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Greater

OKLAHOMA CITY at a glance

123 Park Avenue | Oklahoma City, OK 73102 | 405.297.8900 | www.greateroklahomacity.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS Location...................................... 4 Climate........................................ 7 Transportation.......................... 8 Population..................................11 Housing......................................13

Economy....................................14 Education..................................17 Income........................................21 Labor Analysis........................22 Incentives.................................23

Commercial Real Estate.....28 Tax Rates..................................29 Utilities..................................... 30 Available Services.................32

Ranked No. 11 for most economic diversity of the top 350 metros.

2

-WalletHub


GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY: One of the fastest-growing cities in America, and among the top five places for economic strength, job creation and to start a business. A top two small business ranking. One of the most popular places for millennials, and one of the top 10 cities for young adults. The list of reasons you should grow your business in Oklahoma City is growing – almost as quickly as the list of reasons why people love living here. In Greater Oklahoma City, we understand that partnership among business,

government and civic leaders is integral to our success. Our low costs, diverse economy and business-friendly environment have kept the economic doldrums at bay, and provided value, stability and profitability to our companies – and now we’re poised to do even more. Let us introduce you to the thriving 10-county region that is Greater Oklahoma City: a region that has rediscovered its strengths – and redefined itself for the future.

NO. 4 OF TOP 10 BEST CITIES TO MOVE TO IN 2015.

- SIMPLE MOVING LABOR

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LOCATION The Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) includes seven counties: Oklahoma, Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, and McClain. It is the 27th largest city and 42nd largest metropolitan area in the United States. The Greater Oklahoma City Partnership region extends to include three additional counties —Kingfisher, Payne and Pottawatomie —to provide a broad economic area.

CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY AREA: 621.2 square miles - the third largest geographic area for a city in the nation. OKLAHOMA CITY MSA: 5,581 square miles THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION: 7,978 square miles OKLAHOMA CITY ELEVATION: 1,285 feet above sea level Source: U.S. Census Bureau, City of OKC

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«

1,500 miles

1000 miles

500 miles


THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION Stillwater

Hennessey

Yale

PAYNE Cushing

Perkins

KINGFISHER

Crescent

LOGAN

Langston

Guthrie

Kingfisher

§ ¦ ¨ 35

Edmond

§ ¦ ¨ 40

LINCOLN

OKLAHOMA Jones

Yukon

Spencer

§ ¦ ¨ 235

Mustang

Union City

Tuttle

Will Rogers World Airport

44

GRADY

Prague McLoud

§ ¦ ¨

CLEVELAND

Bethel Acres

Pink

Norman

Lake Thunderbird

Noble

Goldsby

§ ¦ ¨ 35

Chickasha

Harrah

Tinker AFB 240

Moore

Newcastle

§ ¦ ¨

Choctaw

Midwest City

Oklahoma City Minco

§ ¦ ¨

Slaughterville

Lexington

Ninnekah

POTTAWATOMIE

CANADIAN El Reno

Chandler

44

Luther

§ ¦ ¨ 40

Shawnee Tecumseh

MCCLAIN Rush Springs

LEGEND

<5,000 5,000 - 10,000 >10,000

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REGIONAL COMMUTER PATTERNS This map shows the 10-county Partnership region and the commuting pattern between each county. The number listed in the county is the percentage of residents who stay in their home county to work. The lines between counties show the percentage of residents who travel to other counties to work. NOTE: The graphic assumes all commuting occurs within the region, with

KINGFISHER 59%

PAYNE 75%

LOGAN 22%

26%

16%

62%

5%

CANADIAN 25%

no leakage. However, the table provides the raw number of commuters from county to county and includes commuters that leave the region (“Outside of Region”). “Outside of Region” commuters are not accounted for in the county to county graphic image. For the purpose of clarity, only commuter flows of 5% and above are pictured below.

10%

LINCOLN 31% OKLAHOMA 87%

54% 6%

37%

5%

7%

6%

40%

54%

44%

GRADY 35%

33%

POTTAWATOMIE

52%

CLEVELAND 40%

10%

13%

8%

25%

MCCLAIN 22% From

To

Canadian Cleveland Grady Kingfisher Lincoln Logan McClain Oklahoma Payne Pottawatomie

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SOURCE: LEHD, 2013

Canadian

Cleveland

Grady

Kingfisher

Lincoln

Logan

Mcclain

12,869 1,930 1,103 251 208 513 318 8,644 264 332

3,114 40,170 1,892 114 535 839 2,899 19,299 656 1,636

360 498 6,441 62 93 151 427 907 45 143

389 75 104 2,777 21 170 29 349 77 31

88 117 48 12 3,015 67 35 471 282 503

243 153 188 89 76 3,528 65 1,862 225 48

257 1,639 882 32 54 175 2,546 833 68 150

Oklahoma

Payne

34,313 189 53,211 442 7,432 149 1,249 103 3,603 960 9,938 551 5,048 87 243,057 1,909 3,235 15,513 7,038 421

Pottawatomie

414 1,183 193 38 1,225 130 145 2,055 308 11,068

Outside of region

2,374 9,168 3,853 1,603 2,263 1,846 5,466 34,006 9,396 7,057


CLIMATE The average annual temperature is 61° F (high 72°, low 51°) with an average rainfall of 36.5 inches and average snowfall of 7.6 inches per year. The average number of flying days is 350 per year – the same number of days you’ll see the sun shining in Oklahoma City. AVERAGE LOW - HIGH Jan.........29° - 50°

