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FAA OKs Oroville Airport Plan

OFF TO THE RACES

Dorothy Scott runway relocation not slated until at least 2020 BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The long awaited approval of the revised Capital Improvement Plan for Oroville’s Dorothy Scott International Airport was received from the Federal Aviation Administration. City Clerk Kathy Jones made the announcement at the Tuesday, Feb. 4 meeting of the Oroville City Council. The plan calls for crack sealing, seal coating, pavement marking and apron reconstruction. This project gets rid of the taxiways and builds aprons at each end of

“We wanted to be able to spend a little as possible and what we do spend to not be ripped out when we’re ready to do the relocation.” Kathy Jones, Oroville Clerk/Treasurer

the runway which can be used even after the runway is moved. The project will begin sometime later this year. “We wanted to be able to spend as little as possible and what we do spend not be ripped out when we are ready to do the relocation,” said Jones. The runway relocation project remains several years out as the city saves towards its portion of the costs. “The environmental study for the runway relocation is planned for 2019, with construction not until 2020,” said Jones. “This is all very exciting,” said Councilman Ed Naillon. Mayor Chuck Spieth also received approval of Resolution 531 declaring February 2014 as General Aviation Month. Councilman Tony Koepke made the resolution, which was seconded by Naillon and approved unanimously.

STP GRANT APPLICATION The hearing to amend the city’s 20142019 Six-Year Transportation Program was cancelled as the application the city had made to resurface Central/Ridge Drive from Main Street west to the city limits, including sidewalk upgrades, was not selected for funding. If the city had been selected to receive the STP funds for the project, the amendment would have been required. AMBULANCE STANDBY REQUEST A request for the ambulance to stand by at Molson for the NW Ice Fishing Festival was turned down, despite be approved in past years. Ambulance Coordinator Debra Donahue reported that the city could be left shorthanded if the request was approved because three members of the crew were still taking classes in Tonasket on Saturdays. Donahue added that maybe members of the county’s search and rescue team could be at the event. She added that the ambulance would respond to the event if needed, however. Donahue also reported that the EMR class has been completed with six graduates with scores over 80 percent. Two students, however, did not complete the class and have reimbursed the city for the costs. A third, who successfully completed the course, but is moving from the area, will reimburse the city as well. The next meeting of the Oroville City Council will be Tuesday, Feb. 8 at 7 p.m. in the city council chambers located at 1308 Ironwood St.

Brent Baker/staff photo

John Sasse gets off to a rip-roaring start at Saturday’s Bonaparte Lake Snow Drags, which came off without a hitch despite temperatures that started at 12 below zero. For more photos and an account of the event, see page A2.

Fraud investigation leads to body Son says ailing father killed himself BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN - The investigation of a possible Social Security fraud by an Oroville area man led to the discovery of his father’s dead body buried 16 miles northeast of Ellisforde. On Wednesday, Feb. 5, the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office was contacted by an agent from the Special Agents of the Social Security Administration, Office of the Inspector General and a detective of the Washington State Patrol Cooperative Disability Investigation Unit (CDIU), according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. “Their units investigate fraud cases, including social security frauds. During one of their investigations they had received information that a subject living in Okanogan County had been taking his father’s Social Security funds, after the father had killed himself and the son had buried him on their property,” Sheriff Rogers wrote in a press release on Monday. Interviews were conducted on family and friends to try and determine what was going on. The investigation showed that Bruce Thompson had been receiving social security funds but had made no more withdrawals from his account since 2010. The investigation also showed that there had been no activity at all involving the elder Thompson since 2010. The next day detectives contacted Kenneth C. Thompson, 52 of Oroville, the son of Bruce E. Thompson, who was born in 1943. When the son was interviewed he was very open with the detectives, according to Rogers. “Kenneth Thompson said that several years ago his father had cancer and was dyeing from it. Kenneth Thompson told Detectives that his father refused to go to the doctors and told him that he was going to kill himself. Kenneth Thompson said that his father owed him money and they had decided that after he was dead, Kenneth Thompson would keep drawing money from Bruce Thompson’s account for about a year to pay back the money he was owed,” the sheriff writes.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 07

OCSO/submitted photo

Members of the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office, the Washington State Patrol Crime Lab and volunteers began digging on Friday, Feb. 7 looking for the body of Bruce Thompson. After three days of digging they found his remains on Sunday, Feb. 10, around 1:15 p.m. The body was removed from the site and an autopsy will be performed. The son admitted that in November 2009 he had helped his father finish digging a hole on their property located at 47 Emily Road, Oroville. He said that sometime just prior to Thanksgiving in 2009 he came home and his father was not there. He went out to the burial site and found his father lying in the hole dead, according to Rogers. “Kenneth Thompson said that his father had shot himself with a shotgun,” continues Rogers. “...Thompson said he removed the shotgun from the hole and then buried his father. (He) also said that he did use his father’s debit card to with-

draw money for about eight months until the card expired.” Search warrants were obtained for the elder Thompson’s bank accounts in Nevada and a search warrant was also obtained for the property on Emily Road. After the interview, Kenneth Thompson took Detectives to the property located at 47 Emily Road, which is approximately 15 miles northeast of Ellisforde, to show them where his father was buried. On Friday, Feb. 7 detectives, members of the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office, the Washington State Patrol Crime Lab and volunteers began digging at the site

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

for the body of Bruce Thompson. After three days of digging on Sunday, Feb. 9, at around 1:15 p.m., they unearthed the remains of Bruce Thompson. The body was removed from the site and an autopsy will be performed, said the sheriff. “From what we found at the scene everything matches pretty much what Kenneth Thompson had told us. The weapon that was supposedly used was not found during the search warrants but was located late last night at another families residence in Idaho. The investigation at this time is ongoing,” said Rogers.

Snow Drags Talent Show Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A5

Community Schools Cops & Courts

A6-7 A8 A9

Classifieds/Legals A10 Sports A12-13 Obituaries A14


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 13, 2014

OUTDOORS

Chilly but awesome Was it cold? More like: Was ... it... COLD! It was. But it was also a heck of a lot of fun, even for the camera-toting reporter that didn’t set foot on (or more accurately, set butt on) a snowmobile. Despite frigid temperatures and this winter’s frustratingly spare snowfall, those who actually did make it to the Bonaparte Lake Snow Drags had about as HALF-BAKED good a time as Brent Baker one can possibly have while braving temperatures measured at minus-12 at the site as the racing began. It eventually turned into one of those crystalline, sundappled mountain paradise kind of days that we in the North Country are so privileged to enjoy from time to time. In the sun, temperatures eventually landed on the right side of the zero degree(Fahrenheit) mark, though not by much. There was just enough snow atop the 22-inch thick ice to throw out impressive plumes that glittered in the winter sunlight as the sleds rocketed down the course, ever faster as the event progressed into bigger, more powerful classes. The kids got trophies, the adult winners took home cash, the Bonaparte Lake Lodge had standing-room-only crowds watching the races through the windows with a roaring fire at their backs and food and hot drinks on the tables in front of them. Does it really get any better than this? I didn’t go to last year’s races (boss/partner in journalistic crime, Gary DeVon, did) but organizers Mike and Bridgette Sterling said that the lessons learned last year were put to good use. Apparently efficiency on the staging end of things caused some bottlenecks last year. Not so this time around. At the start of each class of races, all of the competitors were gathered at the bracket board and lined up in the staging area. Most races got off within 30 seconds of the end of the previous run down the course, with only one mid-race delay for refueling the generator that powered the light system. Ah, the lights. The classic racing “Christmas Tree” configuration, with mounted laser start and finish lines, made false starts an automatic call and finishes an easy judgement. It removed guesswork from the equation and insured against unnecessary disputes The machines raced hard, the competitors were good-natured, and the three riders that bucked off their sleds at the start received plenty of genuine sympathy along with some goodnatured ribbing (and likely some significant bruises). Maybe best of all, the nonprofit Bonaparte Snowmobile/ ATV Club hit its fundraising goals for donations that will go toward scholarship(s) given to Tonasket High School graduates, as well as donations to the Make-a-Wish Foundation and the Susan G. Komen Foundation. Hopefully it’s an event that grows over time. It’s easy to understand why some decided not to brave the cold weather, but for those who did on Saturday, there wasn’t a better place to be.

A chilly day in the mountains didn’t snow down the snowmobiles at the Bonaparte Lake Snow Drags on Saturday as (left) the sleds took off, often side by side, and roared down the course in fewer than five seconds. The crowd was a bit down from last year thanks to -12 degree temperatures and the relative lack of snow in the region, but the Bonaparte ATV/Snowmobile Club still hit its fundraising targets for scholarships for Tonasket High School seniors, the Make-a-Wish Foundation and the Susan G. Komen Foundation. Photos by Brent Baker

Fast & Frigid Above, an impressive array of sponsors helped to pull the event off (Cindy Grabeel photo). Right, kids all received trophies, including (l-r) Sage Fuhrman, Adam Humston, Alex Goetz, Riley Rose, Corbin Cruz and Matt Wagner. Wagner, of Omak, took first place in kids’ division racing.

Above, Ryan Rose launches off the starting pad on one of his runs down the course. Left, Ryan Selzler won three divisions and took second in a fourth to walk away with a few hundred dollars of prize money.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

Tonasket CCC presents 19th Annual Talent Show

The Community Cultural Center presented the 19th Annual Talent Show in Tonasket on Saturday, Feb. 8. The event featured several acts, including The Rick Braman Players (above and right), Mauricia Millard (left) and The Alley Family (below). Also performing were Lex and Jake Hylton, Sandy Vaughn and Sam Howell, Nick Watts, Sunny Rickabaugh, Jonas Webber, Melinda Garcia, Parker Kenyon and Marcelino Ruiz, Andy Marinsac and Pat Liley, Flap, Sara Jordan, Sunny Lanigan and Kyle McConnell. Bud McSpadden did double duty as performer and emcee. Janet Culp organized the event. For a slide show featuring all the performers see www.gazette-tribune.com.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 13, 2014

More questions than answers County Commissioners want collaboration between hospitals, but what that means is unclear BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Submitted photo

It’s Showtime finished it’s 2014 run on Saturday, featuring Tyler Graves (left) and Steve Kinzie, both singer/songwriters from Tonasket. Even though attendance was light, everyone there enjoyed an evening of great music and camaraderie. “The Friends of the Oroville Library would like once again to thank all of the sponsors who made this year’s events possible, and Walt and Vicki Hart for the generous donation of their wonderful facility,” said Rick Braman, president of the Friends of the Library. “We would also like to extend a special thank you to Becky (Desjardin) and Hometown Pizza for their donation of pizzas for the first two events. We hope to see you all again next winter.”

Water rates rise Only slightly higher than the rates from the 1990s BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

NORTH COUNTY – The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District has informed water users that their rates will be increasing for the first time in over ten years. The new rates will be $137.50 per acre, up $3.50 over the last increase in 2012. Prior to that they had been $99 per acre. The current $75 account charge remains the same. Several factors have led to the increase, including electric, fuel and equipment costs. The new rates reflect a slightly higher increase than what users were paying in the 1990s, but is about $7 more than what were being paid since 2012, according to a letter that went out to all water users at the end of January. “In the late 1990’s we as water users were paying $134 per acre

for water. Following a management change and settlement with the Bureau (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) we were able to reduce rates to $99 in 2002, a rate we all enjoyed for 10 years,” say the OTID Board of Directors in their letter to water users. “Although our management policies did not change during the ten year period, the cost of doing business did and we were forced to raise assessment rates back up to $130 pr acre two years ago.” The district is facing a 31 percent increase in electric power alone, say the board of directors. Power for the pumps represent 32 percent of the district’s operations and maintenance budget for the coming year. The board commends former district manager Tom Scott and his staff for keeping controllable costs as low as possible. Scott retired at the end of 2013. His replacement, Jay O’Brian has been charged with continuing those policies, according to the OTID board. “Jay is already aggressively pursuing alternate revenue

sources working with the Colville Confederated Tribes Fisheries Department toward long term agreements for using OTID desilting basins as fish acclimation ponds, as well as rent revenue for cell towers on OTID lands,” write the board. They continue, “With today’s all time low interest rates, the interest income OTID generates from our reserve funds is minimal and can no longer be considered as a reliable revenue source, thus other avenues must be explored.” The manager is also working with a pump and motor manufacture which may supply brand new pumps and motors for less than the cost of repairing just the motor on the district’s existing pumps, most of which are now 20 to 30 years-old, obsolete and unrepairable, according to the board. The letter concludes, “We remain committed to providing you with irrigation water at the lowest possible cost. We appreciate your understanding regarding this necessary rate increase.”

