HIIN NG G

22 HANSON: Craftsmen of Music Gini Moore Campbell

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Hall of Fame Member Spotlight: Alice Brown Davis Millie J. Craddick

38 Lasting Long: Eighty Years Since WPA Marjorie Barton

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OHOF’s Story Through Its People

ON THE COVER: Oklahumma, 48 x 48, acrylic on canvas By Bert Seabourn

JANE McKELLIPS S E R I E S

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A OM O K L A H O M A C H I L D R E N ’S K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

G W E N D O LY N H O O K S S E R I E S

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O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

S E R I E S


FROM THE

FROM THE

CHAIRMAN...

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

In May, we announced the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Class of 2015. Receiving our state’s highest honor on the evening of Thursday, November 19 at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel and Convention Center will be Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City; Jim Halsey, Tulsa: Bill Hancock, Hobart; Mike Larsen, Perkins; William J. Ross, Oklahoma City; Sharen Jester Turney, Ardmore; and Steadman Upham, Tulsa. Francis Tuttle, Wellston, will be inducted posthumously. In addition, we have a number of community partners who are serving as sponsors for the 88th annual Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony. Presenting sponsors are the Tulsa World, The Oklahoman, and The Lawton Constitution. Express Employment Professionals is the 2015 Broadcast Sponsor and The Chickasaw Nation is the Floral Sponsor. UMB Bank, Oklahoma City/Tulsa, is hosting the private reception for Honorees and Patron

donors on November 18th and Dillingham Insurance of Enid is hosting the after-party and reception following the banquet and induction ceremony on the evening of November 19th. On behalf of the officers, directors, and staff, I want to thank these community leaders for joining us in recognizing our own. Back by popular demand, Burns Hargis and Mike Turpen will be serving as masters of ceremonies again this year and we expect another sold-out crowd. Tickets go on sale to the public on August 28, so mark your calendars now and plan to join us in Tulsa for the 88th annual Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony.

Joe P. Moran III, Chairman

CHAIRMAN

VICE CHAIRMEN

Joe Moran III

Bruce T. Benbrook

Tulsa

Woodward

PRESIDENT... This summer has been a busy one at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, located in the Gaylord-Pickens Museum, and the calendar is full into the fall. In addition to weddings and private events, we hosted the Hearts for Hearing summer camp, a classic car show, and award-winning author and historian Michael Wallis presented on Route 66 thanks to the support of the Oklahoma Humanities Council and The National Endowment for the Humanities. “America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66”, made possible by Dolese Bros., was featured in the Tulsa World Gallery this summer and on September 9th at 5:00 p.m. we will host the opening of the “Bert Seabourn: American Expressionist” exhibit. The Second Century Board hosted Oklahoma Born and Brewed, its first craft beer and small plate pairing event. Our Third Thursday’s story time and crafts continues to increase in popularity, so bring your little ones and join us at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, September 17 for the next event.

CHAIRMEN’S COUNCIL

Ann Caine

Gary Parker

Jennifer M. Grigsby

Calvin Anthony

Amanda Clinton

Gregory E. Pyle

Pat Henry

Chad Dillingham

Richard N. Ryerson

Glen D. Johnson

Malinda Berry Fischer

Michael E. Smith

Roxana Lorton

Virginia G. Groendyke Enid

Renzi Stone

Tulsa

Tom McDaniel

Joe D. Hall Elk City

Kathy Taylor

Oklahoma City

Lee Allan Smith

Robert Henry

Oklahoma City

Stratton Taylor

Oklahoma City

G. Lee Stidham

Gary Huckabay

Steve Turnbo

Kirk Jewell

Michael C. Turpen

Duke R. Ligon

Hardy Watkins

John Massey

Ronald H. White

Oklahoma City

Mark Stansberry

Stillwater

TREASURER

Rebecca Dixon

Lawton

CHAIRMAN EMERITUS

Tulsa

Bill W. Burgess, Jr.

Ken Fergeson

CHAIRMAN'S APPOINTMENTS, DIRECTORS AT LARGE

Oklahoma City

Edmond

Nevyle R. Cable Okmulgee

Altus

Fred Harlan Okmulgee

Judy Hatfield Norman

Clayton C. Taylor Oklahoma City

Steven W. Taylor McAlester

Lawton

Clayton I. Bennett Oklahoma City

Rhonda Hooper Oklahoma City

Xavier Niera Norman

Stillwater

Checotah

PRESIDENT

DIRECTORS

Shannon L. Rich

Phil B. Albert

Oklahoma City

Claremore

Bill Anoatubby Ada

Alison Anthony

OklahomaHOF.com

Sand Springs

Steve Burrage Antlers

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Shannon L. Rich, President & CEO

CORPORATE SECRETARY

Stan Clark

CHAIRMAN ELECT

Our newest release, If The Fence Could Talk, hit the top of the charts of the Oklahoma’s Best-Sellers List and next month we will be releasing the first set in our “I Am Oklahoma Children’s Series” geared for elementary students. I encourage educators attending Encyclo-Media in October to sit in on the panel discussion by the series’ authors and visit our booth. One set of the biographies will be placed in every public elementary school library in the state of Oklahoma through our library distribution program. As part of the Smithsonian’s Museum Day Live! we will be offering free admission on September 26th and 27th. Please visit our website at OklahomaHOF.com to learn about all events and programs of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

Stillwater Tulsa Enid

Stillwater

Yukon

Stillwater

Oklahoma City Durant

John McArthur Lawton

Vicki Miles-LaGrange Oklahoma City

Muskogee Durantt Alva

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Tulsa

Claremore Tulsa

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Oklahoma City


Bert Seabourn American Expressionist

BY MARISSA RAGLIN

ert Seabourn has always been an artist. Inspired by comic books at a very young age, he sold his first cartoon to Kingfisher Publications as an eighth grader in Purcell, Oklahoma. Seabourn’s humility states, “It would take another four years before I’d sell my second one.”

B

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Seabourn possesses a constant drive to reinvent himself; viewing old subjects in a new way, in fresh perspectives.

F

ast forward many years and Seabourn is employed as a Navy journalist/artist serving during the Korean War from 1951-1955. During this time, Seabourn created two Navy subject comic strips in a series of published works entitled, “You’re Fighting Ships, Little Known Facts about Your Navy” and “Navy Heroes.” In addition, Seabourn created several large murals in California and Hawaii displaying his versatility as an artist. It was in 1955 that he received his discharge papers in California and made his way back home and to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

ABOVE & PREVIOUS PAGE: Wind Walker, 23 ft tall, cast bronze and fabricated welding

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Seabourn first found employment as a commercial artist with Semco Color Press and then with Oklahoma General Electric. Seabourn had a full schedule, working 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. followed by evening art classes at Oklahoma City University from 1955 to 1961. He often found himself returning home to the drawing board to do freelance art jobs. Seabourn’s weekends were initially for school studies but soon became replaced with frequent local art shows. Seabourn entered a mural design competition for Kerr-McGee Corporation in 1963, submitting a mixed-media work featuring an off-shore drilling rig with seagulls. Ultimately, Seabourn was not selected but his painting led him to a brand new phase of work. Seabourn says, “I painted flying gulls, sitting gulls, laughing gulls, fat gulls, and skinny gulls. They sold well, but at the same time I was experiencing the most profound changes in my philosophy and style that I have had as an artist. I was becoming an Indian artist or an artist who paints Indians. I did many realistic faces of Indians based on old photos but then I began blending the characteristics of several faces into a composite face, the master story teller and legend teller combined with birds of prey or birds in general.” This style lasted twenty years for Seabourn, and he believes this style is what people most associate him with.


Oklahoma Girl, 30 x 22, watercolor on paper

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“I think of myself as an American expressionist who sometimes paints Indians, and sometimes paints non-Indians, and sometimes paints landscapes, and sometimes paints flowers.

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Relativity 48 x 36, acrylic on canvas

or more than 50 years, Bert Seabourn exhibited his work throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and South Africa. Seabourn’s first overseas show was in Germany in the mid-1970s. A selective listing of locations of paintings in permanent collections include: The Vatican, Rome, Italy; China’s National Palace Museum, Taipei, Taiwan; Moscow State University, Ulyanovsk, Russia; The American Embassy, London, England; The Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC; The President Gerald R. Ford Library Collection, Ann Arbor, Michigan; The George and Barbara Bush Collection, Texas; The State Art Collection, National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City Museum of Art, and the Oklahoma Judicial Center in Oklahoma City; the Fred Jones Museum of Art, Norman; and Oklahoma State University’s Museum of Art, Stillwater. In 1986, Seabourn began working in Santa Fe, New Mexico on a monumental piece of sculpture. “It was a combination of cast bronze and fabricated welding, depicted a red tailed hawk and the face of

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a medicine man.” The sculpture stands 23 feet tall, featuring a 5-foot long feather adorning the hair of the medicine man, and another wing measuring 12 feet long. In 1988, the completed sculpture entitled, "Wind Walker" was unveiled in Oklahoma City and now stands in front of the Oklahoma Attorney General’s Office. The recipient of several notable honors, Seabourn was designated a Master Artist by the Five Civilized Tribes Museum in 1976. In 1981, Governor George Nigh awarded him the Governor’s Arts Award. In 1988, Oklahoma City University honored him with the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humane Letters. In 2004, Seabourn received Oklahoma’s Living Treasure Award and, in 2009, he received a Lifetime Achievement Award and was named Artist of the Year. Seabourn’s recent works of art convey his perspective on many topical issues. Seabourn says his work portrays, “art lovers and art critics, shamans, women in general, ladies of the evening, buffalo, roosters, dogs, cats, and birds.”


