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November / December 2008

FOR MEMBERS AND FRIENDS OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART


view

Joseph Mills Photography

the

Oklahoma City Museum of Art Executive Staff Carolyn Hill, President & CEO Hardy S. George, Ph.D. , Chief Curator Rodney Lee, Finance Director Kenneth H. Lindquist, Development Director

Editorial Staff Alison Amick, Associate Curator Chandra Boyd, Education Curator Jim Eastep, Membership Officer Nicole Emmons, Editor Brian Hearn, Film Curator Matthew C. Leininger, Registrar Leslie A. Spears, Communications Manager

Board of Trustees Officers Frank D. Hill, Chairman Virginia Meade Fox, Immediate Past Chairman Elby J. Beal, Chairman-Elect Leslie S. Hudson, Vice-Chairman Judy M. Love, Vice-Chairman Duke R. Ligon, Vice-Chairman Peter B. Delaney, Treasurer John R. Bozalis, M.D., Secretary *James C. Meade Katy Boren Frank W. Merrick William M. Cameron *Charles E. Nelson Teresa L. Cooper Maurice C. Nickell, D.D.S. *Marion DeVore Morris Permenter Theodore M. Elam John P. Porter *Nancy Payne Ellis Christopher P. Reen *Shirley Ford Marianne Rooney Preston G. Gaddis II Robert J. Ross David T. Greenwell Amalia Miranda Silverstein, M.D. Kirk Hammons Darryl G. Smette Suzette Hatfield Jeanne Hoffman Smith K. Blake Hoenig Denise Semands Suttles Joe M. Howell, D.V.M. Jordan Tang, Ph.D. The Honorable Willa D. Johnson Lyndon C. Taylor Penny M. McCaleb Wanda Otey Westheimer Katie McClendon Charles E. Wiggin Frank McPherson Marsha Wooden *Lifetime Trustee Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center 415 Couch Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (405) 236-3100 Fax: (405) 236-3122 www.okcmoa.com Readers’ comments are welcome. E-mail nemmons@okcmoa.com. Requests for permission to reprint any material appearing in this publication should be sent to the address above.

Director’s Letter T

he Board’s appointment of Glen Gentele secures a proven leader for a new era in the life of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art in the Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center. Glen’s accomplishments in all aspects of museum leadership attest to a lifetime of commitment, hard work, and high standards. In visiting with Glen, I sensed his clear understanding of the opportunities inherent on museum outreach and civic partnerships that have come to define the larger role that museums play in their communities. His fresh ideas, thoughtfulness, and firm grasp of discipline and mission are attributes of a new colleague and leader whose arrival at the Museum is warmly welcomed and eagerly awaited. Thank you, Glen, for your confidence in the Museum and in Oklahoma City. And thank you to the search committee and board of trustees for an exemplary search process and an inspiring choice.

Carolyn Hill President & CEO

On the Cover

Inside Exhibitions..............................................................Pages 4-5 The Collection........................................................Pages 6-7 Calendar...................................................................Pages 8-9 Film.......................................................................Pages 10-11 Education...........................................................Pages 12-13 News....................................................................Pages 14-15

Mission statement The Oklahoma City Museum of Art enriches lives through the visual arts. William Glackens (1870-1938). Bathers at Bellport (detail), ca. 1912. Oil on canvas, 25 x 30 in. The Phillips Collection, acquired 1929


Glen Gentele New President & CEO Carolyn Hill steps down at end of year

G

len Gentele has been appointed to head the Museum, succeeding longtime director Carolyn Hill, who announced in January her intention to step down as president and chief executive officer at the end of the year. Gentele was elected by the Board of Trustees and will assume his duties on January 1, 2009. “As we move into a new era, it is with utmost confidence and enthusiasm that I announce the election of Glen Gentele as the new president and chief executive officer of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art,” said Frank Hill, Chairman of the Board of Trustees. “Glen is an accomplished professional, who is an ardent advocate for the highest museum standards. His embrace of the Museum’s vision and strategic goals assure that the Museum will continue to be guided by the same core values of integrity, quality, commitment, accountability, passion and resilience that have characterized the Museum’s stunning accomplishments since opening the new Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center in March, 2002.” Gentele is currently the director of Laumeier Sculpture Park, one of the nation’s premiere open-air museums located in St. Louis, Missouri. He also holds a joint appointment as the Aronson Endowed Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art at the University of Missouri. St. Louis. A native New Yorker, Gentele brings over 15 years of museum and education experience to his new post, having served in important positions at The John and Mable Ringling Museum in Sarasota, Florida, the International Sculpture Center in Washington, D.C., the Art Museum at Florida International University in Miami. In addition to his professional museum appointments, he has taught at Florida International University and the Ringling School of Art and Design.

“His embrace of the Museum’s vision and strategic goals assure that the Museum will continue to be guided by the same core values of integrity, quality, commitment, accountability, passion and resilience that have characterized the Museum’s stunning accomplishments since opening the new Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center in March, 2002.” Frank Hill, chairman of the Board of Trustees

As Director of Laumeier Sculpture Park since 2001, Gentele dramatically revived the artistic direction of the institution through exhibitions, the collection, and education and outreach initiatives. He organized many exhibitions with important international artists as well as several permanent collection exhibitions. Gentele is credited with strengthening corporate, foundation, and individual support; growing the permanent collection through significant acquisitions; expanding public programs and educational opportunities; increasing visitation to over 300,000 annually; and launching the first major capital campaign initiative for the organization in its history. Gentele earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Florida State University and his Master of Fine Arts Degree from the Maryland Institute of Art, Baltimore. He was also awarded a fellowship in the Core program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. In accepting his new position, Gentele commented: “I am thrilled to have been selected as the next President and Chief Executive Officer of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. I have great respect and admiration for Carolyn Hill and am honored to carry on the legacy of excellence that she has established. This is an extraordinary opportunity and it will be a privilege to assume the leadership of such a fine institution. I am eager to work together with our supporters, board, staff and community to continue to advance the Museum locally, nationally and internationally.” In response to Gentele’s appointment, Carolyn Hill said: “I have met with Glen and am convinced that he is the right person to lead the Museum in the future. I am impressed with Glen’s vision and passion for the arts as well as his strong commitment to continue to operate the Museum in accordance with the highest standards of ethical and fiscal responsibility. I look forward to introducing Glen in the coming months to the leaders of our city and state and to our many wonderful donors and partners who have made our success possible.” The national search for Carolyn Hill’s replacement began in January 2008 when she announced her plans to step down as leader of the Museum at the end of this year. The search committee was composed of Elby Beal, as chair, Frank Hill, Virginia Fox, Leslie Hudson, Judy Love, Frank Merrick, James C. Meade, Pete Delaney, John Bozalis, and Duke Ligon. Gentele will be joined in Oklahoma City by his wife, Shannon, a contemporary art curator and writer who has been active in the St. Louis arts community. He has a son who is a junior at Yale University.