OKANOGAN - There was a bit of mystery surrounding a session the Okanogan County Commissioners called last week with the elected commissioners and administrators of county hospitals. Called to the meeting were representatives of North Valley Hospital, Three Rivers Hospital (Brewster) and Mid-Valley Hospital (Omak). The meeting was moderated by Bruce Buckles, Executive Director of Aging and Adult Care of Central Washington, who asked that the hospital representatives share ideas on collaboration of services. Each of the hospital administrators spoke briefly about their own issues, but according to several who attended the meeting, there seemed to be a disconnect between what the commissioners wanted discussed and what the hospital representatives had on their minds. Commissioner Jim DeTro was not present at the meeting. “What they wanted was our ideas on how we could collaborate services,” said North Valley Hospital CEO Linda Michel. “They gave us several articles about the Western Washington Rural Health Care Collaborative (WWRHCC). It’s a group of 12 rural hospitals on the west side that collaborate on various things. But they couldn’t tell us (at the meeting) what it was they collaborate on.” The group consists of a dozen Critical Access Hospitals located from Forks and Sedro Woolley

on the north end, Ilwaco to the southwest and Prosser to the southeast. According to the collaborative’s website (wwrhcc.org), most of its efforts are focused on exchanging ideas, applying for federal grants, provide joint contracting and negotiating, and work together to improve health care delivery systems. “They obviously can’t be collaborating on patient services,” Michel said. I’ve contacted three CEOs (in that group) that I know to see what it is that they do.” Michel said the majority of that group of hospitals had significant differences from the Okanogan County hospitals. “Those other hospitals have huge medical facilities around them that aren’t very far away,” she said. “These CAHs are profitable. What’s going to happen if we put three CAHs that struggle to make money together?” One concern expressed by hospital administrators was that the commissioners’ goal is to consolidate services and potentially merge the three hospital districts. Michel said her own talking points reflected that concern and the effects on health care availability in the north county. If, for example, the outlying hospitals were converted into triage centers with patients sent to Omak, the consequences would include the closing of the nursing home (since it is currently dependent on hospital income to survive), the likely loss of the veterans’ clinic, an exodus of providers that no longer would have access to a hospital, as well as a significant loss of jobs for Tonasket’s largest employer. The NVH district employs about 230 people. “I spoke to the elderly traveling so far sometimes even to get to our hospital,” Michel said. “Maybe I’m speaking too much from the heart, but thats the way I felt. We value our community services. A CAH - any rural hospital - is only for essential care. So

to reduce services (in Tonasket) would be removing essential care from our community. “Our community is already so spread out, from Wauconda to Chesaw.” In the end there were no decisions made, and one observer who was not formally interviewed noted that there seemed to be a disconnect between what the facilitator wanted to discuss and what the hospital representatives wanted to talk about. A clipboard was passed for volunteers to join a committee to discuss further collaboration. “The other CEOs and I all volunteered (among others),” Michel said. “I’m not going to let them do something here that I’m not involved with. But all in all, I’m not sure what they expect.”

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FEBRUARY 13, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Is heroin making inroads into our rural county?

While the fatal heroin overdose of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman both cut short a brilliant career and has dominated much of the national news lately, we are faced with the potential for many of our own tragedies right here in rural America. One just has to read the weekly court and police stats to see that heroin, which once brought to mind the decrepit back alleys of our big cities, is making inroads into Okanogan County. While it was an oddity to hear of an arrest for heroin just a few short years ago in the county it seems like we see it happening on a regular basis nowadays. People are even being charged with selling it in the parking lots of high schools now. Of course rather than the problem having sprung from people using so-called traditional street drugs and moving up to a bigger high, the gateway drugs are now prescription painkillers. These aren’t the people who moved from “wake and bake” on to the next big thing and on up the line, these are the folks who were prescribed soOut of called “legitimate” painkillers like OxyContin, My Mind became addicted and can no longer get their fix. Doctors will tell you there are certainly legitiGary A. DeVon mate medical reasons for prescribing opiates in an effort to control chronic pain, but it seems like their use has spun out of control. Many of us have friends or family members who have gotten addicted or had trouble weaning themselves off these prescribed painkillers after they no longer needed them. The reported street price for things like Oxy, or as it’s sometimes called “Hillbilly Heroin,” was something like $40 a tablet. As the problem intensifies and the supplies dry up it can only push that price higher. Addicts were bound to look for something cheaper – especially if it is another opiate. This is a pattern being repeated across America and it becomes more scary when we think of those young people who didn’t become addicted because they were prescribed these painkillers, but because they got them out of family, friends or neighbors medicine cabinets. Pharming, as it’s called, is an all too common practice among some of our young people. ABC News reports that rural kids say they do this because they’re bored. Well for “boredom” or some other reason, they grab whatever they can find and often that’s these same highly addictive painkillers. Once they’re hooked if they don’t find the help they need they, like those that were prescribed these painkillers, may turn to whatever they can get on the streets. This isn’t somebody’s 1930’s “Reefer Madness” fantasy; it is already happening in our towns. Heroin, something most of us thought was the choice of only the hardest of hardcore junkies, has become the drug people are turning to. There are unscrupulous people only too willing to supply to this growing number of people who have gotten hooked on painkillers. Heroin prices have gone down and the purity has gone up, according to ABC. This will make it even more attractive to people who have become addicted to things like OxyContin. Celebrity addictions like that of Rush Limbaugh and deaths like that of Hoffman get most of the press, but addiction, whether it is booze or drugs, can ruin the lives of everyday people. We need to find some way to address this increasing addiction problem and get people the help they need before it grows further out of control and those back alleys we thought of as only being a big city problem, are our own.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Beach needs cleaning

Dear Editor, This letter is to the attention of Mayor Chuck Speith and the City of Oroville, We are the Brownies from Girl Scout troop 3851. Our names are Hailey Helm and Mary Lu Tafolla. We are writing to you because we are concerned about the glass and the trash in the sand, along the beach, at the city park. We have done some research, and we would appreciate it if the city would rent or purchase a sand sifter or beach cleaner. These can be easily attached to a tractor. We have several reasons for asking you to make this consideration. Our number one concern is safety. In the future someone may cut their foot on glass. Also, a nice clean beach will keep campers coming as well as show pride in our community. Lastly, cigarette butts and trash on the beach endanger our local wildlife. We hope that you will seriously consider taking action on this issue. Your Citizens, Hailey Helm Mary Lu Tafolla

Helped with success Dear Editor, The Bonaparte Snowmobile/ATV Club would like to say a big thank you to everyone for supporting the Snow Drags at Bonaparte Lake. Even though it was very cold (12 below), the race was great, especially with the new Drag Racing Lights.

COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

The Molson Leader

92 Years Ago: February 1 – 8, 1922: Yesterday morning, at about four o’clock, fire broke out in the Palace Hotel at Oroville and is reported to have destroyed the buildings from the Palace north to the corner of the block, which were formerly known as the Peerless Hotel. It is reported that the firemen were handicapped by frozen water pipes. Preliminary steps are being taken for the organization of another state bank in Molson and a large number of local people are to be stockholders of the new institution. President N. E. Whitworth of the Commercial Bank of Okanogan is interested in the undertaking. The charter has not yet been secured and the organization work is incomplete. The loan limit was reduced from a minimum of $1,000 to $500 by a vote of the stockholders of the Okanogan County Live Stock Loan Association, at a special meeting held at Okanogan on Tuesday of last week. This will permit a large number to receive loans who were not eligible under the former ruling. Ending the “milk war” which has ruled in Spokane for several months, during which milk retailed at 10 cents per quart, producers and dealers have come together and the retail price of milk was advanced to 13 cents per quart. The American Theater will be opened Saturday evening of this week after have been closed since the electric light plant was destroyed by fire more than a year ago. The opening was delayed by the difficulty of finding parts for the machine necessary to receive the electric current from the Delco light plant that has been installed in the Molson Leader building. Announcement of a change of the name of the Potter Mercantile Co., to the Molson Mercantile Company is made this week. C. S. Slawsom, of Northport, will continue as president and H. L. Borland, manager of the store, who has been here since September.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: February 6–13, 1964: Wednesday, Feb. 15, before the Tonasket and Oroville basketball game, the faculties of the two schools will have a chance to draw first blood. The Oroville Bombers will be led by their rifle-

None of this would have been possible without our generous sponsor’s: Kinross Cold Corp., Xtreme Powersports, Ty Olson Construction, The Kueler Bar & Grill, Kruse Electric, Beyers Market, Hughes Department Store, Bonaparte Lake Resort, K<>K Guest Ranch, OK Chevrolet, Tim’s Tire Pros, Sunrise Chevrolet, Washington Tractor, Omak Marine, Wauconda Cafe’, Ogborn Plumbing, Morgan & Son, Gene’s Market, Midway Building Supply, Superior Auto Parts, Frontier Foods, Red Apple Inn, Okanogan Tractor, Tonasket Subway, Okanogan Estate and Vineyards, Double S Meats, Republic Brewing Co., Rockwall Cellars, CJ Cycle, 24-7 Property Maintanence/Omak Paving and Coors Light. Hope to see everyone next year, Saturday, Feb. 7! Sincerely, Michael Sterling - President Bonaparte Snowmobile/ATV Club

Skilled care essential

Dear Editor, For the next 18 years, approximately 8,000 baby boomers will turn 65 every day. By 2030, one in five Washingtonians will be considered elderly – and many will need long-term care. Reliance on government support for long-term care needs will continue to grow as baby boomers age. The future looks startling to those of us who comprise the “silver tsunami,” and is downright alarming for thousands of Washingtonians who rely on the state’s

Medicaid system to pay for long-term care services in nursing homes and assisted living centers. Assisted living Medicaid rates haven’t been updated in nearly a decade – and were cut by six percent from 2010 to 2012. Nursing home rates were last updated in 2007. Rates fell short by over $100 million in 2012 – and over half the state’s nursing homes lost money. Failure to update rates creates problems at the bedside, where care quality is truly defined. Seventy percent of the cost of longterm care is wage and labor-related, thus financial losses equal lost jobs and that translates to lost quality. This is simply not sustainable. Washington Health Care Association has represented skilled and assisted living providers in Washington for over forty years. Our 400+ members tell us that the issue of appropriate funding does not change because of shifting demographics. Washington’s system of facility-based long-term care is threatened as never before. Now, as in the future, when a loved one’s care needs can’t be met at home, it’s critical that trained and certified staff are available to provide quality care in a cost-effective, safe and highly-regulated care setting. Please call the Legislative Hotline in Olympia today, 1-800-562-6000, and let your legislators know that seniors matter. Tell them skilled and assisted living care must be a priority in the supplemental budget. Robin Dale, CEO Washington Health Care Association

lb.; ground beef, lb. $.39; boneless ham, $.59 ITEMS per lb. FROM THE The Gazette-Tribune PAST 25 Years Ago arm round ball coach, cock-and-fire Donnie Hughes. Hughes supporting armament will come from the dribbling fanatic Leonardo “Dribble” Petty; Eddie “Go for Six” Tingstad; the“Jumping Hyena” from Kettle Falls “Bounding” Billy Grunst; the “Sawed Off Howitzer” from Montana, Mickey “Set & Pump” Gray and others we dare not describe. Oroville High School is proud to have two representatives to the Washington Music Educators Association All-State Convention to be held in Yakima, Feb. 20-22. Kathleen Kernan will be in the All-State Band and John Zosel will be in the All-state Chorus. The bank will number about 200 and the chorus around 400. The Oroville Hornets will tangle with the unbeaten Tonasket Tigers here Friday night. Part of the Hornet team that will see action are: Wayne Scott, Mike Bourn, Ken Scacco, Raymond Wilson, Pat Siegrist and Charles Cox. Robert Drummond presented a letter to the Oroville Chamber of Commerce from the Omak Chamber, inviting Oroville to send its road committee to a meeting for the consideration of a river grade highway which would bypass Chelan. The Oroville Board of Education ruled Tuesday, Feb. 11, those pupils attending the Oroville Schools, who live within the city limits, will not be transported to and from school in school busses. The ruling became necessary when the bus supervisor, William Higginbotham reported the busses were overloaded in violation of Washington State Motor Vehicle laws. One bus, with a capacity of 73 students, has been hauling as many as 104 riders. Weather Wise by Marge Frasier, Official Observer: Feb. 5, 44 degrees maximum and 25 minimum; it show 7” of snow but a note with the figures stated that was the amount on the ground at the time of recording; Feb. 6, 40 max. and 17 min.; Feb. 7, 33 max. and 9 min.; Feb. 8, 30 max. and 10 min.; Feb. 9, 30 max. and 10 min.; Feb. 10, 41 max. and 20 min.; Feb, 11, 42 max. and 36 min with no precipitation for the period and the same amount of snow on the ground. Groceries of the times: Tall tins, evaporated milk, $.10; Florida grapefruit, 10 for $1.00; 10 oz. shrimp, breaded, $.59; 12 oz. orange juice, $.49; pot roast, $.39 per

February 2-9, 1989: Nelson Monitz, of Oroville, decided to cast a helium balloon to the wind in celebration of his wife’s birthday last Nov. 17, 1988. Nelson first tied a message to the red rubber sphere with his name and address with the question “Hi, could you tell me how far this went?” The last I saw of it was heading south, down he valley towards Okanogan. “I guess it made a turn some place because I got a message from a farmer in Warner, Alberta, Canada, who had found it on his fence on Nov. 18, one day later.” It had traveled some 900 miles. The annual Tonasket Kiwanis Ground Hog Dinner has come and gone again. Over one and one-third ton of sausage was prepared for the annual fund raising event. Three hundred and seventy five enjoyed the Ground Hog dinner in the Tonasket High School Cafeteria. The body of Buddy Hires Sr. was retrieved from the icy waters of Lake Osoyoos last Monday morning. Hires died tragically when his car plunged through the ice on Sunday afternoon, according to eye witnesses, trapping him inside. Divers attempted to recover his body on Sunday but trouble with their regulators due to the icy waters prevented them for the recovery. Local business people were pleasantly surprised to learn that the Oroville High School student population not only does most of its shopping locally, but also has approximately $218,244 in yearly spending power, according to a newly released survey. The survey was a combined project of Wenatchee Valley College-North and Okanogan and Oroville high school’s Future Business Leaders of America. The Oroville students said that they did 61 percent of their shopping locally compared to only 26 percent for the Okanogan students. North Valley Hospital Board met in special session last Friday, to discuss what to do with over a quarter a million dollars in outstanding hospital bills owed by various government agencies. Mae McCone, new head of the business office for NVH reported to the board that $168,689 Department of Social Health Services, $68,323 Medicaid and $23,059 Labor & Industry bills are still listed on the hospital’s computer billing system. Some of these bills date back as far as five years, said McCone. (Writers comment 2014,“sound familiar?”)