Wolf Robe NDN 12 x 12, acrylic collage on canvas

Seabourn possesses a constant drive to reinvent himself; viewing old subjects in a new way, in fresh perspectives. Looking for new opportunities, Seabourn is excited to expose his work to new audiences. Seabourn’s expressionistic style breathes life into his subjects. He deals fearlessly with many sensitive topics, poking fun at his subjects by his use of clever titles.

C

ontinually creating, Seabourn works in his studio usually seven days a week. While in the studio Seabourn goes “to battle with paper or canvas, struggling to capture themes of the past as well as the themes of today.” Seabourn starts each day with an early morning painting. “I usually wake up early and start painting in either a sketchbook or on a canvas. I find my most creative time is early, before other things start interrupting.” When starting a new painting, Seabourn says, “I’m always thinking design and color. There are usually a few splatters to fill a void or to loosen up a tight painting. Sometimes I might add a collage in an area. In some of my recent works, I try to find a little humor in the title as well as in the painting. Life is too short to be too serious.”

Fool Bull as Dapper Dan 48 x 36, acrylic on canvas

Wolf Robe, 48 x 48, acrylic on canvas

Soft Shoulders 36 x 48, acrylic on canvas

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After creating thousands of paintings and printing hundreds of editions, Seabourn still gets excited about new ideas … Shaman and Medicine Bird, 40 x 49, acrylic on canvas

Seabourn’s multiple artistic practices continue to keep him interested in creating new works. “When a new painting series starts, it’s like starting anew,” he says. “I enjoy printmaking and doing lithographs, serigraphs, monotypes and etchings. The monotypes and etchings are my favorite in the original multiple field.” After creating thousands of paintings and printing hundreds of editions, Seabourn still gets excited about new ideas and specifically, when inking a plate and pulling it through the press, he lives for that feeling of sneaking a peek of the finished product for the first time.

Distant Thunder, 54 X 54, acrylic on canvas

In addition to his time in the studio, Seabourn teaches art classes at Oklahoma Contemporary and at the Fine Arts Institute of Edmond. His classes explore the bridge between realism and abstraction. His classes focus on creating unique works through fusion of design, color, form, and composition. In addition to painting techniques, an introduction to transfers and collage are tailored to the development of each artist. Seabourn believes “a painting should not tell a complete story but only enough to entice the viewer to fill in the missing pieces

so it becomes a part of him as well as a part of the artist.” Outside of teaching and painting, Seabourn states that he has no hobbies. He treats time away from the studio as working vacations, constantly sketching, painting and viewing artwork. Married for more than 65 years, Seabourn and his wife, Bonnie, met while attending the same high school in Purcell. Although not a practicing artist, Seabourn relies heavily on Bonnie’s artistic critiques. “I rely on her honest answers and good suggestions when asking for a critique on a working painting. She has a good sense of humor, too.” Together they have three daughters, four grandchildren, and eight great grandchildren, all of which live in Oklahoma. Seabourn’s works of art cover a vast area of ideas and concepts. “I think of myself as an American expressionist who sometimes paints Indians, and sometimes paints non-Indians, and sometimes paints landscapes, and sometimes paints flowers. I think of an expressionist as a painter who expresses himself with the honest use of paint, meaning…it drips, it smears, it splatters, it runs…it does all of these things.”

An opening reception will be held for Bert Seabourn: American Expressionist on September 10, 2015 from 5 – 7 pm. This exhibition will remain on display until January 9, 2016. While his work is on display, Bert Seabourn will lead an Artist Talk on October 15, 2015 from 6pm-7pm.

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preserving our architectural heritage BY GINI MOORE CAMPBELL

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he founder of Meyer Architecture in 1968, Paul B. Meyer served as the “Capitol’s architect” for 25 years. He co-founded Friends of the Capitol, serving as its first chairman, and served on the Oklahoma Capitol Preservation Commission more than 30 years. Meyer earned his Bachelor of Architecture Degree from the University of Oklahoma, was a member of the Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Tau engineering

Paul B. Meyer founded Meyer Architecture in 1968.

In 2015, Paul B. Meyer retired from MA+ Architecture, turning over leadership to longtime members of the firm’s management team.

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OKLAHOMA STATE CAPITOL Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

societies, and served as president of his social fraternity, Alpha Sigma Phi. He served as a principal of MA+ Architecture until his recent retirement. His past and present community involvement and memberships include service to Oklahoma City’s Downtown Rotary Club, AIA National Disaster Response Team, Murrah Federal Building Memorial Archives Committee, Oklahoma City Mayor’s Professional Liaison Committee, Oklahoma Centennial Commission, and Friends of the Capitol. Although Meyer has designed hundreds of new and commercial projects, he always has had a deep affinity for preservation and bringing back to life structures that tell the story of Oklahoma’s rich history. With a commitment to remain active in the community, earlier this year Meyer retired, turning the leadership of the firm over to his partners Gary Armbruster AIA, CEFP and Heath Tate, AIA, both long-time members of MA+ Architecture management. Together, they are continuing the growth and innovation of MA+ Architecture while following Meyer’s lead in preservation.

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The Senate Assembly Room, which had been converted to offices through the years, began its transformation with the removal of the drop ceilings to expose the original ornate coffered ceilings of the 1914 design. Hard wood floors, custom rugs, period chandeliers, wall sconces, plantation shutters, and drapery completed the facelift. Careful attention to the incorporation of technology ensured it did not detract from the neo-classical design.


At the Oklahoma State Capitol, Meyer designed the restoration of the House and Senate chambers, Senate lounge, and the Court of Criminal Appeals. He was also architect of the 1975 design for the Legislative Conference Rooms and won national and local awards for historic preservation. He conceived the design for the Centennial Memorial Plaza of the Oklahomans, one of more than 200 projects designated “official� by the Oklahoma Centennial Commission, as was the Indian Tribal Flag Plaza, designed by Meyer and his son David.

Beginning in 1998, the $1.5-million restoration of the House Chamber included recreating the massive stained glass panels, a historically-accurate paint scheme, custom carpet, furniture, lighting, and electrical upgrades. It also included the addition of a fire sprinkler system.

The House Chamber prior to restoration.

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The 1985 project restored the original Senate Lounge, complete with new flooring, finishes, furniture, and draperies. The original fireplace can still be seen far left. Modernization of the Senate Chamber during the 1970s had included neoclassical ornaments being covered up with wood paneling and stained glass ceiling panels replaced with ceiling tiles. In 1993 Meyer began the restoration project following extensive research of original photographs and plans. The stained glass ceiling panels, incorporated with fragments from the original panels, were installed and brought natural light back to the room.

Flanking the steps, the 1977 restoration of the House and Senate conference rooms was the first historical preservation project completed at the Oklahoma State Capitol Building.

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The neoclassical eloquence of the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals Courtroom had vanished following years of modernization. The 1995 restoration of the courtroom, and subsequent modifications in 2014, were possible because of extensive historical research. The Betty Price Gallery, home to the Oklahoma State Art Collection, was completed in the fall of 2007. Located just west of the rotunda on the first floor, the Gallery includes 4,700 square feet and brought back to life the original marble floor and plaster molding that had been covered during a 1970’s remodel. The Gallery features museum quality lighting, security, and HVAC systems were installed specifically for the artwork.Â

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In 1985, a staircase that had been hidden for decades and used as office space was returned to its original form and use. The Visitor’s Center is located at the bottom of the staircase.

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The Centennial Memorial Plaza of the Oklahomans was one of nearly 200 projects celebrating Oklahoma’s Centennial. The plaza features three shades of granite—Oklahoma red with buff pink and black being the complimentary colors—and features 28 rosettes based on the Oklahoma State Seal and commemorates 28 events in the history of Oklahoma beginning with 11,000 B.C. when the first Native Americans occupied the land of Oklahoma. The final rosette ends with the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City. Completed in 1990, the Indian Tribal Flag Plaza, inspired by the Spiro Mounds, features four entrances representing the cardinal directions and rises to 10’ in the center. The Plaza features the flags of the 36 Indian tribes in Oklahoma and materials used represent the symbolism of elements found in nature.

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ST. JOSEPH OLD CATHEDRAL Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Located at 307 N. W. 4th Street in downtown Oklahoma City, St. Joseph Old Cathedral sat directly west of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. On April 19, 1995, the Cathedral and other Parish buildings were severely damaged as a result of the bombing of the Murrah Federal Building. A new master plan including building a rectory closer to the church, a covered walkway to connect the church and offices, renovating and repairing the office buildings, and restoring the historic interior of the church, was created by Meyer and his son David. Just eight months later, on December 12, 1995, St. Joseph Old Cathedral was rededicated. As part of the master plan, a monument dedicated to the victims of the April 19 bombing was created. “And Jesus Wept” features a statue of Jesus Christ flanked by black columns and recessed openings in the surrounding wall. There is one recessed opening for each life taken by the bombing. The stark contrast between the realistic Christ and the modern structure is intended to inspire contemplation and deepen the understanding of what happened on April 19, 1995. St. Joseph Old Cathedral was dedicated on December 18, 1904 by the Rt. Rev. Theophile Meerschaert, Oklahoma’s first Bishop. Following repairs and renovation it was rededicated in December, 1995.

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The covered walkway to connect the church and office, in addition to the courtyard, added in 1995.