Exhibitions

The Collection Film

Education News




Gifford Beal (1879-1956). On the Hudson at Newburgh, 1918. Oil on canvas, 36 x 58 ½ in. The Phillips Collection, acquired 1924

American Impressionism

Paintings from the Phillips Collection Opens Nov 6

T

he Oklahoma City Museum of Art will play host to fifty-four works from the golden age of American impressionism, November 6, 2008, through January 18, 2009. American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection includes celebrated American artists Childe Hassam, Maurice Prendergast, John Henry Twatchman, and J. Alden Weir. During the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, these artists transformed the heroic American landscape into a modern idiom with a style of impressionism that blended European approaches to painting with American sensibilities and preferences. Organized by The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., the exhibition presents some of the finest examples of American impressionism from one collection. “Etched in the memory of many in Oklahoma City is a wonderful exhibition of works from The Phillips Collection which came to the Museum many years ago,” said Carolyn Hill, president & CEO. “We revere such an exceptional museum and collection, so to bring such beautiful key works to Oklahoma City from The Phillips Collection is an eagerly awaited encore.” Duncan Phillips, founder of The Phillips Collection, was among the early collectors of American impressionist paintings. From 1912 to 1922, he acquired an impressive collection of works by leading American painters working in an impressionistic style. When he opened his museum in the fall of 1921, the collection included 237 paintings, of which 87 works by 25 different artists were examples of American impressionism. A great number of these were by acknowledged “mature” masters of the style, such as Hassam, Theodore Robinson, Twatchman, Weir, and William Lathrop. The collection also included paintings by Ernest Lawson, Prendergast, Gifford Beal, and Helen Turner. These artists applied the brighter palette and broken brushwork of French impressionism to the American landscape. They focused on intimate and atmospheric views of parks and beaches as well as urban views and charming interiors. While impressionistic works emphasize the seasons, changing light, and optical effects, American impressionist painters differed from their French counterparts by continuing to imbue their work with larger ideas related to the emotional and spiritual character of the landscape. The result was a fresh interpretation of America’s landscape and cities.



Exhibitions

The Collection Film

2008-2009 SEASON SPONSORS PRESENTING SEASON SPONSOR

Inasmuch Foundation SEASON SPONSORS

Allied Arts Foundation Chesapeake Energy Corporation Devon Energy Corporation Kirkpatrick Foundation Oklahoma Arts Council SandRidge Energy, Inc. MidFirst Bank • OGE Corporation Quest Resource Corp. Cox Oklahoma • The Oklahoman Thatcher Hoffman Smith Film Endowment EDUCATION SPONSORS

Sarkeys Foundation and Sonic, America’s Drive-In Arts Education Endowments

This exhibition has been organized by The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. The exhibition and national tour are supported by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of the American Masterpieces program.

Education News


Highlights of the exhibition include a range of work by many of the key players of the movement. Focusing largely on landscape painting, American Impressionism features many of The Phillips Collection’s most treasured paintings, which depict scenes from Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York, eastern Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts. These early works formed the cornerstone of the museum and continue to inform the development of its collection. Duncan Phillips considered impressionism a question of personal temperament or subjectivity combined with natural phenomena. In the work of both Twatchman and Weir, for instance, Phillips found depictions of the intimate moods of the artists’ Connecticut properties as celebrations of the American countryside and pastoral respite from the modern world. Both artists used the language of French impressionism to explore nature’s emotional effects. Twatchman, whom Phillips considered one of America’s greatest artists, is still thought of as the pre-eminent American impressionist landscape painter. His painting, Summer, is a classic example of his work, and Phillips regarded it as one of his best purchases for 1919, outranking all others, including those by Weir, Hassam, and Lawson. The exhibition also showcases the work of a lesser known but equally extraordinary artist, Allen Tucker. Phillips acquired Tucker’s paintings, Red

Childe Hassam (1859-1935). Washington Arch, Spring, ca. 1893. Oil on canvas, 27 1/8 x 22 ½ in. The Phillips Collection, acquired 1921

turned his attention towards other artists. He was drawn not only to the new American realism, but also to the American moderns around Alfred Steiglitz and the artists of the School of Paris, including Pierre Bonnard, Edouard Vuillard, Henri Matisse, and Georges Braque. Phillips’ collecting practices were ultimately driven by his desire to create a cohesive aesthetic collection independent of chronology or schools of painting. Only artists whom he saw as “modern in mind,” or whose work could be seen as links between past and present, found a permanent place in the collection. Ernest Lawson (1873-1939). Spring Night, Harlem River, 1913. Oil on canvas mounted on panel 25 1/8 x 30 1/8 in. The Phillips Collection, acquired 1920

Barns and The Rise, in 1926-1927. Considered by his contemporaries to be the “American van Gogh” because of his vigorous and animated brushwork, Tucker captured the attention of Phillips who sought to add an original van Gogh to his growing collection of modern art during this period. DUNCAN PHILLIPS AND AMERICAN IMPRESSIONISM Duncan Phillips was a man of his time in his enthusiasm for American impressionist painting. When he arrived in New York in 1910, with dreams of becoming an art critic, impressionism was America’s popular mainstream aesthetic style. By the end of the decade, he could count himself as one of its first collectors. American impressionist works were the foundation of the museum and significantly shaped its development, playing a vital role in Phillips’ maturing appreciation of abstraction. In the early 1920s, the writings of contemporary critics, such as Roger Fry and Clive Bell, opened Phillips’ eyes to the intent of abstract art, and his collecting in that decade reflected his new understanding. He added very few American impressionist paintings to his collection after 1923. As Phillips became more knowledgeable in his understanding of abstraction, he

Exhibitions

Allen Tucker (1866-1939). The Rise. Undated. Oil on canvas, 30 ½ x 36 in. The Phillips Collection, acquired 1927

The Collection Film

Education News




Museum selected for Major Gifts by The Ossorio Foundation gives Museum 11 works Large-scale assemblage key piece