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 13, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Happy Valentine’s Day to everyone Baby, it’s COLD outside! But, we can’t complain too much, as compared to the Midwest and Eastern parts of the country. A phone call from our Brazilian boy, Marco, who was visiting in Boston didn’t think it was too bad, but that was last week before it dumped some more inches of snow. And calls from our nephew, Mike, a long distance truck driver, has a lot of variations in his daily work, from road closures, to sunshine, while he pulls a trailer filled with multiple cars, from one agency to another, sometimes new ones sometimes from the auction yards. Remember that tomorrow is Valentine’s Day. Half of February, down the tube, already! Of course, it is a short month. When you reach my age, and drop your eye drops under a king size bed, it is quite a process to retrieve them. First, you find the grabber, because the little round bottle rolls a goodly distance. Then you find the flashlight and it will probably need new batteries. Then, you locate said bottle, grasp it, and pull it toward you, and it comes up empty, because the tiny screw and rubber pad, have come off somewhere under the bed. So, back to square one! All the while

Surprise planned for Valentine’s Day BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

Valentine’s Day is next Friday the 14th and a surprise is being planned for the occasion. Come and be a part of the fun. The Garden Club will be meeting here that day as well. That evening is the oneman show at the High School Commons starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $17 from Doris Hughes or $20 at the door. The name of the show is, “A Fine and Pleasant Misery” with the humor of Pat McManus reminiscent of Mark Twain and Bill Cosby. The event is sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce and is a kick-off for the Ice Fishing Derby on Saturday, Feb. 15 at Sidley and Molson lakes. The Derby is

50’s Dance this Saturday Night BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

wondering “will I be able to get up off this floor?” Finding what I thought was an earring, turned out to be the screw and success was completed. Where was a grandchild when I needed one!!! Oh! these Golden Years! But we still wanna hang on, please? I’ve mentioned numerous times that I don’t know anything about football, but I do understand numbers, and I really enjoyed the numbers as they escalated during the Super Bowl game. I still think it is a very rough sport and a good way to get killed, but I was happy for the Seahawks and their supporters and especially for those that were in a numbers “pool” and won a few bucks. Do you remember when dominoes were one of the games we played as kids? The game sorta went by the wayside, then a few years ago, became popular with a variation called “chicken foot,” then, a bit later another variation called Mexican Train? During this cold snap in the weather get together a few friends and drag out the old dominoes and you’d be surprised how quickly an afternoon goes playing either of the games, or just plain old dominoes. How good to see Jerry Ecklor out and about after recent surgery to slow down Parkinsons complications.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS also sponsored by the Chamber and both events should be fun. On the evening of Feb. 15 the North Valley Community Schools is hosting a 50’s Dance at Vicki’s Back Door Club on Main Street starting at 6 p.m. Live music by Project 3:16. Hamburgers, hotdogs, adult and child beverages, floats and banana splits – tons of drawings and prizes for winners of Best Dancers, Best Costumes, Best Hula-Hoopers and Best Yo-Yo-ers. TIckets sold at the (back) door are $10, Child $5, and Family $25. Another fun evening well planned. John and Joy Lawson have informed me that they and their

THE LEARNING TREE

It’s here! well, almost. The 50’s Dance is on Saturday, Feb.15, and the doors open at 6 p.m. Got your outfit picked out? Been practicing your dance moves? How about your hula-hooping skills or yo-yoing techniques?

Contests for all of these, and dozens of drawings throughout the evening, too. Tons of food, drink, and an ice cream bar will keep you sated throughout the evening. Our thanks to North Cascades Broadcasting for the

Clam/Crab Feed this weekend

TONASKET EAGLES

BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

OK we are getting some snow, don’t you just love it. Our Crab/Clam feed is this weekend on Saturday, Feb. 15 starting at 5:30 p.m. and going to 8 p.m. Come in and get your tickets or just buy them at the door the evening of the event.

TONASKET GUN CLUB

All proceeds go towards our Scholarship Fund. There will also be a Dessert Auction that same evening and those proceeds will go for the heart fund. (Don’t forget your valentine). Our wonderful Kitchen Ladies will be having a special breakfast for Valentine’s Day (only a few

THE ALLIANCE FOR AVIATION

16 yard Robert McDaniel Noah Olmstead Bob McDaniel Jeff Taylor Randy Cline Lloyd Caton, Jr.

25 24 22 21 21 20

Handicap Jeff Taylor Bob McDaniel Lloyd Caton, Jr. Noah Olmstead Randy Cline

23 22 20 19 19

Canadian Friends will be at the Center on Friday, Feb., 21, right after lunch, to bring their music for our enjoyment and entertainment. We appreciate them all. The entrees for next week and beyond are as follows: Tuesday, Feb. 11: Baked Ham; Thursday, Feb. 13 is Tuna Noodle Casserole; Friday, Feb. 14 is BBQ Chicken; Monday, Feb. 18 is Sweet and Sour Pork; Thursday, Feb. 20 is Country Fried Steak, and Friday, Feb. 21 will be Chicken. Our bus driver, Maurice Reichel, has informed me that the bus from here to Omak, regularly scheduled for the fourth Monday of the month, has been rescheduled to Wednesday Feb. 19. Pinochle Scores for Feb. 8 follow: The door prize was won by Danny Weitrick; most pinochles by Ken Ripley; high scoring man was Leonard Paulsen and high scoring woman was Judy Ripley. More later. flashy pink and green publicity posters you’ve seen around town. You can still sign up for these classes that start next week: Is Your Dog Training You (six sessions; Monday, Feb. 17…); Dyeing With Shaving Cream (one session, Thursday, Feb. 20); and Voice Training (six sessions; Thursday, Feb. 20…) To register call Ellen Barttels at (509) 4762011, email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu or sign up on our website at northvalleycommunityschools.com. days later). It will be on Sunday, Feb. 16 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. French toast stuffed with fruit and a side of bacon, ham or sausage for only $6. Pinochle scores from last Sunday, Feb. 8 as follows: First place Jean Jones, second place Dave Russell, low score to Jo Porter and last pinochle to Penny Smith and Julie Hovland We wish all a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

Aviation Alliance commends Oroville Mayor Spieth SUBMITTED BY DEVIN OSTING

Feb. 9 Results

And how about that old Ford truck of their well groomed horses, or riding that has appeared at his driveway? One in one of the carts being pulled by one of the first “dates” I ever had was to a of their high stepping horses. It wasn’t movie in an old truck very easy being confined indoors, much like that. The movie when her health deteriorated was shown in a tent, sitand you’d usually find her ting on benches, much like sitting on the patio, soaking the old revival meetings… up sunshine, weather permitbet my great-grandkids can’t ting. Condolences go out to even visualize that. her family and friends. Another “squeaker” of a Do you have 40 or 50 ball game with Gonzaga but this point pens lying around in time Portland didn’t come drawers, containers etc. and out the winner, but Memphis possibly six of them work? overcame them at the last you remember when you THIS & THAT Do minute, and won. could buy universal refills I was surprised to see the Joyce Emry for them? Try and find one obituary of Victor Noel in the today… and when you do, let paper last week. My husband me know. and Victor were neighbors, moving to I remember, back in my high school the same locale, in 1935. Clayton had a days, when neon colored socks became bicycle and Victor had a horse, and they popular, (ugly) and now the sports shoes used to race, when they were little boys are being trimmed with all kinds of iriand how many times, over the years, descent colors, and I still don’t like them. have I heard them laugh about that. Do you sometimes get so bogged Condolences go out to the family. down with your house work, you don’t It’s no wonder business isn’t as brisk know where to begin, and so you just as it once was. Any time you try to reach don’t, and determine that “next week” a businessperson on the telephone, you would be a better day to start that projget a recording that tells you to punch a ect?” And then you’ve gained a whole bunch of buttons. If and when a human day to do something more interesting, finally comes on the line, you learn the like read a new book, or re-read a favorbusiness person is either out to lunch or ite old one. The word for that is procrasin conference. tination, and I use that word much too Another of Oroville’s longtime resi- often! dents, Jean Curtis, passed away at So many folks ask me about Bob North Valley Care Center, Tonasket, last Hirst…. First of all, I guess I’d say he’s Thursday. The Curtis family was noted a “tough ole’ bird.” He has had so many for the fine horses they owned, trained health issues, been in and out (mostly and showed and they had a lot of ribbons in) the hospital the past several months, for their efforts. I think Jean was most and I think he has occupied most of the happy when she was in the saddle of one available beds, and he just never gives

WASHINGTON, DC — The Alliance for Aviation Across America today commended Mayor Chuck Spieth of Oroville, Wash. for proclaiming February “General Aviation Appreciation Month.” In Washington, the general aviation industry represents $3.18 billion in economic activity annually. The Dorothy Scott Municipal Airport has an annual economic impact of $3.1 million and supports 51 local jobs. “This proclamation recognizes the vast benefits of general aviation to local communities and cities such as Oroville. The Dorothy Scott Municipal Airport provides vital services to the area, includ-

ing agricultural spraying, medical transport, and civil air patrol,” said Selena Shilad, Executive Director of the Alliance for Aviation Across America. “We extend our gratitude to Mayor Spieth for his dedication to raising awareness of this important industry.” Formed in 2007, the Alliance for Aviation Across America is a non-profit, non-partisan coalition of more than 6,300 individuals representing businesses, agricultural groups, FBO’s, small airports, elected officials, charitable organizations, and leading business and aviation groups that support the interest of the general aviation community across various public policy issues.

Ice Fishing Festival this weekend BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The big Winter Ice Fishing Festival is just days away. This is a family affair and there’s something for everyone, starting with a Pancake Breakfast from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. You can register at the Grange Hall or at the Sidley Lake Office starting at 7 a.m. The big new event this year is the Pine Box Derby. You can use your car from your childhood or purchase a kit for a new one at the Camaray Motel in town. The race will be held in the Grange Hall at 3 p.m. If you don’t want to enter you can be there to watch. All day you can enjoy the Arts

in to “stuff” that happens to him. I’m sure he fights so hard to be well enough to beat me at another game of pinochle. Seriously, this broken arm/shoulder has really taken its toll on him but you can only keep a “fighter” down so long and last Friday he was able to take some steps, (with a walker and assistance) and for him that was success. So, hopefully he’ll continue in that positive direction and then we’ll put him in a glass cage where we can keep track of him. Keep him and Margaret in your thoughts and prayers. At the United Methodist Church are many 8 track tapes. Yes, I know they are very outdated, but if there is anyone out there that collects them, (for old time’s sake) they are being offered for free. Then we’ll have more space in the storage shed, to collect something else. If you’re interested call (509) 476-2458, Shirley Moser or you could call me, (509) 476-3353. Then on Wednesday, March 5, Wednesday, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. there will be a Red Cross Blood Draw, at the United Methodist Church. It’s a month away, but March 14 is the date of the Oroville Scholarship Foundation (formerly Dollars for Scholars) Variety Show and Silent Auction, to be held at the OHS Commons. Mark it on your calendar. Verne and Noreen Harness are missed in the community, since they’ve moved to 524 N. Ely St. Apt. A2, Kennewick, WA. 99336. No one is in charge of your happiness except you! Happy Valentine’s Day.

HILLTOP COMMENTS and Crafts tables from local vendors. Best of all you can visit with old friends or make some new ones. For more info call Robin Stice at (509) 485 4002. There will be Dog Sled Demonstrations from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. (Editor’s Note: Although as of Tuesday, it looks like there may not be enough snow for the rides, but the dogs will be there for demonstrations, according to Oroville Chamber President Clyde Andrews.) The place to be on Saturday, Feb. 15 is Molson, see you there. Don’t forget to purchase your raffle tickets and win a great prize

That old Ground Hog must have been right - we have had more snow but, it is suppose to warm up at bit into the teens and twenties. Hang in there, Spring will be here sooner or later. I am ready for sooner. That is after the Ice Fishing Festival. BINGO will again be on the third Friday (Feb. 21) of the month at 6 p.m. at the Grange Hall in Molson. The cost is $10 for your cards. Bring your neighbors and your friends. This is a night for the entire family. Here are the winners for the Pinochle players on Monday, Feb. 3 with 27 players attending. Men - High - Ken Ripley and Rodney Field.; the Low - Ed Craig and Ladies - High - Danny Wietrick and the Low - Dolly Engelbretson. Traveling went to Marilyn Cross.


FEBRUARY 13, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life COMMUNITY CALENDAR at the “back door;” $10 adult, $5 Weed Office at (509) 422-7165, Blues Band to or stop by the office, Room 102 in child, $25 family. the County Courthouse. Perform at Winery Father Daughter OROVILLE – The Randy OSF Variety Show Battle Blues Band will perform Dance

A Fine & Pleasant Misery play OROVILLE - Oroville Chamber of Commerce sponsors the Patrick McManus Show “A Fine and Pleasant Misery on Saturday, Feb. 14 at Oroville High School at 7 p.m. There is also a 50’s Dance at Vicki’s Back Door Club to support Community Schools.