July........72° - 94°

Feb.........33° - 55°

Aug........71° - 93°

Mar.........41° - 63°

Sep.........63° - 85°

April.......50° - 72°

Oct.........52° - 73°

May........60° - 80°

Nov.........40° - 62°

June.......68° - 88°

Dec.........31° - 51°

WEATHER ANNUAL AVERAGES Clear / partly cloudy days................... 235 Rainy days*.................................................. 82 Precipitation...............................36.5 inches Snowfall..........................................7.6 inches Wind speed..................................... 11.4 mph

SOURCE: NOAA, COMPARATIVE CLIMATE DATA, 30 YEAR AVERAGE * ANY PRECIPITATION EXCEEDING 0.01 INCHES

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TRANSPORTATION Oklahoma City is as easy to reach as it is to navigate, with commute times averaging 20 minutes or less and minimal congestion.

MAJOR HIGHWAYS SERVING AREA: Interstate 35......................................... North and South Interstate 40.............................................East and West Interstate 44............................................. Northeast and Southwest Interstate 235.........................................Connects I-35 & I-40 & U.S. 77

HIGHWAYS The Greater Oklahoma City area has more than 2,400 miles of highways and interestates. The highest concentration being at 384 miles of roadway in Oklahoma County where the crossroads of I-35, I-40, and I-44 meet in Oklahoma City. Freight carriers and truck transportation run efficiently with the 646 miles of interstates in the region and minimal congestion. Starting in the third quater of 2016, the $892-million Driving Forward project

Interstate 240..................................Interconnects I-40, I-44 & I-35 U.S. 62................................................East and Southeast U.S. 77 (Broadway Extension)........... North and South U.S. 270................................ Southeast and Northwest U.S. 277...............................................................Southwest

will begin work on multiple turnpikes in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa areas. For the Oklahoma City area, lanes will widen along 7.5 miles of the HE Bailey Turnpike near Newcastle, a Northeast Oklahoma County Loop will be created with 21 miles of new turnpike to connect I-44 to I-40, and the Southwest Kilpatrick Extension will create 7 miles of new roads to connect I-40 to State Highway 152/Airport Road. Airport Road runs just north of Will Rogers World Airport, giving another route to the airport with the Southwest Kilpatrick Extension. For more information on the Driving Forward project visit DrivingForwardOK.com.* AIR Will Rogers World Airport is the Greater Oklahoma City regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major commerical airport. The airport has six airlines, 22 nonstop flights, and about 75 total daily departures. The airport is located a short drive from downtown Oklahoma City with easy access to three major interstates. Will Rogers World Airport sits on more

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NON-STOP AIR SERVICE

po lis

Seattle

M in ne a

ay w id it M tro o e g D ca

hi

C San Francisco

Las Vegas

Salt Lake City

New York/Newark Baltimore

Chicago O’Hare

Denver

Washington D.C.

Los Angeles

St. Louis

Charlotte

OKC

Phoenix Dallas/ Ft. Worth

Dallas Love Field

Houston Houston Hobby Inter.

Atlanta

Orlando Sanford

NON-STOP SERVICE* Atlanta.................................................Delta, Southwest

Las Vegas................................... Allegiant, Southwest

Baltimore........................................................ Southwest

Los Angeles......................................United, American

Charlotte Douglas...................................................American

Minneapolis............................................................... Delta

Chicago Midway.......................................... Southwest

New York/Newark................................................United

Chicago O’Hare...............................American, United

Orlando Sanford............................................... Allegiant

Dallas Love Field......................................... Southwest

Phoenix........................................................... Southwest

Dallas/Ft. Worth............................................ American

Salt Lake City........................................................... Delta

Denver..............................................Southwest, United

San Francisco....................................................... United

Detroit........................................................................ Delta

Seattle.............................................................. Alaska Air

Houston/Hobby........................................... Southwest

St. Louis.......................................................... Southwest

Houston/Intercontinental................................ United

Washington D.C. Dulles..................................... United * Subject to change without notice. 9


than 8,000 acres of land and provides a wide array of development opportunities. The airport operates on three runways, two 9,800-ft parallel to one another and one 7,800-ft crosswind runway, allowing the airport to accommodate any size aircraft.

Airport, and the Stillwater Regional Airport. Learn more about Will Rogers World Airport at FlyOKC.com.

In addition to Will Rogers World Airport, Oklahoma City has two reliever airports, Wiley Post Airport and Max Westheimer Airport. Wiley Post Airport is located in Northwest Oklahoma City flying mostly corporate and business aviation. Max Westheimer Airport in Norman, owned by the University of Oklahoma, is mostly used for general aviation. Greater Oklahoma City also boasts several other general aviation airports such as the Clarence E. Page Airport in Yukon, the Shawnee Regional

TRAIN Amtrak service is provided via the Hearland Flyer, which makes daily runs to Fort Worth, Texas. The train departs from the historic Santa Fe Depot at the front door of Bricktown Oklahoma Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entertainment district. The Heartland Flyer now offers a bike service for those looking to explore Forth Worth car-free. Two Class I lines provide most of the rail transportation in the Greater Oklahoma City region: Union Pacific and BNSF Railway. These lines have more than 4,000 miles of track and connnect Oklahoma communities with other U.S. cities, markets, and ports.