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he Ossorio Foundation has given the Museum eleven works by American artist Alfonso Ossorio. The gift consists of nine ink, wax, and watercolor drawings, an etching, and a large-scale assemblage, all completed between 1949 and 1984. The Ossorio Foundation was created in 1995 to ensure that Alfonso Ossorio’s life-work would be interpreted, organized, and maintained in a manner commensurate with its achievement. Today, the foundation identifies museums and educational institutions nationwide which wish to include Ossorios in their collections, arranges gift/sale acquisitions, and is in the planning stages for the establishment of a scholarship program. “We are grateful to the Ossorio Foundation for selecting the Museum as a recipient of works by Ossorio,” said Carolyn Hill, president and chief executive officer. “Clearly this gift enhances the collection and adds importantly to the Museum’s ability to explore assemblage works.” Museum Chief Curator Hardy George was contacted earlier this year by the Foundation and allowed to choose those pieces he felt would enhance the Museum’s collection. After careful consideration, he selected the ten works on paper and the large 1968 assemblage INXIT, Congregation, which had been housed on the artist’s East Hampton estate. “Ossorio’s INXIT combines crudeness and refinement with a sense of the spiritual associated with Oceanic and African tribal fetish objects, resembling a large, “primitive” altar piece,” said George. The colorful, eight-foot sculptural object is constructed on a wooden door and frame and decorated with animal bones, horns, mirrors, knobs, and many other items the artist found in hardware stores, junk shops, or just lying around. Ossorio was known for using these objects in his assemblages, which he called “congregations.” The son of a wealthy plantation owner, Ossorio (1916-1990) was born in Manila on the island of Luzon, in the Philippines. In 1930, at age 14, he moved to the United States and in 1933, became an American citizen. He published his first wood engravings in an illustrated edition of W.W. Appleton’s poems in 1934, and in the same year, he began studying fine art at Harvard University. Around this time, he met Amanda Coomaraswamy, the first curator of Indian, Persian, and Mohammedan art at the Museum of Alfonso Ossorio (American, 1916-1990). INXIT, Congregation, 1968. Assemblage, 98 x 80 x 24 in. (248.92 x 203.2 Fine Arts, Boston, who moved in avant-garde art circles in New York City and x 60.96 cm). Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Gift of The Ossorio Foundation, 2008 © The Ossorio Foundation, reproduced with permission was a friend of Alfred Stieglitz. By the early 1940s, Ossorio was working in the Surrealist manner and had moved to Taos. While living there, he met Betty Parsons and in 1941 had his first solo exhibition in her New York gallery. “During this early period, it is quite evident that the young Ossorio was worldly, well educated and moved in sophisticated circles,” said Hardy George. “He was hardly a naive primitive, as his later, powerful imagery might suggest.” Ossorio was first introduced to “primitive” art at the Peabody Museum while at Harvard, and in New York in the late 1940s, he became an admirer, collector, and good friend of Jackson Pollock. He also traveled to Paris and developed a close relationship with Jean Dubuffet, who, along with Pollock, used “primitive” imagery in his early abstractions. When Ossorio returned to New York, at the suggestion of Pollock, he bought a sixty-acre estate, known as the “Creeks,” where he remained until his death in 1990. There, he became part of the avant-garde art community, which included not only Pollock and his wife, Lee Krasner, but also Willem de Kooning. In the 1950s, Ossorio began to work on his assemblages of glass eyes, shells, pottery shards, and bones. Dubuffet’s collages made up of sand, pebbles, burlap, and other objects were a major source of inspiration for Ossorio. The Museum plans to exhibit these works as a group in 2009.



Exhibitions

The Collection Film

Education News


National Organizations

Henry C. Pearson (American, 19142006). The Aspects of the Case, 1969. Ink and watercolor on orange paper, 12 x 24 7/8 in. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION: FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES, a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Photo credit: Lyle Peterzell

Museum receives major donation Gift part of Fifty Works for Fifty States program

T

he Museum has received a gift of fifty works of art from New York collectors Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, with the help of the National Gallery of Art, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The donation is part of a national gifts program titled The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States. Ending in 2009, the program will distribute 2,500 works from the Vogel’s collection of contemporary art throughout the nation, with fifty works going to a selected art institution in each of the fifty states. Artists whose work is being donated to the Museum include Lynda Benglis (b. 1941), Martin Johnson (b. 1951), Lucio Pozzi (b. 1935), Edda Renouf (b. 1943), and Richard Tuttle (b. 1941). “To be chosen as a recipient of such a major donation as part of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States is an extraordinary honor,” said Carolyn Hill, Museum president and CEO. “These outstanding works will very much strengthen our holdings in contemporary art.” Not only are the best-known aspects of the Vogel Collection minimal and conceptual art, but also these donations explore numerous directions of the post-minimalist period, including works of a figurative and expressionist nature. Primarily a collection of drawings, the 2,500 works the Vogels are donating include paintings, sculptures, photographs, and prints by more than 170 contemporary artists, mainly working in the United States. The Museum joins institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta; the Indianapolis Museum of Art; the Speed Art Museum, Louisville; and the Seattle Art Museum in being selected to receive these works. The National Endowment for the Arts is funding the publication of a book, The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, scheduled for release in mid November. Four works from each museum’s gift are included in the volume. Martin Johnson (American, b. 1951). Exerptunis, 1981. Metal armature, resin, textile, paint, wood, and plastic, 49 x 33 x 10 in. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION: FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES, a joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Photo credit: Lyle Peterzell

Exhibitions

The Collection Film

Education News




NOVEMBER

Enriching Lives Through the Visual Arts!

1

SATURDAY

School • Glassblowing - Level 1, 10a-2p • Seascapes, 10a-noon DROP-IN ART • Tie Creatures, 1-4p FILM • Splinter, 5:30 & 8p

4

TUESDAY

11

TUESDAY

18

TUESDAY School • Nature Shape Silhouettes, 4-5p

25

TUESDAY

5

WEDNESDAY

6

The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

7

The Museum is open until 9pm

School • Glassblowing Two-Day Intensive, 6-9p EXHIBIT LECTURE • “A Personal Vision: Collecting American Impressionism, 19151925, 5-6p EVENT • Members’ Preview, 6-9p

FILM EXHIBIT • American Impressionism: Paintings • House Made of Dawn, 5:30 & 8p from The Phillips Collection, opens school • Museum Studies, 5:30-8p MUSEUM STORE • New Merchandise Preview, 5-9p FILM • Redskin, 7:30p

