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A P R I L 2016

MAGAZINE OF THE OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

From Unnamed to Rediscovery: The Diverse Life of O. Gail Poole Foreman Scotty and the Circle 4 Ranch Students Highlighting Our Heritage Hall of Fame Member Spotlight: Myra Yvonne Chouteau An Encounter with Choctaw Horses


APRIL 2016 VOLUME 21 • NUMBER 1 PRESIDENT & CEO Shannon L. Rich

CONTENTS

VICE PRESIDENT Gini Moore Campbell CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE Bob Burke DESIGN Skip McKinstry skipmckinstry.com

MAGAZINE OF THE OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME

L E V E L S

2 From the Chairman Mark A. Stansberry

D O N O R

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11 Foreman Scotty and the Circle 4 Ranch Cliff Davis, son of Foreman Scotty 18 Students Highlighting Our Heritage Oklahoma Heritage Week Essay Winners 22 Hall of Fame Member Spotlight: Myra Yvonne Chouteau Millie J. Craddick 28 An Encounter with Choctaw Horses Neil Chapman

CHOCTAW NATION OF OKLAHOMA

THINK … CREATE … DISCOVER

40 Book Review: I AM OKLAHOMA CHILDREN'S SERIES “My brain was not made to remember details. My brain was made to think up new ideas, create, and make connections.” DR. JORDAN TANG

How does a scientist think? According to Dr. Tang, it all starts with curiosity. He asks a question. He wants to know how something works or how it can be better. You may not know it, but you think like a scientist every day. When you ask questions and try to solve problems, you are thinking like a scientist.

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3 From Unnamed to Rediscovery: The Diverse Life of O. Gail Poole Kyle Cohlmia

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From the President Shannon L. Rich

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A M

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

S E R I E S

42 OHOF’s Story Through Its People

E.L. AND THELMA GAYLORD FOUNDATION GiANT PARTNERS JAMES C. & TERESA K. DAY FOUNDATION

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THE OKLAHOMAN MEDIA COMPANY PUTERBAUGH FOUNDATION

ON THE COVER: “Hazel’s Clothesline,” oil on paper, 18.375”x25.375” by O. Gail Poole.


FROM THE

FROM THE

CHAIRMAN...

PRESIDENT...

FROM UNNAMED TO REDISCOVERY: THE DIVERSE LIFE OF O. GAIL POOLE

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

In December I had the honor of being named chairman of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. For the next two years I will be working with our board of directors and staff to increase awareness of this outstanding organization as we enhance how we tell Oklahoma's story through our people. A museum curator from western Oklahoma, my mother Lucy Stansberry first introduced me to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame many years ago. She knew the importance of the work the organization was doing through its wide range of programming. I was hooked. However, it was not until I became active in the leadership of the organization that I learned how extensive the programming actually was. From scholarships and leadership opportunities for teens and young professionals to free field trips and providing resources to teachers in the classroom, the Oklahoma Hall

of Fame is changing how we celebrate who we are. In addition, efforts already are underway in planning for the 2016 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony. Scheduled for the evening of Thursday, November 17th at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City, the 2016 Class of Honorees will be announced on May 19th at the GaylordPickens Museum, home of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. I plan on spending time on the road in the coming months working with leadership across the state and meeting and thanking as many donors as possible for making all we do a reality. I look forward to seeing you soon.

Mark A. Stansberry, Chairman

CHAIRMAN

VICE CHAIRMEN

Mark A. Stansberry

Phil B. Albert

Edmond

CHAIRMAN-ELECT

Gov. Bill Anoatubby Ada

Claremore

Joe P. Moran III

Virginia G. Groendyke Enid

CHAIRMEN’S COUNCIL

Xavier Neira

Calvin J. Anthony

Norman

Bruce T. Benbrook Woodward

PRESIDENT & CEO Oklahoma City

Wewoka

Oklahoma City

Shannon L. Rich

Duke R. Ligon

TREASURER

Sand Springs

Vicki Miles-LaGrange

CHAIRMAN EMERITUS

Tulsa

Clayton I. Bennett Oklahoma City

Nevyle R. Cable

Amanda Clinton

DIRECTORS

Glen D. Johnson

Lawton

CORPORATE SECRETARY

CHAIRMAN APPOINTMENTS DIRECTORS AT LARGE

Oklahoma City

Bill Burgess, Jr. Okmulgee

Tulsa

There are many wonderful programs and events happening at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. Earlier this month we awarded scholarships to high school students from throughout the state who participated in the Oklahoma Scholarship Competition. On May 5th we will host the official release of our latest publication, Making Things Better: Wes Watkins' Legacy of Leadership from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Museum. The following week, on May 12th, the O. Gail Poole: Rediscovered Oklahoma Master exhibit will open at 5:00 p.m. in the Tulsa World | Lorton Family Gallery and run through July 30th. Please join us for these fun and educational programs and events. Last month our Teen Board hosted its fifth annual Oklahoma Hall of Fame Land Run which supports education programming. Another successful event, the 5K, 1K, and 1-mile fun run started and ended at the Museum with

Stillwater

Pat Henry Lawton

Glen D. Johnson Oklahoma City

Roxana Lorton Tulsa

Tom J. McDaniel Oklahoma City

Lee Allan Smith Oklahoma City

G. Lee Stidham Checotah

Alison Anthony Bob Burke

Oklahoma City

Steve Burrage Antlers

Ann L. Caine Oklahoma City

Stan Clark Stillwater

Mick Cornett Oklahoma City

Teresa Rose Crook Edmond

Chad Dillingham Enid

Rebecca Dixon Tulsa

Gentner F. Drummond Tulsa

Greg Elliott Chickasha

Ken Fergeson Altus

Malinda Berry Fischer Stillwater

OklahomaHOF.com

Jennifer M. Grigsby

more than 225 runners. The deadline for Oklahoma students, grades 9 through 12, to apply to serve on the 2016-2017 Teen Board is Friday, May 27th and applications are available online at oklahomahof.com. Students represent schools statewide so please encourage your teen to apply. We are excited to announce plans to update and enhance existing exhibitory in the Museum. In working with ROTO, nationallyknown and awarded museum consultants, Phase One will be complete by November 16, 2016, with Phases Two and Three to follow. The Museum will continue to focus on our state's greatest natural resource-our people-and we cannot wait to share the new experiences with you. Thank you for your continued support!

Shannon L. Rich, President & CEO

Joe D. Hall

Gregory E. Pyle

Fred Harlan

T. Hastings Siegfried

Steven D. Hendrickson

Michael E. Smith

Robert Henry

C. Renzi Stone

Rhonda Hooper

Clayton C. Taylor

Gary Huckabay

Kathy Taylor,

Ronnie Irani

Steven W. Taylor

Kirk Jewell

Stratton Taylor

Rebecca Keesling

Steve Turnbo

Judy Love

Michael C. Turpen

John Massey

Hardy Watkins

John M. McArthur

Susan Winchester

Elk City

Okmulgee

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Yukon

Oklahoma City Stillwater Tulsa

Oklahoma City Durant

Lawton

Frank W. Merrick Oklahoma City

Durant Tulsa

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City

W

Oklahoma City Tulsa

McAlester

Claremore Tulsa

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Oklahoma City

BY KYLE COHLMIA

ithin a fast-paced, competitive society, the need to brand, market, and sell is an ever-present demand. Even within our personal lives, there is pressure to define who we are in definitive and sometimes binary terms. Native Oklahoman and accomplished artist, O. Gail Poole is unique in his artistic practice, as he is defined by his diversity, with intersects of styles ranging from sketch illustrations and traditional Western to impressionism and imaginative realism.

Bond Payne

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

“Self-Portrait,” oil on paper, 8.5”x16.5”.

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“O’Keeffe’s Mountain,” oil on masonite, 11.5”x15.5”.

Nicole Poole, the artist’s daughter, has dedicated her life and career to immortalizing her father and his work, stating that as a child she was her father’s shadow, recounting times of how she “slept behind his displays at exhibits and painted alongside him whenever [she] had the chance.” She has archived his entire collection, which she continues to exhibit around Oklahoma in remembrance of her father. Nicole posits, “Dad’s paintings were an extension of himself, and as such, they’re just a part of who I am. There was never any question that I would take care of them. I call them ‘the boys,’ and I’m working to make sure they don’t live in the dark.”

after he won a local drawing contest by sketching an illustration on a matchbox. Poole carried out his mother’s wish, and after graduating from Bradley High School he attended the University of Oklahoma, completing his BFA in 1957 in arts advertisement. During college, Poole enrolled in the ROTC, achieving the rank of captain and serving as Commanding Officer of Company H, 7th Regiment of the National Society of Pershing Rifles. Poole was also a member of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity during college and served as an officer for the United States Army, stationed at Fort Hood, Texas.

E A R LY L I F E:

“Courbet,” oil on masonite, 9.5”x7.5”.

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ords such as “unnamed,” “untamed,” and “unpredictable” are used to describe O. Gail Poole. The idea of using words with the prefix “un,” of taking-away-from or opposing the original derivative is certainly one way to pronounce Poole’s renegade disposition. However, like many Oklahomans who carry a pioneer spirit, there is also a sense of foundation for who Poole was and how he continues to evolve beyond his years. Artist Sherrie McGraw once said, Poole’s artistic style “changes as frequently as the Oklahoma wind.” And wind we experience as Oklahomans, sometimes subtly and other times violently, but not unlike Poole who continues his legacy as a true Oklahoma spirit within the foundation of his upbringing and ephemeral nature of his artistic expression.

Like many Oklahomans, Poole grew up in a rural area of our state. He was born in Marlow, Oklahoma, on September 30, 1935 to Woodrow “Woodie” and Hazel Poole. His father, who was a self-taught painter for barn advertisements, left the family for California when Poole was a young child. After which, Poole’s mother relocated the family to Bradley, Oklahoma. Poole’s interest in the arts at a young age could be attributed to heritable traits, however, Nicole credits his mother for his inspiration and success. A school teacher and “manager of her twelve siblings,” Hazel was a large supporter of his artistic pursuits, selling eggs on the weekends, determined to provide her son with a college education. In addition, life on the family farm provided Poole with a strong work ethic, to which Nicole acknowledged that “the family anecdote is that Dad became an artist because he was sick of bailing hay!” Nevertheless, Poole continued the family’s artistic legacy and arguably became an artist “Outside of Bend Oregon,” oil on board, 11.5”x15.5”.