“And Jesus Wept� is dedicated to the men, women, and children who lost their lives on April 19, 1995 following the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building.

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TAFT STADIUM Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Built in 1934 as part of the Works Progress Administration, Taft Stadium, located near N. W. 23rd Street and May Avenue in Oklahoma City, has undergone an extensive renovation and expansion by MA+ Architecture. The original rock wall still stands, but inside features new seating, concessions, press boxes, restrooms, and locker rooms.

On Saturday, April 18, 2015 the Oklahoma City Energy beat the Seattle Sounders 2-1 in its home opener at Taft Stadium.

Through the years the stadium has hosted a wide range of sporting events, from stock car racing and semi-pro football to high school football and track. In the 1980s it was home to the Oklahoma City Slickers and this year professional soccer returned to Taft with the Oklahoma City Energy.

Renderings of the proposed renovation and expansion of historic Taft Stadium.

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MATTIE BEAL HOME Lawton, Oklahoma

Constructed during the years of 1907 to 1910, the historic Mattie Beal Home was the first in Lawton to be listed on National Register of Historic Places. The 14-room, 2-story Neoclassical Greek Revival style with Baroque ornamentation and a Mediterranean roof was built by Charles Warren and Mattie Beal Payne.

Mattie Beal, a telephone operator in Wichita, Kansas, was the second name drawn in the 1901 land lottery. She chose a 160-acre tract on the southern edge of Lawton where her home was built and eventually divided it into lots. She also donated land for Lincoln School, a church, and two city parks.

In 1923, the home underwent its first renovation when the Paynes simplified the exterior and incorporated the Art Deco style. With several owners through the years, the Lawton Heritage Association acquired it in 1974, saving it from demolition and performed extensive renovation work. Beginning in 2002, the home began being restored to the 1923 Art Deco style. The foundation and basement walls were stabilized and new air conditioning and heat were installed.  All surfaces, both interior and exterior, were reworked including replacement of rotting roof brackets, missing stair balustrades, and new historic paint schemes. The Mattie Beal Home reopened in 2005 following a three-year restoration.

The Mattie Beal Home was the first in Lawton to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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OKLAHOMA HERITAGE ASSOCIATION PUBLISHING

the leader in publishing Oklahoma's history

NEW RE LE A S E F ROM T H E FO R E WO R D BY BAR RY SWITZE R

Oklahomans have always excelled in sports competition. The high level of achievement began with Jim Thorpe’s domination of the world sports stage at the 1912 Olympic Games. He was called “the greatest athlete in the world.” The excellence continued as Oklahoma athletes began “giving it their best effort” in high school and college competition in the young state. It was not long after statehood that Oklahoma began producing national stars in baseball, football, and basketball. Many local boys made the big leagues in baseball and amateur and college basketball teams took national titles in the 1930s and 1940s. Oklahoma A & M was the first college in the nation to win back-to-back NCAA basketball championships.

Oklahoma’s 100 Greatest Athletes By Berry Tramel & Bob Burke $14.95

After World War II, football became the favorite sport of many supporters of Oklahoma high school and college programs. University of Oklahoma football became the number one sports venue as the Sooners played weekly before the largest gathering of fans in the history of the state. However, Oklahoma athletes’ success in the last half of the twentieth century has not been limited to football, baseball, and basketball. Oklahomans have won world and Olympic championships in wrestling, gymnastics, softball, and rodeo. In any sport, wherever played and at whatever level of competition, Oklahoma athletes rise to the top. Oklahoma is truly the home of champions!

UP C OM I N G R E L E A S E S : I AM OKLAHOMA CHILDREN’S SERIES The first set in the I AM OKLAHOMA CHILDREN’S SERIES will be released in September with one set being placed in

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

“I’d write short stories or parts of books in the evening. Then I’d read it to the class the next day. That’s how my writing career started.”

L E O N A M I TCH E L L

A M

“In most of my adventure stories, I’m actually writing about adventures I had with Gary or about our made-up adventures.”

Te Ata had a deep voice. Part of her training was learning how to vary its sound. She could play the parts of many characters in her one-person program—a weary Indian mother, a weathered medicine man, or a young Indian princess.

OPERA STAR

“Once I heard Leona sing, I had a whole new appreciation for opera. I fell in love with her voice. I moved to Oklahoma City from my home in Detroit to study opera at Oklahoma City University just like she did.”

BILL WALLACE

DEONNA CATTLEDGE, OPERA STUDENT

“You must have tenacity—develop the hide of an elephant.”

BILL WALLACE

LEONA MITCHELL

DARLEEN BAILEY BEARD I

Te Ata was shy around most people. But she loved to sing, dance, and act out stories.

LEONA MITCHELL

AUTHOR OF ADVENTURE AND ANIMAL STORIES

B I LL WA L LACE

DR. JORDAN TANG

How does a scientist think? According to Dr. Tang, it all starts with curiosity. He asks a question. He wants to know how something works or how it can be better. You may not know it, but you think like a scientist every day. When you ask questions and try to solve problems, you are thinking like a scientist.

BILL WALLACE

OKLAHOMA CULTURAL TREASURE

TE ATA

J O R DA N TA N G

WI L L RO G E R S

“My brain was not made to remember details. My brain was made to think up new ideas, create, and make connections.”

e taught best of ce. He was nrise over llel between gures we

TE ATA

THINK … CREATE … DISCOVER

HOOKS

JORDAN TANG

McKELLIPS

OKLAHOMA’S FAVORITE SON

every public elementary school library. This distribution is made possible by the generosity of an anonymous donor.

HAILEY

WILL ROGERS

SCHUERMANN

BEARD

oped on the make such ery walk of Will Rogers.”

Book Review

CHERYL SCHUERMANN S E R I E S

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

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O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

PAT I H A I L E Y S E R I E S

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C H I L D R E N ’S

JANE McKELLIPS S E R I E S

O OKKLLA AH HO OM MA A H HEERRIITA TAG GEE A ASSSSO OC CIIAT ATIIO ON N PPU UBBLLIISSH HIIN NG G

Will Rogers Oklahoma's Favorite Son

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Te Ata Oklahoma Cultural Treasure

By Darleen Bailey Beard

By Cheryl Schuermann

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O K OLK L A A H O M A C H I L D R E N ’S H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

G W E N D O LY N H O O K S S E R I E S

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O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

Leona Mitchell Opera Star

By Pati Hailey

Bill Wallace Author of Adventure and Animal Stories By Jane McKellips

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S E R I E S

By Gwendolyn Hooks

ALL PUBLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE GAYLORD-PICKENS MUSEUM STORE, AT OKLAHOMAHOF.COM, AMAZON.COM, AND BOOKSTORES STATEWIDE.

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“There is a creativity here. It’s hot, it’s cold.  A toughness comes from growing up here. We are made and shaped here. Work ethic … determination … it all ties Oklahomans together.” HANSON

HANSON HANSON, 1993, one year after their debut at Mayfest in Tulsa.

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N

C R A F T S M E N

O F

M U S I C

BY GINI MOORE CAMPBELL

T

here is an overwhelming synergy that exudes between  Isaac, Taylor, and Zac Hanson, balanced perfectly between sibling and professional relationships. There is also a unique  mixture of confidence and maturity combined with desire and determination between the brothers who have been making music together for more than 20 years.   ​ rom the beginning, Isaac, Taylor and Zac, as well as their F four younger siblings, have been exposed to the arts.  Their parents, Walker and Diana were high school sweethearts at Tulsa’s Nathan Hale High School.  They played the leads in high school productions and music has been a constant in the family.  HANSON’s second cousin is an opera singer and their grandfather had an extraordinary voice. 35 23


were introduced to artists from the early  rock-n-roll era of the late 50’s and early 60s. They would sing and each learned to play the piano, in addition to Isaac learning the guitar; Taylor the keyboard; and Zac the drums.  They remember growing up listening to Tulsa’s KOOL 106.1, admitting they did their share of critiquing other artists as well.   ​ riginally a duo with Isaac and O Taylor, at age 6 Zac joined the group. In 1992, The Hanson Brothers, the band’s original name, played Tulsa’s  Mayfest.  That day, at ages 11, 9, and 6 respectively, the brothers knew what they wanted to do with their life.   The Hanson Brothers performing at Tulsa’s Mayfest in 1992. From left, Isaac, Taylor, and Zac. Courtesy Tulsa World.

More than a decade after making their debut at Tulsa’s Mayfest, HANSON returned in 2005 to perform.

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hile with Helmerich & Payne, Walker Hanson and his family spent a year in South America.  The brothers remember spending a lot of time listening to the music of the 1950s and 1960s—the Dick Clark era—during that year.  At home in Tulsa, they

“If Michael Jackson and Elvis can do it, why can’t we?” said Taylor. “We were taught to put our minds to it, have the courage to try, and to not be afraid to fail,” he continued.  The brothers acknowledge the constant  encouragement by their parents to follow their dream of making music.   HANSON remembers early on their father attending a workshop by legendary manager and fellow Tulsan Jim Halsey. At 7:45 a.m. the following morning, HANSON was in the lobby of the hotel Halsey was staying in. Halsey received a call in his room letting him know there were three brothers in the lobby ready to sing for him. Halsey asked for a few minutes and then joined them downstairs.   “We sang for 20 minutes.  We were proud but apologetic about the early morning call,” Taylor recalled.  The encounter resulted in Halsey being one of the first to provide the young entertainers with sound advice.  