NW Ice Fishing Festival MOLSON - The Northwest Ice Fishing Festival will be Saturday, Feb. 15 at Molson and Sidley Lakes. Tourney starts at 7 a.m., register at Sidley Lake office. Other activities include pancake feed at Grange Hall, Dog Sled Demos, Pinewood Derby, arts and crafts, raffles & baked Goods.

Grange Flea Market Cancelled OROVILLE - This month’s Oroville Grange Flea Market, which had been scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 15, has been cancelled. It will resume next month on the third Saturday.

‘It’s Now or Never’ with the King OROVILLE – Saturday, Feb. 15, is the date, 6 p.m. is the time and Project 3:16 is the band! This is the Third Annual 50’s Dance presented by North Valley Community Schools. Contests for Best Era Costume, Best Dancers, Best Hoola-hoopers and Best Yo-yoers. Food galore and beverages available. An ice cream bar with the best banana splits you’ll ever experience. Best of all, Elvis is coming! This event is for every one of every age. It all happens at Vicki’s Back Door Club on Main Street in Oroville. Tickets sold

Chewelah dinner to help with Honor Flights By Justin Peterson INLAND NW Honor Flights VOLUNTEER

My name is Justin Peterson, I am an eighth grader on a mission. Four and a half years ago I did a non-graded school project on World War Two. As part of this project I wrote a paper on World War Two and had the honor of interviewing and sharing the stories of ten local WWII Vets with my community. I also raised money for Inland Northwest Honor Flight by speaking at meetings in town, writing letters like this one, holding a change drive, and a Taco/Nacho feed. My original goal was to raise $600, enough money to send one Veteran to D.C. Generous donations from all over helped me to raise $4300 and send 15 Veterans to D.C. on a deserving trip with donated Southwest Airlines plane tickets. I have decided to continue to raise money for this wonderful organization to ensure that all the Veterans who would like to go to Washington D.C., can. I have hosted six more Nacho Feed dinners in two towns since then. With everyone’s help I passed my initial goal and have now raised and secured donations of over $66,000 sending close to 100 Veterans on an Honor Flight! In July of 2011 and again in May of 2013I was honored with the opportunity to travel to D.C. on and Honor Flight with a group of Veterans as a guardian. These trips helped me to see just how important my work is, and just how much this honor means to our military heroes. My new goal is to raise $100,000 by the time I graduate from high school. Inland Northwest Honor Flight is an organization that sends our WWII, Korean War and terminally ill Veterans of all

OROVILLE - Father Daughter Dance for girls ages Pre-K to 6th grade and their father figure (bring your dad, uncle, brother, grandfather or friend) on Saturday, Feb. 15 from 7 - 9 p.m. at the OHS Commons. There will be sweets and light refreshments along with lots of dancing and music. Tickets are by donation at the door all proceeds will benefit Oroville PTO. Pictures will be available for an additional cost. Come enjoy a night to remember, all are welcome!

OROVILLE - The Oroville Scholarship Foundation’s annual Variety Show and Silent Auction fundraiser will be Friday, March 14 at OHS Coulton Auditorium. Those that would like to participate in the variety show are encouraged to contact Oroville Music Director Eric Stiles at the high school, (509) 476-361 or email him at eric.stiles@oroville. wednet.edu. To donate auction items you may call G. Hauenstein at (509) 476-2416 or Terri Barker at (509) 476-3145.

Molson Family Bingo

Tonasket Food Bank

MOLSON - Family Bingo Night is Friday, Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. Come and enjoy, bring a friend and snacks to share. Children are welcome, this is a fun night. We have fun and have snacks at the break at half time.

Heart to Heart Tonasket Free Methodist Church will be hosting Heart to Heart, a women’s evening of praise, worship and fellowship, on Thursday, Feb. 27. The church is located at 1 Stanton Loop Road, Tonasket, just up the Havillah Rd. from the high school softball field. Social begins at 6:30 p.m. with the event starting at 7 p.m.. Jen Willson, recently returned from a long-term mission to Malawi, Africa, will be the speaker. Contact Pat Richey (509) 486-4680 or Kristi Hutchins (509) 486-2910 for more information.

Backpack Sprayer Calibration OKANOGAN The Okanogan County Noxious Weed Control Board will be holding a Calibration Class for backpack sprayers and ATV’s on Thursday, April 17. We need a minimum of 20 participants in order to hold the class, so pre-registration by March 1 is required. In the class you will learn how to calibrate your sprayer, figure out how much product your sprayer is actually putting out per acre and practice calculating application rates or how much product you need to put in your sprayer based on label recommendations. There will be a $5 charge for the class, and possibly several pesticide license credits will be available. For more info call the Noxious

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

The Gazette-Tribune

OMAK – Two Omak residents were arrested on drug charges at a residence near Omak High School, according to Frank Rogers, Okanogan County Sheriff. The North Central Washington

OCSO/submitted photo

Jared James Morris

Narcotics Task Force with the assistance of the Omak Police Department executed a search warrant at 4 North Fir Street in Omak on Wednesday, Feb. 5 at around 10 p.m. Arrested at the residence was Jared James Paul Morris, 22 of Omak. Morris was arrested for two counts of delivery of a controlled substance, heroin and two counts of delivery of a controlled substance, heroin within 1000 feet of a school and one count of possession of heroin with the intent to deliver. “One of the transactions actually took place in the Omak High school parking lot,” said Sheriff Rogers. “During the search of Morris’ residence they also located heroin, scales, packaging materials and cash. Unknown amounts of drugs or cash that was recovered at this time.” A short time later, with the assistance of the Tribal Police Department the Task Force also arrested Jesse Leander

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 4762386.

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

wars on all-expenses paid trips to Washington D.C. to see the memorials built in their honor. The program started with focus on WWII Heroes, and last year began honoring Korean War Veterans. As time goes on, they program will naturally transition to Vietnam War Veterans. The average cost to send a Veteran is now $900 which includes airfare, meals, hotel and transportation. So far over 600 WWII and Korean Veterans have gone to D.C. since the first flight in November 2009, with Veterans still on the waiting list right now. Because INWHF relies solely on donations, every bit really does

OCSO/submitted photo

Jesse Leander Abrahamson

Your Complete Eyecare Centre

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

count. This March 8, I will be having the 5th Annual INWHF Nacho Dinner at the American Legion Post #54 in Chewelah. I am writing to invite you and those you know to come. There is no set price, we are just asking for donations. We will also have a raffle for a night at the Davenport Hotel. Tickets are only sold at the dinner. If you are unable to attend, I would appreciate it if you would consider making a donation to this wonderful organization. I also ask that you please tell all your friends and neighbors to help me get the word out. Please contact me with any questions by email, FB message, or give me a call. And take a look at my website, you can buy wristbands and hatpins there and can even donate with a credit card. Thank you for helping me to help our Veterans. I look forward to seeing you on March 8.

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

WATERFRONT

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

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eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

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A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

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Developmental Disabilities Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

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In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

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24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

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HEALTH CARE

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MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

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1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health

(509) 826-8496

INLAND NW HONOR FLIGHTS

Abrahamson, 19 of Omak, for one count of delivery of a controlled substance, heroin within 1000 feet of a school. Abrahamson was present during the drug deal in Omak School parking lot. Both Morris and Abrahamson were booked into the Okanogan County Jail.

Oroville Food Bank

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

for the first of February’s concerts at Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday, Feb. 6. The following Thursday, Feb. 13 will see Ruby Rust on stage to set the stage for Valentine’s Day, followed by Sunny Lanigan on Thursday, Feb. 20. Doors open at 6 pm. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

NW Drug Task Force arrests two for heroin

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 13, 2014

SCHOOLS

Reading Corps opening doors to literacy at Oroville Elementary Students designing posters to look like book covers for classroom doors for the Washington Reading Corp literacy event. With high attendance by families on Jan. 29 and a lot of hard work, all of the posters were finished. Later the students were allowed to choose one free book.

BY ADELINE SYLVESTER AMERICORP MEMBER

Brent Baker/staff photo

Winners of the Tonasket Elementary School Spelling Bee last week were (front center) Kara Willson, 1st place; (left) Malia Whitmore, 2nd place; and (right) Cody Stirek, 3rd place. Superintendent Paul Turner (top left) and TES Principal Jeremy Clark administered the contest.

Kara Willson w-i-n-s TES Spelling Bee BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket Elementary School held its first Grade 1-5 Spelling Bee on Friday, Feb. 7. Class champions competed in the tournament in the school’s library, with many of their classmates able to watch via computer from their classrooms. While the competition included all grades together, the school champion and runner-up advancing to regionals in Wenatchee had to be in fourth or fifth grade. “It was brand new to do school wide,” said TES Principal Jeremy Clark, who judged the competition with Superintendent Paul Turner. “It’s a great opportunity to have an academic-based competition for the kids. I twas neat to get the younger kids competing with the older students. It’s a good opportunity for everybody.” Clark said that some of the tournament rules had changed from recent years, when multiple students from area schools would compete in a county-wide spelling bee to determine regional qualifiers. Now, one fourth or fifth grade entry from each school moves on. Once the dust had settled and the words had all been spelled (or

not), fourth grader Kara Willson emerged as the winner, with Malia Whitmore taking second and Cody Stirek finishing third. The first several rounds included words that the kids had previously studied, such as “bloviate” and “murderous.” Competitors could ask for definitions or to hear the words used in a sentence. It took eight rounds to cut the field from 18 down to three, with a couple of the first graders outlasting some of their older competitors.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Knowledge Bowl team includes (front row, l-r) Leighanne Barnes, Dalton Smith, Levi Schell, Kahlil Butler, Tawan Murray, Thomas Kennedy, (back) Nick Jelinek, Alex Mershon, coach Susan McCue and Cheyan Kinkade. Not pictured is Allison Glanzer.

Prepping for Regionals Tonasket Knowledge Bowl team seeks another state trip BY BRENT BAKER

Moses Lake. The Tonasket RoboTigers, as they call themselves, programmed and designed a LEGO robot that scored points for completing several “missions” on a thematic obstacle course. The RoboTigers also demonstrated their skills in mechanical design, project presentation and team work/core values in front of a panel of judges. The RoboTigers were judged “exemplary” in the areas of team work and mechanical design, and even took home a trophy for “Best Strategy and Innovation” for their robot

OROVILLE HONOR ROLL CORRECTION FRESHMEN 4.0

Courtnee Kallstrom (4.00)

SUPERINTENDENT (3.75-3.99) Yessica Nemecio.

In addition to working with all grade levels, members also help in HOSTS, which stands for Help One Student To Succeed. HOSTS is a program that brings in volunteers from the community to work one on one with students in a guided half-hour session to gain reading skills. If you are interested in helping out with this program, we could always use the extra help in the HOSTS program for half an hour a week or more. In addition, volunteers are always welcome to help where and when they can. Please call the school at (509) 476-3332. As the year goes by, significant growth has been seen in students who are served by this program, as well as the ones served in HOSTS. We are currently in the process of planning our second and last literacy event of the year and are hoping to see another great turn out!

The final few rounds featured words that seemed a little less challenging, but had not been included on study lists. “Jargon” and “signify” tripped up the other finalists, while Kara Willson correctly spelled “secure” to wrap up the top spot. Willson and Whitmore advance to regional competition in Wenatchee. Regional winners advance to the state finals, with the potential of qualifying for the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, D.C.

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

LEGO Robotics team heads to state semis TONASKET - Tonasket Middle School’s LEGO Robotics team placed fourth at the First LEGO League Qualifying tournament at Central Washington University on Saturday, Feb. 1. Their victory earned them a spot at the state semi-finals, where they will compete against teams from all over eastern Washington. The tournament will be hosted by Chief Moses Middle School in

assist reading specialist Mary Willey by staffing a reading intervention classroom. This classroom works intensively with students on a specific skill for 30 minutes a day, until they can reach the goal set for their grade level; once they are able to reach and maintain their goal, they are graduated and another student is entered into the program. This takes place during the school day, but before and after school services are offered as well. Before school starts and in the first session of the day, reading homework help for k-2 is offered for students who need extra help or who haven’t completed their homework. After school, there is a homework help and book study program for grades three through six; there are three 20-minute rotations – students go from working on homework to reading a book as a group to completing an activity related to the reading.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Submitted photo

AMERICORPS VISTA, TONASKET SCHOOLS

Submitted photo

Spelling Bee contestants, ranging from first to fifth grade, expressed a bit of nervousness in their own ways prior to last Friday’s competition at Tonasket Elementary School.

The Tonasket Middle School LEGO Robotics team, which qualified for the state semifinals, includes (in no particular order) includes Arrora Thomas, Kallysta Ray, Brianna Gutierrez, Levi Silverthorn, Zeke Silverthorn, Zach Clark, Mitchell Fitzthum and Adam Steinshouer.