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“On the Canadian,” oil on masonite, 8.5”x10.5”.

“Near Taos, Rio Grande,” oil on masonite, 15.5”x19.5”.

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“White Horse with Salmon Sky,” oil on board, 13.375”x20.5”.

A DV E RT I S I N G C A R E E R :

L I F E A S A N A RT I S T:

Throughout his early career, Poole worked as a commercial artist and illustrator. After graduation at OU, he moved to Richmond, Virginia and served as the vice president for a local advertising agency, returning to Oklahoma in 1963. He worked as a freelance artist for several years for the Ackerman McQueen agency before starting the Oklahoma City Art Director’s Guild. In 1967, along-side fellow artist Joe D. Hobbs, the groundbreaking Poole-Hobbs Advertising Agency opened. A real-life Don Draper, Poole led this agency into success as one the most forward thinking advertising agencies in the state. However, Poole had other plans for his career, yet to be pursued. While leading his advertising agency, during the late 1960s and early 1970s, Poole joined a group of modern Southwest artists who traveled extensively to the southwest region of the United States and Mexico. In 1974 Poole was invited to exhibit in a show in Mainz, Germany called “Western Artists of Oklahoma,” a show which defined the beginning of his practice as a professional artist. Poole who was dedicating his off hours to practicing his art, stated that “the more I painted, the more dissatisfied I became with the commercial business. My partner was experiencing the same feelings and we decided to go our separate ways on very good terms.” In 1975, Poole sold his shares to the remaining PooleHobbs partners, and dedicated his life to his artistic practice.

Through the exposure to more traditional forms of art, Poole connected with his friend, Oklahoma-born impressionistic artist Richard V. Goetz who owned Geatches Studio in Oklahoma City, and later taught art classes. Goetz mentored Poole throughout this time period, once stating, “Poole you’ve got a lot of talent, but you don’t know a damn thing about art.” Goetz’s critique jolted Poole into looking at art as more than just an image on

“I came to realize there is a mystery in art which is unexplainable but nevertheless real.” O. GAIL POOLE

“White Horse by Moonlight,” oil on masonite, 12.25”x22.375”.

canvas, to which Poole stated, “I came to realize there is a mystery in art which is unexplainable but nevertheless real.” In 1976, Poole retracted from the influence of his southwest art friends and moved on to more classically-inspired painting. During this year, he was also elected as chairman for the Oklahoma City Bicentennial Art Exhibit, which marked the change in artistic practice for Poole. He stated, “I don’t want to be known as Western Artist… Artist will do.” Also during this era, and along with Goetz and a group of other local artists, Poole founded the Professional Artists Association.

“Taos Mountain with Poplar Tree,” encaustic on board, 17”x19”.

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“Jan in Kimono and Repose,” oil on masonite, 16”x24”.

“Woman in Blue,” oil on masonite, 20”x16”.

Then Poole himself joined the Pastel Society of America and the Oklahoma Society of Impressionists, exhibiting his works at renowned institutions in Oklahoma including the Gilcrease Museum, the Philbrook Museum of Art, and the Cowboy Hall of Fame, later renamed the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. In addition to Geotz, Poole also attributes influence from other inspirational artists and teachers such as Yang Cho, Mark Daly, Bernie Fuchs, Gregg Kreutz, David Leffel, Sherrie McGraw, Frank Mason, and Fritz Scholder. He left Oklahoma City shortly after the failure of Penn Square Bank in the early 1980s, moving to Norman, where he quickly found his niche in a setting

of actively engaged citizens. More than a decade after Poole sold his business, he painted as a professional artist, experiencing several years of creative expression, painting traditional landscapes and portraiture. This period lasted through the 1980s, however, during the early 1990s, Poole experienced a shift in artistic practice. He stated, “At first, I tried to be marketable…the oil boom was getting into full swing at the time and all the oilies (sic) were into western art, so I painted western art and sold quite well. All of a sudden I realized I was doing commercial art again... Everybody and his dog got into doing western art, and seeing them do it made me realize what I was doing. I pulled in my

“Jen,” oil on paper, 22.25”x16.375”.

horns and my work.” We see the shift in his work of imaginative realism, muted paintings of human heads, spheres, and against surreal backgrounds or whimsical paintings of clowns, jungle animals, and cowboys painted in unconventionally bright colors. In 2000, Poole took a sabbatical from painting for a few years after a controversial response

to an exhibit at the Oklahoma State Capitol, but continued to travel and sketch in pen and ink, watercolor, and gouache. In 2010, Poole exhibited at MAINSITE Contemporary Art gallery in Norman, and began painting avidly again, working with bold colors in oil and encaustic to depict traditional southwestern figures of cowboys and Native

Americans, using highly stylized and modernistic expressions. While Nicole recounts that although his styles varied, he “remained rooted in classical impressionistic technique and subjects of Western and Native Americana.” She also notes his “dedication to research and development instead of focusing on the final result.”

Untitled, oil on masonite, 18.5”x16”.

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Foreman Scotty

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icole Poole’s curated exhibit, O. Gail Poole: Rediscovered Oklahoma Master, will run from May 12 – August 27, 2016 at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in the Tulsa World | Lorton Family Gallery. The exhibit highlights Poole’s diversity in both landscapes and portraits found in his extensive collection. Programming for this exhibit includes an artist talk by Sherri McGraw on June 8th from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. and gallery talk by Nicole Poole on July 14, 2016 from 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

and the Circle 4 Ranch

For more information on this exhibit, please contact gallery manager, Marissa Raglin at 405/523-3231, or visit oklahomahof.com. “Tall Bull, Chief of the Dog Soliders,” oil on board, 16”x12”.

L A S T I N G L EG A C Y: Poole, who passed away on April 13, 2013 at the age of 77, certainly provided enough diversity and works to fill a lifetime. Nicole spent months cataloguing her father’s collection, a tedious process that included measuring, documenting, preserving, and taking photos of each of his works in storage, in order to provide a more continuous process in order to showcase his work. As she stated in her blog, “Dammit, I will create a legacy for Dad.” In addition, Nicole has created The O. Gail Poole Scholarship Fund, which provides funding for students from atrisk communities to attend the Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts in Norman and the O. Gail Poole Memorial Travel Fund, which provides financial

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aid to Oklahoma artists who are interested in traveling the country for their projects. When attempting to define Poole, the prefix “un,” is frequent. However, now that his collection is available, collectively for the first time since his passing, arguably it is appropriate to preface Poole’s life with a “re,” a repetition or restoration, a rediscovery. Throughout her process, Nicole has unearthed a rediscovery of her father’s life, stating: I want the world to know that Dad was an Oklahoman. He was a passionate yet humble man who held himself to a very high standard. He dedicated all his days to either art or advocacy, and sought validation from within, rather than without. While he was a creative force to be reckoned

with, Dad didn’t take himself too seriously. He deflected compliments with a joke and an easy grin. He was approachable and generous, gregarious and charming. He loved to dance, to joke, and to be with his friends; he had this big, joyful laugh that was completely contagious. In short, he just loved living. As a state, Oklahoma embodies a sense of pioneer spirit: the foundation for a strong sense of self and ability to take a chance on the unconventional. Understanding Poole’s pioneer spirit, background, and diversity, lends to the ephemeral nature and cyclical process of life, death, and rediscovery, to which Nicole replied, “I don’t believe it’s possible to know where Oklahoma stopped and Dad started.”

BY CLIFF DAVIS, SON OF FOREMAN SCOTT Y

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teve Powell, better known as Foreman Scotty to those who grew up in the Great State of Oklahoma, was born in Sharon, Oklahoma in 1930. He later moved with his family to Oklahoma City and attended the original Classen High School, known today as the Classen School of Advances Studies. It was during his time at Classen that he became intrigued with theatre.

Foreman Scotty on set at the Circle 4 Ranch.

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Foreman Scotty with a giveaway and good values with kids in studio.

F Xavier T. Willard played by Danny Williams, Foreman Scotty, and Wilson Hurst as Cannonball McCoy.

ollowing graduation he spent time in Hollywood. He landed bit rolls alongside other young aspiring actors and actresses. He appeared alongside Jane Powell who had signed with Metro-Goldywn-Mayer while still in her teens.

In the early 1950s he returned home to Oklahoma and decided to pursue a career in radio. Attempting to break into the business, he worked at various radio stations in smaller markets, eventually winding up at WKYRadio as a gopher. Being in the right place at the right time, WKY was selected by the FCC to test the local signal strength of FM radio. Powell’s first opportunity to hit the air waves was at WKY as a result of the testing. However, the invasion of South Korea by North Korea detoured those plans and Powell found himself on foreign soil. Among the multiple decorations Powell received for his service during the Korean Conflict, he was most proud of the Bronze Star. Established in 1944, the Bronze Star is awarded for combat heroism and meritorious service. Originally created to recognize the sacrifices of infantry soldiers, defense officials expanded the award to honor members of all branches of the military. Following his honorable discharge, Powell accepted his next job in radio at KOTV in Tulsa, Oklahoma. KOTV was the first television station to sign on in the Tulsa market and only the second statewide behind WKY-TV in Oklahoma City. At KOTV he was responsible for day-to-day duties as an on-air radio personality. All larger stations at the time were just beginning to experiment with the new medium of television. In 1953, station management asked him and others to audition for a kids' television show. The on-air talent was to come up with an idea and creative concept for the show. The result—Powell spent the next The Circle 4 Ranch set was torn down and reconstructed daily as the station only had one studio.

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Foreman Scotty and four audience participants celebrating their birthdays on Woody the “famous birthday horse.”

Steve Powell as on-air announcer on WKY Radio.