DISTANCE AND DELIVERY TIME FROM OKLAHOMA CITY TO MAJOR U.S. CITIES Major Cities

Atlanta Chicago Dallas Denver Detroit Houston Kansas City Los Angeles Memphis New Orleans New York St. Louis Seattle

Distance (Miles) Highway

Rail

868 1,006 896 846 200 388 630 792 1,086 1,230 437 638 339 379 1,367 1,489 474 583 718 1,000 1,548 1,592 462 539 2,021 2,360

Same Day: Dallas, Houston, Chicago, Denver, Memphis Overnight: Los Angeles, New York, Atlanta, Detroit

SOURCES: UPS, FEDEX, CON-WAY FREIGHT

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Delivery Time (Days)

Motor Carrier

Rail

2 4 2 3 1 7-8 hours 2 2 2 4 1 1.5 1 1 2 6 1 2 2 3 3 7 1 1 3 5


REGIONAL POPULATION City

2015 Population

Percent Growth

2010-2015

Bethany 19,766 Chickasha 15,845 Choctaw 11,992 Edmond 89,182 El Reno 17,005 Guthrie 10,320 Midwest City 56,738 Moore 56,970 Mustang 18,347 Norman 118,294 Oklahoma City 630,749 Shawnee 30,722 Stillwater 48,755 Warr Acres 10,200 Yukon 24,484 Source: ESRI BUSINESS ANALYST, 2015

3.8% -1.2% 7.6% 9.6% 1.5% 1.3% 4.4% 3.4% 5.5% 6.6% 8.8% 2.9% 6.7% 1.6% 7.8%

POPULATION Oklahoma City is the most populous city in the state of Oklahoma. From 2010 to 2015, Oklahoma City’s metro population grew by nearly 9%, and has experienced a 1.75% average annual growth rate. In 2015, the Oklahoma City MSA population was estimated to be 1,343,996 while the city of Oklahoma City’s population was 630,749. Since 2010, the Oklahoma City MSA is the 18th-fastest-growing large metro in the country and has grown twice as fast as the nation.

POPULATION BY RACE AND ETHNIC GROUP

Total Population % White % Black % American % Asian % Hispanic Indian Origin* 2010 2015 2010 2015 2010 2015 2010 2015 2010 2015 2000 2010 2015 Oklahoma City

506,250

579,999

630,749

62.7

61.2

15.1

15

3.5

3.5

4.0

4.3

17.2 19

Oklahoma County

660,448

718,627

769,733

64.6

63.1

15.4

15.4

3.5

3.5

3.0

3.2

15.1 16.8

OKC MSA

1,095,421

1,252,987

1,343,996

71.9

70.2

10.4

10.6

4.1

4.1

2.8

3.1

11.3 12.9

1,414,813

1,513,479

72.8

71.1

9.6

9.8

4.5

4.6

2.7

3

10.6 12.1

Greater OKC Region 1,243,058 Oklahoma

3,450,654 3,751,616 3,923,568 72.2 70.6 7.4 7.5

8.6 8.6

1.7 2

8.9 10.2

Nation

281,421,906 308,745,538 318,536,439 72.4

0.9

4.8

16.3 17.6

70.9 12.6

12.8

1.0

5.2

*Persons of Hispanic Origin may be of any race. SOURCE: Esri Business Analyst, 2015, U.S. Census

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OKLAHOMA CITY’S MSA POPULATION (1,343,966) IS LARGER THAN THE TOTAL POPULATION OF THE STATES BELOW.

WYOMING

591,625

VERMONT

637,849

ALASKA

741,123

NORTH DAKOTA

SOUTH DAKOTA

DELAWARE

1,027,698

OKLAHOMA CITY

12

854,685

936,924

MONTANA

SOURCE: Esri Business Analyst, 2015; U.S. Census

750,438

OKC

1,343,996


HOUSING: MOVING TO OKLAHOMA CITY

- WalletHub

This vibrant, active city is even more livable because of its affordability. Unlike many metropolitan areas today, you can afford to live comfortably in a quality home, while still enjoying the area’s arts, entertainment and recreational opportunities. Explore the neighborhoods layered with personality, colorful art enclaves and plenty of clean, green spaces.

Oklahoma City Ranks No. 2 for Healthiest Housing Markets in 25 Big Cities.

The Council for Community and Economic Research (C2ER) Cost of Living Index shows that Oklahoma City is 24.7 percent below the national average* in terms of housing costs. NEW HOME AVERAGE SALES PRICE •$229,998 for 2,400 sq. ft. new-build home AVERAGE RENTAL RATE •$794 per month for 2-bed, 2-bath, 950 sq. ft., unfurnished apartment

AVERAGE HOME SALES PRICE •$187,375 (new construction and resale) SOURCE: C2ER COST OF LIVING INDEX 2015 ANNUAL AVERAGE DATA; *NATIONAL AVERAGE FOR APPROXIMATELY 300 URBAN AREAS; OKLAHOMA CITY METROPOLITAN ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS, AVG HOME SALES FOR 2015

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ECONOMY MAJOR INDUSTRIES: The economy of the Greater Oklahoma City region is diverse. While federal, state and local government are the largest employers, and the oil and natural gas sector generates the largest revenues, the area’s major private sector economic contributors include: • Aviation & Aerospace: With the largest concentration of aviation and aerospace firms in the state, the Greater Oklahoma City region’s 265 firms employs 38,000 workers – and growing. Nearly 65 percent of the workforce at Tinker Air Force Base - the largest single site employer in the state – consists of civilian contractors and service providers.