SUBMITTED BY MICHELE GIOVIA, WOMEN IN STEM PROGRAM COORDINATOR

OROVILLE - With gray skies and cold weather typical of January, we find ways to keep ourselves upbeat and optimistic through the long winter months. At Oroville Elementary, classroom decorations are one way of doing just that. On Jan. 29, families came to a Washington Reading Corps (WRC) literacy event to help create decorations for classroom doors, designing posters to look like book covers. With high attendance and a lot of hard work, all of the posters were finished. Once a family finished with their project, they moved to the hallway for each student to choose one free book, courtesy of the Page Ahead Foundation. Helpful school volunteers and current WRC members staffed this event. Washington Reading Corps (WRC) is part of the national AmeriCorps program, which is now celebrating its 20th anniversary. There are currently over 80,000 members across the United States in service, with over 500 managed by the Washington Service Corps. Out of the existing programs in our state, Washington Reading Corps is the only one that focuses solely on education, providing small group tutoring in specific reading skills. This year, Oroville Elementary is one of a small number of schools in Washington that has Reading Corps members. The members at Oroville Elementary this year, Nathan Haney and Adeline Sylvester,

PRINCIPAL (3.50- 3.74 )

Narya Naillon, Nathan Hugus, Sandra Hilstad, Ryan Marcolin.

MERIT (3.49-3.00)

Liliana Nava, Phoebe Poynter, Lindsey McKinney, Brentt Kallstrom, Jennifer Vazquez, Palton Johnson, Itzell Castillo-Diaz.

design. The team of eight seventh and eighth grade students was the only team in the region to advance to the semi-finals. The students are excited to represent North Central Washington at next Saturday’s tournament. The team, coached by THS high school science teacher Emily Bjelland and AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer Michele Giovia, includes Arrora Thomas, Kallysta Ray, Brianna Gutierrez, Levi Silverthorn, Zeke Silverthorn, Zach Clark, Mitchell Fitzthum and Adam Steinshouer.

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TONASKET - Tonasket’s Knowledge Bowl team has made three straight trips to the state finals. This year’s team is looking to make it four-for-four as they gear up for regional competition on Chelan on Feb. 19. “This year we’re placing really well in the meets,” said Knowledge Bowl coach Susan McCue. “We’ve placed first twice and second twice; the times we’ve finished second we’ve actually beaten the first place team. “We’re hopeful we’ll go to state this year. There are some pretty tough teams: Okanogan and Cascade our toughest rivals.” A bonus this year has been the strength of the JV and freshman teams, which at one point finished seventh in a 22-team competition. “They’ve done extremely One Call • One Bill • Statewide

well,” McCue said. “They’ve always been in the upper half of the pack.” Competition includes three rounds of questions that teams compete to answer accurately and more quickly than their opponents. Three teams compete together in each round and scores are cumulative throughout the whole competition. The varsity regulars have included Levi Schell, Kahlil Butler, Nick Jelinek and Dalton Smith. Schell, who was on each of the previous three state finals teams, specializes in geography, history and chemistry, and has done well with questions about English this year as well. Smith’s strengths are math, technology and general knowledge; Jelinek is strong in literature, English, chemistry and science; and Butler specializes in

312 S. Whitcomb

astronomy and general science. The JV team includes Alex Mershon, Leighanne Barnes and Allison Glanzer, while Thomas Kennedy, Tawan Murray and Cheyan Kinkade make up the freshman squad. The regional and state team, however, will include six members, and McCue said she is facing some tough choices. “That’s the most difficult thing as a coach,” she said. “I have so many highly qualified people. There are a lot of factors that go into determining who goes.” Three years ago the Tonasket team finished eighth at state; two years ago the Tigers were fourth and last year they didn’t place. State finals, if they qualify, are March 22 in Arlington. But along with wanting to improve on that performance, the team is focusing on a number of the same things emphasized in athletic competition. “We started this year emphasizing good sportsmanship,” McCue said. “It doesn’t matter how accomplished you are if you don’t present yourself in a top notch way. This team has done that.”

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FEBRUARY 13, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A9

Cops & Courts Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

Sandra Rose Moses, 27, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 4 to second-degree theft. Moses was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the March 21, 2013 crime. She was also ordered to pay restitution in the amount of $1,575 to Moon Security of Spokane and $203 to Friendship Diversion Services of Okanogan. Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 30, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 4 to second-degree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree theft. McCraigie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $1110.50 for the Oct. 21, 2013 crimes. David Jason Harder, 42, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Feb. 4 to two separate charges of second-degree burglary, both occurring on Sept. 24, 2013. Harder was sentenced to nine months in jail for the crimes, and fined $2,221. Eli Paul Vanbrunt, 29, Riverside, pleaded guilty Feb. 5 to seconddegree theft. Vanbrunt was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the Dec. 22, 2011 crime. He was also ordered to pay $1,074.85 in restitution to Wal-Mart. In an unrelated case, Vanbrunt also pleaded guilty Feb. 5 to third-degree theft. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended and credit for 35 days served. That sentence is to run concurrent with the above crime. Vanbrunt was fined $1,010.50 and ordered to pay $92.03 in restitution to Wal Mart. A second-degree burglary charge was dismissed. That crime occurred June 25, 2012. Myron Robert John, 23, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 5 to thirddegree assault. John was sentenced to eight months in jail and fined $1,210.50 for the March 22, 2012 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for April 15. In an unrelated case, John pleaded guilty Feb. 5 to POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with credit for 90 days served, and fined $1,010.50 for the Mar. 18, 2013 crime. The court dismissed Feb. 3 two charges again Nicholas Guiterrez Lopez, 56, Okanogan: attempted second-degree rape and fourthdegree assault. The charges were dismissed without prejudice. The court declined Jan. 27 to press first-degree criminal trespass charges against Gordon Lester Dick Jr., Omak. The case was transmitted to Okanogan County District Court. The court found probable cause to charge Donald Lee Thomas, 58, Tonasket, with POCS (methamphetamine) with intent to deliver, POCS (heroin) with intent to deliver, and five counts of possession of a legend drug with intent to deliver. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 26 in Okanogan. The court found probable cause to charge Shanyce Rachel Rodriguez, 20, Oroville, with firstdegree burglary, second-degree assault, third-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 25 near Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Dylan Thomas James Counts, 19, Okanogan, with second-degree burglary, seconddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 26 in Okanogan. The court found probable cause to charge Jacob Ryan Atkinson, 18, Omak, with five counts of second-degree malicious mischief and 12 counts of third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 27 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Patrick Dale Bilby, 21, Omak, with five counts of second-degree malicious mischief and 12 counts of third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 27 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Wendall George, 44, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine). The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 30 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Michelle Lynn Carden, 25, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine) with intent to deliver, unlawful possession of a legend drug and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 30 in Oroville.

Juvenile

A 15-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Jan. 29 to two separate charges of MIP/C. The boy was sentenced to a total of nine days in detention with credit for nine days served, and fined a total of $200. The crimes occurred Oct. 28 and Dec. 27, both 2013. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Jan. 29 to third-degree theft and four counts of second-degree vehicle prowling. He was sentenced to four days in detention with credit for four days served,

and fined $100. A restitution hearing was scheduled for March 26. The crimes occurred Nov. 26, 2013. In a separate case, the same boy was found guilty (deferred disposition revoked) Jan. 29 to four counts of third-degree theft, six counts of second-degree vehicle prowling, and one count each of second-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The boy was sentenced to 30 days in detention with credit for 30 days served, and fined $100. Those crimes occurred April 18, 2013. A 16-year-old Riverside boy pleaded guilty Feb. 5 to theft of a motor vehicle, second-degree DWLS and POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). The boy was sentenced to 15-36 weeks in a state detention facility with credit for nine days served, and fined $100. The crimes occurred Nov. 16, 2013. A 15-year-old Okanogan girl pleaded guilty Feb. 5 to third-degree theft. She was sentenced to two days in detention and fined $100 for the Nov. 11, 2013 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for April 30. In a separate case, the same girl was found guilty (deferred disposition revoked) of harassment (threats to kill) DV, fourth-degree assault (DV) and resisting arrest. She was sentenced to five days in detention with credit for five served, and fined $100. Those crimes occurred Sept. 4, 2013. A 14-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Feb. 5 to third-degree theft and MIP/C. The girl was sentenced to seven days in jail with credit for seven days served, and fined $100 for the Nov. 4, 2013 crimes. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Feb. 5 to third-degree theft. The boy was sentenced to eight days in detention with credit for eight days served, and fined $100 for the Sept. 18, 2013 crime.

District Court

Nora Marlen Ariana Figueroa, 23, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Crystal Gail Fletcher, 33, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Fletcher received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. She also had an addition thirddegree DWLS charge dismissed. Michaella Jean Flores, 31, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and two counts of third-degree DWLS. Flores was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $2,444. Lee Andrew Gardee, 42, Omak, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Gardee was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Gary William Gerlinger, 72, Omak, had two charges dismissed: POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams) and use of drug paraphernalia. Gerlinger was fined $400. Bernardo Ortiz Godinez, 34, Tonasket, guilty of DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Godinez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 214 days suspended, and fined $2,881. Tanya Paige Hayner, 25, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Hayner was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $858. Mark Stuart Helberg, 44, Tonasket, guilty on two counts of thirddegree DWLS. Helberg received a 90-day suspended sentence and was fined $636. James Douglas Hires, 50, Tonasket, had a DUI charge dismissed. Hires was fined $1,425. Duke Holst, no middle name listed, 40, Tonasket, guilty of violating a no-contact order. Holst was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $258. Tiffany Pauline Irey, 33, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Irey received a 90-day suspended sentence and was fined $858. Jayme Erica Israel, 45, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Israel was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 135 days suspended, and fined $808. Monte Ray Jane, 51, Omak, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Jane was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $1,716. Stephanie Renee Judd, 22, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Judd received a 180-day suspended sentence and was fined $1,358. Roy Garrett King, 26, Oroville, had a DUI charge dismissed. Michael Christopher Leavell, 48, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: outdoor burning of prohibited substances. Faith Ann Lezard, 20, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Lezard was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 165 days suspended, and fined $768. Noel Lockett, 46, Oroville, guilty on two counts of second-degree criminal trespass. Lockett was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $1,216. Lockett also had a charge dismissed: violation of a nocontact order. Lyle Zachary Long, 28, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Feb. 3, 2014 Domestic dispute on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Burglary on W. Broadway St. in Conconully. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Juniper St. in Oroville. Theft on S. Locust St. in Tonasket. Vehicle theft on W. Third Ave. in Tonasket. Leroy Joseph Zacherle, 45, booked for DUI, first-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation. Shane M. Heisey, 28, booked for POCS (heroin) and two counts of POCS (methamphetamine). Carl Edward Morris, 33, booked for disorderly conduct. Julie McWilliams-Hurst, 55, booked for negligent driving and POCS. Richard Joseph Cobos, 21, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree theft. Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014 Domestic dispute on Ponderosa Rd. near Tonasket. Fraud on Talkire Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on River Overlook St. near Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Drugs on Engh Rd. in Omak. Anthony Abraham Grand-Louis, 43, booked for disorderly conduct and obstruction. Mechelle Maxine Haley, 41, booked for violation of a no-contact order. Madison Leigh Louie, 27, booked for first-degree trafficking in stolen property and second-degree burglary. Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 Trespassing on Valley St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Snow blower reported missing. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Check fraud on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Credit card fraud on Fir St. in Oroville. Juvenile problem on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Firearms on Central Ave. in Oroville. Fraud on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Threats on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Structure fire on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Tiffeney Marie Olson, 33, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), thirddegree DWLS and possession of drug paraphernalia. Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014 Domestic dispute on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Assault on Mill St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Monroe St. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Holmes Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Warrant arrest on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Jared James Paul Morris, 22, booked on two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (heroin), two counts of delivery of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a school zone, POCS (heroin) with intent to deliver, and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Jesse L. Abrahamson, 19, booked for delivery of a controlled substance (heroin) and delivery of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a school zone. Michaella Jean Flores, 31, court commitment for third-degree theft and POCS (methamphetamine). Juan Manuel Medina, 19, court commitment for use of drug

paraphernalia. John Douglas Gelvin, 58, booked on two counts of fourth-degree assault (DV) and interfering with reporting (DV). Kyle Albert Cantlon, 21, booked for second-degree burglary, seconddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Friday, Feb. 7, 2014 Burglary on Skyview Dr. in Omak. Assault on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Lakeview Heights Dr. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Copple Rd. near Omak. Drugs on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. DWLS on Engh Rd. in Omak. DWLS on Main St. in Oroville. Threats on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Cash reported missing. Rueben Edward Miller, 22, court commitment for DUI. Destiny Delores Dill, 42, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Dia Marie Gardner, 38, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Carla Jean Agapith, 42, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for firstdegree DWLS. Peter Larson Ekblad, 44, booked for third-degree DWLS. Lazelda Marie Foster, 19, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 DWLS on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. DWLS on N. Van Duyn St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. Country Vue Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Vehicle window reported smashed. Malicious mischief on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Building reported egged. Assault on Koala Ave. in Omak. Victor A. Pamatz Valencia, 24, booked for DUI. Jess Davis Lamoreaux, 28, booked for DUI and possession of a legend drug without a prescription. Wayne Morris McGhee, 65, booked on an Omak Police Department OMAK THEATER FTA warrant for DUI and an OCSO FTA warrant Starts Fridayfor seconddegree DWLS. BrandonCONTAGION Michael Paisley, 30,PG booked 13 for third-degree DWLS.