Foreman Scotty made live appearances statewide, including at the Great State Fair of Oklahoma. ca.1960.

three years in Tulsa with the show as Foreman Scotty. How was the name chosen? The “foreman” is for the foreman of a ranch, “Scotty” for the Scottish Terrier as Powell believed everyone liked the little Scotty dogs. Eventually, WKY-TV asked Powell to bring The Foreman Scotty Show to Oklahoma City. He did, and from 1957 until 1971 Foreman Scotty hosted nearly 25 children, five days a week, at the Circle 4 Ranch. Ironically, the show was not scripted, they made it up as they went along. The show included a live television audience, mainly children and their parents, and three main characters—Foreman Scotty, Cannonball McCoy, and Xavier T. Willard. Announcer William Hurst played McCoy, while television personality Danny Williams played Willard. Parents had to book a year in advance for their children to be a part of the show. While the children sat on benches as part of the set, parents sat in the “hayloft” and watched through a large window. Because the show was shot in the station’s only studio, the set had to be set up and torn down daily. The interaction between the children in the audience and the main characters was a big part of the show. For those celebrating a birthday, they would sit on a special wooden horse appropriately named “Woody” for the entire half-hour show.The barrel-shaped body of the horse allowed sufficient room for up to three birthday riders. Later,Woody was upgraded to accommodate up to six celebrating their birthdays “on the ranch.” One of the remaining Woodys has found its home in the front window of the home of Powell’s son. Foreman Scotty, Dan Blocker from Bonanza, and Wilson Hurst as Cannonball McCoy. It was not uncommon to have special guests visit the Circle 4 Ranch.

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A publicity shot of Foreman Scotty and 3D Danny (Danny Williams).

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To honor his father, Cliff Davis has created a foundation to benefit children from the Great State of Oklahoma. Even today, Cliff is approached by Foreman Scotty fans to share their memories of his father.

Daily, the Magic Lasso appeared on screen to “lasso” the child who would walk away with the coveted Golden Horseshoe. Children would scream and holler during the segment, hoping the lasso would choose them. The story was that the horseshoes came from a secret gold mine where the horseshoes were made of gold in the mines, put on the horses’ hooves, and then smuggled out. The horseshoes have become collector’s items, selling on eBay and Amazon for as much as $250. And then there was the Secret Password—“nicksobilly,” the name of the show’s director Billy Nicks in reverse. Prior to filming a live Saturday show, a password was needed and Powell looked at Nicks and said “nicksobilly.” The tradition was born.

Media guides from Steve Powell’s time in Oklahoma’s two largest markets—Tulsa and Oklahoma City.

Adventure segments were also common. Foreman Scotty and his posse would make visits to rural areas, schools, and fairs. Foreman Scotty, along with other members of the show, had a real passion for their craft and entertaining children in what was considered to be the innocent days of radio and television. In addition to adventure and entertainment, each episode was filled with positive life lessons and examples of doing the right thing—a real “white hat” approach. In 1958 came the movie with Foreman Scotty and 3D Danny (Danny Williams). In “The Shootout in Downtown Oklahoma City” the two are lured into a trap by the Masked Spy. Filmed in downtown Oklahoma City, Foreman Scotty rode a motorcycle with a large golden horseshoe on the front. The black and white movie, with no special effects, included good guys and bad guys, fist fights, and a shootout. Of course, Foreman Scotty was the hero. Powell and his wife Mary were the proud parents of two—Cliff and the late Lisa. Oklahoma City remained Powell’s home until his death at the age of 64. Even in the later years of Powell’s life, his son remembered that a family outing always included someone stopping Powell for an autograph, to reminisce about the show, or to simply say “thank you.” To learn more about Steve Powell, please visit ForemanScotty.com.

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STUDENTS HIGHLIGHTING OUR HERITAGE For nearly 40 years students statewide have competed in the annual Oklahoma Heritage Week Competitions sponsored by the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. For more than a decade, IBC Bank has cosponsored the competitions. Elementary students compete in a poster competition, middle school and junior high in an essay competition, and high school students in a video competition. Featured here are the first, second, and third place state winning essays.

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1ST PLACE STATE

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By Wyatt Hood, 6th grade OKLAHOMA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY, EDMOND

LEONA MARY KIESPERT “Nanny” MATER: A True Entrepreneur of Guthrie

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n 1905, an early pioneer and entrepreneur was born in Oklahoma Territory. She was named Leona Mary Kiespert. Her mother had traveled to Oklahoma in the 1889 Land Run from Missouri when she was only five. Her maternal grandmother had herself been an entrepreneur, being the first person in Logan County to raise tomatoes and vegetable plants in cold frames with her husband who loved Astronomy and spent hours studying the stars, sun, moon, and the planets learning about weather and its habits. Leona’s mother grew up on a farm in southern Logan County and married Albert Kiespert in 1902. Leona was their second child. Leona grew up on a farm south of Guthrie. She, along with her seven brothers and sisters, worked on the farm helping their parents make a living. Leona’s parents continued to raise plants along with several of her aunts, uncles, and cousins. Her maternal grandparents had seen a vision of raising tomatoes and vegetable plants in beds and eventually greenhouses. Even today, most of the greenhouses in Guthrie are descendants of her family. Leona learned at an early age to identify areas where there was a need and not much supply. When she married Ralph Mater in 1924, they made their greenhouse their primary focus. During World War II times were tough; they moved around with Ralph finding work, eventually as an electrician in the Boeing Plaint in Wichita, Kansas. After Leona’s daughter, Matilda Mae, graduated college as a registered nurse, the entire family moved back to their first home, Guthrie. Back in Guthrie, they reestablished their greenhouse business. Times grew better, but Leona was always looking for that next venture. She learned from her daughter about medicine. She also saw many friends of her aunts and uncles growing old with not much family in Guthrie. The combination, medicine and lonely people growing older, gave Leona the idea of creating a home which could take care of people as they aged with medicine and nurses available to assist them. The vision would become the first nursing home of its type in the state of Oklahoma, the Golden Age Nursing Home, which is still one of the largest of its kind in the state. In the 1950s, the United States began experiencing increased pressure to establish long-term care facilities for older Americans because aging workers in cities had fewer children to care for them. Leona and her husband found property just a block from downtown Guthrie. They knew location was a big part of success. In 1955, they bought two

Wyatt Hood earned the first place honor for his essay on Leona Mary Kiespert Mater. He received his cash award and commendation from former Gov. George Nigh, IBC Bank President & CEO Bill Schonacher, Oklahoma Hall of Fame Chairman Mark Stansberry, Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb, and Oklahoma Hall of Fame President and CEO Shannon L. Rich.

houses, tore them down and built a building which allowed for numerous bedrooms with a hallway down the middle, a kitchen, and sitting area. Once complete, their daughter assisted with the nursing and they began to fill their rooms. Leona’s vision had been a success. Then in 1963, Ralph’s health took its toll causing him to eventually lose his eye sight. Believing it best, they sold the Golden Age Nursing Home. In 1969, Leona lost her husband. Having only one daughter and four granddaughters, Leona turned to another vision where she saw a need. In the mid 70’s through the 80’s, Leona became known to all of Guthrie as “Nanny.” Few daycare centers existed and many mothers had started working. Leona turned her house into a daycare center. Anytime you stopped by the house, no matter if it was early morning or late evening, you would find her with children. She again was on the leading edge of looking around and identifying where there was a need with little supply. In 1990 Leona suffered a stroke and went to live in the Golden Age Nursing Home. She died in January, 1991 at the age of 85. She was a great example of an entrepreneur who did not let hard times set her back. She continued to look for success and found it in areas that many folks never would have expected to find it. In her lifetime, she had a successful greenhouse with pieces of it continuing today in Guthrie, created and built the first nursing home in Guthrie and in the state of Oklahoma, and, later in life, created an in-home childcare center where she became known as “Nanny Mater,” raising many of the leaders in Guthrie today. I am proud to say, this amazing lady was my grandmother. I hope that in my lifetime I can successfully accomplish just one of the many ventures that she experienced.

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2ND PLACE STATE

By CHANDLER WILSON, 7th grade

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BETHEL MIDDLE SCHOOL, SHAWNEE

ETTA RAY BEARD

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have lived in Pottawatomie County my entire life, but when given an opportunity to write about its history, I realized that I did not know a lot about it. I began to research the history but chose to focus on my hometown, Shawnee. My mom told me about an article that she read in the Shawnee Outlook. The article talked about two Shawnee universities celebrating 100 years. The author, Tom Terry stated: “when Shawnee was settled after the land run of 1891, a number of experienced and entrepreneurial businessmen came to this area. Two brothers, John and Henry Beard, were instrumental in attracting railroads to serve Shawnee.” I thought those two brothers would be a good subject for my essay. But when I began to look for information about John and Henry, I discovered there was someone behind those two brothers: a woman named Etta Ray Beard. Shawnee is located along the North Canadian River, six miles southeast of the intersection of U.S. Highway 177 and Interstate 40. The Creek and Seminole Indians originally lived in this area. After the Civil War, there were several tribes,

in addition to the Sac and Fox, Citizen Band Potawatomi, Absentee Shawnee, and Kickapoo, that the federal government removed to this region. In the 1870s, Texas cattlemen drove their herds across Indian Territory and one of the four major trails was near present-day Kickapoo Street in Shawnee. Beginning in April 1889, the United States government began to open Indian lands to white settlement. Soon a land run was scheduled for the area that was designated as Pottawatomie County. September 22, 1891 was the date scheduled for a land run in a soon-tobe town called Shawnee. There were thousands lined up on that day. Etta Ray, John and Lola Beard, J.T. Farrall, and Elijah Ally all lined up for the land run too. Etta Ray was a young woman engaged to Henry Beard. Henry lived in Oklahoma City and when he had to go away on business Etta Ray decided she would do the land run herself. Etta also decided that instead of running many miles to stake her claim, she would simply step over the line, later named Kickapoo Street. When she did so, she immediately set up a tent and

Gov. George Nigh, IBC Bank President & CEO Bill Schonacher, Oklahoma Hall of Fame Chairman Mark Stansberry, Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb, and Oklahoma Hall of Fame President and CEO Shannon L. Rich recognized Chandler Wilson for her essay on Etta Ray Beard.