12

13

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

School • Glassblowing Two-Day Intensive, 6-9p

EVENT • Teacher Workshop, 5-8p Film • Frozen River, 7:30p

19

WEDNESDAY Friends’ Lecture • “Alexandria: The Ancient City Rediscovered,” 6p

26

WEDNESDAY

20

14

The Museum is open until 9pm

The Museum is open until 9pm

The Museum is open until 9pm

School • Glassblowing - Level 1, 10a-2p • Things That Go!, 10-10:45a • Things That Go!, 11-11:45a DROP-IN ART • Tiny Shrines, 1-4p FILM • The Exiles, 5:30 & 8p

15

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

FILM • Frozen River, 5:30 & 8p

School • Intro to Impressionism, 10-11a • Landscape Drawing, 10a-noon • Glassblowing - Level 1, 10a-2p DROP-IN ART • Magnificent Masks, 1-4p FILM • Frozen River, 5:30p • The Who: Live at Kilburn 1977, 8p

21

The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SCHOOL • Museum Studies, 5:30-8p • Painting with Light, 6-9p FILM • Louise Bourgeois: The Spider, The Mistress, The Tangerine, 7:30p

FILM • Planet B-Boy, 5:30 & 8p

27

8

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

28

22

The Museum is open until 9pm

SCHOOL • Glassblowing - Level 1, 10a-2p DROP-IN ART • Junk Art, 1-4p FILM • Planet B-Boy, 5:30 & 8p

29

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

museum IS CLOSED FOR thanksgiving!

FILM • Monsieur Verdoux, 5:30 & 8p

DROP-IN ART • Cornucopia Creations, 1-4p FILM • Monsieur Verdoux, 5:30 & 8p

2

SUNDAY School • Basics of Drawing, 1-4p • Altered Books, 1-4p FILM • Don Giovanni, 2p

9

SUNDAY School • Basics of Drawing, 1-4p • Digital Photography for Absolute Beginners, 1-4p • Basic Painting, 2-4p FILM • In the Land of the War Canoes, 2p

16

SUNDAY School • Basics of Drawing, 1-4p • Impressionistic Floral Watercolors, 1-4p FILM • Frozen River, 2p

23

SUNDAY School • Impressionistic Pastels, 1-4p • Creative Use of Your Digital Camera, 1-4p • Jewelry-Making, 2-4p FILM • Planet B-Boy, 2p

30

SUNDAY FILM • Monsieur Verdoux, 2p


DECEMBER

The Museum is closed on Mondays. Museum Cafe is open 11am-3pm.

2

TUESDAY

3

WEDNESDAY School • Glassblowing Holiday Ornaments, 6-9p

9

TUESDAY

10

WEDNESDAY School • Glassblowing Holiday Ornaments, 6-9p

4

The Museum is open until 9pm

School • Painting with Light, 6-9p FILM • Who Does She Think She Is?, 7:30p

The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

6

The Museum is open until 9pm

FRIDAY

THURSDAY

11

5

SATURDAY

FILM School • Who Does She Think She Is?, 5:30 • Fantastic Photographs, 10a-noon & 8p • Things That are Cold, 10-10:45a • Things That are Cold, 11-11:45a DROP-IN ART • Pop Art Collage, 1-4p FILM • Who Does She Think She Is?, 5:30 & 8p

12

The Museum is open until 9pm

13

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

FILM • Trouble the Water, 5:30 & 8p

DROP-IN ART • Winter Mobiles, 1-4p FILM • Trouble the Water, 5:30 & 8p

7

SUNDAY School • Making Pop-Up Cards for the Holidays, 1-4p • Digital Photography, 2-4p FILM • Roméo et Juliette, 2p

14

SUNDAY

School • Painting with Light, 6-9p FILM • Trouble the Water, 7:30p

EVENT • Family Day, noon-4p FILM • NO FILM

16

TUESDAY

23

TUESDAY HOLIDAY WORKSHOP • Ornament Making, 1-3p

17

18

School • Glassblowing Holiday Ornaments, 6-9p

School • Painting with Light, 6-9p FILM • Momma’s Man, 7:30p

24

25

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

HOLIDAY WORKSHOP • Greeting Cards, 1-3p

MUSEUM IS CLOSED FOR CHRISTMAS DAY!

FILM • A Christmas Tale, 5:30 & 8p

Drop-in ART • Wintertime Scenes, 1-4p FILM • A Christmas Tale, 5:30 & 8p

WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAY

The Museum is open until 9pm

THURSDAY

19

FRIDAY

26

30

31

HOLIDAY WORKSHOP • Shrinky Dink Art, 1-3p

HOLIDAY WORKSHOP • Party Hats, 1-3p

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

20

SATURDAY

FILM • Momma’s Man, 5:30 & 8p

The Museum is open until 9pm

The Museum is open until 9pm

School • Snowy Scenes, 10-noon • Snowflake Self-Portraits, 10-11a DROP-IN ART • Stained Glass, 1-4p FILM • Momma’s Man, 5:30 & 8p

27

21

SUNDAY School • Mosaic Ornaments, 1-4p • Making Pop-up Cards for the Holidays, 2-4p FILM • Momma’s Man, 2p

28

SUNDAY FILM • A Christmas Tale, 2p


6th Film Preservation Festival

In recognition of National American Indian Heritage Month, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art in collaboration with the University of Central Oklahoma Film Studies Collection and the American Indian Cultural Center & Museum, and the Film + Video Center of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian present recently restored films that depict diverse images of Native Americans in the film medium. Live Musical Score Performed by the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra! Thursday, November 6, 7:30 p.m.

Redskin

One of Paramount’s last silent films, this spectacularly photographed tale of a Navajo caught between two cultures was shot in two-strip Technicolor. Richard Dix plays the Navajo abducted to a government boarding school as a child, but his partial assimilation into white society leaves him neither Indian nor white, just “Redskin.” The film was far ahead of its time in presenting a sympathetic and authentic portrayal of Native Americans and the prejudices they faced, despite all of the leading roles being acted by nonIndians. Director: Victor Schertzinger 1929 USA 82min. NR 35mm print courtesy of the Library of Congress Special price $10 per person. No discounts apply. Friday, November 7, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.

House Made of Dawn

This film adaptation of N. Scott Momaday’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel is a story of loss and redemption. A young man, played by actor/poet Larry Littlebird, must cope with his life in two distinct but conflicting worlds of the 1970s— the reservation in the Southwest and the gritty urban environment. Richardson Morse’s quiet, insightful film ultimately celebrates the natural and the enduring. Director: Richardson Morse 1987 USA 90min. NR 35mm print courtesy of Film + Video Center of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian

Saturday, November 8, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.