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A strong relationship, steeped in mutual respect, had been formed. Too young to play the bars, HANSON performed at block parties, school assemblies, shopping malls, and festivals. It was during a school assembly that HANSON had their “watershed” moment.  They remember that by the end of the performance they had an audience, they remember it  feeling different. In 1994, just two years after Mayfest, HANSON released their first independent album Boomerang, had a manager, and by 1996 they had a record contract with Mercury Records.  In 1997, “MMMBop,” their debut single, topped charts worldwide.  Selling more than 12-million copies, the single was #1 on The Billboard Hot 100 and on the United Kingdom’s Official Pop Singles.  

HANSON experienced the exhilaration of truly connecting with an audience when more than 8,000 people packed the space to hear them sing. Up to that point they had only played to an audience a fraction of that size.  Following the performance, the band had to walk 30’ through the crowd to their van. They realized just a few feet in that the need for more security had arrived.   The next day they made their first appearance on The Late Show with David Letterman. ​ ecause of their travel and reB hearsal schedules, the brothers were homeschooled.  Sometimes by their mother, and sometimes by a tutor on set.  Each brother possessed the discipline needed to balance their education and career.  Their travels provided a unique supplement to their studies.  

At the 11th annual Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards, HANSON picked up awards for Favorite Music Group and Favorite Song for “MMMBop.”

“You need a tolerance for failure to have success.” Isaac Hanson

I​ t was at a shopping mall in Paramus, New Jersey, that same year that

HANSON performed at the 2003 Lifebeat charity concert in Los Angeles, California, to support the fight against HIV/AIDS.

HANSON during a sound check in 2003 before performing for a sold-out crowd at Carnegie Hall in Manhattan, New York.

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“Most read about the Mona Lisa. We saw it,” Isaac said. “​ At the time when your mind is most capable, we began our journey,” Zac added.

YOUNGEST GRAMMY NOMINEE The release of “MMMBop” in 1997 put HANSON on the map. The song hit #1 in 27 countries and earned the band three Grammy nominations— Best New Artist, Best Pop Performance, and Record of the Year.  It also gave Zac the honor of being the youngest songwriting nominee in Grammy history.

Their album Middle of Nowhere, released later in 1997, hit #2 on The Billboard Top 200 and #4 on the Canadian Top Albums.  The album sold more than 8-million copies.  They rounded out the year hitting #9 on The Billboard Hot 100 with “I Will Come To You,” the Adult Top 40 with “Where’s the Love,” two Canadian Top 10s with “Weird” and “Thinking of You,” and their Christmas release “Snowed In” hit #7 on the United States’ Top 200 Chart.   3 Car Garage: Indie Recordings 19951996 was released the following year, hitting #6 on the North American Album charts and “This Time Around,” released in 2000, reached #19 on The Billboard Top 200 and #20 on The Billboard Hot 100.

F

ollowing a trying couple of years with a new record company which had been formed through corporate mergers, Island Def Jam Records, HANSON, realizing they no longer had a trusted partner, made the decision to strike out on their own and launched 3CG Records. Isaac remembered, “We were going to win. Some wished us good luck, some thought we were done.”  

HANSON launched 3CG Records in 2004. 3CG is the acronym for “three-car garage,” referring to an album released early in their career and the building that currently serves as their offices and recording studio located in The Brady Arts District in Tulsa.

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A documentary entitled “Strong Enough to Break” chronicled the band’s struggles, and ultimate success, with the album that took three years and leaving IslandDef Jam to complete.  They knew the new venture would be difficult; they believed it was worth the risk. In 2004, Underneath, the album they fought so hard to make, was released on the 3CG label and debuted at #1 for Top Independent Albums.  Fans and audiences welcomed the new sound lead by infectious single “Penny And Me”.  The Walk album soon followed. While working on The Walk,  the brothers visited South Africa, wanting to learn more about the impact HIV/AIDS and poverty had on its citizens.  They soon realized, as a band, they could make a difference.  It became known as the Take The Walk Campaign.  HANSON


created a charity single, “Great Divide,” with proceeds from the 99-cent download benefitting the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa.  

“We’ve made it to the next benchmark, now we have a new story to tell.” Taylor Hanson

“Something as simple as a song written by three guys from Oklahoma could travel all around the world, inspiring people to do something incredible in their lives. It doesn’t matter how small it seems, you have an incredible power to make a difference,” Zac said when recalling the experience. In addition, to further increase awareness and bring others to act, as part of The Walk Tour the band and its fans would walk one mile, barefoot,  before each stop on the tour. In talking about the plan, Isaac said, “I hope that we can inspire just a few people to understand their capacity

One of the many, one-mile barefoot walks prior to a concert during The Walk Tour to bring awareness to the impact of HIV/AIDS in South Africa.   HANSON in the studio in 2006 recording The Walk album.

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“There is that Tulsa sound. We are that Tulsa sound.” Zac Hanson to lead. Their own capacity to take what they have and make a difference with it.”   From left, Zac, Isaac, and Taylor  performing in Tulsa’s iconic  Cain’s Ballroom.

HANSON has performed “The National Anthem” for many events, from NASCAR and GRAMMY’s on the Hill to the Oklahoma City Thunder and the FIFA Women’s World Cup.

In 2010, HANSON performed as part of the “Eat for the Beat” concert series at Epcot in Florida.

In 2013 HANSON performed at the O Music Awards in Nashville, Tennessee. Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, left, of The Roots joined in.

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HANSON partnered with TOMS Shoes and set a goal of selling 50,000 pairs of shoes in conjunction with the walks.  As part of their business model, TOMS matched the number sold and delivered 50,000 pairs of shoes to South Africa.  With 48 miles completed, they reached their goal and in November, 2007 HANSON was in South Africa distributing shoes.  Take

The Walk Campaign became a catalyst for future giving as they continue to incorporate some type of charitable act in all that they do. Shout It Out, released in 2010, was an album that reflected the type of music HANSON grew up on.  It rose to #30 on Billboard’s All-Genre Top 200 and #2 on The Independent Albums Chart.  ANTHEM, the band’s sixth studio album, rolled out in 2013 and hit #5 on the Top Independent Albums chart and #22 on The Billboard Top 200. 

Proud Tulsans, HANSON shot their video for “Thinking ‘bout Somethin’” in their hometown.


Produced and written solely by the band, ANTHEM also marked the beginning of the brothers third decade in music.  The album is an eclectic mix of pop, soul, blues, and old-fashioned rock and roll with lyrics that touch on romance, heartbreak, life, maturity, and everything in between.

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o many things have changed since HANSON first hit the top of the charts with “MMMBop.”   They are no longer sticking labels and postage on single color postcards and performing at local arts festivals, but they are deeply rooted in their home town of Tulsa more than twenty years after they first started.  Each has married and between the three they have 11 children.  The brothers met

their wives on the road—Isaac met Nikki in Louisiana while Taylor met Natalie and Zac met Kate in Georgia.  HANSON always has impressed industry leaders with a maturity beyond their years, and that has not changed.  Their business acumen is equally impressive. They have a deep passion not only for their music, but for those around them and are committed to their community and causes that benefit others. Their fan base has continued to grow with new generations of audiences and followers.  Their talent and creativity, combined with a willingness for the daring, continue to impress and win-over music critics. After all, they are HANSON . . . craftsmen of music. ​

MMMHops / The Hop Jam In 2013, the band announced the release of MMMHops Pale Ale. The beer was debuted at the premiere of The Hangover Part III starring Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, and Zach Galifianakis. In addition, “MMMBop” is featured on the film’s soundtrack. The brothers also annually host The Hop Jam Beer and Music Festival in Tulsa, the largest craft beer festival in Oklahoma with more than 45 thousand attendees. As part of the band’s commitment to giving, they support the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma through the event.

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Although Merritt’s schedule keeps him on the road, he returns home to entertain family and friends as much as possible.

TINTED WINDOWS

BRYCE MERRITT

In 2009, Tinted Windows released their debut album with S Curve Records. Taylor Hanson and Adam Schlesinger of Fountains of Wayne formed the Tinted Windows band that includes James Iha of the Smashing Pumpkins and Bun Carlos from Cheap Trick.

Edmond native Bryce Merritt began his musical journey as a ten-year old with performances at venues across Oklahoma, including the renowned Oklahoma Rodeo Opry. Before finding his own sound as a teenager, Bryce opened for country artists Craig Morgan, Billy Currington, and Phil Vassar.   It was during high school that Bryce developed his soulful pop style and began packing local venues with his live performances.  Then in 2010, with modern influences from Ben Rector and Jason Mraz, and classic influences from the likes of Frank Sinatra and Stevie Wonder, Bryce entered a world of garages, closets, and attics to create his 6-song EP, “Half-Full”. Upon graduation from high school, Bryce briefly stepped away from music to play college tennis with plans of becoming an architect.  However, the pull of the songs in his head was far too strong and within months, Bryce found himself in Nashville attending Belmont University’s School of Music and getting recognition at local hot spots.  While at Belmont, Bryce was selected for the 2011 Urban/Pop Showcase and also opened for several national acts, such as Drew Holcomb and Green River Ordinance during their stops in Nashville.  In addition to his solo performances, he represented the University in their elite ensembles Phoenix, Jazzmin, and 2014 national ICCA finalists, the Beltones. Visit brycemerrit.com to learn more.

ROOTS & ROCK N ROLL HANSON will be on the road into November with its Roots & Rock N Roll Tour.   Each venue features two nights of unforgettable concerts including both cover songs and HANSON’s original work, in addition to a special DJ set with Taylor. “This tour is all about celebrating our musical journey, starting with a night of cover songs that have inspired us, followed by a night of rare tunes and fan favorites. Each night will be a totally unique experience,” said Isaac. 