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spread out her belongings so that no one would say that it was not her property. The early settlers decided to name their new town Shawnee, after the Indian tribe. A few days after the land run, Henry Beard and Etta’s fathers brought logs and began to build a house on the new land. Etta Ray had moved to Oklahoma from Illinois with her family to participate in the Land Run of 1889. She had a good education and helped her family run a business in Oklahoma City. That is where she met Henry Beard. They were married on November 8, 1891. That cabin they started building a few days after the land run was the very first cabin in Shawnee. It was given to the City of Shawnee decades later and moved to the Santa Fe Depot where it still stands today. Their log house is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Soon after the run, James Farrall created Shawnee’s first named street, Farrall Street, which ran right through his property. By 1892, the population was estimated at 250 people. Several stores, two banks, two newspapers, two brickyards, seven cotton gins, three flour mills, and one livery stable for livestock were now all located in Shawnee. Etta was Shawnee’s first postmaster and would also take over Henry’s duties when he was out of town. Henry and his brother, John, decided that a train going through Shawnee would really help it grow. After months of negotiation, on July 4, 1895, the Choctaw, Oklahoma, and Gulf railroads arrived at Kickapoo Street. The train station was called the Santa Fe Depot and was built in 1902-1903 and stands today as a museum. The population in Shawnee jumped from 350 in 1894 to 2,500 in 1896. This little town began to boom and it continues to prosper even today. John and Henry Beard were right: the trains were necessary for Shawnee’s success. But I believe that Etta Ray Beard is the reason behind their success. Most of the present downtown area of Shawnee was once part of Etta’s claim. If she had not been there on the day of the land run and staked her claim just over the line, things could have been very different. Henry and Etta might have just continued living in Oklahoma City. They would have never built the first cabin, served as mayor and postmaster, and would not have brought the railroad companies to Shawnee. Etta Ray Beard is a very important person in Pottawatomie County’s history.

3RD PLACE STATE

By Mary Abigail Sharp, 7th grade

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BETHEL MIDDLE SCHOOL, SHAWNEE

KRIS STEELE

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love my community and am proud to live in Shawnee,” Kris Steele, former Oklahoma State Representative and State Speaker Pro Tempore, valiantly states as a proud citizen of Shawnee. Steele’s focal point is the criminal justice system and foster care and adoption services. He has interest in the money and space we consume in the prisons from the low risk and non-violent people we insist on locking away. He has huge concerns for the children coming from abusive homes and being placed in another unhealthy environment because of the Department of Human Services. Former Baptist minister and public school teacher, Kris Steele, a true representative of Oklahoma, Pottawatomie County, and the city of Shawnee, Oklahoma, strives for change not only in our county but our state as well. He’s a native Oklahoman, born in Ardmore, and currently lives in Shawnee. He earned a bachelor’s degree in religion from Oklahoma Baptist University in Shawnee and a Masters in education from East Central University in Ada. Steele sees how the incarceration rates for our state have risen to the third highest in the nation. He worked to limit the role and control the governor has regarding the parole system, however the attorney general ruled this petition to be illegitimate. Another step to his plan concerns Steele’s desire to facilitate allowing non-violent offenders out of the prisons and into a supervised monitoring program. By doing this, it would save money and space for the housing of violent offenders. This would give our county, state, and country the comfort of knowing our prisons aren’t being neglected or ignored. Steele has dedicated his attention to the safety of our state and county, and he tries to diminish the high crime rates to which our citizens have been subjected. Some officials have expressed concern and spoken out regarding the outcome of freeing the nonrisk offenders, but he assures they would be cared for in either a fully qualified

rehabilitation center and/or by being highly supervised. He confidently states, “I believe there is a better way. I think that we cannot sustain the path that we’re on,” Another important endeavor Mr. Steele has worked for is funds needed for children in the custody of the Department of Human Services. Steele has, and is currently, working towards a brighter future for our adoptive and foster care system. Steele, a father himself, worries for the children who could be harmed at shelters and foster homes. Steele is demanding extensive changes within the system. They are suing DHS in favor of the children. They are relentless in their plight to allow these children to exist in safe environments. The public has been pleased overall with the changes and hail Steele as one of the people who started it all. Another one of Steele’s successes is The Pinnacle Plan, a form to reestablish the policies and works of DHS to ensure the safety and protection of the fostered children. The touch-points of the plan include several important elements needed for the DHS to be successful. These include an effective system of communication, increase the

number of staff, include Child Welfare Practice Model in the training, assure the work is efficient and good quality, the children must be well cared for outside of the house, and to include the community’s partners in planning and help. Steele considers a child’s well-being important to our state and county. He works to make sure our state and county have the privilege of being able to say we know our adoptive and foster children are being well cared for. Mr. Steele is a role model, father, husband, upstanding politician, and a former minister. He deserves appreciation from our state, county, and city. He keeps our prisons and our disadvantaged children at the top of his priority list. He not only strives for good in our communities, but Steele is always working for the best for our state and country. He’s proud to say he lives and supports his home, our community, and our state. We should always be proud to say Steele is one of our own.

For her research and writing on Kris Steele, Mary Abigail Sharp received her award from Gov. George Nigh, IBC Bank President & CEO Bill Schonacher, Oklahoma Hall of Fame Chairman Mark Stansberry, Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb, and Oklahoma Hall of Fame President and CEO Shannon L. Rich.

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H A L L

O F

F A M E

M E M B E R

S P O T L I G H T

Myra Yvonne Chouteau BY MILLIE J. CRADDICK

In Oklahoma history, certain notable families have contributed a great deal, often over several generations — one of these was the Chouteau family. Chouteau’s family’s roots pre-date the Lewis and Clark Expedition. She was the great-great-great-granddaughter of Major Jean Pierre Chouteau, who is credited with establishing the first white settlement in what is now Oklahoma in 1796. In 1794, the French government of Louisiana granted Jean Pierre Chouteau a six-year monopoly to trade with the Osage. In 1802, he lost his monopoly in the Missouri area and relocated to the Verdigris River. He led a party of French trappers and traders to a site on the Grand River that is now within the

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nducted in 1947 at the age of eighteen, Myra Yvonne Chouteau is the youngest Oklahoma Hall of Fame inductee in its history. Chouteau, the only child of Corbett Edward and Lucy Annette (Taylor) Chouteau, was born in Ft. Worth, Texas on March 7, 1929. The family soon moved to Vinita where she grew up. Chouteau was of French and ShawneeCherokee descent.

Yvonne Chouteau with husband Miguel Terekhov and their daughters Elizabeth and Christina.

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In 1972, The Oklahoma City Times reported that the Oklahoma City Council had passed a resolution commending Yvonne Chouteau for the 40 years of contributions as an “ambassadress from Oklahoma to the world.”

city limits of Salina. The purpose of the visit was to explore the then unknown country along the Grand, Verdigris, and Arkansas rivers and to open a permanent trading post in the area. The post became so prosperous that many of the Chouteau family moved to the settlement. Chouteau had started dancing lessons when she was 2 ½ years old. In 1932, before she was three years of age, Chouteau led the Silver Anniversary Statehood Day parade in Oklahoma City and presented dance numbers on the Statehood Day program. In 1933, she performed during the Century of Progress in Chicago World’s Fair where she represented Oklahoma on American Indian Day in dances that included some of the finest Indian dancers in America. In 1935, Gov. E. W. Marland named her to represent him at the San Diego Exposition where she appeared in ballet and Indian dances. In Oklahoma, Chouteau has been honored year after year in about every conceivable manner. She was made an Honorary Colonel on the staff of many governors after Gov. Marland made her an Honorary Major in 1936. The Oklahoma legislature in 1941 made her the official “Daughter of Oklahoma, Goodwill Ambassadress from Oklahoma to the World at Large.” She was an original member of the Ambassador Corps of Gov. Henry Bellmon that attended the New York World’s Fair in 1964 and 1965. Chouteau has danced in nearly all theaters of cities in the United States with a population of at least 50,000. She was inspired to dance at age four after seeing legendary ballerina Alexandra Danilova perform in Oklahoma City. It was an era when the arts enjoyed unprecedented popularity in Oklahoma. During the 1930s, it was common for the greatest performing artists of the time to make stops in both Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Chouteau received training in Oklahoma and, later accompanied by her mother, travelled to New York to study. She first studied at the VilzakSchollar School and then, after winning a scholarship, the School of American Ballet, where she was spotted by the one that had inspired her—Russian-born ballerina Alexandra Danilova. At the time New York City was the best place to study, because all the Russian masters were there.

Yvonne Chouteau, inducted at the age of 18, remains the youngest member of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame at the time of induction.

Chouteau said, “One day a group of us from the school heard that the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo was having auditions, we were too young, but went anyway. After the audition, I dashed out, I was so scared. Later, my mother received a call from the manager, who said ‘Why did your little girl run away? We have chosen her to be with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo.’ I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry.” Chouteau was what was called a ballet baby and later became an internationally known prima ballerina. It was an exciting period in ballet as George Balanchine was bringing over Yvonne Chouteau and husband Miguel Terekhov performed together with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo.

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Yvonne Chouteau leading rehearsals.

Yvonne Chouteau performing in the 1940s.

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all famous Russian teachers from the Ballet Imperial School in Saint Petersburg. “I thought it would be fun to go to a scholarship competition and see how I would stack up. And here I was, kind of a little child prodigy from Oklahoma City. It was kind of discouraging. But I went, and I won. I won a lifetime scholarship to the American School of Ballet,” she said. Her parents were ecstatic. Chouteau went to professional children’s school. Actually finishing all schoolwork by correspondence. When able, she would go to the school, where there were children sixteen years of age or less. There were all kinds, actors, actresses, and dancers, and they were all there to pursue what would become their respective careers. Chouteau’s existence in New York was not nearly as glamorous as one might

believe. She said, “It was a very difficult life. My mother hesitated because she did not want me, as such a young person, 14 years of age, to constantly tour, rehearse, and dance. My grandmother told her, ‘she will miss her life as a child.’ But just to dance, nothing can compare. I’ve often said to the people I’ve danced with, ‘Life was dancing. There was nothing else.’ I learned early on, and I was depicted as a lyrical ballerina. The critics would say, ‘She has her own style,’ which was true. But, oh, the long white tutus, flowers in the hair….You became almost gazelle like. A male ballet dancer uses as much energy during one evening’s performance as a football player does during three quarters of a game. Ballet slippers are worn out after one evening’s performance.” Danilova, then the leading dancer of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, recommended Chouteau and provided her with a chaperone in the form of her assistant. She was the youngest dancer in history to turn professional at age fourteen. Despite her age, Chouteau was subject to the same discipline and pressures as every other member of the corps de ballet, though she recalled that “as long as I was on stage I was happy.” She was even happier when in only her first season she was given several roles to understudy. She made her official debut as a soloist on her 16th birthday in Coppelia’s Prayer solo. Her repertoire included major roles in Raymonda, Paquita, The Nutcracker and Swan Lake, as well as in many of the works made for the company. After having been singled out early in her career by the choreographer and dancer Léonide Massine, then at the height of his fame, she considered herself to be a “Massine dancer” and danced to considerable acclaim in many of his works. Drawing on her dancing experiences and comprehensive education, she also trained under some of the great masters at that time— Ernest Belcher, Dorothy Perkins, Adolf Bolm, and George Balanchine. Chouteau’s parents, proud of her determination and talent, saw to it that their daughter had every opportunity to perfect her passion. Over the years, the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo experienced great success and performed throughout the world during the 1940s and 1050s, which was Chouteau’s tenure. The director of the Ballet