The Exiles

The Exiles chronicles one night in the lives of young Native American men and women living in the Bunker Hill district of Los Angeles. Based entirely on interviews with the participants and their friends, the film follows a group of exiles — transplants from Southwest reservations — as they flirt, drink, party, fight, and dance. Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive. Director: Kent MacKenzie 1961 USA 72min. NR 35mm Sunday, November 9, 2 p.m.

In the Land of the War Canoes Best known as one of the premiere photographers of the twentieth century, Edward S. Curtis devoted his life to documenting the disappearing world of the American Indian. In this film, Curtis retold a tribal story of love and revenge among the Kwakiutl Indians of Vancouver Island. Restored from the only surviving print in 1972 with a new score of original music and chants by the Kwakiutls themselves, the film presents a magnificent image of a lost world. Director: Edward S. Curtis 1914 USA 47min. NR

Followed by

Native American Images in Film: A Panel Discussion Moderated by

American Indian legal scholar & author, Rennard Strickland

Thursday, November 13, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, November 14, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Saturday, November 15, 5:30 p.m. ONLY; Sunday, November 16, 2 p.m.

Frozen River

Frozen River is the story of Ray Eddy (Melissa Leo), an upstate New York trailer mom who is lured into the world of illegal immigrant smuggling when she meets Lila, a young Mohawk woman who lives on a reservation that straddles the US-Canadian border. Broke after her husband takes off with the down payment for their new doublewide, Ray reluctantly teams up with Lila (Misty Upham), a smuggler, and the two begin making runs across the frozen St. Lawrence River carrying illegal Chinese and Pakistani immigrants in the trunk of Ray’s Dodge Spirit. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize for drama at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. Director: Courtney Hunt 2008 USA 97min. R HDdigital

ONE SHOW ONLY! Saturday, November 15, 8 p.m.

The Who: Live at Kilburn 1977

In what would be one of the last live performances for drummer Keith Moon, this bombastic concert was filmed in 1977 at the Gaumont State Theatre in Kilburn, North London, as part of the film The Kids Are Alright. Songs include “Baba O’Reilly,” “Pinball Wizard,” “My Generation,” “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” and more. 138min. 35mm transfer to HDWidescreen ALL SEATS $10. Same day advance tickets go on sale Saturday at 10 a.m. Call 405-278-8237.

For film updates visit

www.okcmoa.com/film 10

Exhibitions

The Collection Film

Education News


Thursday, November 20, 7:30 p.m.

Louise Bourgeois: The Spider, The Mistress, The Tangerine

This film is a journey inside the life and imagination of an icon of modern art. As a screen presence, Louise Bourgeois is magnetic, mercurial and emotionally raw. There is no separation between her life as an artist and the memories and emotions that affect her every day. As an artist, she for six decades, she has been at the forefront of successive new developments, but always on her own powerfully inventive and disquieting terms. Directors: Marion Cajori & Amei Wallach 2008 USA 99min. NR HDdigital Fri. – Sat., November 21 – 22, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, November 23, 2 p.m.

Planet B-Boy

With compelling characters and vibrant dance sequences, Planet B-Boy is set in the international world of B-boying – the urban dance more commonly known as “breakdancing.” Weaving between the vivid backdrops of Osaka, Paris, Seoul, and Las Vegas, unforgettable images frame the intimate stories of dancers who struggle for their dreams despite being misunderstood by larger society and even their own families. All the b-boys’ lives collide in Germany where their skills are put to the ultimate test: the “Battle of the Year” finals, with crews from 18 nations vying for the title of World Champion. Director: Benson Lee 2007 USA 95min. NR 35mm

NO FILM Thursday, November 27 CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING Fri. – Sat., November 28 – 29, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, November 30, 2 p.m.

Monsieur Verdoux

Charlie Chaplin’s Monsieur Verdoux is now widely considered one of his best works. This self-described “comedy of murders” was based on an idea by Orson Welles, which Chaplin reportedly bought for five thousand dollars in a refusal to be directed by anyone but himself. Chaplin stars as the moustachioed bluebeard in beret and cravat whose charming manners and good looks cloak a deep-seated, murderous hatred, festering since the loss of his longstanding job as a bank clerk. Chaplin immodestly proclaimed it “the cleverest, most brilliant film of my career.” Director: Charlie Chaplin 1947 USA 124min. NR 35mm

Exhibitions

Thursday, December 4, 7:30 p.m.; Fri. – Sat., December 5 – 6, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.

Thursday, December 11, 7:30 p.m.; Fri. – Sat., December 12 – 13, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.

In a half-changed world, women often feel they need to choose: mothering or working? From Hawaii’s Big Island to the suburbs of Ohio, from New York City to the deserts of New Mexico, this documentary features five fierce women who refuse to choose as they each chart a path to create their individual type of art. Through their lives, we explore some of the most problematic intersections of our time: mothering and creativity, partnering and independence, economics and art. Director: Pamela Tanner Boll 2008 USA 84min. NR HDdigital

This powerful documentary takes you inside Hurricane Katrina in a way never before seen on screen. Incorporating remarkable home video footage shot by Kimberly Rivers Roberts – an aspiring rap artist trapped with her husband in the 9th ward - the filmmakers weave this insider’s view of Katrina with a devastating portrait of the hurricane’s aftermath. Trouble the Water is a redemptive tale of self-described street hustlers who become heroes – two unforgettable people who survive the storm and then seize a chance for a new beginning. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize for documentary at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. Directors: Tia Lessin and Carl Deal 2008 USA 96min. NR 35mm

Who Does She Think She Is?

Salzburg Opera in HD Sunday, December 7, 2 p.m.

Roméo et Juliette

With its four duets for the title couple, Charles Gounod’s Roméo et Juliette is one of the most famous love tragedies in opera literature. Stage director Bartlett Sher (winner of this year’s best director Tony Award for his Broadway revival of South Pacific) makes his European opera debut with this production of Roméo et Juliette. Rolando Villazón, one of the leading lyric tenors of our day, acts as Romeo. Juliette is acted by the young Georgian soprano Nino Machaizde. The young French-Canadian conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts for the first time in Salzburg. Approximate running time: 3hrs plus one intermission SPECIAL PRICE: $20 Adults/ $18 Members, Students, Seniors. Advance tickets go on sale Tuesday, November 25, 2008. Call 405-278-8237, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Trouble the Water

NO FILM Sunday, December 14, GO TO FAMILY DAY! Thursday, December 18, 7:30 p.m.; Fri. – Sat., December 19 – 20, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, December 21, 2 p.m.