Cost of Living Index Memphis

84.5

Oklahoma City

88.1

Tuscon

92.8

Detroit

95.3

Pittsburgh

98.2

Atlanta

99.9

Denver

109.6

Chicago

116.2

Seattle

140.3

Boston

144.3

Washington DC

146.8

San Francisco

176.4

Manhattan

227.4

100 = average of reporting communities SOURCE: C2ER COST OF LIVING INDEX, 2015 ANNUAL AVERAGE DATA, COMPOSITE INDEX

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Bioscience: Oklahoma City’s Bioscience presence is generating national and international attention. The sector employs more than 51,000 statewide. Companies within this industry are dedicated to providing Bioscience goods and services, as well as education and research testing.

Energy: Oklahoma City is the Energy capital of the state. Energy accounts for approximately 3% of metro employment but more than 9% of total compensation. The sector draws its strength from several Energy companies with headquarters in the city.


• Health Care: As one of the nation’s major centers of healthcare delivery, the Oklahoma City metro employs more than 74,000 health care sector workers. Our 30 general medical and surgical hospitals and 16 specialized hospitals combine to offer outstanding healthcare. • Manufacturing: This broad category includes metals and machinery; building materials; food products and medical devices and equipment. With more than 36,000 employed, the manufacturing sector represents approximately 6.1% of the Oklahoma City MSA’s total nonagricultural labor force. • Professional, Business & Financial Services: Similar to the healthcare sector, the Oklahoma City region provides business and financial services to a market that extends beyond the state boundaries. This sector makes up 19% of the metro’s total workforce with more than 109,800 employees in this sector.

#3

FASTEST GROWING DOWNTOWN EMPLOYMENT - THE CITY OBSERVATORY

Wholesale and Retail Trade: Oklahoma City’s central location and accessibility have made it a vital crossroads for commerce. The convergence of I-35, a major northsouth interstate, and I-40 and 1-44, major east-west interstates, and numerous U.S. and State Highways position Oklahoma City as a major wholesale and retail trade center. For the year 2015, the Oklahoma City MSA had estimated total taxable retail sales of $20.9 billion.

• International: The Greater OKC metro area boasts a substantial international presence, with 31 countries represented by foreign-based subsidiaries in the region. More than 40,000 are employed by these companies, which provide a broad range of products and services. 15


LEADING EMPLOYERS:

The following table shows the major employers in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. COMPANY State of Oklahoma Tinker Air Force Base OU - Norman Campus FAA Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center INTEGRIS Health* Hobby Lobby Stores Inc* OU Health Sciences Center City of Oklahoma City Mercy Health System of OK* OGE Energy Corp.* Devon Energy Corp* OU Medical Center SSM Health Care of Oklahoma, Inc.* University of Central Oklahoma Norman Regional Hospital Chesapeake Energy Corp* UPS AllianceHealth Oklahoma Sonic Corp* AT&T The Boeing Company LSB Industries, Inc.* Oklahoma City Community College Dell Hertz Corporation Great Plains Coca-Cola Bottling Company Farmers Insurance Group American Fidelity* Johnson Controls Bank of Oklahoma Loveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Travel Stops & Country Stores* Cox Communications* Continental Resources* ATC Drivetrain LLC* Dolese Bros. Co.* Rose State College

PRODUCT/SERVICE EMPLOYEES Government 46,900 Military 26,000 Higher Education 11,900 Aerospace 7,000 Health Care 6,000 Wholesale & Retail 5,100 Higher Education 5,000 Government 4,600 Health Care 4,300 Utility 3,400 Oil & Gas 3,200 Health Care 3,200 Health Care 3,000 Higher Education 3,000 Health Care 2,800 Oil & Gas 2,500 Transportation 2,500 Health Care 2,500 Retail 2,460 Telecommunications 2,400 Aviation 2,400 Manufacturing 1,950 Higher Education 1,700 Sales & Business Service 1,700 Rental Services 1,700 Manufacturing & Distributing 1,500 Customer Service 1,300 Finance/Insurance 1,300 Manufacturing 1,200 Finance 1,100 Retail 1,100 Telecommunications 1,000 Oil & Gas 1,000 Manufacturing 1,000 Manufacturing 1,000 Higher Education 1,000

*Indicates headquarters in the MSA; employee counts subject to change

SOURCE: THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY CHAMBER

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EDUCATION K-12 EDUCATION: The Greater Oklahoma City Region offers a variety of choices in K-12 Education. Our 10-county area enrolls more than 267,000 students in the public school system. Harding Charter Prep High School, Classen School of Advanced Studies, Dove Science Academy, Edmond North High School and the Oklahoma School of Science and Math (OSSM) are regularly recognized on the U.S. News & World Report’s Best High Schools in the Nation list. A total of 50 schools in our region have been recognized as National Blue Ribbon Schools. Our region gives parents diverse educational options with 19 public charter schools and 54 private and parochial schools recognized by the Oklahoma Private School Accreditation Commission. WORKING TOGETHER Civic, business and education leaders developed a blueprint that has forever changed the area’s largest school district, Oklahoma City Public Schools. Near completion, MAPS for Kids is a comprehensive education reform plan that raised $700 million for Oklahoma City Public Schools and surrounding school districts. In addition to building seven schools and renovating 65 others, the comprehensive plan implemented strategic academic reforms; improved student achievement; restored classroom discipline; and increased accountability with students, parents and the community.