Recreation Fee on National Forest for President’s Day

10 essentials for safer trip to the forest Submitted by Nancy Jones Okanogan-Wenatchee Nat’L Forest

OKANOGAN - The public may visit many federal recreation day-use sites on the Presidents’ Day weekend holiday–Saturday, Feb. 15 - Monday, Feb. 17, 2014– without paying a fee. The fee-free day honors America’s presidents, especially George Washington and Abraham Lincoln whose birthdays are Feb. 22 and Feb. 12. The fee waiver applies to day-use fees at Forest Service recreation sites in Oregon and Washington. This includes many picnic areas, boat launches, trailheads and visitor centers. Concession operations will continue to charge fees unless the permit holder wishes to participate. Fees for camping, cabin rentals, heritage expeditions or other permits will not be waived. Before heading to the woods for any type of recreation, be sure to carry the “10 Essentials” with you.  The “10 Essentials” is a list of vital safety items that should be carried by anyone recreating in the woods.  The list is a good starting point, but recreationists should add to the list depending on where they are going and what they will be doing.

FOREST OFFIÇE INFO: Chelan Ranger District, 428 W. Woodin Ave., Chelan, WA 98816; (509) 682-4900; hours M-F 7:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Cle Elum Ranger District, 803 W. 2nd Street, Cle Elum, WA 98922; (509) 852-1100; hours M-F 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; closed for lunch 12:30 to 1:15 p.m. Entiat Ranger District, physical address 2108 Entiat Way, (P.O. Box 476), Entiat, WA 98822; (509) 784-4700; hours M-F 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Methow Valley Ranger District, 24 West Chewuch Road, Winthrop, WA 98862; (509) 9964000; hours M-F 7:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

THE 10 ESSENTIALS: 1. “Strike-anywhere” matches. Matches weigh noth- Naches Ranger District, 10237 ing and can easily fit in Hwy. 12, Naches, WA 98937; your pocket. (509) 653-1401; hours 8 a.m.2. Fire starter. Always 4:30 p.m.; closed for lunch noon include fire starter with to 12:30 p.m. matches. Fire starter assures that you can get Okanogan Valley Office, 1240 fire going quickly, no South Second Ave., Okanogan, matter how bad the con- WA 98840; (509) 826-3275; ditions. Be sure to carry hours M- F 7:30-4 p.m.; closed the waterproof matches, for lunch 11 a.m. to noon striker, and fire starter in a waterproof case in your Okanogan-Wenatchee National pocket. Forest Headquarters office, 215 3. Map Melody Lane, Wenatchee, WA 4.  Compass 98801; (509) 664-9200; hours 1065. MIN F Flashlight with extra bat- M-F 7:45-4:30 and extra bulb, since STARRING MATT DAMON,teries KATE days are short and night Tonasket Ranger District, 1 W. Sunday,WINSLET, Feb. 9, 2014 JUDE LAW & GWYNETH Winesap, Tonasket, WA 98855; comes quickly. DWLS PALTROW on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Assault on Engh Rd. in Omak. 6. Extra food. Food helps (509) 486-2186; hours M-F 7:45 FRIon7:00 Trespassing River9:30 Ave. in Okanoward off hypothermia in a.m.-4:30 p.m. gan. cold, wet weather, and it - Fri. April 21 - 22 SAT * W. 4:15 7:00 Structure fire on Third St. in9:30 Please note that wehelps you think clearly in Thurs. Wenatchee River Ranger will be returning Tonasket. Residence was empty. CAPTAIN AMERICA: District, 600 Sherbourne, SUN 4:15 a crisis. to21, our Regular The Cameron Blake*Emery, court JUSTIN NARNIA: FIRST A7:00 VENGER Starring Vince Vaughn & Kevin JamesWA 98826; (509) BIEBER Showtimes on 7. Extra clothing. Rain jack- Leavenworth, commitment for DUI. September 8th. WKDAYS 7:00 548-2550; M-F 8 otherwise a.m.-4:30 Amber Rae Erks, 22, booked for et, wool hat, gloves, etc.  Summer Showtimes: hours 7 & 9pm nightly (unless stated) fourth-degree assault (DV), thirdWearing layers of clothing p.m. degree DWLS and an ignition is also a good idea. 14’ interlock violation.THEATER MIRAGE 8. Sunglasses. These are At the especially important in Key: CRAZY STUPID LOVE PG 13 118country where the snow MIN Under SC the Influence DUI - Driving glare off the snow can DWLS/R - Driving While License Oliver, B.C. 250-498-2277 WITH STEVE CARELL, RYAN Suspended/Revoked cause snow blindness. Reg. Showtimes: Sun.-Mon.-Tue.-Thur. 7:30pm. Fri. & Sat. 7 & 9pm JULIANNE9. MOORE POSC -GOSLING Possession of a & Controlled First aid kit Thurs. Fri. Sat. 14’ Substance 10. Pocket knife PhILOMEna Sept. 8 - 9 - 10 7:00 9:40 MIP/C FRI - Minor in Possession/ConFri. &13-14 Sat. at 7:00 & 9:10 p.m. ThUrs. - Fri,. Feb. sumption SAT *4:00 7:00Vehicle 9:40 For winter travel, it is a good TMVWOP - Taking a Motor FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS idea to carry additional tools and Sun. - Mon. - Tues. - Wed. - Thur. Sept. 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 without Owner’s Permission SUN *4:00 7:00 saT.-sUn.-mOn.-TUes. CLOSED (re-opens Sept. 16) DV - Domestic Violence equipment in your vehicle.  In FTA - Failure to Appear (on a waraddition to the 10 essentials listed Feb. 15-16-17-18 Fri. - Sat. Sept 16 - 17 WKDAYS 7:00 Matinee of this show on the rant) above, you’ll also want to carry a shOwTimes On saT. Sat. at 2 p.m.All seats $4.50 FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine 7&9:30pm for matinee. G Starts Friday cell phone, a space blanket and The Smurfs RP - Reporting Party enough repair supplies to be able OCSO -COLOMBIANA Okanogan County Sheriff’s nEbraska OMAK THEATER PG 13 to 107 SCsnowshoe or ski. fix MIN a broken Officer 509-826-0860  www.omaktheater.com ThUrs. - Fri. Feb. 21-21 DOC - State Department of Correc- STARRING A metal ZOE cup will be needed CONTAGION 106 min ACTION/ DRAMA Matt Damon, Kate Winslet, tions for VARTAN melting snow. If you carry Starring SALDANA & MICHAEL Jack shadOW rEcruIt Jude Law &rYan: Gwyneth Paltrow USBP - U.S. Border Patrol i. a whistle, a plastic one is bet- saT.-sUn.-mOn.-TUes. Starts FrFeb. Fri. 7:00 & 9:30 8-9-10-11 CBP - U.S. Customs and Border FRI 7:15 9:40 Sat.*4:15, 7:00 & 9:30 ter to use in the winter as it Protection Sun. *4:15 & 7:00 PG 13 THEATER ICE - Immigration and 7:15 Customs Wkdays: 7:00 SAT *4:15 9:40 doesn’t freeze to your lips. A OMAK Omak and mirage TheaTers are nOw digiTal The portable shovel is an important Enforcement MIRAGE THEATER | 509-826-0860 www.omaktheater.com

MOVIES Oliver Theatre 12 YEars a sLaVE

SUN *4:15 7:15 WKDAYS 7:15

On Valentine’s Day, Financial Gifts Can Be Sweet!

as appreciated stocks, you may also be able do not sound like the most romantic of THE HELP PG 13 146 MIN F to avoid paying capital gains taxes on the Valentine’s Day presents. And yet, if your Sandra Rasmussen valentine is& alsoVIOLA your spouse, your purchase donated shares. STARRING EMMA STONE DAVIS of life and disability insurance may actually be Financial Advisor IRA contributions — Many people don’t one of the most thoughtful gifts you can give. FRI 7:30 32 N Main St. Suite A contribute the maximum annual amount to Of course, your employer may offer some Omak, WA 98841 their IRA SAT (which, inSUN 2014, is*5:00 $5,500, or8:00 $6,500 life and disability insurance as employee 509-826-1638 if you’re 50 or older). While you can’t directly benefits, but this coverage may be insufficient WKDAYS 7:30 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC contribute to your valentine’s IRA, you can for your needs. After all, if something were to certainly write him or her a check for that happen to you, your insurance may need Reported by Edward Jones to provide enough income to pay off your purpose. Valentine’s Day is almost here. This year, mortgage, send your children to college and instead of sticking with flowers or chocolates Gifts of stock — Like everyone else, your perhaps even help pay for your spouse’s for your valentine, why not give a gift with sweetheart uses a variety of products — and retirement. As for disability insurance, many a future? Specifically, consider making a he or she might enjoy being an “owner” of the employers’ plans are quite limited in what meaningful financial gift. companies that produce these goods. You they provide, so you may need to supplement can help make that happen through gifts of this coverage with a separate policy. And the However, a “meaningful” gift doesn’t gain its stock in these businesses. A financial advisor possibility of incurring a disability, even for a meaning from its size, but rather its impact. can help you through the straightforward short time, may be greater than you think. In What types of financial gifts can have the process of buying stock and transferring it to fact, a 20-year-old worker has a three-in-10 www.gazette-tribune.com greatest effect on the life of your loved one? another person. chance of becoming disabled before reaching Here are a few possibilities: retirement age, according to the Social Debt payment — Consider volunteering Security Administration. Charitable gifts — Your valentine may well to pay your valentine’s car payment, or support the work of a variety of charitable credit card payment, for a month, and then As you can see, you can choose from a range organizations. Why not give to one of them, encouraging him or her to put the savings of financial gifts to brighten Valentine’s Day in the name of your loved one? Not only will to work in an investment. The fewer debts for your loved one. So, consider the ones that you be helping a group that does good work, we have, the more we have to invest for our make the most sense for your valentine and but you may also be able to receive a tax future. start “wrapping them up,” so to speak. deduction for your contribution, assuming the organization qualifies for tax-exempt Life and disability insurance — Quite This article was written by Edward Jones for status. And if you give financial assets, such frankly, life insurance and disability insurance use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

FINANCIAL FOCUS

winter survival tool; with one you can dig snow caves to survive a cold night. Moreover, in avalanche terrain, a shovel is a must. It is nearly impossible to dig someone out of an avalanche without a shovel. Lastly, in avalanche country, always carry an avalanche transceiver along with your shovel. The most important essential, however, is not on the list — it’s common sense. Having the right equipment is one thing, knowing how and when to use it is quite another. Good judgment always makes the difference.

MOnuMEnts MEn 2 hrs. CRAZY STUPID LOVE 118 min

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

Staring Steve Carrell, Ryan Gosling

pg13

aCTiOn/biOgraphY/drama& Julianne Moore Fri. 7:00 & 9:40 13 sTarring geOrgePGClOOneY, Sat. *4:00, 7:00 & 9:40 maTT damOn, billSun. mUrraY *4:00 & 7:00 Wkdays: 7:00 Fri, 6:45, 9:30 saT: *4:00, 6:45, 9:30

sUn.& mOn. : *4:00, 6:45 wkdaYs: 6:45 COLOMBIANA

PG 13 107 min

Action / Drama. Starring Zoe Saldana & Michael Vartan

The

MIRAGE THEATER

Fri. 7:15 & 9:40 Sat. *4:15 7:15 & 9:40 Weekdays: 7:15Theater 101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Sun. *4:15 & 7:15

100min PG 13 146 min THE HELP LEGO MOVIE Starring Emma Stone & Viola Davis pg

animaTiOn/COmedY/aCTiOn Fri. 7:30  Sat. & Sun., *5:00 & 8:00 sTarring willWeekdays: arneTT, 7:30 elizabeTh banks, Craig berrY Adults $7.50 Kids 11-under & *Discount Matinee-kids/adults $5 ea

Fri.children 7:00, 9:30under saT. *4:15, 9:30 unless film is G No age 47:00, admitted sUn.& *4:15,under 7:00 wkdaYs. 7:00to R rated films rated.mOn. No one 17 admitted without their own parent. Photo ID required.

rObOcOP aCTiOn/Crime/sCi Fi

pg13

118min

Weekdays: 7:00 & 9:40

sTarring JOel Waltkinnaman, garY Oldman, miChael keaTOn Disney’s Fri. 6:45, 9:45 saT. *4:00, 6:45, 9:45 sUn. & mOn. *4:00, 6:45 wkdaYs. 6:45

EndLEss LOVE

pg13

103 min

drama/ rOmanCe sTarring gabriella wilde, alex peTTYFer, brUCe greenwOOd Fri. 7:00, 9:45 saT. *4:15, 7:00, 9:45 sUn.& mOn. *4:15, 7:00 wkdaYs. 7:00 Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 13, 2014 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE â&#x20AC;˘ February 13, 2014

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discriminationâ&#x20AC;?. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale

Orville: 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, lake view, nice, clean $750/1st/last/damage. Airport Rd. 509-560-0240

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

TONASKET HOME

Large Home, beautifully landscaped, fenced very private backyard, accents this home in established neighborhood. 2319 sq ft. with 4 bedrooms, 1 ž baths, hobby room, open spacious kitchen, Lots of parking, sprinkler system, all this within walking distances of schools and shopping. Price reduced to $249,500. Call 509-486-2359 for appointment.