Russe de Monte Carlo wanted to add more Americans to the ballet. He took in fellow native Oklahoman and Native American, Maria Tallchief. She was already in the company as Chouteau joined it as a child. By then, Tallchief was a big soloist. Chouteau said of herself: “I was not a bravura-style technician who could whip off 32 fouettés, a quick whipping movement of the raised leg, without blinking an eye, nor was I a classical ballerina in the purest sense. I preferred roles I could put my heart and soul into, roles that were technically challenging but demanded more than executing steps. Every dancer has an individual forte, and mine was being able to create an illusion and express a mood on stage.” Chouteau stayed with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo for fourteen years, until 1957. In addition to her career with Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, she made television appearances in New York, danced with the Saint Louis Municipal Opera and at Jacob’s Pillow, a dance center, school, and performance space located in Becket, Massachusetts. Chouteau said “classical ballet technique has its roots in 16th century Italy but was developed in France during the 1600s. Today, French words are used in all parts of the world for the various steps and positions of classical ballet.” Chouteau described the art of ballet as a form of dancing performed for theatre audiences and like other dance forms, ballet may tell a story, express a mood, or simply reflect the music. But a ballet dancer’s technique, or way of performing, and special skills differ greatly from those of other dancers. Ballet dancers perform many movements that are unnatural for the body, yet when these movements are well executed, they seem natural and effortless. Ballet dancers appear to defy the laws of gravity as they float through the air in long, slow leaps. It’s such a graceful movement. They keep perfect balance while they spin like tops without becoming dizzy. During certain steps, their feet move so rapidly that the eye scarcely can follow the movements. The women often dance on the tips of their toes, and the men lift them high overhead as if they were nearly weightless. The dancers take joy in controlling their bodies, and ballet audiences share their feelings. The audience can feel

as though it glides and spins with the dancers. Simply by using their bodies, ballet dancers are able to express many emotions, such as anger, fear, jealousy, joy or sadness. Chouteau has stated, “I have received in my life international applause and recognition, but to me, the greatest satisfaction in my career has come when I have been able to strike an empathetic chord in someone else’s soul.” The 1954-1955 the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo season was particularly difficult for the company. Finances were tight and a 30-week tour crossing the United States was made by bus rather

Yvonne Chouteau, left, with Mike Larsen, Rosella Hightower, Maria Tallchief, Marjorie Tallchief, and Moscelyne Larkin. The five prima ballerinas were honored in Larsen’s Flight of Spirit that graces the State Capitol’s rotunda.

At the age of 14, Yvonne Chouteau was the youngest dancer ever accepted into the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. Chouteau, along with Rosella Hightower, Maria Tallchief, Marjorie Tallchief, and Moscelyne Larkin, are featured in The Vintage Garden at the Tulsa Historical Society as part of The Five Moons by artists Monte England and Gary Henson.

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than train in order to save money. This proved extremely hard on the dancers’ bodies. Chouteau was already considering her future when she fell in love with a fellow principal dancer, Miguel Terekhov. They married in 1956. In 1957 the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo headlined a season at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. By this time Chouteau was already six months pregnant with her first daughter, but “since I had no problems and showed very little, I went ahead and danced.” Among the roles she performed was the

course of ballet study leading to a degree. The couple gave their first performance at the University in March, 1961. Chouteau became the Director of the Chouteau-Terekhov Academy of Ballet at the Oklahoma Science and Arts Foundation, where she was formerly artistic director of the Oklahoma City Civic Ballet, the precursor of today’s Oklahoma City Ballet. During a 1982 interview Chouteau spoke of how her heritage had enriched her dancing, “The Indian people are very artistic as a whole. We are also very non-

were named Oklahoma Treasures by former Gov. Frank Keating in 1997. The ballerinas also are immortalized in Mike Larsen’s painting Flight of Spirit in the Rotunda of the State Capitol. The State Legislature commissioned the Chickasaw artist to paint the mural in 1991, and the painting’s dedication that fall marked the ballerina’s first public appearance together. The painting shows the past and the present of Oklahoma history and the contribution these five ballerinas have made to the arts and to Oklahoma. A set of bronze sculptures, The Five Moons by

Prayer Solo in which she had made her soloist debut. These would be her last appearances with the company. Following a period of dancing in Miguel’s home city of Montevideo in Uruguay, and the birth of a second daughter, the couple returned to Oklahoma. During their visit, University of Oklahoma (OU) President Dr. George Cross invited them to visit the campus. Over lunch he asked if they would be interested in teaching a course at OU while they visited Chouteau’s parents. They agreed to teach just one course. Miguel said, “But when the announcement came out in the campus paper, we had so many sign up that we had to have four sections. That was the beginning of what was to become our department.” They became full professors and Artists in Residence at the University of Oklahoma, where they initiated the

Yvonne Chouteau remembered, “I was always happy when I was on stage.”

Yvonne Chouteau’s publicity image while performing with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo.

verbal, and so I think dance is a perfect expression of the Indian soul.” Although having differing Indian backgrounds, perhaps it was a similar spirit that helped propel five young women forward to enjoy and perfect their art and become known as Oklahoma’s “Five Indian Ballerinas.” Maria and Marjorie Tallchief, Rosella Hightower, Moscelyne Larkin, and Yvonne Chouteau danced their way into the hearts of art lovers throughout the world. The five ballerinas had the skills and the techniques that all dancers needed, but unlike many dancers, the five ballerinas had the spirit and passion credited to their American Indian heritage and Oklahoma roots. As a result of their impact in the world of dance and the proud heritage each held in their heart, the five ballerinas

artists Monte England and Gary Henson, are located in The Vintage Garden on the Tulsa History Society grounds. When the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian opened in Washington, D.C. in 2004, Chouteau was honored with the inaugural National Cultural Treasures Award, celebrating her contribution to the nation’s cultural heritage. Other honors began in 1947 with her listing in the International Who’s Who. In 1963 Women in Journalism named her Outstanding Woman and American Women in Radio and Television named her Woman of the Year. The University of Oklahoma’s Theta Sigma Phi named her Outstanding Faculty of 1964 and the Soroptimist Club of Oklahoma City named her Outstanding Woman of Oklahoma for 1970.

Proud to support the T E L L ING OF O KL AH O M A ’ S S TO RY

through its people

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An Encounter with Choctaw Horses BY NEIL CHAPMAN

While working on a photo project for the Oklahoma Supreme Court, titled “Transfer of the Courts,� Supreme Court Justice Yvonne Kauger suggested that I consider doing a photo project on the Choctaw horses, as they are considered endangered. Because I was not interested in horses, I sort of ignored the suggestion. A year passed and Justice Kauger again encouraged me to look at the Choctaw horses down south. She seemed confident I would find a photo project there. Will was the first horse that introduced himself to author and photographer Neil Chapman.

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hile attending the Oklahoma City Red Earth Festival an Oklahoma photographer, Chester Cowen, introduced me to Francine Bray, one of the individuals who care for the Spanish Colonial Mustangs and the special strain called Choctaw horses, in Antlers, Oklahoma. Talking to her piqued my interest. Francine invited me to visit and stay with her and husband Michael and meet Bryant and Darlene Rickman, the main owners of the horses. It was

The home of Francine and Michael Bray in Antlers. The Brays help care for the Choctaw horses.

confusing at first knowing what to call the horses, Spanish Mustangs, Spanish Colonial, or Choctaw, but after some time it became clear. Originally the Spanish brought these horses to America, they then became known as Spanish Colonial horses. In time, Native American tribes acquired these horses—

From left, Michael and Francine Bray, Bryant and Darlene Rickman, and Dawna and Neil Chapman.

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namely Choctaw, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Seminole, and Creek. Then based on who owned them their strain became known as Choctaw horses or Cherokee horses. Confusion solved. Several weeks later, I drove down to Antlers. Upon arriving at Francine’s home I noticed horses in the front yard and in the two adjacent pastures. Throughout my adult life I was never afraid of horses but I always had a healthy respect for them because I knew that they could hurt you if you were not paying attention. As soon as I got out of the car, Francine took me over to one of the horses. His name was Will. He seemed inquisitive and gentle. I said to Francine “I thought the horses were wild”. She said, “They can be wild, and the more you are around them you’ll see what I mean”. The room that Michael and Francine put me up in had a window overlooking the pasture. Seeing the horses running and

kicking raised my excitement about getting my cameras and going out to be with them. Observing them it did not take long for me to see that the horses could indeed be unpredictable, but were gentle enough for me to be close to them. This first session had me excited about working more with these beautiful creatures. The next day Francine drove me to meet Bryant and Darlene Rickman. Both seemed as gentle and feisty as the horses they had cared for, more than forty years of caring. They both told me how the Spanish Mustangs came to be in the hands of the Indians before the 1830 Indian Removal Act and the “Trail of Tears”.

Neil Chapman photographing some of the herd.

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came to learn that in the early years there were thousands of these horses. When the government migrated tribes from the southeast United States to Oklahoma, not only did Indians succumb to the devastating travel, but hundreds, if not thousands, of the horses died as well. In the years leading to the mid1900s the Choctaw horse numbers dwindled; enter Gilbert Jones who lived in Medicine Springs, Oklahoma. Gilbert moved to the Antlers area in the early 1950s and brought Spanish Colonial horses with him and for the rest of his life worked diligently to preserve the horses. During this time these beautiful animals ran wild on Blackjack Mountain. In the early 1980s another horseloving family, Bryant and Darlene Rickman were introduced to

Gilbert Jones and their friendship ensued. Bryant also connected with several Choctaw families in various Oklahoma locations who were willing to sell their horses. Over a four-year period nine horses were purchased and though they were all over the age of 25 they are credited with saving the Choctaw strain. What was unique was that the Choctaw families breeding records were well recorded and had clearly shown that these horses were from the original “Choctaw strain”.

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A herd of horses running toward Neil Chapman in the Choctaw pasture.

At times, the horses surrounded Neil Chapman.