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (POPULATION 25 YEARS AND OVER) Less than High School Graduate....12.2% High School/Technical School.......27.4% Some College........................................25.1% College Graduate or Higher........... 35.4% SOURCE: CENSUS, 2014 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY (1 YEAR ESTIMATE); OKC MSA

This innovative vision for our school system was reaffirmed in October 2007, when voters overwhelmingly approved a $248.3 million bond by 78 percent! This support helped to earn Oklahoma City a spot as one of the “100 Best Communities for Young People” by the America’s Promise Alliance in 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012.

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TOP 20 DEGREE COMPLETIONS IN THE GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION

Social Sciences 697

Family & Consumer Science 607

Psychology 795

Visual & Performing Arts 801

Engineering Technologies 423

Education 1,493

Public Admin 273

Protective Services 515 Parks, Recreation & Leisure 331

Communcation & Journalism 894

Physical Sciences 434

Engineering 1,533

Computer & Information Science 597 Agriculture 571

Liberal Studies 2,492

Interdisciplinary Studies 1,255

Biological & Biomedical Sciences 777

Health Professionals 3,087 Law 326 Business 4,274

Graduates 273

3,000+

SOURCE: OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION, 2014-2015

HIGHER EDUCATION In the Greater Oklahoma City area, there are 18 public and private colleges and universities, including two research universities, Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma. These institutions of higher learning provide thousands of undergraduate and graduate degree opportunities. Oklahoma also has a nationally acclaimed Career and 18

Technology system, offering programs and services in 29 technology center districts operating on: 56 campuses, 398 comprehensive school districts, 25 skill centers and three juvenile facilities. Not only do these centers provide training to high school and post-secondary students, they also provide invaluable training services to a variety of businesses in a number of different skill areas.


AREA COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES 2014-2015 Enrollment University of Oklahoma  30,987 State, four-year     OU Health Sciences Center 3,762 State     OU College of Law 541 State Oklahoma State University 28,590 State, four-year     OSU-Oklahoma City 9,840 Two-year OSU School of Veterinary Medicine 407 State Oklahoma City Community College 20,454 State, two-year University of Central Oklahoma 20,083 State, four-year Rose State College 9,826 State, two-year Redlands Community College 3,621 State, two-year Oklahoma City University 3,511 Private, four-year Langston University 3,053 State, four-year Oklahoma Christian University 2,924 Private, four-year Mid-America Christian University* 2,688 Private, four-year Southern Nazarene University* 2,254 Private, four-year Oklahoma Baptist University 2,101 Private, four-year University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma 1,037 State, four-year Southwestern Christian University* 813 Private, four-year St. Gregory’s University 701 Private, four-year University of Phoenix* 471 Private, two-/four-year Brown Mackie College 285 Private, two-/four-year Hillsdale Free Will Baptist College 263 Private, four-year DeVry University* 197 Private, four-year Total Enrollment 148,409 Total includes 2014-2015 full academic year (fall, spring, summer) enrollment; *(fall 2014 enrollment used when complete enrollment is not available.)

SOURCE: OKLAHOMA HIGHER EDUCATION ENROLLMENTS BY INSTITUTION PUBLIC AND PRIVATE (2014-2015) , OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION; IPEDS DATA CENTER

CAREERTECH TRAINING INSTITUTIONS Francis Tuttle Technology Center Canadian Valley Technology Center Gordon Cooper Technology Center Meridian Technology Center Metro Technology Center Mid-America Technology Center Moore Norman Technology Center Mid-Del Technology Center Eastern Oklahoma County Technology Center Total Enrollment*

2014-2015 Enrollment Location 27,039 OKC 22,316 El Reno / Yukon / Chickasha 16,591 Shawnee 16,031 Stillwater 15,635 OKC 15,076 Wayne 12,381 Moore / Norman 6,202 Midwest City 2,709 Choctaw 133,980 *Total enrollment includes ACD, industry specific traning and full-time enrollment. SOURCE: OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION, 2014-2015

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GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY REGION COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES DEGREE COMPLETION AND ENROLLMENT PROGRAM OF STUDY

ENROLLMENT 5-Year 2014-2015 Average

DEGREES 2014-2015

DEGREES 5-YEAR AVERAGE

Agriculture and Related Sciences

2,497

2,405

571

512

Architecture and Related Services

513

589

102

113

Biological and Biomedical Sciences

5,479

5,066

777

734

Business

22,616

22,635

4,274

4,397

Communication and Journalism

4,125

4,154

894

840

Communications Technologies

127

101

56

26

Computer and Information Science

3,947

3,464

597

492

Construction Trades

74

95

18

14

Culinary Services

191

168

24

19

Education

8,696

9,084

1,493

1,652

Engineering

10,726

8,941

1,533

1,315

Engineering Technologies

4,226

5,147

423

347

English Language and Literature

1,251

1,349

288

280

Ethnic, Cultural, and Gender Studies

146

147

35

37

Family and Consumer Science

3,387

3,571

607

656

Foreign Languages

749

775

150

156

Health Professions

18,008

17,986

3,087

3,221

History

1,050

1,101

182

194

Homeland Security and Protective Services

3,160

3,179

515

481

Law

1,111

1,265

326

379

Liberal Arts and Sciences

23,026

29,432

2,492

1,891

Library Science

185

214

52

58

Mathematics and Statistics

907

781

151

149

Mechanic and Repair Technologies

300

281

105

77

Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies

3,073

3,538

1,255

1,160

Natural Resources and Conservation

289

272

62

62

Parks and Recreation

2,278

2,137

331

305

Philosophy and Religion

336

347

67

72

Physical Sciences

4,086

4,098

434

373

Psychology

4,612

4,578

795

802

Public Administration

1,009

944

273

281

Residency Programs

43 3,731

4,043

697

753

Theology

496

714

68

85

Transportation and Materials Moving

529

511

121

111

Visual and Performing Arts

4,659

4,834

801

794

Other

106

1,782

8

138

Grand Total

141,701

149,764

23,664

22,989

*Does not include institutions who do not report to the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. Source: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