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Health General

LITTLE HOUSE on very nice city lot. Poor condition needs lots of work. Seller terms to reliable, able buyer only. Seller is licensed RE Agent. $44,500 Call 509-4762121

For Rent American Legion Housing 1105 Appleway, Oroville

Now Accepting Applications

for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts. 6XEVLGL]HGIRU,QFRPH4XDOLÂżHG+RXVHKROGV z Great Oroville Location z Picnic area z Spacious Floor Plans z On-site laundry z Park-like setting

Call for information and application

509-476-2808 TTY 425-562-4002

NICE APARTMENTS Available, $410 - $650. Located In Oroville And Okanogan. CALL TODAY, You Could Get One Month For FREE! Call Sun Lakes Realty, 509-476-2121

Health General

For Rent

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: Okanogan: Clinical Informatics Specialist â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Full time Dental Hygienist Part time/20 hours per week. Travel between Okanogan, Brewster & Oroville required. MA-R, MA-C, LPN or CNA Full time Registered Dietitian Full time. English/Spanish bilingual preferred. Promotor(a) 4 Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

On Call CMA Oroville & Tonasket Is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

Brewster (Jay Ave.): WIC Peer Counselor Part time/10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Tonasket: MA-R, MA-C, or LPN 1 per diem positions LPN, MA-C or MA-R 0.80 FTE/32 hours per week

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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Crosswords

21. Sanctums in ancient temples

6. 18-wheeler

24. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sesame Streetâ&#x20AC;? watcher

7. Building

25. Computer acronym

8. Sharp ends

28. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;? of ABM

9. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ bitten, twice shyâ&#x20AC;?

30. Blazer, e.g. (acronym)

10. Flight data, briefly

33. Almost boil

11. A load

34. Court figure

13. Involves

36. ___ boom bah!

14. Catch a glimpse of

38. Concurring person of age (2 wds)

17. Salts with I

41. Anger

22. Sampler

42. Military surround and capture

23. Columbus discovery of 1493

43. Start of a refrain (hyphenated)

25. Fungal spore sacs

44. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To ___ is human ...â&#x20AC;?

26. Harshly criticize

46. Very dry, as wine

27. Wicker weaver

47. ___ Peninsula, where Kuala Lumpur is located

29. Beliefs

48. Sun, e.g. 50. Beasts of burden 52. Harpsichord 56. Penn State library

ANSWERS

Across 1. Circus cries 4. ___ line (major axis of an elliptical orbit)

18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flying Down to ___â&#x20AC;?

31. Bar order, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;theâ&#x20AC;? 32. Fancy home 35. Breakfast staple 37. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go!â&#x20AC;?

An Equal Opportunity Employer Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is currently recruiting for Seasonal Firefighter and NRW2 Engine Leader positions. Positions are open until filled. For more information, or to apply please visit our website, www.dnr.wa.gov. If you have further questions (after reviewing our website) contact Heidi Seitters at (509) 684-7474. DNR is an equal opportunity employer.

Firewood NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the sellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the sellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF FEB. 10, 2014 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;make goodâ&#x20AC;?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPTION -HAPPY, loving, stable, professional couple would be thrilled to expand our family and give your baby a secure home. Call Veronica and James 1-800-681-5742 EVENTS-FESTIVALS

63. ___-mutton

40. Severe

64. Winter coats

45. Sir Walter Scott novel (2 wds)

65. Sonatas, e.g.

49. Dust remover

66. Heavy cart

51. Fitness centers

67. Fastener

52. Icy

EARLY BIRD Automobile, Antique and Collectible Swap Meet. Puyallup Fairgrounds, February 15 and 16, Saturday 8-5, Sunday 9-3, admission $5.00. For information call 1 (253) 863-6211.

68. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Catcher in the ___â&#x20AC;?

53. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... happily ___ afterâ&#x20AC;?

12. Bang-up (hyphenated)

55. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bet ___!â&#x20AC;? (2 wds) Down

57. Russian emperor 58. Mysterious: Var.

1. Brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equipment 2. Arizona Indian

59. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ quam videriâ&#x20AC;? (North Carolinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto)

19. Ace

3. Become unhinged

61. Large, Australian flightless bird

20. Reserve

4. ___ Wednesday

62. Cabernet, e.g.

16. U.S. citizen of Hispanic descent (2 wds)

The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Elementary School Life Skills Paraeducator and Bilingual Early Childhood SPED Paraeducator. Applicants must have an AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 semester college credits, or documentation of successfully passing the State Assessment. Position will remain open until filled. To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed.

39. Those who eat with small, quick bites

8. Keats, for one

15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ___ you!â&#x20AC;?

Elementary School Life Skills Paraeducator Bilingual Early Childhood SPED Paraeducator

60. Draws unspecific conclusion

54. Prefix with phone

14. C4H8O2, e.g.

Help Wanted

5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harper Valley ___â&#x20AC;? (acronym)

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com

Statewides FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS OWNER/OPERATOR Dedicated Home Weekly! Solos up to $175,000/year. $2500 Sign-on Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year. $5,000 Sign-on Bonus! Forward Air 888-652-5611 DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com MISCELLANEOUS DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/month (where available.) Ask About Same Day Installation! Call Now! 1-800-430-5604

Public Notices CALL FOR BIDS City of Oroville Central Ave. and Cherry St. Overlay and Water Improvements Fed. Aid Proj. No. STPR-Z924(002) Sealed bids will be received by the City of Oroville at City Hall located at 1308 Ironwood, Oroville, Washington, 98844 until 2:00 P.M., Pacific Time on February 27, 2014 and there publicly opened and read. The City of Oroville Central Avenue & Cherry Street Overlay and Water Improvements consists of grinding and overlaying existing pavement, installing new water main and services, curb, gutter, and sidewalk replacements to accommodate ADA ramps, pavement markings, traffic control, and utility adjustments. The City of Oroville in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. Plans, specifications, and bid documents are available for electronic download at the Engineerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web site at www. scjalliance.com. Insert the eBidDoc #2634231 to download the digital documents for $10.00. Plans, specifications, and bid documents are also available at the office of SCJ Alliance, in Wenatchee at 15 Palouse Street, Wenatchee, WA 98801 upon payment of $40.00. Contract documents are on file for inspection at Oroville City Hall and area Plan Centers. A bid bond in the amount of 5% of the bid shall accompany all bids. All bids shall be marked â&#x20AC;&#x153;SEALED BID FOR CENTRAL AVENUE & CHERRY STREET OVERYLAY AND WATER IMPROVEMENTSâ&#x20AC;?, on the outside of the envelope. Bids must be completed on a lump sum and unit price basis as indicated on the BID PROPOSAL, and the total price shall be used for comparison of bids. The City of Oroville reserves the right to reject any or all bids for cause Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 6, 13, 2014. #542060 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 2/17/2014 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1988 Toyota PU Lic# B36687N Wa Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 13, 2014. #541793 PUBLIC NOTICE Contractors and Vendors Lists As authorized under RCW 35.23.352(2), and RCW 35.23.352(8), the City of Oroville is updating their Small Works Roster, consisting of contractors interested in performing work for the City of Oroville which is estimated to cost less than $100,000 and their Vendorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List, consisting of vendors interested in providing supplies, materi-

Public Notices als, equipment or services between $7,500 and $15,000 through telephone and/or written quotations. In awarding contracts for such projects, the City of Oroville shall invite proposals from all appropriate contractors or vendors who have requested to be included on the Small Works Roster and/or Vendors List, and shall select the lowest responsible bid. All contractors and vendors, where required by law, must be properly licensed or registered in this state. The City of Oroville actively seeks participation by minority or women owned firms who otherwise qualify. Individual Assurity Bonds acceptable. Forms may be secured at the Oroville City Hall or by calling 509-476-2926. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 6, 13, 2014. #540993 Civil Service Exam The City of Tonasket Civil Service Commission will be testing for an entry level patrolman eligibility list on Friday, April 4th, 2014. Lateral Officers may apply but will go through the same process and testing as the entry level. Call 509-486-2132 for an application packet or write to City of Tonasket, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Applications will be accepted until 4:30 pm March 21, 2014. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Civil Service Secretary Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on Febraury 13, 20, 2014. #543554 TS No.: WA-13-588486-TC APN No.: 6200110000 Title Order No.: 8336369 Grantor(s): GARFIELD A SANDOVAL Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (â&#x20AC;&#x153;MERSâ&#x20AC;?), AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3125880 NOTICE OF TRUSTEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et. seq. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 2/21/2014, at 10:00 AM At the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to wit: LOT 11, PLAT OF MOCK TRACTS, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME B OF PLATS PAGE 21, RECORDS OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 23128 HWY 20 , OKANOGAN, WA 98840 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/1/2007, recorded 11/07/2007, under 3125880 records of Okanogan County, Washington, from GARFIELD A SANDOVAL, AS HIS SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Grantor(s), to LANDSAFE TITLE OF WASHINGTON, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (â&#x20AC;&#x153;MERSâ&#x20AC;?), AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, FSB, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., (â&#x20AC;&#x153;MERSâ&#x20AC;?) (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Green Tree Servicing LLC. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Grantorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $151,310.87 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $288,090.65, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 11/1/2009, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 2/21/2014. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 2/10/2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 2/10/2014 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trusteeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 2/10/2014 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other de-

continued on next page


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Sponsored by

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ANSWERS

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 7 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

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San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 (866) 645-7711 Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-588486-TC P1066114 1/23, 02/13/2014 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 23 and February 13, 2014. #537881

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Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 10/21/2013 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue,

PAGE A11 11

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the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/hom e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web

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Puzzle 9 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

faults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME GARFIELD A SANDOVAL, AS HIS SEPARATE PROPERTY ADDRESS 23128 HWY 20 , OKANOGAN, WA 98840 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 8/19/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on

Public Notices

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FEBRUARY 13, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE February 13, 2014 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 9

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The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville Puzzle 4 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.56)

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee 6

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614 Fir Street- Oroville- 2 bedroom home with wood floors, new vinyl windows and insulation added to ceiling and floor. 5 lots give this home a spacious yard and a large area for a garden. NWML# 596221 $128,000 7 6

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Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon Lake and Country Beautiful new construction home with expansive views of the valley! Situated on 1.43 acres, plenty of space featuring a master bedroom on the ground floor and 2 bedrooms upstairs. Attention to detail! Good access from paved road. Come see for yourself! MLS#489214 $199,900!

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

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Next to Ell Lake this home has great fishing and conservancy, easy access, and a desirable recreation area. Home has in addition to 3 bedrooms, den & 2 bath an additional 1 bedroom or family room with 2nd Kitchen, laundry and full bath. All on one level for a great private hide-a-way. Property has 3500 sq ft hay barn & 2900 sq ft equipment shed. Fenced & cross fenced. Seasonal lake too. Additional 39 acres with certified water right & equipment also available. True working farm. MLS® $239,500

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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#1 Top Producer Office in North County! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

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SUN LAKES REALTY

Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.57)

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

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To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602


Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 13, 2014

SPORTS

Hornets escape Manson’s upset bid By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - On paper, the Oroville girls basketball team should have had no problem defeating Manson on Thursday, Feb. 6. But there’s a reason the games are played on the court and the Trojans gave the Hornets all they could handle before Oroville escaped with a 35-33 victory. The Hornets were unable to enjoy much about the win after senior Marissa Garcia was carried off the court in the fourth quarter and taken to the hospital with a knee injury of undetermined severity. Still, escape the Hornets did, in a matter worthy of Houdini. The only points Oroville scored in the fourth quarter came off a runner in the lane by Lily Hilderbrand that snapped a 33-33 tie with 2:40 remaining. Other than that the Hornets suffered an agonizing string of shots that seemingly rimmed, bounced or spun out in situations where they normally score. “That was unbelievable,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “Our normal stuff didn’t go in. And they had some shots they just threw up there that did.” Manson was poised for the upset after Baylee Ward heaved in a desperation, fall-away 3-pointer to beat the 30-second shot clock and lifted the Trojans into a 27-27 tie. Oroville had led by as many as 10 points, but the lead was gone. Ward scored again to give Manson a two-point lead. “The first four minutes (when Oroville raced to a 13-3 lead) were too easy,” Bourn said. “The girls seemed to think the game was over; Manson didn’t think so. And then we were behind.” Meagan Moralez hit a 3-pointer to end the third quarter to give the Hornets a 33-31 lead, but neither team scored through the first five minutes of the fourth. Oroville’s defense kept forcing turnovers; offensively the Hornets couldn’t buy a basket. Garcia made the first gamesaving defensive play with a blocked shot on a fast break with four minutes to play. But her knee buckled as she landed, delaying the game for nearly 10 minutes as she was tended to. Manson immediately tied the game after her departure, but that turned out to be the last shot the Trojans could get off. After Hilderbrand snapped the tie, the Oroville defense forced turnovers on each of the Trojans’ next three possessions, despite being unable to build on the lead themselves. Kali Peters made a game-sav-

Submitted photo

Oroville senior Sierra Speiker last week signed her letter of intent to attend the University of Idaho on a four-year cross country/track and field scholarship.

Speiker signs with Idaho

Top, the Oroville Lady Hornet Basketball team surprised their moms with personalized “Hornet Mom” jackets before Thursday’s win against the Manson Trojans. The moms wanted to send a special thanks to Coach Mike Bourn and the girls for this awesome gesture. (Courtesy photo) Left, Marissa Garcia blocks a Manson shot that would have tied the game late in the fourth quarter. Garcia was injured on the play. Right, Kali Peters knocks away a Manson pass. Peters also had a game-saving play late in the Hornets’ 35-33 victory last Thursday. Brent Baker/staff photos

ing play of her own in the final seconds, running down an errant pass in the backcourt, getting the ball back into the front court and running the clock down to five seconds before being forced out of bounds. Manson threw the ensuing pass out of bounds and the Hornets were home free. “The girls dug in at the end,”

Bourn said. “Marissa’s play probably saved the game for us. If she can’t come back, I feel really bad for her. She’s been coming on strong.” Mikayla Scott led the Hornets (12-6, 8-1 Central Washington League North Division) with 11 points, with Brittany Jewett adding nine points and Hilderbrand eight.