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MA KI NG M US IC zero2sixty

MATT STANSBERRY & THE ROMANCE Strong vocals, a killer rhythm section, soulful background singers, and a threepiece horn section make up the unique sound of Matt Stansberry & The Romance. From left, Joe Stansberry, Chanda Graham, Myra Beasley and Matt Stansberry.

Formed in 2012, Matt Stansberry & The Romance is a 10-piece band from Oklahoma City that blends a new and refreshing vibe with the retro sound inspired by the music of the 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s. The band released its first album, “Let’s Brighten It Up”, in 2012 followed by “Crash Landing” in 2014. Matt Stansberry, grew up in Edmond listening to his gifted singer and songwriter parents and has rooted himself in Oklahoma and the Oklahoma music scene. As the front man, songwriter, and lead guitarist, Stansberry is constantly encouraging bandmates to experiment and

improvise. With a timeless look and energetic showmanship, Matt Stansberry & The Romance perform at festivals, public and private events, on university campuses, and in music halls and clubs throughout the Southwest and Midwest to audiences from 50 to 50,000. Governor Mary Fallin asked Matt Stansberry & The Romance to perform during her 2015 Inaugural Ball. They shared the stage with Wanda Jackson, the "Queen of Rockabilly” and 2014 inductee into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. Learn more about Matt Stansberry & The Romance at mattstansberry.com.

Through friendship, encouragement, creativity, and raw talent, zero2sixty owns an eclectic sound that pleases crowds of all ages. Band founder and original bass player Mike Dudzinski formed a group called “Fusion” in the late 1990s. The band focused mainly on the sounds of smooth jazz. Vocalist Michelle Lopez joined the band shortly thereafter, followed by lead guitarist/vocalist John Carnuccio. Through the years, the band’s style and sound developed into what is today a predominantly classic rock band. Although primarily a cover band, zero2sixty also performs a growing number of original tunes. After a name change to “zero2sixty,” guitarist/vocalist Cam McLain joined the ensemble, followed by drummer Burke Martin and bassist/vocalist Mike Duncan. Stan “The Man” Fitzgerald, equipment and sound manager, keeps zero2sixty sounding great. Together, the group brings more than 160 years of combined musical experience to create their vibe and entertain their audiences. Visit zero2sixtyband.com to learn more about the band and its members. zero2sixty plays in concert series, clubs and restaurants, and at private events statewide.

“Only a few things have remained constant throughout my life and I’m honored that family, music, and Oklahoma top that list. They are dear to my heart and have shaped who I am.” Matt Stansberry

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H A L L

O F

F A M E

M E M B E R

S P O T L I G H T

Alice Brown Davis BY MILLIE J. CRADDICK

The area now known as Oklahoma was thinly occupied in the early nineteenth century by Indian tribes, thousands of buffalo, and a few traders and explorers. As a good deal of the land consisted of only tall prairie grass, it was considered “the Great American Desert.�

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The native tribes of the eastern United States, including the Five Tribes, were ordered to leave their homes and move to their new land—Indian Territory. They settled between the North and South Canadian rivers, some 20 miles southeast of present-day Shawnee, originally a part of the land designated for all the Creek tribes. From the Seminoles who followed the trail west, one family emerged to provide leadership of the tribe, in major and minor roles, for the next century. The Brown family produced four members who were undoubtedly the real leaders of the tribe, both officially and unofficially, and established a tradition of service that lasted from 1832 to 1935. Dr. John Frippo Brown, a South Carolinian of Scottish descent, was a graduate of the historic University of Edinburgh, Scotland. He was a government employee serving as a doctor and tending to the Florida Seminoles as they made their trip westward. In 1832 they followed the “Trail of Tears” to what is now Oklahoma, a hazardous overland route which took a heavy toll on Indian lives. Although all the Tribes underwent great difficulties in their migration, the Seminoles, the poorest, suffered what has been called “the worst of the removal hardships.”

Alice Brown Davis, center, the first woman to serve as chief of any of the Five Civilized Tribes, the day she was sworn in.

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During the course of his duties with the Seminoles, Dr. Brown met and fell in love with a young Indian Princess, Lucy Redbeard, whose tribal name was Cono-ha-ge, whom he renamed Lucy. Lucy was of the ruling Katcvlke or the Tiger Clan, from which Seminole Chiefs had been drawn. They flaunted the Seminole tribal laws and ran away to be married. Not long afterwards they were forgiven by her people and were allowed to return. The mating of the girl of royal blood with the “Medicine Man,” who also descended from a noble family, resulted in the birth of several children. Alice was born to John Frippo and Lucy Redbeard Brown on September 10, 1852 near Parkhill, close to present-day Tahlequah, in the Cherokee Nation. Brown and her brothers received considerable education, which added to inherited talent, fitting them for leadership. As a child, Alice attended both Cherokee and Seminole mission schools, studied Dickens and Shakespeare, and learned both English and Mikasuki as first languages. It was thought that she was probably tutored to some extent by her father who was fluent in several languages.

The Brown children were reared in the Fort Gibson area and were equally at home in both the white and Indian cultures. One of Brown’s best friends was Jessie Chisholm of the well-known ranching family. The Browns, educated by Presbyterian and Baptist missionaries, became active in mission work. They accepted acculturation as the Seminoles only hope for progress but never abandoned their tribal heritage. Alice was born into a family with a tradition of serving others. She followed the models of her father and brothers and, like them, served the tribe throughout her life. In 1867, when she was fifteen years old, a cholera epidemic struck the Seminole settlement at Greenhead Prairie, the area to which the Brown family had moved following the Civil War. Alice assisted her father in caring for the sick without regard to her own risk. They worked together throughout the epidemic; when it was over, her father died as a result of the long hours and overwork. After completing her education, Alice taught school at Sasakwa where she met her future husband, a storekeeper in nearby Okmulgee, George Rollin Davis, a white man. They were married January 20, 1874, by

Samual Checote, Chief of the Creek Nation and an ordained Methodist minister. Together they began a joint career of service to the Seminole community. In 1882, they established the Bar X Bar Ranch and trading post where they founded the settlement of Arbeka, near the North Canadian River not far from Muskogee. George Davis was appointed postmaster. During this time Davis served as peace officer, and spent much of his time tracking down whites who were illegally selling liquor to the Indians. Alice helped him in running the ranch, the trading post, and the post office at Arbeka. They also were responsible for disbursing the local Indians’ headright money and the Civil War pensions for veterans and widows. Eleven children were born to George and Alice. When the youngest child was three years old George died and Alice, now in her late forties, took over the management of the ranch, twenty cowboys, the post office, her children, and a continuous stream of Seminoles seeking her assistance as counselor or benefactor. While postmaster at Arbeka, her office was robbed by the famous outlaw Al Jennings. Some years later, after Jennings had evidently mended his ways, he ran for Governor of Oklahoma and was able to pick Alice out of a crowd while making a speech in Wewoka. Alice’s personal qualities of devotion to her people, her just decisions when she advised and scolded and fed them had become legend. She often paid for their food and doctor bills out of her own pocket. Throughout her life, Alice believed that the Indians should adapt the white man’s Emahaka Mission was established in 1894 for the education of Seminole girls. Alice Brown Davis was a teacher and served as superintendent at Emahaka.

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lifestyle to their own, retaining their Seminole heritage while taking advantage of the benefits offered by another culture. She attempted to protect those who needed her help, to counsel and educate her tribe to better equip them to deal with their problems, and to guard the institutions of her people against the domination of the powerful whites. As Alice grew older, she became increasingly involved in the affairs of the tribe. After her husband’s death, she became the superintendent of the Seminole girls’ school, Emahaka, located near Wewoka. Emahaka had been built in 1892 by the Seminole Nation at a cost of more than $50,000; it was extremely modern for the time and place. It was one of the few buildings in the territory able to boast indoor plumbing and steam heat. The school, which was originally run by the American Baptist Home Mission Society and later turned over to the Seminoles, offered grades one through ten. It was staffed by a faculty of eight and had a curriculum ranging from elementary arithmetic and the first reader to natural philosophy and foreign languages. In order to enable Oklahoma to become a state, the federal government had required the end of tribal governments in Indian Territory. The tribes were supposed to turn over all functions to officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Although Alice believed that learning the white man’s ways was important to the Seminoles, she was determined to retain Indian control over Indian education. She initially refused to yield authority over the school. Her brother, John F. Brown, who was Chief of the Seminole, finally persuaded her to yield to the law. She belonged to the congregation of the Spring Baptist Church at Sasakwa, where her brother John

In 1874 Alice Brown married George Rollin Davis. Together they had 11 children.

became the pastor. She performed missionary work in Florida and was active in Muscogee Creek, Seminole, and Wichita Baptist associations. In 1909 she was sent as an emissary from the Indians of her nation to the Seminoles still living in the Florida Everglades. Alice was heavily involved in the legal affairs of the Seminoles. She was interpreter in the courts from the days of the Dawes Commission to 1935. She even traveled to Palm Beach, Florida in 1905 to act as an interpreter for the United States in the murder trial of John Ashley, a white man being tried for the murder of DeSoto Tiger, a prominent Seminole. Alice also became involved in several missions to Mexico, investigating a claim by the Seminoles for a land grant there. The Mexican government had promised such a grant to the Seminoles in return for

