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Perspective OKLAHOMA FARM BUREAU

Keith Kisling, OKFB District Seven Director and Alfalfa County Farm Bureau member, will be honored with the Governor’s Outstanding Achievement in Agriculture Award during Oklahoma Ag Day on May 9.

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April 13, 2018

OKFB District Four Director and Cotton County Farm Bureau member Jimmy Kinder has been chosen to receive the Governor’s Agriculture Environmental Stewardship Award on May 9.

Two OKFB members to be honored with Governor’s Excellence in Agriculture Awards during Oklahoma Ag Day activities May 9 eith Kisling of Burlington and Jimmy Kinder of Walters will be honored with Governor’s Excellence in Agriculture Awards on May 9, as announced by the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry. The awards will be presented during a special ceremony hosted by ODAFF May 9 at 2:30 p.m. at the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, which also is sponsoring the event. To celebrate Oklahoma Ag Day, agriculture groups and organizations also will set up on the fourthfloor rotunda of the state Capitol on May 9 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Kisling, OKFB District Seven Director and Alfalfa County Farm Bureau member, will be honored with the Governor’s Outstanding Achievement in Agriculture Award. The prestigious award honors leaders in the agricultural industry who

exemplify personal values, performance and achievement. Recipients are recognized for having high standards of conduct, leadership, innovation and accomplishments in agriculture and as serving as a role model for Oklahoma agriculture’s young people. As full-time farmers and ranchers, Kisling and his wife, Marlene, have built a thriving agricultural business growing wheat, wheat pasture, cattle, irrigated corn, soybeans, alfalfa hay, grass hay and sorghum. The couple also have operated a feedlot for stocker cattle. Kinder, OKFB District Four Director and Cotton County Farm Bureau member, will be presented with the Governor’s Agriculture Environmental Stewardship Award. The award recognizes Oklahoma agriculturalists who are leaders in developing and adopting environmentally

innovative agricultural practices. This award highlights the efforts of an Oklahoma agricultural producer who is a steward of the environment and is dedicated to conserving the natural resources of Oklahoma while helping to ensure a continued supply of food and fiber. Kinder is a fourth-generation farmer and rancher from Cotton County and an early innovator in Oklahoma agriculture. His family farms wheat, canola, sesame and grain sorghum. They also grow grass and raise stocker cattle. Other award recipients include Randy Gilbert of Tecumseh, honored with the Governor’s Outstanding Public Service in Agriculture Award, and Larry Watkins of Stillwater, who will posthumously be recognized with the Governor’s Outstanding Legacy in Agriculture Award.


Raspotnik-Jones joins OKFB field services klahoma Farm Bureau has hired Penny Raspotnik-Jones as its southeastern field representative. In her position, Raspotnik-Jones will work as a liaison between county Farm Bureaus and the state Farm Bureau. She will serve members in Atoka, Bryan, Choctaw, Coal, Haskell, Hughes, Latimer, LeFlore, McCurtain, McIntosh, Pittsburg and Pushmataha Counties. A cattle rancher from the southeastern Oklahoma town of Hartshorne, RaspotnikJones and her family raise registered and commercial Angus cattle.

“As a third-generation rancher, I am passionate about agriculture,” RaspotnikJones said. “If I can help another agriculture producer in my Farm Bureau role, then I feel that I have accomplished something truly important.” Raspotnik-Jones earned a master’s degree in agricultural education and a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from Oklahoma State University. Before joining OKFB, she spent 10 years as an agricultural economics and horticulture professor at Eastern Oklahoma State College.

Penny Raspotnik-Jones

Register for 16th Annual YF&R Golf Classic by Friday, April 27 he Oklahoma Farm Bureau Young Farmers and Ranchers will host its 16th Annual YF&R Golf Classic on Friday, May 4 at the Cedar Valley Golf Club in Guthrie, Oklahoma. Proceeds of the event will benefit the OKFB Legal Foundation, which defends the rights of Oklahoma farmers and ranchers. Check-in for the annual scramble-style tournament will begin at 7:30 a.m. with tee off at 9 a.m. Prizes will be awarded to the top three teams, along with awards for longest drive and closest to the hole. Registration is open through April 27. The cost is $350 for a team of four and $90 for an individual. Mulligans are available for $10 each, with a maximum of three per player. Costs for the tournament must be paid in advance. Hole sponsorships also are available at three levels:

Platinum – $1,000 Includes green fees for four players, a meal and door prizes, two free mulligans per player and a sponsored hole named for the team.

Gold – $750 Includes green fees for four players, a meal and door prizes, one free mulligan per player and a sponsored hole named for the team.

Silver – $500 Includes green fees for four players, a meal and door prizes and a sponsored hole named for the team. To learn about sponsorship opportunities and more information, contact OKFB YF&R Coordinator Zac Swartz at 405-205-0070.

Oklahoma Farm Bureau Online Farm Bureau members from Kentucky and Louisiana visit Oklahoma on beef tour Kentucky and Louisiana Farm Bureau members visited Oklahoma cattle ranches last week during the states’ annual beef tours. In addition to touring various farms and businesses in Oklahoma, the members also met with the OKFB board of directors over dinner. Find pictures of the tour on the OKFB Twitter page.

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How does the capital gains tax deduction help Oklahoma family farmers and ranchers? With pressure to bring more funding to education, state legislators recently have been pushed to remove the capital gains tax deduction. Dr. Shannon Ferrell, an Oklahoma State University agricultural economics professor, released an in-depth analysis of the deduction’s impact on agriculture. Find a link to it on the OKFB Facebook page.