20

13

Social Sciences


INCOME Oklahoma City’s cost of living consistently ranks below the national average and well below cities such as Denver, Albuquerque, Kansas City and San Antonio. Oklahoma City also offers some of the most affordable housing, transportation, utilities, groceries and gas in the U.S., and residents still have more disposable income than in other cities. See the cost of living calculator in the “About Oklahoma City” section of www.okcchamber.com/costofliving.

INCOME

# Households Per Income Category

% of Total Households

Median Household Income ($50,256) Under $15,000............................................................................... 65,592............................................ 12.5% $15,000 - $24,999........................................................................ 57,028............................................10.9% $25,000-$34,999.........................................................................53,580............................................10.2% $35,000-$49,999.........................................................................84,528............................................. 16.1% $50,000 - $74,999.....................................................................100,196............................................. 19.1% $75,000 - $99,999........................................................................63,164................................................12% $100,000 - $149,999....................................................................61,087.............................................11.6% $150,000 - $199,000................................................................. 20,506............................................. 3.9% $200,000+......................................................................................18,946............................................. 3.6% Total Households................................................ 524,627 SOURCE: ESRI BUSINESS ANALYST 2015 OKC MSA

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LABOR ANALYSIS UNEMPLOYMENT RATE The unemployment rate for the Oklahoma City metropolitan area averaged 3.7% for 2015. Increases in the area’s population and labor force have kept pace with economic growth, keeping the region’s unemployment rate low in comparison to the nation.

TOTAL EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY Information...............................................................................1.3% Natural Resources and Mining..........................................3.1% Other...........................................................................................3.6% Construction............................................................................4.6% Financial Activities................................................................5.3% Manufacturing.........................................................................6.1% Leisure and Hospitality........................................................10.8% Professional and Business Services................................13.2% Education and Health Services.........................................14.2% Trade, Transportation and Utilities..................................17.7% Government.............................................................................20% SOURCE: BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, CURRENT EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS, PRELIMINARY 2015

LABOR ANALYSIS 2015 Labor Force............................668,012 Employed............................... 643,277 Unemployed............................. 24,735 Underemployed*...................55,000 Unemployment Rate................. 3.7% *No official government statistics are available on the total number of persons who might be viewed as underemployed. Underemployed workers have training or education surpassing the needs of their current position.

SOURCE: U.S. DEPT. OF LABOR, BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS; OKC MSA

AVERAGE HOURLY WAGE SCALES OF SELECTED OCCUPATIONS Position

Entry Wage Average Wage

Material Handler ............................................................ $8.34............................... $12.44 Forklift Driver.................................................................. $10.92...............................$16.19 Customer Service Rep................................................. $9.46..............................$15.00 Computer Support Specialist.................................... $12.07............................ $20.86 Machinist........................................................................... $12.25...............................$18.81 Team Assembler............................................................. $8.45............................... $12.80 Administrative Assistant............................................. $9.55............................... $14.86 Computer Programmer................................................ $15.23.............................$32.75 Accountants and Auditors.......................................... $17.42..............................$32.22 Registered Nurse............................................................ $19.79..............................$28.17 Total, all occupations............................................$8.72......................... $20.80 SOURCE: OKLAHOMA EMPLOYMENT COMMISSION, OKLAHOMA WAGE NETWORK; OKC MSA, MAY 2014

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STATE INCENTIVES OKLAHOMA QUALITY JOBS PROGRAM – 10 YEAR CASH INCENTIVE Companies can directly receive up to 5% of new payroll in the form of quarterly cash payments for up to 10 years. Companies qualify if they are central administrative offices, manufacturers, research and development agencies (including wind power manufacturers), distribution centers (with 40 percent out-of-state delivery) or certain service companies (with out-of-state sales exceeding 75% of total sales), and must achieve an annualized new payroll (within three years) of $2.5 million or more. OKLAHOMA QUALITY JOBS – HIGH IMPACT PROGRAM Lowers annualized payroll threshold to $1 million for businesses that produce new direct jobs to the State that are equal to or greater than 1% of the total labor force of the county in which they locate. Payout is 2.5% of taxable wages for six years.

Oklahoma City ranks No. 3 in Best Cities for Jobs.

OKLAHOMA QUALITY JOBS – SMALL EMPLOYER PROGRAM Allows qualifying small businesses (90 employees or less) to receive up to 5% cash-back incentive for up to seven years to locate or expand in Oklahoma. 21ST CENTURY QUALITY JOBS INCENTIVE PROGRAM – 10 YEAR CASH INCENTIVE Created to attract growth industries by rewarding businesses with a highly skilled workforce. Companies can receive up to 10% on new payroll for up to 10 years, or twice the net benefit of the Quality Jobs Program. The new jobs must pay an average wage of 300% of the county’s average wage. This incentive targets knowledge-based service industries, such as professional, scientific and technical services, specialty hospitals, music, film, and performing arts. Out-of-state sales must be a minimum of 50%.