In 1961, Alice Brown Dais was posthumously inducted into the American Indian Hall of Fame at Anadarko. In 1964, a bronze bust of Davis, sculpted by Willard Stone, was unveiled at the World’s Fair in New York City.

the service of Chief Cowakogee (Wildcat), who had fought against the Apaches in defense of the Sonora region of Mexico in the 1840s. During the administration of Chief Hulputta, a group of Seminoles considered a “removal to Mexico” and went down to Mexico to view the country. Hulputta, Alice, and about thirty delegates went to Santa Rosalia, Chihuahua, Mexico in 1903. She was again serving as interpreter, this time for Hulputta, who spoke little English. They met with Mexican

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officials to discuss the land grant, but achieved nothing. In 1905 Alice returned with other influential Seminoles to Mexico City to pursue the land grant, but they had to drop the matter when the Mexican Revolution erupted. She returned once more in 1910, but too much time had elapsed and her mission to obtain the land grant failed. In 1922, at age 70, her work led to her appointment by President Warren G. Harding to serve as tribal chief following her brother’s death in 1919. She held the distinction of being the first woman chief of any tribe of Indians west of the Mississippi, perhaps the only one chosen by her people and also appointed by a president of the United States. The tribal land affairs, which she had been appointed to resolve, became a source of contention between Alice and the government. A survey conducted had shifted the old boundaries between the Creek and Seminole nations, and the new boundaries transferred several important parcels of land to the Creeks. The new line went right through the middle of her beloved Emahaka, and also transferred sections of land on which a number of Seminole churches stood. She refused to sign the deeds transferring them to the Creek Nation or the federal government, on the grounds that it was morally wrong for her to pass a most valuable tract of land out of the hands of the destitute Seminole people. She justified her refusal by stating, “If this be the cause of my resignation I will feel that I have done that which is right and just to myself and my people.” The matter went into lengthy litigation and the case became moot when an abandoned Emahaka burned to the ground a few years later. Because of the friction between the tribes, the Seminoles separated themselves from the Creeks. They

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were allotted what was considered very poor land for agricultural purposes—rocky on clay hillsides, rough, covered with black-jack, persimmon, small hickory, and scrub timber—not far from Wewoka, capital of the Seminole Nation. But the poor territory given the Seminoles became one of the most valuable properties owned by any people of Oklahoma, when oil was discovered southeast of Wewoka.

Alice lived during a period of tremendous change in Oklahoma. She lived through the great buffalo migrations, the Civil War, the opening of Oklahoma to white settlement, the period of outlawry and violence, the struggle for statehood, the oil boom, and the emergence of modern society. Throughout her life, she followed the models of her father and brothers and tried to serve her people, the

John Brown, Alice Brown Davis’ brother, served as chief of the Seminole Nation from 1885 to 1901 and again from 1905 to 1906. Davis’ brother Andrew Jackson Brown served as treasurer for the tribe.

It was because of the ensuing oil boom, and the many fields in Seminole County that mushroomed into milliondollar-a-day production, that the chiefs of the Seminoles found themselves very important. Many disputes had arisen over title to lands and royalties and lawsuits were being filed daily. Oil companies, banks, businessmen, and others seeking to own oil properties wanted someone of responsibility among the Indians to assist them in bringing adjudication of Indian owners’ rights to the wealth accumulating from the oil production. So it was, the president of the United States was called upon to appoint the chief of the Seminole Nation for purposes of negotiating from old treaties made before the oil came.

Seminoles, and guide them through the changes that occurred. Alice continued to serve the Seminoles as chief until her death on June 21, 1935. She was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 1930, was nominated to be placed in the American Indian Hall of Fame at Anadarko, and the Davis Building at the University of Oklahoma was dedicated to her memory. In 1964, a bronze bust of Alice was sculpted by Willard Stone and unveiled at the World’s Fair in New York City on Oklahoma Day in celebration of the life of this remarkable woman, “a leader of her people.”


Proud to support the TEL LI N G OF O KLAHOMA’S STORY

through its p eople

35 37


LASTING LONG E I G H T Y

Y E A R S

A F T E R

W P A

BY MARJORIE BARTON

38


W

ith proof that at least 40 million of the nation’s 120 million were without income, President Franklin D. Roosevelt designed a program in 1935 to accomplish public works rather than welfare. He felt strongly that people would rather work than be on the “dole,” as it was called at that time. Roosevelt named his new idea the Works Progress Administration, changed to Work Projects Administration (WPA) later. WPA was the final outcome of an effort to give the people the New Deal Roosevelt had promised when he was elected. Other New Deal programs such as the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) and Civil Works Administration (CWA) were forerunners. The whole world was in a recession, the Great Depression. For eight years the WPA, signed into law in 1935, initiated and completed “never before thought of projects” across the nation. When WPA ended in 1943, upgraded infrastructure was estimated to have been completed 25 years earlier than estimated without federal aid. Roads, bridges, dams, airports, and general conservation projects were finished and used by the 120 million people, then in the lower 48 states. Naysayers yet declare it really did not work, but the 30+ percent national unemployment rate was lowered to 14 percent even prior to the launch of the National Defense projects. In some areas of Oklahoma the unemployment rate was proved to be more than 50 percent. Sadly, preparing for war required a lot of jobs, which further eased the unemployment rate. However, it was WPA workers who rapidly accomplished work needed on military bases such as Fort Sill in Lawton and the Altus Air Force Base. Oklahoma also led the nation in armories built, completing nearly 60. Today most of

Schools and other buildings were usually marked with a bronze WPA shield. It is often difficult to recognize other work done by the WPA program because it was designed to be “laborintensive.” The formula of 80 percent for labor and 20 percent for material was successfully carried out in the building of everything from roads and parks to dams and schools. The WPA gave many the opportunity to work and provide for their families.

the National Guard units meet in more centralized facilities, but most of the armory buildings are put to good use. Everything from recreation centers to museums fill the spaces now. Every time an American visits one of the national parks created during the 1930s, he is benefitting from New Deal programs such as WPA. During the Great Depression the park at Sulphur, Oklahoma, was Platt National Park, now part of the Chickasaw National Recreation area. Evidence of WPA work can still be found throughout the park. All national and many state parks, were built or upgraded during that time. National Park Ranger Keith Flannery pointed out that the vast amount of work accomplished then by the WPA and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) would cost a fortune and be impossible to do in today’s world.

A WPA road crew works to clear the area for a new farm-to-market road.

Work accomplished by the WPA in the National Park Service (NPS) Recreation Demonstration Project created several new state parks in Oklahoma. Probably one of the most significant being Lake Murray State Park near Ardmore. The NPS was also responsible for landscape architecture and planning of the giant complex known as Mohawk Park in Tulsa. It includes a golf course, a zoo, a fish hatchery, and general picnicking facilities. Much of the public

BELOW & FACING PAGE: Many of the sidewalks, roads, and drives built by WPA are still used today.

35 39


Completed in 1937 by the WPA, the old Chandler armory is now home to the Route 66 Interpretive Center.

thought these and other parks were going to be national parks because of the NPS involvement. Such Demonstration Recreation Projects can be found in several states. Most of the state parks completed in the 1930s have conspicuous granite markers commemorating the work done there by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Sadly, there is no recognition for the labor of hundreds of men and the millions of dollars contributed by the WPA. Upgrades to these parks are on-going, with several converting an older WPA structure to a Nature Center for education and enjoyment of those who visit. A few Edmond’s American Legion Hut was completed in 1936 and still serves the organization today.

40

WPA bronze shields can be found in the parks, but many of today’s population do not know the story behind them. When you see a CCC marker, remember that WPA workers were there also. When the WPA program was designed, it required that every project approved would have a financial sponsor, with no guidelines as to the amount which must be contributed. This applied to counties, school districts, cities, parks departments, and basically, every category of government which needed work. This included the section of WPA called Federal One, the arts of music, theatre, art, and writing. It is impossible to name anything which would not qualify for help. It is important to note that the Historical Records Survey began under Federal One, until it was moved to its separate program. It is evident that visitors will be able to enjoy the murals by Ruth Monroe Augur in the Garfield County Courthouse in Enid for many more years. They depict the many trails by which Oklahoma was inhabited. Most post office murals in Oklahoma are attributed to a funding by the Treasury Department, not the WPA, although many wrongly think they are of the Federal One. However, the sixteen murals in

the Anadarko Post Office were planned and funded by WPA through a program called TRAP, Treasury Relief Art Project. They are indeed, very unique. Although many murals done in the WPA program in Oklahoma are lost or painted over, work of the Writers Project remain as one of the very useful. Writers throughout the United States recorded interviews of pioneers, slaves, and Native Americans. In most states that amounted to two or three rolls of microfilm. In Oklahoma there are 41 rolls of film, which have now been digitized. The rolls are indexed for easier reference and the WPA Oklahoma Slave Narratives have been published. Children learned to play instruments, and community choirs and bands were formed under direction of the Federal Music Project. Eddie Burris, best known in Muskogee for having arranged “Okie from Muskogee” for Merle Haggard, learned to play the guitar in a WPA music program. The long running Oklahoma City Symphony was a product of the Federal One Music Project. Significant Oklahoma Indian artists were Acee Blue Eagle and the well-known Kiowa Five, which included Stephen Mopope, designer of the Anadarko murals. Artist and sculptor Willard Stone’s name can be found on recognition stones at schools and buildings as architect. When Oklahomans drink clean water and use electrical appliances, they are probably doing so because the WPA program built a dam to make a lake. The spillway at Lake Okmulgee is listed on the National Register Properties in Oklahoma and is a National Historical Landmark. It is one of many examples of lakes used primarily for drinking water. Construction on the Pensacola Dam at Disney began when Roosevelt


Sewing rooms were set up in each of Oklahoma’s 77 counties. A Singer sewing machine used by the WPA in one of its many sewing rooms.

released 41-million WPA dollars for the project. It was the largest multiple arch dam in the world until 2009 when China built one greater. The Pensacola Dam is operated by the Grand River Dam Authority (GRDA). The dam in the Great Salt Plains of Oklahoma provides recreation in a unique landscape. Nearly all the older state parks have dams creating lakes for fishing and recreation. Mattresses were just one of the many items produced through the WPA.