Momma’s Man

Momma’s Man chronicles the increasingly anxious dilemma of Mikey, a young husband and father who stops off at his parent’s loft during a business trip to New York and finds himself emotionally unable to leave. One of the most acclaimed films of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, Azazel Jacobs’ third feature film is both a tribute to his parents (and to the New York of his childhood) and an acutely perceptive, deeply personal tale on a universal experience: the fear of growing up. Director: Azazel Jacobs 2008 USA 94min. NR 35mm

MUSEUM CLOSED on December 25

Fri. – Sat., December 26 – 27, 5:30 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, December 28, 2 p.m.

A Christmas Tale

Junon (Catherine Deneuve) and Abel are the parents of three grown children: Elizabeth, a melancholic playwright with a mathematician husband and a tortured son; Henri, the selfdestructive black sheep; the youngest, Ivan, the peacemaker, is married to the beautiful Sylvia and has two eccentric little boys; while a fourth - Joseph, the eldest - died from leukemia as a boy. When the disease reappears again in the family, everyone returns home for a long Christmas weekend. All crowded again under the same roof, solidarity quickly - and hilariously - devolves into feuding, drunkenness, and bed-hopping, as everyone struggles to make sense of the mysteries of family, life, and what lies ahead. Winner of a Special Jury Prize at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. Director: Arnaud Desplechin 2008 France 143min. NR HDdigital

The Collection Film

Education News

11


Museum School

FAMILY DAY American Impressionism

Museum School classes and workshops fill quickly. The following offerings still had spots available at the time this publication was printed. For descriptions or a complete listing of classes and workshops for November and December, visit www.okcmoa.com/education/museumschool. Pre-registration is required. To register by phone, call (405) 236-3100, ext. 213.

ADULT CLASSES

CHILDREN’S CLASSES

PAINTING WITH LIGHT Thursdays, November 20-December 18, 6-9 pm (4 classes; no class November 27) $75 members/ $90 nonmembers (limited supply list)

SEASCAPES Saturday, November 1, 10 am-noon

Ages 14-adult

Ages 6-9 $10 members/$15 nonmembers (materials provided)

BASIC PAINTING Sunday, November 9, 2-4 pm LANDSCAPE DRAWING Saturday, November 15, 10 am-noon FANTASTIC PHOTOGRAPHS Saturday, December 6, 10 am-noon

MOSAIC ORNAMENTS Sunday, December 21, 1-4 pm $20 members/ $25 nonmembers (materials provided)

SNOWY SCENES Saturday, December 20, 10 am-noon

CHILDREN’S CLASSES

MAKING POP-UP CARDS FOR THE HOLIDAYS Sunday, December 21, 2-4 pm

Ages 15-36 months (with parent) $7 members/$9 nonmembers (materials provided) THINGS THAT ARE COLD Saturday, December 6, 11-11:45 am

CHILDREN’S CLASSES

Ages 3-5 (with parent) $7.50 members/$10 nonmembers (materials provided)

In celebration of American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art presents a Family Day on Sunday, December 14, 2008. From noon to 4:00 p.m., families can visit the Museum of Art to view the exhibition and step back in time to enjoy fun-filled activities for all ages, inspired by the first part of the twentieth century. These include hands-on art, face painting, mini-tours, and scavenger hunts in the galleries, and door prizes. Then, beginning at 1:00 p.m., a variety of performers will take the stage for a “Vaudeville Extravaganza.” Acts ranging from dancers and musicians to magicians and jugglers will be featured, as will silent films from the Ragtime era. All activities at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art are included in the price of Museum admission: $12 adults, $10 students/seniors, and free to members and children ages 5 and under.

ARTREACH New program provides Museum experience for 6th graders

CHILDREN’S CLASSES

Ages 10-13 $10 members/$15 nonmembers (materials provided)

Devon Energy, American Fidelity Foundation, and The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools have teamed up to provide an educational experience at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art for sixth grade students in Oklahoma City Public Schools. This initiative, ARTREACH, will provide bus transportation, admission to the art museum, and a hands-on art project while at the Museum. Schools may schedule one trip to the museum, which will take approximately two hours, and will be required to complete an online survey about their experience. But hurry, the project ends January 18, 2009!

JEWELRY-MAKING Sunday, November 23, 2-4 pm DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY Sunday, December 7, 2-4 pm

NO CLASS OPENINGS

FAMILY HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS

Ages 5-12 (with parent) $10 members/$15 nonmembers (materials provided) ORNAMENT MAKING Tuesday, December 23, 1-3 pm

To schedule a Museum tour, call (405) 236-3100, ext. 213, and reference ARTREACH. To schedule bus transportation, contact Robyn Hilger via e-mail, robyn@okckids.com, or call (405) 879-2007 to find out how many school buses have been allocated for your school. Fax bus transportation requests to Joyce Childs (405) 587-1002. For questions or comments, contact Robyn Hilger.

GREETING CARDS Wednesday, December 24, 1-3 pm

PARTY HATS Wednesday, December 31, 1-3 pm

12

Exhibitions

Photo by Eckie Prater

SHRINKY DINK ART Tuesday, December 30, 1-3 pm

The Collection Film

Education News

Photo by Eckie Prater

MAKING POP-UP CARDS FOR THE HOLIDAYS Sunday, December 7, 1-4 pm $20 members/ $25 nonmembers (materials provided)

Sunday, December 14, 2008 Noon - 4 p.m.


EXHIBITION LECTURE “A Personal Vision: Collecting American Impressionism, 1915-1925” Susan Behrends Frank, Ph.D., The Phillips Collection Wednesday, November 5, 2008 Noble Theater, 5 - 6 p.m.

Join Dr. Susan Behrends Frank, assistant curator at The Phillips Collection, for “A Personal Vision: Collecting American Impressionism, 1915-1925.” A specialist in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century art, Dr. Frank is the organizing curator of American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection, an exhibition of more than fifty paintings that is touring across the US as part of the National Endowment for the Art’s [NEA] American Masterpieces program. Her illustrated lecture will focus on the collector Duncan Phillips who personally knew most of the 22 artists featured in the exhibition. This lecture is free to the public with paid Museum admission and is free to members. Seating is limited to 250, and reservations are required. Please call (405) 236-3100, ext. 213, or e-mail reservations@okcmoa.com.

FRIENDS’ LECTURE “Alexandria: The Ancient City Rediscovered” Jean-Daniel Stanley, Ph.D., Smithsonian Institution Wednesday, November 19, 2008 Reception: Lobby, 6 p.m. Lecture: Noble Theater, 6:45 p.m.