-Glassdoor

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INVESTMENT/NEW JOBS TAX CREDITS Provides growing manufacturers a significant tax credit based on either an investment in depreciable property and the addition of full-time equivalent employees engaged in manufacturing, processing, or aircraft maintenance. A five-year tax credit may be offered by calculating 1% of investment in qualified property or a credit of $500 per year per new job, doubled in an Enterprise Zone. QUALITY JOBS & INVESTMENT TAX CREDIT Prior to January of 2010, qualifying companies had to choose either the Quality Jobs Program OR the Investment/ New Jobs Tax Credit benefits. As of January 1, 2010, certain qualifying companies will have the option of receiving both of these incentives.

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FIVE-YEAR AD VALOREM TAX EXEMPTION This exemption is for new, expanded or acquired manufacturing, research/development or specific computer/data processing service facilities. Real estate, machinery and equipment used directly in the manufacturing process are eligible. The exemption requires a minimum capital investment of $250,000; $250,000 in additional annual payroll in small counties and $1 million additional payroll in large

counties. If a $7 million investment is made in new facilities for certain computer service companies or web portals, there is no additional payroll requirements, provided that the current payroll is maintained. SALES TAX EXEMPTIONS FOR MANUFACTURERS Machinery, equipment and tangible personal property used in design,


development and manufacturing are exempt from sales tax. Inputs and consumables used in the manufacturing process are also exempt from sales tax. Oklahoma also provides for a sales tax exemption on the energy consumed in the manufacturing process. CUSTOMIZED EMPLOYEE TRAINING Consistently ranked as one of the top programs in the nation, Oklahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Training for Industry Program (TIP) provides customized training and resources to qualifying new and expanding Oklahoma companies at little or no cost to the company. Delivered through the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Career Technology Centers, TIP ensures that companies have a productive workforce from the start. OTHER ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Additional assistance programs include: Sales Tax exemptions, Foreign Trade

Zones, Financing Programs, Export Assistance, Government Contracting Assistance, New Market Tax Credits, Former Indian Lands Tax Credit, Aerospace Industry Engineer Workforce Tax Credit, OK Community ED Pooled Financing for infrastructure-related construction, CDBG/EDIF, Economic Development Pooled Finance Incentive and Limited Industrial Road Assistance. Contact Chamber staff for more on any of these programs. RECRUITMENT RESOURCES To facilitate the recruitment process, the Oklahoma Employment Securities Commission (OESC) will pre-screen eligible applicants to meet the specifications outlined within job descriptions, test applicants for aptitudes in specific skills and provide any personnel functions necessary to ensure recruitment success.

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OKLAHOMA AEROSPACE ENGINEERING TAX CREDIT Provides tax credits to engineers hired by or contracting with aerospace companies through December 31, 2017, and the companies that hire them, with the purpose of enhancing the state’s ability to attract and retain a top-notch workforce pool for the Oklahoma aerospace industry. Workforce Retention • Tax credits to aerospace companies that hire engineers. A larger tax credit is offered for graduates of Oklahoma institutions. (10% of the qualified wage cost for the 1-5 years of employment from an Oklahoma institution or 5% of the qualified wage cost for the 1-5 years of employment from a non-Oklahoma institution)

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Workforce Attraction • Tax credits to engineering graduates who agree to work for an Oklahoma aerospace company, not to exceed $5,000 per year for the first 1-5 years of employment. • An employer tax credit of 50% of tuition reimbursed to a new engineer graduate, based on the average tuition at an Oklahoma public college or university, for the first through four years of employment.


LOCAL INCENTIVES OKLAHOMA CITY STRATEGIC INVESTMENT PROGRAM (SIP) The SIP is a deal-closing fund that provides companies with a cash award based on newly created jobs within Oklahoma City. Qualifying companies such as manufacturing firms, headquarters and shared service or customer care operations must hire a minimum of 50 full-time employees and produce an annual payroll of $1.75 million. Firms must also meet or exceed specific average wage thresholds. The City’s grant will be performance based, tied to the company’s actual job creation and capital investment. Potential grant amounts will be based on available funds at the time a company applies for an award through this program. GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY INCENTIVES In addition to Oklahoma City’s SIP, other communities in the region offer several different local incentives to qualifying companies to complement those available from the state. These include TIF districts, small business start-up packages, economic gardening, build-to-suit programs, and loan & grant packages. Contact the individual cities within the Greater Oklahoma City region to inquire if these specific incentives are available in their communities. For more information visit www.greateroklahomacity.com and click on “Expansion & Relocation” and then “Incentives.” Individual cities within the Partnership region may have additional incentive programs available. *All incentives subject to revision

#1

IN CAREERS FOR VETERANS

#3

BEST CITY FOR A SMALL BUSINESS

#3

-Sterling’s Best Places

- WalletHub

CITIES FOR MILLENNIAL COLLEGE STUDENTS - OnlineColleges 27


COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE Oklahoma Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s construction climate, one of the most competitive in the United States, makes building a facility an affordable and viable option. Costs of commercial and industrial construction are significantly lower here than in most areas throughout the Southwest, including Dallas, Houston, Phoenix and Denver, according to the RS Means Square Foot Costs survey. INDUSTRIAL SITES The Greater Oklahoma City Chamber maintains a comprehensive online database, www.okcedis.com, of industrial buildings and sites for the Greater Oklahoma City region. Customized site or building searches, site and building tours or build-to-suit proposals are available.