The kinds of projects implemented as work opportunities for many are all part of a history book and rarely mentioned by those who live in the 21st century. All of Oklahoma’s 77 counties had at least one “sewing room” in which clothing, bedding, and even army supplies were mended or sewn. That more than 14,000 quilts were made in those sewing rooms seems impossible, but it happened. Nearly two million articles of clothing and one-half million “comforters” were made and distributed. Other programs provided for the production of mattresses. When it came time to prepare for war, the seamstresses were said to be so experienced and able to use the commercial machines that many military items were mended and able to be used instead of purchasing new. Apparently tents, knapsacks, and other supplies were repaired in the sewing rooms. Although the administration was accused of “boondoggling” and workers were labeled as “piddling around” or “poking along,” evidence of the work can be seen in every state. It did affect every American—workers, shopkeepers, artists, musicians, teachers, and farmers. Every American either worked on a project or has driven on a road, went to a school, or visited a park as a result of the roughly 11 million projects across the nation. Projects were completed in places that were territories at the time. Eleven billion dollars is difficult to translate into 21st century dollars, but that is what was spent. Remember that 80 percent of that money paid labor. Earning a little money allowed families to purchase much needed items. Many young men were able to finish high school courses in the CCC camps in which they worked. Not much has been said about that program, but the

Established in 1936, Northeast High School at 3100 N. Kelley in Oklahoma City today is the Northeast Academy for Health Sciences and Engineering Enterprise and serves students in grades 6 through 12. The Guthrie Bluejays continue to play their home games in “The Rock,” a WPA-built stadium in Guthrie. Built in an amphitheater style, the architects used the natural slope of the ground for seating.

The Pecan Bowl of Okemah, completed in 1939 by the WPA, serves as the high school sports arena for the Okemah Panthers. A WPA chapel remains at the Davenport Cemetery.

35 41


The Latimer County Courthouse in Wilburton, one of a handful of WPA courthouses in Oklahoma, is still adorned with the WPA shield noting its completion in 1939.

WPA paid unemployed teachers to go to the camps and teach those interested in attending. Most of those in the CCC had left school in search of a way to help their unemployed parents and were glad for the opportunity to finish classes. Both on-site and correspondence courses were offered. The WPA program was very much involved with the CCC camps, explaining why many do not know for certain whether a relative was “in the CCC” or working for WPA at a CCC camp. Highways have been improved and dams have been maintained. Schools have been repurposed, maintained, or replaced, and have served millions. The Final Report and news story about the end of WPA in Oklahoma claimed $212-million spent in Oklahoma. The report enumerated a lot of interesting facts. Schools were built in Oklahoma at a rate unlike any other state—825. Perhaps Oklahoma built so many The amphitheater at Shannon Springs Park in Chickasha was a WPA project completed in 1939.

42

because it was such a new state, while many states built less than 100. No record is found as to how many WPA built schools are still in use today. Many have been repurposed as homes, churches, and community centers. WPA schools, including some with large additions, still in use include Northeast High School in Oklahoma City, Alice Robertson Junior High in Muskogee, and Westville High School. In Chickasha the high school is now a junior high, a typical transition of usage as seen in many school districts. Many of the eight-grade schools remaining are using WPA built buildings. An extensive trip around Oklahoma reveals many, primarily quarried-rock buildings still in use. Many WPA-built schools that operate today are usually a source of pride and frequently the primary building in the community. The ones removed were frequently destroyed by fire, while some were lost to the damming of a river. Some WPA school buildings were removed over loud protests of local citizens. The WPA was not limited to building schools. Fairground improvements were plentiful. Courthouses and city buildings, as well as university structures and chapels, were added. Remaining courthouses today include Delaware, Wagoner, and Latimer counties. They have been remodeled, updated, and expanded, but not destroyed.

Several counties received Public Works Administration grants and used WPA labor to build new or completely remodeled courthouses. Few remain, but the WPA program was responsible for more than 90,000 new outhouses in Oklahoma alone. Outhouses for girls and boys are still in existence at the Diamond Point School in Nowata County. Another outhouse is located at the old Procter School, now a community building. Those are most unique as they are covered with rock like the schools. The program seemed to have been involved in some extremely unique projects in almost every state. In Tennessee, it is Steeple Chase; in Ohio, a Soap Box Derby Coliseum; in Kansas, a tower known as Coronado Heights; and the list goes on. In Oklahoma it is The Holy City of the Wichitas, originally started as an Easter Passion Play. It is in a unique setting, the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge. The reason for the location, however, was the terrain. It is said the terrain is similar to that of Jerusalem. The Holy City was dedicated in 1935 and in 1936 more buildings were completed. Rose gardens were popular in the 1930s. The Tulsa Municipal Rose Garden was constructed with hand labor and teams of horses in 1935 and 1936 as a WPA project. Although the Set on one acre in Nowata County, the historic one-room Diamond Point School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Nestled in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, The Holy City of the Wichitas encompasses 66 acres and is home to the longest running Passion Play drama in the United States.

CCC is recognized, the whole of Will Rogers Park in Oklahoma City was a very large WPA project, including its Rose Garden. Not only a rose garden, but a perpetual year round exhibit was the outcome of Honor Heights Park in Muskogee. Although Azaleas are featured in a month-long festival, the park has many flowering plants, a rose garden, and now a Butterfly Pavilion. At Christmas time the park is lit with at least one million lights for a drive through display. The park features a man-made waterfall and steps built by the WPA. A Veteran’s Hospital sits at the top of the hill. Forts in the state were built before statehood for the usual reasons and some were abandoned, then reclaimed. Fort Gibson had long been deserted when the WPA entered the picture. Grant Foreman, Oklahoma historian, was instrumental in suggesting and promoting more than one WPA project. The fort was rebuilt and a substantial restoration project is currently underway. According to news stories of the 1930s, the school “hot lunch” program was a well-accepted WPA project. This may have been partially due to health and school authorities insisting that the children did much better in class if they were not so hungry. The program barely began before the development

of WPA, but was carried out more completely nationwide as health authorities pushed the idea. The school lunch program was supplemented and kept at low cost because of two community gardens and canning rooms. Both contributed part of the yield to schools, which created both nutritious and inexpensive meals. Many communities today are reintroducing community gardens to the landscape. Without a doubt the vaccination program promoted during the 1930s by the WPA was another benefit to the whole nation. Properly built and placed outhouses, the school lunch program, and immunization against contagious diseases significantly changed the lives and life expectancy of millions of Americans. That the unique work program phased out almost unnoticed because of the devastating issues of World War II does not equate to the fact that much of its efforts continue to affect the lives of Americans in the 21st century. The Work Projects Administration of President Roosevelt’s New Deal Program changed the face of America.

Leaning on a Legacy: The WPA in Oklahoma by Marjorie Barton was published by Oklahoma Heritage Association Publishing in 2008.

May Oklahomans continue to appreciate the gardens, parks, architecture, trees, ponds, and dams built by a program to which there was scarcely a “thank you” in return. Those who worked because of the WPA survived, rarely complaining and forever appreciative for what was accomplished.

The Tulsa Municipal Rose Garden is part of the Tulsa Garden Center in Woodward Park at 2435 S. Peoria.

35 43


OHOF’s Story

Through its People

ABOVE: Dr. Brad Robison, right, author of If the Fence Could Talk, and illustrator Margaret Hoge sign copies to the donors who made Oklahoma Heritage Association Publishing’s most recent release possible.

ABOVE: Oklahoma Heritage Association Publishing’s newest release, If the Fence Could Talk by Brad Robison and illustrated by Margaret Hoge, is being sold at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum Store and at bookstores statewide. BELOW: At the Scholarship Awards Assembly, Chairman Joe Moran III presented the Bacone College full, four-year tuition grant to Michaela Blackmon of Muskogee High School.

RIGHT: Mrs. Don Symcox presented the $1,000 Cleveland County scholarship, made possible by her and her husband, to Norman North High School student Katerina Ozment.

BELOW: Cayla Casto getting her face painted during Anniversary Day at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

ABOVE: Katherine McLemore helps daughter Annabelle, center, and Madison with crafts at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum’s Anniversary Day celebration.

44


ABOVE: From left, Ann Ackerman, Bruce Benbrook, Shannon L. Rich, and Joe Moran III. Ackerman and Benbrook, on behalf of Leadership Oklahoma, presented the Statewide Community Award to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Gaylord-Pickens Museum at the April Board of Directors Meeting.

ABOVE: Morning Dawn Worthean, a 2015 senior from Hulbert High School, received the $1,000 Cherokee County Scholarship from donors Herman and LaDonna Meinders during the Scholarship Awards Assembly.