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Both families dedicated their lives and sacrificed much to preserve, breed, and care for these incredible horses. During the years of knowing Gilbert, Bryant purchased his horses and today is the main caregiver of the Spanish Colonial Mustangs and Choctaw horses in Oklahoma. He currently has approximately 400 horses, just under 200 are the Choctaw strain. Bryant relayed stories and information about the horses while driving to the Choctaw pasture near Antlers. It was a rainy, wet day and after an hour of off-road driving, we reached our destination. It seemed we were in the middle of nowhere. Francine, Bryant, and I got out of the truck and Bryant started calling the horses. In a long, loud holler he yelled, “COME-OOON” was the phrase he yelled, and it was loud and long. No horses, so we drove deeper into the grassy, pine covered area. “COME-OOON” over and over again; we stood there waiting. Then you could hear it, distant pounding. You could actually hear the horses running before you saw them. Then they were in sight, running in full gallop, heading right toward us. I have to say it was exhilarating, and if I didn’t believe they were wild looking before, I did now. Bryant told me to get on the tailgate and he would drive away letting the horses run toward me, I remember thinking “run towards me?” He kept calling “COME-OOON” and I kept photographing those beautiful creatures running right at me.

Bryant stopped the truck but the horses kept coming. I was extremely nervous as they came closer and closer until they were close enough to bite me. The horses knew there was feed in the truck bed so they were testy with each other, which made for

Neil Chapman photographed as Stallions postured for dominance and to protect their mares.

a more unnerving experience. To photograph, at times I had to push them back. I finally got off the tailgate and cautiously walked in and around fifteen or so of the herd. Stallions were posturing with other stallions vying for alpha dominance and protecting their mares. Bryant was pointing out characteristics he knew I would not recognize, such as ears folded back, head forward, a stallion staring at another and marking

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Official Heritage Horse of Oklahoma In 2014, during Oklahoma’s 54th Legislature, the passage of Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 34 recognized the Oklahoma Colonial Spanish horse as the Official Heritage Horse of Oklahoma. Chief Going Streak, one of the Stallions that became one of the photographer’s favorite horses, was recently stolen from the herd.

Neil Chapman has spent months photographing the herds and capturing the character of each one.

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Lelani, one of Maila Coleman’s herd, enjoyed interacting with Dawna Chapman and playing with her hat.

their territory. He warned me to be careful. When they fight, other horses will scatter and run and you do not want to be in their path. Soon, an Alpha fight ensued; one of my favorite horses to watch was the stallion Chief Going Streak. In between the excitement of the horses playing, running, and fighting, I would work close up and far away documenting and trying to capture their character.

36

I could tell I was hooked. These were different than any other horse I had been around before. During the next weeks and months, I visited the Bray and Rickman herds several times, as well as others they had introduced me to in their area— Maila Coleman, Harold and Donna Davis, and Jim Stephens to name a few. They all allowed me to spend time with their herds.

I have a new project today. Here are some of the wonderful images these horses allowed me to capture; my favorite is of Lelani and my wife playing with a hat. Through my work I hope to provide a face to an animal deserving of our attention and protection as, with roughly 400 remaining, the Choctaw strain is considered endangered because of their numbers and of the scarcity of resources to care for them.

Horses in Maila Coleman’s herd.

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27 horses make up the herd cared for by Donna and Harold Davis.

One of the horses in Donna and Harold Davis’ herd is blind, her name is Ra-Chella.

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BOOK REVIEW

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

the leader in publishing Oklahoma's history

NE W RE L E A S E S BEARD

Students from Dibble Public Schools with books celebrating Oklahoma’s history and heritage. Those seated showcase If the Fence Could Talk and the “I Am Oklahoma Children’s Series,” books published by Oklahoma Heritage Association Publishing, a publication of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

WILL ROGERS OKLAHOMA’S FAVORITE SON

WIL L RO G E R S

“About once in every 50 years a personality is developed on the American scene whose qualities of mind and heart make such an impression upon us that most of our people in every walk of life generate an affection for him—such a man was Will Rogers.”

I AM OKLAHOMA CHILDREN’S SERIES

UNKNOWN

“A great tradition is that of Will Rogers. He ought to be taught in the schools because of what he embodied of the best of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. He was homely as a mud fence and yet as beautiful as a sunrise over an Oklahoma field of alfalfa. There is a curious parallel between Will Rogers and Abraham Lincoln. They were rare figures we could call beloved without embarrassment.”

Will Rogers: Oklahoma’s Favorite Son by Darleen Bailey Beard

CARL SANDBURG, POET

DARLEEN BAILEY BEARD I

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

A M

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

S E R I E S

HOOKS

LEONA MITCHELL OPERA STAR

LE O N A M ITC H E LL

“Once I heard Leona sing, I had a whole new appreciation for opera. I fell in love with her voice. I moved to Oklahoma City from my home in Detroit to study opera at Oklahoma City University just like she did.”

Leona Mitchell: Opera Star by Gwendolyn Hooks Jordan Tang: Think . . . Create . . . Discover by Cheryl Schuermann Te Ata: Oklahoma’s Cultural Treasure by Pati Hailey Bill Wallace: Author of Adventure and Animal Stories by Jane McKellips $9.95 each

DEONNA CATTLEDGE, OPERA STUDENT

“You must have tenacity—develop the hide of an elephant.” LEONA MITCHELL

G W E N D O LY N H O O K S I

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

SCHUERMANN

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

S E R I E S

JORDAN TANG THINK … CREATE … DISCOVER

J O R DA N TA N G

“My brain was not made to remember details. My brain was made to think up new ideas, create, and make connections.”

A M

DR. JORDAN TANG

How does a scientist think? According to Dr. Tang, it all starts with curiosity. He asks a question. He wants to know how something works or how it can be better. You may not know it, but you think like a scientist every day. When you ask questions and try to solve problems, you are thinking like a scientist.

CHERYL SCHUERMANN I

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

A M

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

S E R I E S

HAILEY

TE ATA OKLAHOMA CULTURAL TREASURE

T E ATA

Te Ata was shy around most people. But she loved to sing, dance, and act out stories. Te Ata had a deep voice. Part of her training was learning how to vary its sound. She could play the parts of many characters in her one-person program—a weary Indian mother, a weathered medicine man, or a young Indian princess.

PAT I H A I L E Y I

O K L A H O M A H E R I TA G E A S S O C I AT I O N P U B L I S H I N G

McKELLIPS

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

S E R I E S

BILL WALLACE AUTHOR OF ADVENTURE AND ANIMAL STORIES

B I L L WA L LACE

“In most of my adventure stories, I’m actually writing about adventures I had with Gary or about our made-up adventures.”

A M

NEW R ELEAS E

“The Dibble School’s Library would like to thank you for your generous donation of books. Each year you gift us with books that greatly enhance our library. This year your gift fills our biggest need. We needed biographies and Oklahoma History for the elementary level. Each book in this collection is very special to us.” I encourage every Oklahoman, regardless of your age, to add this series to your collection. The beautiful design complements the content, making for an engaging read that will remind you why we are so proud to be Oklahomans.

Making Things Better: Wes Watkins’ Legacy of Leadership by Kim D. Parrish Foreword by Tom Cole

BILL WALLACE

BILL WALLACE

A M

O K L A H O M A

C H I L D R E N ’S

Red Dirt Baseball– Boom and Bust: Small Town Professional Baseball in Oklahoma, 1920-1942

Changed Lives: A History of Sunbeam Family Services

by Peter G. Pierce

by Jim Priest and Bob Burke

$19.95

$20.00

Dust Storm by Jane McKellips Illustrated by Christopher Nick

$18.95

$24.95

JANE McKELLIPS I

UP C OM I N G R ELEAS E S :

I think Glenda Dewbre, librarian for Dibble Public Schools, said it best:

— BOB BURKE

“I’d write short stories or parts of books in the evening. Then I’d read it to the class the next day. That’s how my writing career started.”

O OKKLLA AH HO OM MA A H HEERRIITA TAG GEE A ASSSSO OC CIIAT ATIIO ON N PPU UBBLLIISSH HIIN NG G

In 2008 Oklahoma Heritage Association Publishing, a publication of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, released its first children’s book to help support educators at the elementary level with much needed resources. The creation and release of the “I Am Oklahoma Children’s Series” has provided elementary educators with biographies of our fellow Oklahomans geared towards their grade level. From Will Rogers, Leona Mitchell, and Jordan Tang to Te Ata Fisher and Bill Wallace, the I Am Oklahoma Children’s Series is filling a void for educators statewide. Through the generosity of an anonymous donor, the funding for the first five volumes and a library distribution was secured. As a result, one set of the biographies was placed in every public elementary school library in Oklahoma at no cost to the school. And, I hear more volumes are in the works.

S E R I E S

ALL PUBLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE GAYLORD-PICKENS MUSEUM STORE, AT OKLAHOMAHOF.COM, AMAZON.COM, AND BOOKSTORES STATEWIDE.

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35 41


OHOF’S STORY THROUGH ITS PEOPLE

Dr. Tom Friedemann, Superintendent/CEO of Francis Tuttle Technology Center spoke to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame’s Second Century Board and Members at the Center’s District 21 Restaurant. Sue Lunsford and Evelyn Stone Holland with “Something to Believe In” by Willard Stone during the Tulsa World | Lorton Family Gallery’s opening exhibit for Willard Stone Centennial: A Legacy of Art Through Family.

Marissa Raglin and Linda Stone Callery prior to the opening of the Willard Stone Centennial: A Legacy of Art Through Family exhibit on February 25th.

From left, Marissa Raglin led a tour for Susan Winchester, Mark Stansberry, and Greg Elliott during an orientation for incoming members of the board of directors.

Members of the late Willard Stone’s family enjoyed the opening reception of Willard Stone Centennial: A Legacy of Art Through Family in the Tulsa World | Lorton Family Gallery at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum.

During the Willard Stone Centennial: A Legacy of Art Through Family opening reception, some younger members of the Stone Family explored the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Gallery.

LEFT: Kyle Impson and Jared Pickens enjoyed hearing from Dr. Tom Friedemann at the Second Century’s gathering at District 21.

RIGHT: Attending the Second Century’s event at District 21 were Mandy Green, Chantry Banks, and Nichol Vagrosky.

Rachel Ropp, Heath Ropp, Jordan Vineyard, Becky Pryor, and Chelsea Grogan enjoying the Second Century’s night at District 21 and learning more about Francis Tuttle Technology Center.