Industrial Rental Rates

Office Rental Rates Class A Office Quote

$22 - $23

Class B Office Quote

$15 - $18

Class C Office Quote

$12 - $15

Central Business District Ave. Quote

$20.15

Suburban Markets Ave. Quote

$17.65

Average Vacancy Rate

12.3%

Warehouse-Distribution $2.95 - $6 Flex/R&D $3 - $9 Light Industrial $3.25 - $8.50 Average Vacancy Rate 6.7%

Retail Rental Rates Lease Rates

$6.61 - $16.20

Average Vacancy Rate*

SOURCE: MARKET REPORTS FROM CBRE Q1 2015; XCELIGENT Q4 2015; PRICE EDWARDS YEAR-END 2015

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7.5%

*based on weighted avg. lease rates in 7 submarkets


TAX RATES In 2009, the state voted to reduce personal income tax to 5.25 percent followed by further reductions to 5% in 2016. If general revenue triggers are met, additional cuts may be made in 2017. Oklahoma’s taxation and regulatory policies are competitive, both regionally and nationally.

Tax Rate Corporate Income Tax �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6% Sales Tax (State & Local) ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������8.375%* State Personal Income Tax ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5% Ad Valorem (Property Tax) Real Property........................................................................Less than 1% of assessed value Personal (Machinery & Equipment) �������������������������������������������������1.5% of market value Unemployment Compensation Tax - 2.2% on first $17,000 of payroll and 0.1% to 5.5% after two years experience *Local sales tax based on City of Oklahoma City rate of 3.875%. Local tax rates vary by city and county from 3% to 5%. SOURCE: OKLAHOMA TAX COMMISSION

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UTILITIES ENERGY COSTS AND PROVIDERS The 10-county Greater Oklahoma City region has two investor-owned electric utilities providing most of the electric service to the region. Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company and Public Service Company of Oklahoma vary in rates. There are also several municipally owned energy providers in the Greater Oklahoma City region.OG&E Energy Corp., is a fully regulated utility. Edison Electric Institute reported in January 2015, that an average of 1,000kW/400,000kWh monthly bill would be $25,761/$0.0644 per kWh. For the same consumption, the average bill in Texas would be $29,642/$.0741 per kWh.  The US average would be $41,351/$.1034 per kWh. The average cost of industrial electricity in Oklahoma City is 5.7 cents per kWh.  This rate is 37% below the national average. Visit www.oge.com. Oklahoma Natural Gas’ tariffs range from small commercial / industrial using 1,000 Dth to facilities using in excess of 450,000 Dth per year. Rates are determined by factors such as annual revenue and capital investment expenses incurred. Visit www.oneok.com.

GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY UTILITIES: ENERGY Electricity in the Oklahoma City region is provided by OGE Energy Corp., Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative, City of Stroud, Edmond Electric, Kingfisher Public Works Authority, Oklahoma Electric Cooperative, Public Service Company of Oklahoma, and Stillwater Electric Utility. Natural Gas.................................................Oklahoma Natural Gas Company WATER - CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY Capacity.................................................................................... 250,000,000 gpd STORAGE CAPACITY- CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY Plant...............................................................................................35,500,000 gpd Distribution..................................................................................20,350,000 gpd WASTEWATER/SEWER - CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY Treatment Capacity ��������������������������������������������������������������� 101,000,000 gpd Present Load.............................................................................. 70,000,000 gpd *Rates vary depending on municipality

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T H E D I G I TA L

MAGAZINE OF OKLAHOMA CITY

T H E D I G I TA L

MAGAZINE OF OKLAHOMA CITY

ACCLA1M ACCLA1M OKC ACES THE A-LISTS OKC ACES THE A-LISTS

BIOSCIENCE THE SILICON PRAIRIE BIOSCIENCE THE SILICON PRAIRIE

CORPORATE CAMPUS, CORPORATE CAMPUS, TALENT MAGNET

TALENT MAGNET

Oklahoma City has grown by leaps and bounds of the past 15 years, and now the world will know about our success. Check out VeloCity, a digital magazine that gives a dynamic new portrait of Oklahoma City and features articles, pictures, links, videos and more. Help increase the success of our city by sharing www.velocityokc.com with friends, colleagues and family members.


SERVICES AVAILABLE TO NEW OR EXPANDING COMPANIES • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Professional site location assistance Professional business retention and expansion (BRE) services Professional bioscience, aerospace and entrepreneurial assistance Comprehensive research modeling Identification of available real estate Hosting of site tours Workforce analysis Assistance with permitting and numerous other processes Assistance with determining financial resources Work with state and local partners for incentives and training benefits Host / connect with key groups such as investors, developers and bankers Manage Strategic Investment Program (SIP) application process for Oklahoma City Economic Development Trust And more

ABOUT THE PARTNERSHIP The Greater Oklahoma City Partnership is a ten-county regional economic development organization dedicated to the growth and prosperity of central Oklahoma – a region of more than 1.5 million people.

Greater Oklahoma City Chamber 123 Park Avenue Oklahoma City, OK 73102 www.greateroklahomacity.com www.okcedis.com www.greateroklahomacity.com/OKCLBI econdev@okcchamber.com 405-297-8900

01/2016


Greater Oklahoma City at a Glance