ABOVE: Visitors attending Third Thursdays enjoy taking advantage of free admission to the Gaylord-Pickens Museum. BELOW: Amey Pierce read Cowboy Camp by Tammi Sauer at the July Third Thursday event at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

ABOVE: Attendees working on crafts following the July Third Thursdays at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

LEFT: Maxton Harris greets students, teachers, and parents from Cross Timbers Elementary as part of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame’s Free Field Trip Program.

35 45


OHOF’S Story Through Its People BELOW: Logan Rinner enjoyed sitting in some of the cars at the car show at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

ABOVE: Ava, Alyssa, and Cole Humbert enjoyed the car show in conjunction with the Route 66 exhibit at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

ABOVE: On June 27th the parking lot was filled with cars from every decade to celebrate America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66 at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum. BELOW: Elizabeth Garvin dreaming of driving Route 66 at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum car show.

LEFT: Sean Resides, right, a fan of the movie Cars, enjoyed meeting the voice of the Sheriff from the movie, Michael Wallis, at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

More than 200 gathered at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum on July 30 to hear Michael Wallis reminisce about Route 66, The Mother Road, in conjunction with America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66.

46


BELOW: The Oklahoma Hall of Fame Teen Board attended a naturalization ceremony at the invitation of Hon. Vicki Miles-LaGrange. Following the ceremony the group visited with Miles-LaGrange in her chambers.

ABOVE: The lecture by Michael Wallis was made possible through the Oklahoma Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Accepting the grant on behalf of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame were, from left, Bailey Gordon, Mark Stansberry and Joe Moran. Presenting the grant were Oklahoma Humanities Executive Director Ann Thompson and Chairman Susan McCarthy.

ABOVE: Mike Turpen, right, purchased copies of books by award-wining author Michael Wallis at his lecture on the Mother Road at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

ABOVE: Sutton and Rowan Dearmon enjoyed the America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66 exhibition made possible by Dolese Bros.

ABOVE: Jeremy Humbert, left, and Dexter Nelson, II, installing NRG! Exhibits’ America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66 exhibition in the Tulsa World Galley. The exhibit runs through August 29.

RIGHT: Gini Campbell, second from left, interviewed Isaac, Taylor, and Zac Hanson in their Tulsa studio for an article in Oklahoma: Magazine of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

35 47


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SUBSCRIPTION $35 • Subscription to Oklahoma: Magazine of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Hall of Fame Headlines e-update Standard Donor Benefits • Subscription to Oklahoma: Magazine of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Hall of Fame Headlines e-update • 10% discount at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum Store • Invitations to organization and Museum events • Program and event discounts for Donors STUDENT $15 All Standard benefits plus: • Annual admission pass to the GaylordPickens Museum for student (must present valid student ID; kindergarten through college eligible) INDIVIDUALISM: $50 All Standard benefits plus: • Annual admission pass to the GaylordPickens Museum PERSEVERANCE: $100 All Standard benefits plus: • Annual admission passes to the GaylordPickens Museum for 2 adults and household children under 18

48

PIONEER SPIRIT: $250 All Perseverance benefits plus: • Four single-use guest passes to the GaylordPickens Museum OPTIMISM: $500 All Pioneer Spirit benefits plus: • 25% discount on one-time rental of the Devon Classroom GENEROSITY: $1,000 All Optimism benefits plus: • One complimentary weekday use of the Edith Kinney Gaylord Garden or BennettMcClendon Great Hall • Advance opportunity to purchase Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony tickets • Recognition in the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony program

EXECUTIVE CIRCLE: $3,500 All Generosity benefits plus: • Customized facility use package* PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE: $5,000 All Generosity benefits plus: • Customized facility use package* • Recognition in The Oklahoman, The Lawton Constituition and Tulsa World Oklahoma Hall of Fame Sunday Supplement CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE: $10,000 All Generosity benefits plus: • Customized facility use package* • Recognition in The Oklahoman, The Lawton Constitution and Tulsa World Oklahoma Hall of Fame Sunday Supplement

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Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Enid

Oklahoma City

William Wayne Lee

Meinders Foundation

Oklahoma City

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Z. Naifeh and Family

Oklahoma City

Gennady Slobodov

Tallie & Thad Valentine

COLORADO

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Morris $2,500 - $3,499 Oklahoma City All America Bank Mustang Mr. Clyde Moss Yukon Allied Arts Mr. Michael O’Brien Oklahoma City

Mrs. Henry Freede

Nichols Hills

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Venice

William T. Payne Fund

Oklahoma City

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Z. Naifeh and Family

Mr. and Mrs. Duke R. Ligon

Tulsa

Oklahoma City

Tulsa

Oklahoma City

Edward Ruscha

Tom & Brenda McDaniel

Oklahoma City

Sugar Land, TX

Oklahoma City

Edmond

Oklahoma City

CALIFORNIA

Listed below are donors to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Gaylord-Pickens Museum at the $2,500 level and above. Funded solely by private contributions, we are extremely grateful for the support of all the individuals and organizations who give to each of our programs and enable us to tell Oklahoma’s story through its people. This list represents donors as of July 30, 2015.

Devon Energy Corporation

James C. & Teresa K. Day Foundation

Clinton

Ruby C. Petty

Dr. & Mrs. George Henderson

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Elaine & Harrison Levy*

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Edmond

Russell M. Perry

Nancy & Tim Leonard

Chickasha

Roosevelt

Claremore

Mark & Carol Lester

Robert J. Hays

Sen. Charles Ford

Mary & Don Herron

Frank C. & Ludmila Robson*

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Shawnee

Richard L. Sias

LASSO Corp.

Stillwater

Norman

Red Oak Energy Partners, LLC

Mr. & Mrs. William G. Paul

Ann & Burns Hargis

Students & Staff, Francis Tuttle Technology Center

Bixby

Jana Shoulders

First National Bank of Oklahoma Tulsa

Bill & Donna Ramsey

Homer Paul

Edmond

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

F. A. Sewell III

Altus

Continental Resources, Inc. Express Employment Professionals Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

William Tunell, M.D.

Richard Parker

Tulsa Tulsa

DONORS

INTEGRIS Health

Gene Rainbolt

Lawton

Meg Salyer

Janice & A. P. Martin

Oklahoma City

Mrs. Billie Thrash

Oklahoma City

Jordan & Erin Page

Nadine Holloway

Durant

Jean & Penn V. Rabb, Jr.

Al Mertens

McAlester

Ponca City

Josephine Freede

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Judge & Mrs. Ralph G. Thompson*

KWB Oil Property Management, Inc.

Case & Associates

Ada

The Puterbaugh Foundation

Wewoka

Oklahoma City

Mary Sue Hill*

Chickasaw Nation

Mekusukey Oil Co., LLC

Jim & Julie Grissom

Bartlesville

Patty & Joe Cappy

Oklahoma City

Tulsa

Patricia Evans

Mr. & Mrs. Glenn A. Cox

Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores, Inc.

MISSION PARTNERS Mr. and Mrs. Bob Burke

Robert E. Thomas*

Jones

Nancy Ellis

Comtech

Idabel

Tulsa

Greg & Donna Price

Tulsa

Mary Frances & INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Mick Michaelis Oklahoma City Center Duncan Oklahoma City Ike & Marybeth Glass Jasmine & Melvin Moran* Newkirk Jackie Cooper Imports Seminole of Tulsa E. Ann Graves* The Robert Z. Naifeh Tulsa Tulsa Family Mr. & Mrs. Gib James Oklahoma City Neil & Teri Gray Oklahoma City Harrah C. D. & Gwen Jack & Adrienne Grimmett The Kerr Foundation, Inc. Northcutt*

Gen. (Ret.) Tommy & Cathryn Franks

Tulsa

Joseph R. McGraw*

Tulsa

Ms. Lisa Upton Oklahoma City

Ms. Ashlyn Watson Tampa, FL

Julie Watson

Oklahoma City

Helmerich & Payne Inc. Tulsa

Marilyn and Ed Keller Tulsa

Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Meinig Tulsa

Mekusukey Oil Company, LLC Wewoka

Mustang Fuel Corporation Oklahoma City

SONIC, America’s Drive-In Oklahoma City

Southwest State Bank Sentinel

T.D. Williamson, Inc. Tulsa

Williams Foundation Tulsa

Oklahoma City

Ms. Debra Williams Stillwater

Ms. Debbie Wood Oklahoma City

Zarrow Families Foundation Tulsa

We want to accurately thank our supporters. If you notice an error, please contact Bailey Gordon at 405.523.3207 or bg@oklahomahof.com.


$3.95

2015 STATEHOOD DAY FESTIVAL

Saturday, November 14 | 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Celebrate Oklahoma’s 108th birthday with the Oklahoma Hall of Fame’s Statehood Day Festival complete with a full day of family friendly activities and FREE admission! ACTIVITIES INCLUDE: Young Entrepreneurs and Artists (YEA) Market | Food Trucks Face Painting | Inflatable on the front lawn |Scavenger Hunt Discounts in the Museum Store | Interactive crafts for families NOW ACCEPTING YEA MARKET APPLICATIONS, VISIT OKLAHOMAHOF.COM TO APPLY! The Young Entrepreneurs and Artists Market is designed for students of all ages to showcase and sell their work throughout the day. It is our mission to tell Oklahoma’s story through its people, promoting pride in our great state. This event is an opportunity for students to tell their own stories and present their own art, trade or performance.

Applications are due no later than Friday, October 16.

1400 CLASSEN DRIVE | OKLAHOMA CITY, OK | 405.235.4458 | OklahomaHoF.com

Oklahoma: The Magazine of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame  

August 2015

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