42

Jenifer McAbee, Mark Stansberry, Tom Friedemann, and Brian Lux at the Second Century event at District 21 at the Francis Tuttle Technology Center.

On February 3, Bob Burke provided the program for the Panoramic Book Club on his latest book with Berry Tramel, Oklahoma’s 100 Greatest Athletes.

Mike Turpen visited with Leona Mitchell: Opera Star author Gwendolyn Hooks during a book signing at Best of Books in Edmond.

43


PHOTO: COURTESY LIBBY THEDFORD.

OHOF’S STORY THROUGH ITS PEOPLE

VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT:

BRITTON STOWELL

A During the Third Thursday for March Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett took a selfie with a new friend.

During the Third Thursday for March artist Patrick Riley helped those attending create St. Patrick’s Day masks.

Zachary Foster, right, introduces daughters Liesel and Anaka to Oklahoma Hall of Famer Te Ata Fisher at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum, home of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. Courtesy Ali Meyer.

Bob Burke helped a Third Thursday participant with his mask.

44

As part of the board orientation, Steve Hendrickson, Bob Burke, and Mick Cornett joined those visiting for Third Thursday and the reading of Spring Break: Thunder Up for OKC.

Exploring the Bust Garden at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum prior to a wedding are, from left, Elliotte Foster, Amelia Foster, Liesel Foster, and Anaka Foster. Courtesy Ali Meyer.

n Oklahoma native, Britton Stowell is proud to call Oklahoma home and give back to our state by volunteering for the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. “Being an Oklahoman has provided such an incredible upbringing that has instilled in me a sense of generosity, pride and loyalty. These qualities have been instrumental in driving me to fulfill all of my goals and dreams. I cannot wait to put all of the skills that I have learned growing up in Oklahoma to use by bettering our state and its people in the future.” Britton started volunteering for the Oklahoma Hall of Fame as a member of the organization’s Teen Board during his sophomore year of high school. During his three years on the Teen Board, Britton served as a committee chair, vice chairman and chairman of the board. The Teen Board raised over $15,500 for education programming under Britton’s leadership in 2013. Britton now attends Oklahoma State University, pursuing his bachelor of science in Strategic Communications with a pre-law option. In addition to his studies, Britton is the Entertainment Beat Writer for the O’Colly and volunteers for the OSU Dance Marathon, benefitting the Children’s Miracle Network Hospital. In addition to his many on-campus activities, Britton continues to volunteer his time with the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. From participating in the organization’s internship program to volunteering at the Second Century’s Born & Brewed fundraiser, Britton has continued to help the Oklahoma Hall of Fame tell Oklahoma’s story through its people year after year.

35 45


OHOF’S STORY THROUGH ITS PEOPLE

On Saturday, March 12th more than 400 Oklahoma high school students competed in the Oklahoma Scholarship Competition at 14 test sites statewide. The weather was perfect for the 2016 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Land Run on Saturday, March 5th.

More than 250 participated in the Teen Board’s 2016 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Land Run 10K | 5K | and 1-mile Fun Run.

With staff liasions Marissa Raglin, Corie Baker, and Shelley Rowan, the 2015-2016 Teen Board executed another successful Oklahoma Hall of Fame Land Run to support education programming of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

Jennifer Grigsby, Bruce Benbrook, Shannon L. Rich and Mark Stansberry following the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Land Run.

Celebrating following the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Land Run were Jon Harpman, Kristen Davis, and Rohit Keshava. Runners check their results following the annual Oklahoma Hall of Fame Land Run sponsored by the Teen Board.

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MAGAZINE DONORS

Check support level desired. o Student .............................. $15 o Subscription ....................... $35 o Individualism ...................... $50 o Perseverance .................. $100 o Pioneer Spirit .................. $250 o Optimism ....................... $500 o Generosity ................... $1,000 o Legacy Circle ............. $2,000 o Honor Circle ............... $2,500 o Executive Circle .......... $3,500 o President’s Circle ......... $5,000 o Chairman’s Circle ...... $10,000

Yes! I would like to support the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. Mr./Mrs./Dr./Ms. Spouse

Daytime Telephone (

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o Check payable to: Oklahoma Hall of Fame o Bill my o VISA o MasterCard o Discover o AmEx

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Supporting the Oklahoma Hall of Fame makes an excellent gift. Please complete the form above and recipient information at right.

Number /

CVV#

Jennifer & Mark Allen Edmond Robert D. Allen Oklahoma City* Joan Allmaras & Mark Houser Edmond Lona A. Barrick Ada Dr. & Mrs. William L. Beasley Oklahoma City Mr. and Mrs. Clayton I. Bennett Oklahoma City Elizabeth Bennett Oklahoma City Dr. William & Theta Juan Bernhardt Midwest City Barbara Bass Berry Sapulpa* Mr. & Mrs. G. T. Blankenship Oklahoma City* Gary & Lovilla Bowser Woodward Montie & Betty Box Sand Springs Sharlene S. Branham Oklahoma City* Phyllis & Russal Brawley Oklahoma City Bob Burke Oklahoma City* Carol & Nevyle Cable Okmulgee

GIFT RECIPIENT Mr./Mrs./Dr./Ms.

DONORS

GIFT RECIPIENT’S ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

MISSION PARTNERS Mr. and Mrs. Bob Burke

L Brands

The Chickasaw Nation

Lawton

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Edmond

Oklahoma City

MAIL TO: OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME | 1400 CLASSEN DRIVE | OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73106

OklahomaHOF.com

Ada

Durant

SUBSCRIPTION $35 • Subscription to Oklahoma: Magazine of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Hall of Fame Headlines e-update Standard Donor Benefits • Subscription to Oklahoma: Magazine of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Hall of Fame Headlines e-update • 10% discount at the Gaylord-Pickens Museum Store • Invitations to organization and Museum events • Program and event discounts for Donors STUDENT $15 All Standard benefits plus: • Annual admission pass to the GaylordPickens Museum for student (must present valid student ID; kindergarten through college eligible) INDIVIDUALISM: $50 All Standard benefits plus: • Annual admission pass to the GaylordPickens Museum PERSEVERANCE: $100 All Standard benefits plus: • Annual admission passes to the GaylordPickens Museum for 2 adults and household children under 18

PIONEER SPIRIT: $250 All Perseverance benefits plus: • Four single-use guest passes to the GaylordPickens Museum OPTIMISM: $500 All Pioneer Spirit benefits plus: • 25% discount on one-time rental of the Devon Classroom GENEROSITY: $1,000 All Optimism benefits plus: • One complimentary weekday use of the Edith Kinney Gaylord Garden or BennettMcClendon Great Hall • Advance opportunity to purchase Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony tickets • Recognition in the Oklahoma Hall of Fame Banquet & Induction Ceremony program LEGACY CIRCLE: $2,000 All Generosity benefits plus: • Customized facility use package* HONOR CIRCLE: $2,500 All Generosity benefits plus: • Customized facility use package*

EXECUTIVE CIRCLE: $3,500 All Generosity benefits plus: • Customized facility use package* PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE: $5,000 All Generosity benefits plus: • Customized facility use package* • Recognition in The Oklahoman, The Lawton Constituition and Tulsa World Oklahoma Hall of Fame Sunday Supplement CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE: $10,000 All Generosity benefits plus: • Customized facility use package* • Recognition in The Oklahoman, The Lawton Constitution and Tulsa World Oklahoma Hall of Fame Sunday Supplement

*Facility use is subject to availability, and restrictions may apply.

The Lawton Constitution Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Leichter Wewoka

GiANT Partners James C. & Teresa K. Day Foundation Sugar Land, TX

The Oklahoman Media Company Oklahoma City

Puterbaugh Foundation McAlester

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Matthew 25:40 Missions Stillwater

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey K. McClendon Oklahoma City

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meinders Oklahoma City

Mervin Bovaird Foundation $10,000+ Phil B. and Joan M. Albert Tulsa Joe & Darcey Moran Claremore Tulsa American Fidelity Larry and Polly Nichols Foundation Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Anonymous

Mrs. Mary Nichols

Oklahoma City

Baseball in the Cross Timbers LLC Norman

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City

Devon Energy Corporation Oklahoma State University Oklahoma City Foundation Stillwater Dolese Bros. Co. Oklahoma City Adam and Betty K. Permetter Falato Christy and Jim Everest Express Employment Professionals Oklahoma City

Washington, DC

R.A. Young Foundation Dallas, TX

Mrs. Henry Freede

Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Roff, Jr.

Oklahoma City

Houston, TX

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Groendyke

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Ross

Enid

Nichols Hills

Inasmuch Foundation

Mr. Richard L. Sias

INTEGRIS Health

Simmons Foundation

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Kathy Taylor and Bill Lobeck Tulsa

Tulsa

Ms. Sharen Jester Turney Reynoldsburg, OH

Mr. Chad Tuttle Tulsa

University of Oklahoma Foundation Norman

The University of Tulsa Tulsa

Williams Companies Tulsa

Dr. and Mrs. Nazih Zuhdi Nichols Hills

$5,000 - $9,999 110 events Oklahoma City

Allied Arts

Oklahoma City

Anschutz Foundation Denver, CO

Mr. Keith Bailey

Oklahoma City Community Tulsa Foundation, Inc. Big 12 Conference

Mr. and Mrs. Mike D. Case Oklahoma City Thunder Tulsa

Sunbeam Family Services

Tulsa World Media Mr. and Mrs. Duke R. Ligon Company

Love's Travel Stops & Country Stores

Oklahoma City

For more information about any of our donor levels or to customize your donor package at the $1,000 level and above, call Bailey Gordon at 405.523.3207.