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U.S. soybeans, cotton, beef on China’s most recent tariff target list armers and ranchers are well-aware markets ebb and flow, but the tariff tit-for-tat between the U.S. and China is testing both the patience and optimism of families who are facing the worst agricultural economy in 16 years, cautioned American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall. “Growing trade disputes have placed farmers and ranchers in a precarious position,” Duvall said in a statement. “We have bills to pay and debts we must settle, and cannot afford to lose any market, much less one as important as China’s. We urge the United States and China to return to negotiations and produce an agreement that serves the interests of the world’s two largest economies.” Last week, China unveiled a list of 106 imports from the U.S.—including soybeans, cotton and beef—that will be subject to a 25 percent tariff. Thirty percent of U.S. soybeans—about $14 billion worth per year—go to China, making soybeans the United States’ top ag export to China. Cotton is the nation’s No. 2 export to China, with one out of five exported bales transported there.

China’s announcement came in response to a Trump administration proposal that would impose 25 percent tariffs on imports of about 1,300 Chinese product lines valued at $50 billion. Afterward, President Trump asked the U.S. Trade Representative to consider an additional $100 billion in tariffs against China. Trump’s tariff proposal that prompted China to target U.S. soybeans, cotton and beef would not take effect until after a comment period that closes on May 11, and then up to 180 days will be allowed for a final decision by the administration—time when negotiations with China could result in a deal to avert the tariffs. Similarly, the most recent batch of tariffs announced by China has no set start date. Already in effect are tariffs of 25 percent and 10 percent on imports to the U.S. of steel and aluminum, respectively. While these tariffs apply to several countries from which the U.S. imports those products, it is notable that China is the largest global producer of steel and aluminum. And while not much steel comes into the U.S. from China, it does export a significant amount of aluminum to the U.S.

China responded to the U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs with tariffs on imports of 128 U.S. product lines. According to a recent AFBF Market Intel report, of those 128, 94 are agricultural in nature; the remainder are steel and aluminum. The agricultural lines are divided into two categories – 86 products that will be subject to an additional 15 percent tariff and eight products that will be subject to an additional 25 percent tariff. “It is important to keep in mind these new tariffs are in addition to existing tariffs” Veronica Nigh, AFBF economist explains in the Market Intel update. “For example, a Chinese importer of U.S. frozen pork had been paying a tariff of 12 percent before April 2; now she will pay a tariff of 37 percent on the same U.S. product, while competing against frozen pork products from our European Union, Canadian, Brazilian, Chilean and other international competitors subject to the regular 12 percent tariff. It doesn’t take much of a math or economic background to appreciate that the U.S. competitive position will quickly deteriorate in these conditions.”

Member Benefits

Calendar

EZ Ranch

Congressional Action Tour April 17-20 • Washington, D.C. Contact: Tasha Duncan 405-530-2681

EZ Ranch is cattle management software for today’s livestock owners that helps ranchers keep track of their expenses, income and livestock easily and efficiently. EZ-Ranch offers “itemized” profit and loss and livestock tracking. OKFB members can receive a 15% discount by calling 1-888-EZRANCH. Learn more at www.ez-ranch.com.

www.okfarmbureau.org/benefits

16th Annual OKFB YF&R Golf Classic May 4 • Guthrie Contact: Zac Swartz 405-205-0070 Ag Day at the Capitol (rescheduled) May 9 • Oklahoma City Contact: Marcia Irvin 405-523-2405


Published by Oklahoma Farm Bureau Postmaster: Send address corrections to: Perspective, P.O. B. 53332, Oklahoma City, OK 73152-3332

Executive Director Thad Doye

Oklahoma Farm Bureau 2501 N. Stiles Oklahoma City, OK 73105-3126

Non-Profit U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 131 Okla. City, OK.

405-523-2438

Senior Director of Corporate Communications 405-530-2640 Dustin Mielke Senior Director of Policy Communications Hannah Davis 405-523-2346

2018 OKFB Field Representative Regions TEXAS

BEAVER

HARPER

WOODS

GRANT

ALFALFA

WASHINGTON

CIMARRON

OSAGE

KAY

NOWATA

CRAIG

OTTAWA

DELAWARE ROGERS

GARFIELD NOBLE

ELLIS

MAYES

MAJOR

WOODWARD

PAYNE

PAWNEE

LOGAN

KINGFISHER

CREEK

CHEROKEE

ADAIR

WAGONER LINCOLN

DEWEY

TULSA OKMULGEE

CUSTER

ROGER MILLS

MCINTOSH

CADDO

KIOWA

POTTAWATOMIE

WASHITA

SEMINOLE LE FLORE

HUGHES PITTSBURG

HASKELL

MCCLAIN PONTOTOC

GARVIN

COMANCHE

GREER

SEQUOYAH

OKFUSKEE

CLEVELAND

BECKHAM

MUSKOGEE

OKLAHOMA

CANADIAN BLAINE

COAL

GRADY

JACKSON

STEPHENS

HARMON

LATIMER ATOKA

MURRAY

PUSHMATAHA

MCCURTAIN

TILLMAN

JEFFERSON

JOHNSTON

COTTON CARTER

MARSHALL

BRYAN

CHOCTAW

LOVE

Oklahoma Farm Bureau is now armed with a full staff of six field representatives who are ready to serve Farm Bureau members across the state. The field reps act as liaisons between county Farm Bureaus and OKFB. See the above map to learn who is your county’s field representative.

Perspective – April 13, 2018  

Perspective is the official leader newsletter of the Oklahoma Farm Bureau. In this issue, read about two OKFB members honored with awards, l...

Perspective – April 13, 2018  

Perspective is the official leader newsletter of the Oklahoma Farm Bureau. In this issue, read about two OKFB members honored with awards, l...