Beneath the foundations of modern Alexandria, scientists have discovered settlements that existed before Alexander the Great founded the famous Mediterranean city. Join Dr. JeanDaniel Stanley, senior scientist and director, Coastal Geology and Geoarchaeology Program, at the Smithsonian Institute National Museum of Natural History, as he delves into the multidisciplinary approaches used to study soil samples taken from below the city. Using archaeological, stratigraphical, petrological, and geochemical methodologies, Dr. Stanley and a team of scientists have found evidence of human inhabitation in the region as much as seven centuries before the development of what we know as Alexandria.

TRAVEL TOUR The Philbrook Museum of Art Wednesday, December 3, 2008 Featured Exhibition: Paintings from the Reign of Victoria: The Royal Holloway Collection, London

Join the Oklahoma City Museum of Art December 3 for a trip to Tulsa’s Philbrook Museum to see Paintings from the Reign of Victoria: The Royal Holloway Collection, London. The exhibition includes sixty canvases from the collection of self-made English millionaire Thomas Holloway. These pieces became a crowning gift to Holloway’s generous endowment of a college for women (now known as Royal Holloway, University of London), founded in 1879 and opened by Queen Victoria in 1886. A majority of the works have never before been exhibited outside of England and many were the most visible and praised “modern canvases” in London in the 1880s. From scenes of contemporary life to historical events, landscapes, animal studies, and marine subjects, the exhibition demonstrates Holloway’s Victorian ideal of art as the ultimate civilizing influence. To reserve your tour spot, contact Brenda Kelly at Journey House Travel, (405) 463-5811 or brenda@journeyhouse.com.

TEACHER WORKSHOP American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection Thursday, November 13, 2008, 5 - 8 p.m. $10 Registration Fee (materials and boxed meal provided) Maximum enrollment is 40 participants.

Join Museum education curators for an in-depth study of the special exhibition, American Impressionism: Paintings from The Phillips Collection. You’ll hear background information from guest speakers and participate in hands-on activities developed by art educators to take back to your classroom and share with students. Educators receive a full-color resource guide, complete with lesson plans aligned with PASS skills, and a staff development certificate for their participation. Pre-registration is required. To register by phone, please call (405) 236-3100, ext. 213.

Join our guest artists in the Education Center every Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. as they help families to create extraordinary works of art inspired by the Museum’s collection, exhibitions, and special occasions throughout the year. No advance registration is required for you and your children to drop in and make and take a unique creation home with you! Free with paid Museum admission.

Friends’ lectures are free to museum members at the Friend, Friends, and Sustainer membership levels. Seating is limited to 250, and reservations are recommended. Prices are $15 for general membership levels and $20 for nonmembers per ticket on the day of the lecture. For more information, contact Jim Eastep at 236-3100, ext. 215.

Exhibitions

Programs

The Collection Film

November 1 – Tie Creatures November 8 – Tiny Shrines November 15 – Magnificent Masks November 22 – Junk Art November 29 – Cornucopia Creations December 6 – Pop Art Collage December 13 – Winter Mobiles December 20 – Stained Glass December 27 – Wintertime Scenes

Education News

13


Friends Membership Level offers educational opportunities and support Price increases with growth The Friends membership level offers individuals a unique opportunity to expand their knowledge of the arts while meeting new people and supporting the Museum. This segment of the membership enjoys free admission and discounts throughout the Museum as well as three complimentary lectures with receptions and an annual dinner with a speaker each spring. For over thirty years, the Friends Lecture Series has introduced to Oklahoma City well-known curators and Lecturer Dr. Gloria Groom with longtime Friends members James and directors from Virginia Meade. the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, The Field Museum, and The Art Institute of Chicago, among others. Launched on November 1, 1977, the Friends program is a small but growing membership level, which currently represents over 150 of the Museum’s 4,500 members. As the number of Friends members has grown, so too have the Museum’s costs to service this group. Speaker’s fees and travel expenses have increased, as have food and beverage services for receptions and the annual dinner. For these reasons, the Board of Trustees has approved an increase in Friends membership fees and benefits. As of January 1, 2009, Friends dues will increase from $300 to $500 per person. New benefits for couples at the Friends membership level of $1,000 will include name recognition on the donor wall in the Museum’s lobby and an invitation to the Museum’s annual donor reception, hosted by the Board of Trustees on the roof terrace. The 2008 – 2009 Friends lecture season begins on Wednesday, November 19, 2008, with speaker, Jean-Daniel Stanley, Ph.D. of the Smithsonian Institution, who will present “Alexandria: The Ancient City Rediscovered.” For more information on this lecture, see page 12. To join this growing membership level, visit www.okcmoa.com/membership/ support or call Jim Eastep at (405) 278-8215.

Art on Tap, A Beer Tasting Event, held on October 3 at the Museum, sold out with more than 700 in attendance and raised $29,200, a record breaker! Pictured are Chuck and Heidi Coen with Kermit and Sarah Frank.

14

Exhibitions

Renaissance Ball ... When in Rome sold out this year, raising $268,218, with 475 in attendance at the Oklahoma City Golf and Country Club on September 5. Pictured are co-chairs Cliff and Leslie Hudson, with sponsor chairs Suzette and Kim Hatfield.

Roman Art - It’s a wrap!

Roman Art from the Louvre was a groundbreaking exhibition for the OKCMOA on many levels, breaking records and helping to launch several new initiatives. • Attendance nearly doubled early projections with more than 70,000 visitors from 77 Oklahoma counties, 50 states, 43 countries. • 7,000 students visited in 447 school tours; 2,000 visitors came on 91 adult tours. All 538 tours were led by 32 volunteer docents. • Goals were exceeded and sales records broken in Museum Store, Museum Cafe, memberships, and facility rentals. • The members’ preview experienced the largest turnout ever, and Family Day saw more than 1,000 in attendance. Sold-out, exhibition-related events included the Renaissance Ball When In Rome..., Art on Tap, and three overflow lectures. Last Call Friday was introduced with nearly 1,000+ in attendance. • The Museum’s marketing and publicity were unprecedented with 2,000 ads on television, in newsprint, and through new media. • Several feature stories were run in print and electronic media. • Creative partnerships included Little Caesar’s Pizza, Cox Oklahoma, OG+E, Metropolitan Library-Ronald J. Norrick branch, Panera Bread, Oklahoma Children’s Theatre, and hotel packaging programs with the Renaissance Hotel and the Colcord Hotel. • Groundbreaking electronic initiatives were launched, including the first microsite, a subsection of okcmoa.com; new interactive computer stations with touch-screen monitors on the first and second floor landings; and cell phone audio tours.

Last weekend of Roman Art from the Louvre lines.