Columbus, OH

Mr. and Mrs. Tom E. Love

Edmond

Gen. (Ret.) Tommy & Cathryn Franks Roosevelt Mrs. Henry Freede Oklahoma City Aulena & Gilbert Gibson Oklahoma City Joan Gilmore Oklahoma City Marybeth & Ike Glass Newkirk Jack & Adrienne Grimmett Pauls Valley Mr. & Mrs. John D. Groendyke Enid Mark S. Grossman & Cynthia L. Brundige Oklahoma City Joe D. Hall Elk City Dr. & Mrs. Don Halverstadt Edmond Dr. and Mrs. Michael D. Hampton Oklahoma City Fred & Kellie Harlan Okmulgee Robert J. Hays Chickasha Carol & Robert A. Hefner, IV Oklahoma City Dr. & Mrs. George Henderson Norman

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City

Irving, TX

BOK Foundation Tulsa

Mr. and Mrs. Al Branch Oklahoma City

Central Liquor Company, Owned and Operated by the Naifeh Family Oklahoma City

Cherokee Nation Businesses Catoosa

Dillingham Insurance Enid

Alisa Fellhauer Oklahoma City

First United Bank

Oklahoma City

Mekusukey Oil Company, LLC Wewoka Frank & Debbi Merrick Oklahoma City Mary Frances and Mick Michaelis Duncan Jasmine & Melvin Moran Seminole* Jeaneen Eddie Naifeh Oklahoma City Ronald J. Norick Oklahoma City C. D. & Gwen Northcutt Ponca City* Dr. Marion Paden Oklahoma City Richard M. Parker Oklahoma City Homer Paul Edmond William G. & Barbara Paul Oklahoma City Ruby C. Petty Oklahoma City Dr. Richard W. Poole Oklahoma City* Puterbaugh Foundation McAlester Jean & Penn V. Rabb, Jr. Lawton Bill & Donna Ramsey Bixby Jack Rawdon & Dr. Andrea Key Oklahoma City

Ike and Marybeth Glass Newkirk

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Grigsby Edmond

The University of Tulsa College of Engineering & Natural Sciences / Collins College of Business Tulsa

H.A. & Mary K. Chapman Walton Family Foundation Bentonville, AR Charitable Trust Tulsa Zarrow Families Foundation Hall Estill Oklahoma City

Tulsa

Mr. Joe D. Hall

$3,500 - $4,999 Mr. and Mrs. Bill Hancock Kristian Angels Elk City

Prairie Village, KS

Oklahoma City

Mr. Timothy C. Headington Ms. Melissa Baker Dallas, TX

The Woodlands, TX

IBC Bank

Mr. John Boyd

Mr. Douglas L. Jackson

Daniel Brazeale

Lobeck-Taylor Foundation

Careertech Administrative Council, Inc.

Oklahoma City Enid

Tulsa

Mustang Fuel Corporation Oklahoma City

NBC Bank

Oklahoma City

NBC – Altus

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

Chae Group, LLC Oklahoma City

David Chong Oklahoma City

Altus

Cox Charities

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Norman

Mr. John Cox

Oklahoma City

Tulsa

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma Humanities Council, Inc.

Edmond

Oklahoma City

Jani Daniel Laura Edwards

Oklahoma State University Seattle, WA Dr. and Mrs. Stillwater Robert H. Epstein OU/Price College of Business & Rainbolt College Edmond Ethics & Excellence in of Education Journalism Foundation Norman Oklahoma City Mr. and Mrs. W. DeVier Ex Libris Users of Pierson North America Chevy Chase, MD Mr. H.E. "Gene" Rainbolt Edmond Michael and Sherry Fair Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Charles and Peggy First National Bank & Trust Stephenson Family of Okmulgee Foundation

Durant

Tulsa

Okmulgee

Foundation Management, Inc.

UMB Bank

First National Bank of Oklahoma

Oklahoma City

Mr. and Mrs. David L. Kyle SONIC, America's Drive-In Phillip Fox Tulsa

Don & Mary Herron Idabel James R. Higgins, MD Tulsa Mary Sue Hill Oklahoma City* Gary & Betty Huckabay Mustang John & Janet Hudson Edmond Bonnie & Norman Imes, MD Oklahoma City INTEGRIS Health Oklahoma City Mr. & Mrs. Gib James Oklahoma City Willa D. Johnson Oklahoma City Marilyn & Ed Keller Tulsa KWB Oil Property Management, Inc. Tulsa Tracy & David Kyle Tulsa Robert J. LaFortune Tulsa Lana & Dave Lopez Oklahoma City Edmund Martin Edmond John Massey Durant Lynn A. McIntosh Ardmore

Renfro Family Foundation Ponca City Frank C. & Ludmila Robson Claremore* Gennady Slobodov & Salam Ramadan Nichols Hills Mr. & Mrs. Lee Allan Smith Oklahoma City* Don E. Sporleder Davenport Nancy & Mark A. Stansberry Edmond Charles & Peggy Stephenson Family Foundation Tulsa Dean Stringer Oklahoma City* Judge & Mrs. Ralph G. Thompson Oklahoma City* Michael C. Turpen Oklahoma City Tallie & Thad Valetine Oklahoma City Mr. & Mrs. W. K. Warren, Jr. Tulsa* G. Rainey Williams, Jr., Oklahoma City The Winchester Group LTD Chickasha Ruth & Stanley Youngheim El Reno

IN HONOR OF Ret. Air Force General James E. Hill CALIFORNIA Ed Ruscha Venice

IN MEMORY OF Chester Cadieux Aubrey McClendon Yvonne Chouteau Terekhov Robert E. Thomas Lew O. Ward, III

SOUTH CAROLINA Joseph H. Williams Retired CEO, The Williams Companies, Charleston TEXAS Kenneth H. Cooper, MD Dallas* Tom & Phyllis McCasland Dallas Frank W. Rees, Jr Irving VIRGINIA Willis C. Hardwick Alexandria Leslie A. Woolley Alexandria WASHINGTON, D.C. David Busby Adam J. & Betty K. Permetter Falato WYOMING W. R. & Judy Howell Wilson

Listed below are donors to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and Gaylord-Pickens Museum at the $2,500 level and above. Funded solely by private contributions, we are extremely grateful for the support of all the individuals and organizations who give to each of our programs and enable us to tell Oklahoma’s story through its people. This list represents donors as of November 23, 2015.

E.L. and Thelma Gaylord Foundation Oklahoma City

48

Chris & Gini Moore Campbell Edmond Central Liquor Company, Owned and Operated by the Naifeh Family Oklahoma City Checotah Land Mark Preservation Society Checotah The Chickasaw Nation Ada* Dean Andrew M. Coats Oklahoma City Comtech Oklahoma City Bill & Carol Crawford Frederick* Teresa Rose Crook, Edmond Frederick Drummond Pawhuska* Drew & Linda Edmondson Oklahoma City Nancy Ellis Oklahoma City Gary & Mary England Edmond William & Pam Fahrendorf Durant Ken & Mary Ann Fergeson Altus* Charles Ford Tulsa

*Denotes Charter Sponsor

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City, Tulsa

University of Central Oklahoma Edmond

Oklahoma City

Charlie Fowler Fort Sill

Francis Tuttle Technology Center Oklahoma City

Fulton & Susie Collins Foundation Tulsa

Mr. Anthony Garcia Oklahoma City

George Kaiser Family Foundation Tulsa

Paige Givens Oklahoma City

Tip and Suzanne Graham Marlow

Mrs. Holly Henry Flower Mound, TX

Jeffrey G. Hirsch M.D. Oklahoma City

Richard and Jan Ronck Oklahoma City

President Robert and Dr. Jan Henry

Austin Schettler

Oklahoma City

Ms. Kaitlyn Schrick

Oklahoma City

Ben and Ysabel Selander

Oklahoma City

Emily Sutton Zurmehly

Mangum

Moore

Oklahoma City Edmond

Oklahoma City

Ms. Nancy Teague Chickasha

Tri County Tech Foundation Bartlesville

Ms. Lisa Upton Oklahoma City

David Vinson Webbers Falls

Heritage Trust Co. Amanda Irby Darlene Irby Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Jewell Stillwater

Ms. Tracy Jungels Edmond

Kendra Scott Design Oklahoma City

Mr. John McArthur and Ms. Karla Oty Lawton

Ms. Reba McEntire

Dr. and Mrs. Joe Howell

Catherine Wagner

George Knudson

Julie Watson

Ms. Chandra Kroll

Ms. Ashlyn Watson-Atigre

Waxahachie, TX

Mr. Blaire Logan

T.D. Williamson, Inc.

Norman

Edmond

Tulsa

MA+ Architecture & CMSWillowbrook

Leslie Wilsey

Oklahoma City

Edmond

Ms. Jena Malone

$2,500 - $3,499 Ms. Ann S. Alspaugh

Nichols Hills

Ft. Walton Beach, FL Edmond

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Tampa, FL

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City

Manhattan Construction Oklahoma City

McElroy Manufacturing, Inc. Tulsa

Earl Bay Mitchell Edmond

Christina Noe Oklahoma City

OGE Energy Corp. Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum Oklahoma City

Gary D. and Carol A. Parker Muskogee

Nichols Hills

Nashville, TN

Mekusukey Oil Company, LLC Wewoka

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip D. Mercer Shelley Murray Oklahoma Academy Oklahoma Credit Union Oklahoma City

S. Bond Payne and Lori Payne Oklahoma City

Mr. Matthew Price Oklahoma City

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Burrage Mr. Edward Ruscha Antlers

Century City Artist Corp. Mounds

Mr. and Mrs. Art Cotton Oklahoma City

Raven Crowl Norman

Ms. Rebecca Dixon Tulsa

Mr. Todd Dobson Edmond

Ms. Patricia Evans Ponca City

Venice, CA

Chris and Emily Shoffner Edmond

DeAnn and Lee Allan Smith Oklahoma City

Ms. Margaret Anne Snyder Edmond

Stock Exchange Bank Woodward

Tom & Judy Love Foundation Oklahoma City

Mr. Mike Turpen Oklahoma City

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Fergeson VI Marketing and Branding

Nicole Pharaoh

Altus

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma City

GE Corporate

Hardy and Kari Watkins

Shannon Rich and Kelly Kerr

Westchester, IL

Helmerich & Payne Inc.

Yelp OKC

Oklahoma City

Tulsa

Edmond

Oklahoma City

We want to accurately thank our supporters. If you notice an error, please contact Bailey Gordon at 405.523.3207 or bg@oklahomahof.com.


$3.95

O. GAIL POOLE: REDISCOVERED OKLAHOMA MASTER On Display | May 12, 2016 - July 30, 2016

OPENING RECEPTION | Thursday, May 12 | 5 to 7 p.m. | Free Admission O. Gail Poole (1935-2013) was a fourth-generation Oklahoman and an American Master who influenced generations of artists through his skill, dedication and brazen shifts in style. A natural maverick, Poole eschewed easy classification, shifting at will from Impressionism to Playful Modernism and all points in between, as capricious as the Oklahoma winds.

1400 Classen Drive | Oklahoma City 73106 | 405.235.4458 | OklahomaHOF.com

April 2016 | Oklahoma: Magazine of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame  
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