The Collection Film

Education News


Penny and John McCaleb

Oklahoma City

MUSEUM OF ART

Support OKCMOA through planned giving raised money for the construction of the Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center, and the Chihuly Project, which funded the acquisition of the world’s most comprehensive collection of Chihuly glass for the Museum’s permanent collection. In 2007, Penny and John chaired the Museum’s Renaissance Ball, breaking all previous records for revenues raised to benefit the Museum. From small contributions to major fundraisers and benefit events, the McCalebs have witnessed how support of the Museum can make a difference. Wishing to ensure that the Oklahoma City Museum of Art is here for future generations, the McCalebs have included the Museum in their estate plans. “My experiences with the Museum led me to the enjoyment the arts could offer and enriched my life by opening my eyes to new ways of seeing the world around me,” said Penny. “John and I became involved in the Museum and its mission. We enjoy attending events and supporting Museum programs, as Museum members, donors, and now as members of the Lasting Impressions Society.” To join Penny and John in supporting the Museum through planned giving, visit www.okcmoa.com/planned giving or contact Ken Lindquist at (405) 278-8286. Photo by Christina Hicks

Penny and John McCaleb are arts enthusiasts! They support a number of community arts organizations through their patronage, time, and resources. Penny recalls two incidents in her exposure to the arts and the Museum that influenced her and later her husband’s interest in and support of the Museum. As a teenager, Penny and her parents attended an exhibition of works by Salvador Dalí at the Museum. She specifically remembers two works that made a strong impression on her: The Royal Heart, 1953, set with rubies, diamonds, and emeralds, and of course, the melting watches of The Disintegration of the Persistence of Memory, 1952-1954. “These works were so different from anything I had ever seen,” said Penny. “They made a lasting impression on me, and I began to look at everyday objects in new ways.” Later, as a newlywed, she was asked to volunteer assisting the Museum’s women’s auxiliary. The experience led to both Penny’s and John’s involvement in Renaissance Ball and the Museum. Since then, the McCalebs have supported the Museum annually as members and donors. Now, a long-time trustee of the Museum, Penny recalls funds being collected from board members to pay for the Museum’s lawn maintenance, long ago at a former Museum location. Their more recent gifts have supported the Museum’s Legacy Campaign, which

Museum Admission Members, Free Adults, $12 Seniors (62+), $10 College students (with ID), $10 Children (ages 6-18), $10 Children (ages 5 and under), Free Tours (15 or more), $10 per person School Tours (15 or more), $3

Museum Hours.

Tuesday, Wednesday, & Saturday, 10am-5pm Thursday & Friday, 10am-9pm Sunday, noon-5pm Closed Mondays and Major Holidays

Film Admission Members, $5 Adults, $8 Seniors (62+), $6 College students (with ID), $6

Membership Facility Rentals (405) 236-3100, ext. 207

Omelette Party set for February 7

Group Tours (405) 236-3100, ext. 207

The twenty-fifth annual Omelette Party, Harlem EGG-aissance, will be held Saturday, February 7, 2009, 7 p.m. to midnight, at the Coca-Cola Bricktown Events Center. Robin Richardson Cunningham is the chair and Betsy and Dub Brunsteter are co-chairs. The theme is centered around the special exhibition, Harlem Renaissance, opening February 5-April 19, 2009, at the Museum. Banana Seat will return as the band. Gourmet omelettes will be served by area restaurants, and there will be an art raffle from local artists. Tickets will be available for sale after the first of the year. Details to come! Sponsorships are now available at four levels. Call (405) 236-3100, ext. 215, for more information.

School/Teacher Programs (405) 236-3100, ext. 212

Museum School School Tours/Reservations (405) 236-3100, ext. 213

Museum Store (405) 278-8233

Downtown in December Begins November 28

Spend your holiday exploring Downtown Oklahoma City during the seventh annual Downtown in December winter celebration. Only in Downtown Oklahoma City can you experience the thrill of outdoor ice skating, exhilarating snow tubing rides down the nation’s largest man-made slope, water taxi excursions along the winding Bricktown Canal, a magically-lit botanical garden, a spirited 5K run through Downtown, Segway Santa, and plenty of holiday cheer for the entire family! This month-long, family-friendly adventure has attracted over a million revelers to the City’s ten-block polar playground. Festivities begin the day after Thanksgiving and run through the New Year. For information, log on to www.downtownindecember.com or call 1-888-OKC4FUN.

The Collection Film

Visitor Services (405) 236-3100, ext. 237 Administrative Offices (405) 236-3100, ext. 0 www.okcmoa.com

(405) 236-3100, ext. 215 or 200

Save the date!

Exhibitions

Contact Information

Museum Cafe (405) 235-6262 Sunday Brunch, 10:30am-3pm Monday, 11am-3pm Tuesday-Saturday, 11am-10pm

OKCMOA offers docent-guided and self-guided tours to pre-scheduled adult and school groups of 15 or more. Call (405) 236-3100, ext. 207 (adults tours) or ext. 213 (school tours) for details.

Education News

15


nonprofit org. U.S. Postage PAID Okla. City, OK Permit No. 647

Oklahoma City Museum of Art DONALD W. REYNOLDS VISUAL ARTS CENTER

415 Couch Drive Oklahoma City, OK 73102 (405) 236-3100 www.okcmoa.com Address Service Requested

Enriching Lives Through the Visual Arts!

HARLEM RENAISSANCE

Museum Cafe urban. elegant. unforgettable.

For your holiday planning needs! Pre-packaged holiday dinners & catering your holiday parties! Purchase $200 or more in gift cards & receive an additional 10% in gift cards!

February 5 - April 19, 2009

Monday 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. High Tea Tues.-Thurs., 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.; Sunday Brunch 10:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m. For more information, call (405) 235-6262. Make reservations or view menus at okcmoa.com/cafe

Organized by the Oklahoma City Museum of Art

Museum Store surprising. sophisticated. special.

Museum gift cards & memberships make holiday giving even better and shopping easier!

• Books & Multimedia • Jewelry, Apparel, & Accessories • For Home & Office • Prints & Posters • For Kids of All Ages • From OKCMOA Collections & Exhibitions • Complimentary Gift Wrap • Personal Shopper Service • Gift Cards for All Occasions Christen Conger, store manager (405) 278-8232 American Impressionists: Painters of Light and the Modern Landscape ($45 nonmembers/$40.50 members)

Oklahoma City

MUSEUM OF ART

Call the Museum Store, 278-8232 or Membership at, 278-8215

TheViewNovDec2008  

November / December 2008 FOR MEMBERS AND FRIENDS OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART

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