Oroville 50, Bridgeport 28 OROVILLE - Oroville took a 32-16 halftime lead over visiting Bridgeport last Tuesday on the way to a 50-28 victory over the Fillies. Lily Hilderbrand scored 14 points, Meagan Moralez added 12, Mikayla Scott had nine and Marissa Garcia furnished seven for the Hornets.

Shorthanded Oroville wins By Brent Baker

Bridgeport 43, Oroville 41 OROVILLE - The Hornets���

Hornets send eight wrestlers to regionals Leo Curiel (132) finished sixth despite pinning third-place finisher Kaleb Marten of Liberty bbaker@gazette-tribune.com Bell early in the tournament. Scotty Hartvig and Ruben COLBERT - Seniors Eddie Ocampo and Taylor Robinson led Renfro (both 170) advanced to regionals, each winning the way for the Oroville a match before facing wrestling team as the off against each other Hornets advanced eight for fifth and sixth place. to next week’s regional Renfro defeated his tournament. teammate 17-4. Ocampo and Lukas Mieirs (195) Robinson earned finished third in his runner-up finishes weight, pinning Kolby at the Northeast B Buche of Mary Walker District Tournament Eddie Ocampo in the third place match. at Northwest Christian Kittitas hosts the two(Colbert) on Saturday, Feb. 8, making them the most day regional tournament this likely (by seeding) of the Oroville year, beginning at 4:00 p.m. on wrestlers to advance to the state Friday, Feb. 14 and continuing at 10:00 Saturday morning. The finals the following week. Two Hornets placed in the top top five finishers in each weight four at 160, with Ocampo (2nd class advance to the Class 1B/2B place) and Charles Arrigoni (4th) state finals at the Tacoma Dome, both falling victim to Liberty Feb. 21-22. Bell’s Milo Holston. Ocampo earned a 21-6 technical fall victory over Northwest Christian’s Dallas Pierce before being pinned by Holston in the championship match. Arrigoni opened with a victory over Republic’s Chance Wheaton, lost to Holston, came back to pin Republic’s Wyatt Stoddard and was pinned by Pierce in the third and fourth place match. Robinson (182), like Ocampo, only had to wrestle twice as he defeated Lake Roosevelt’s Teddy Sharr 13-2 in the semifinals and Advertise your goods was pinned by Republic’s Lucas and services in the Rittel in the final. Classifieds and Jordan Smith (120), a state reach hundreds of qualifier last year, finished fourth, potential buyers daily. losing to defending state chamCall today to place your pion Trent Skelton (Liberty Bell) AD and make a sale in the semifinals. Smith had two quickly. Watch for wins on the day, including a 17-1 classified specials! technical fall victory in the conOKANOGAN VALLEY solation semifinals, but lost a GAZETTE-TRIBUNE technical fall himself to Kittitas’ 509-476-3602 Logan Weber. By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - After suffering a heart-breaking loss two days earlier, and playing without three regulars, the Oroville boys basketball team looked to be in a bad spot heading into Thursday’s contest with Manson. The Hornets took control of the game early and never looked back in defeating the Trojans 53-36. Oroville’s “MASH Unit,” as Coach Jay Thacker called his team, played without Bryce Glover, Lane Tietje and Connelly Quick. Nonetheless they led 32-18 at the half. Manson actually took a quick 7-2 lead, but back-to-back triples from Juan Lopez and Dustin Nigg gave the Hornets an advantage they would never relinquish. That launched a 17-2 Oroville run as Joseph Sarmiento had his offensive game clicking. He scored 13 of his game-high 18 points in the first half. The Hornets extended the lead in the second half, leading by as many as 24 points. Lopez finished with 14 points and seven rebounds, Andrew Mieirs added nine points and Nathan Hugus had 10 rebounds to go with six points. The Hornets finish their season on the road at Liberty Bell on Thursday. As of press time Tuesday, the Hornets still held the slim hope of qualifying for the district playoffs, but need either an upset of Lake Roosevelt (Feb. 11) or Liberty Bell for that to happen.

California Baptist were two other options. But the offer of a fouryear scholarship, along with a OROVILLE - Sierra Speiker campus that includes the indoor has pursued her running goals Kibbie Dome facility, proved with a passion, but she’s often decisive. “The Kibbie Dome is really had to pursue it while training in nice, and really big,” Speiker solitude. The Oroville High School said. “I’ve run (in a couple of senior, owner of three state cross open events) there already.” The Vandals’ womens team is country titles and one track championship (with one track coming off its fourth consecuseason to go) is looking forward tive Western Athletic Conference to running with the same passion championship, with four runand skill that she’s shown after ners cracking the seven-member first team she signed a letall-conference ter of intent last “They all seemed like team. Three week to attend of those firstthey were there to the University have of Idaho on a work and get better, to teamers exhausted their full cross counpush themselves each college cross try/track scholcountry eligiday at practice.” arship. bility (though The school Sierra Speiker, Speiker said is located in future University of Idaho Vandal some will have Moscow, Idaho, another year of just across the Washington border from track to go), but four others were freshmen and sophomores. All of Pullman. “I fell in the love with the the potential returners finished campus,” Speiker said. “I really in the top third of the field at the liked everything about it. I liked conference finals race. It’s also the first Idaho womthe coach and the assistants a lot. “I met the girls on the team en’s program to win four straight and they were really nice. They conference titles. Since joining all seemed like they were there the WAC in 2005, Idaho has to work and get better, to push boasted either the team or indithemselves each day at practice. vidual champion (or both) in It had that vibe that everyone every year but one. Speiker said she’s looking forwas there to build and become ward to the team aspect of colstronger.” Speiker, who is also a 4.0 stu- lege cross country, which will dent, is looking at studying phys- start in August. “In mid-August we’ll have our ical therapy or sports medicine. She said that Eastern team camp at McCall Lake,” she Washington University (where said. “And then we’ll go back former high school team- and be starting school right away. mate Catie Arrigoni runs) and I’m just really excited.” By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

ZOOM IN ON A BUYER

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Hornet’s Andrew Mieirs gets fouled from both sides on his way to the hoop last Thursday against Manson. Mieirs completed a 3-point play and Oroville defeated Manson 53-36. playoff hopes took a big hit Tuesday, Feb. 4, as Bridgeport claimed a last-second 43-41 victory in a game between two squads fighting for the Central Washington League North Division’s third playoff spot.

Juan Lopez tied the score with a clutch 3-pointer with about 10 seconds left, but Bridgeport answered with the game-winner at the other end. The win gave Bridgeport (4-14, 2-7 CWL) a sweep of the

season series with the Hornets (also 4-14, 2-7). Joseph Sarmiento scored 12 points an pulled down seven rebounds, while Lopez had 11 points and six rebounds to lead the Hornets.


FEBRUARY 13, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A13

SPORTS

Tiger losses cost playoff bid

“’Don’t let a game determine your life.’ “I’ve been fortunate to be able to use basketball as a tool. These senior guys are going to go do great stuff in their lives, and they’ll learn from the experience and discipline they learned from playing basketball.”

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - A season that started with so much promise came to a painful end for the Tonasket boys basketball team on Friday, Feb. 7, as the Tigers dropped a 56-36 decision to Quincy on their home floor. The Tigers needed to win one of their final two games to advance to the district playoffs, but fell to both the Jackrabbits and Omak three days earlier. “Our expectations coming into the season were high,” said Tonasket coach Agustin Pedregon. “I’m happy that we did strive to that in practice. We wanted to beat the best and we practiced hard every night. No one lagged, no one complained. Anytime you have a team like that, you enjoy coming to practice. “It does hurt. For us, we never got the big win. We did compete, but we never got the signature win we needed.” A recurrent theme over the final weeks was the Tigers’ inability to get untracked offensively. That struggle continued throughout Friday’s contest as Quincy’s 3-2 zone thoroughly deflated the Tigers’ half-court offense as most of their points came in defensive transition, frequently after a Michael Orozco steal. It was one such steal-and-score that gave the Tigers a 17-15 midway through the second quarter. But when Quincy stopped turning the ball over, the Tigers stopped scoring. The Jackrabbits went on an eight-minute, 22-3 run that opened up a 37-20 lead. Tonasket made a small run to open the fourth quarter, but with the foul calls going against them and their emotions getting the best of them, the Tiger season came to an end with Quincy’s clinching 13-0 run. That run ended only with an Orozco trey on Tonasket’s final possession. Orozco finished with 19 points, including five 3-pointers, but no other Tiger reached double figures. In all, Tonasket made just eight 2-point baskets. “When you’re a good coach like Wade (Peterson) is, you can do the same thing over and over and tell your opponent you’re doing it,” Pedregon said if his former mentor and the Jackrabbits’ defense. “They kept doing it until they make you stop. That’s

Brent Baker/staff photo

Quincy’s defense closes in on Tonasket’s Trevor Terris during Friday’s loss. what they did to us tonight. “They came out loose, played great defense like they had all their lives. We knew how to break it, we knew the different movements, but we didn’t execute down the stretch. And by that I mean the last few weeks, not just tonight.” Pedregon said two games contributed to what happened in succeeding contests that kept the Tigers from reaching their lofty goals: a pair of 50-48 losses, one to Chelan at home in December and the other at Quincy two weeks ago. “When we played Okanogan (in the first league game of the year) we had a fire,” he said. “We played Brewster, we had a fire. We played one of our best games against those guys, and then we can’t beat Chelan. That deflated our confidence, that we played our best those games and still didn’t beat them. With our confidence coming into the season, the air of the balloon comes out. “And then that game at Quincy, when we led by 14 points (before losing), really came back to bite us in the butt.” Pedregon said that the disappointment of unmet expectations needed to be put in perspective, especially for the seniors he had for two years: Orozco, Trevor Terris, Dyllan Gage, Derek Sund, Roberto Juarez and Kjeld Williams. “I told my guys, ‘Don’t let basketball determine who you are,’” he said.

Omak 53, Tonasket 46 TONASKET - The Tigers missed out on their first opportunity to clinch a playoff spot as they fell into a deep early hole at home against Omak on Tuesday. Tonasket overcame a 14-point deficit to take a 43-42 lead with 4:15 to play, but didn’t score again until Michael Orozco hit a meaningless 3-pointer at the buzzer. “Our lack of defensive intensity to start the game hurt us,” Pedregon said. “But ultimately it was our choices on offense in the final minutes, not understanding the moment of the game, that got us. “It was no one in particular, but we took too many 3-pointers when the shot clock was still at 29 seconds, just jacking stuff up.” The Tigers were in danger of being blown out after the Pioneers took a 27-13 lead after runs of seven and nine points in the second quarter as Omak’s Chance Williams took control of the paint. The defense began to clamp down on him in the final minutes before halftime as the Tigers crept back to within eight, but they didn’t make much more headway until the final minute of the third quarter, when the offense got clicking as well. “We did get some 3s that helped us get back in the game,” Pedregon said. “But it was ball movement and finding the open guy that got us the shots we were making.” Sophomore Adrian McCarthy, in just his second varsity game, scored back-to-back layups off passes from Orozco and Ethan Bensing, and Trevor Terris hit a pair of open treys early in the fourth quarter to draw the Tigers into a tie early in the fourth quarter. Dyllan Gage converted an offensive rebound into two points to give the Tigers a 43-42 lead - their first lead since 4-3 in he first quarter. Unfortunately, the lead lasted just a few seconds as the Pioneers ran off the next 11 points. Gage scored 13 points, Orozco added 12 and Terris finished with 11 for the Tigers.

Tonasket girls finish with losses By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s girls basketball team closed out its season on Friday, Feb. 7, with a 42-30 loss to Quincy in the final game for six Tiger seniors. “It is very difficult to change fundamentally when you are a senior and you only have one season,” said Tonasket coach Stephanie Schertenleib, finishing her first season in her second goaround as the Tigers’ coach. “I had six of them on varsity. I truly loved each one for completely different reasons; they are genuinely fun people to be around and they have such big hearts. “This may sound like a lot of fluff and that is definitely not me. Honestly, they have been beaten down by so many people telling them only negative things that trying to get them to have confidence in what they are doing was almost impossible. Unfortunately you can’t change that mindset in three months.” One bad quarter cost the Tigers against the Jackrabbits. After trailing 13-11 through one quarter, Quincy built a big halftime lead with a 16-2 run in the second quarter. The Tigers kept pace throughout the second half, cutting the Quincy lead to 12 on a number of occasions but never quite getting the deficit back into single digits. Seniors Kathryn Cleman and Kylie Dellinger led the Tigers (3-17, 0-14 Caribou Trail League) with seven points apiece. “I could not have been more pleased with the effort of the girls throughout the season,” Schertenleib said. “That was a very difficult season to endure. The CTL is not a forgiving league. The teams are very good and if you base your success on only wins you will find yourself giving up before you know it. I think the girls gave as much effort as their skill development would allow.” Jenny Bello, Carrisa Frazier, Baylie Tyus and Elizabeth Jackson also played in their final varsity contests. “I hope looking back they will see that sports taught them more about life principles than it did about trying to simply get wins,” Schertenleib said. “That is why I tried to focus on the John Wooden principles.” The Tigers won’t have to cope with many of the CTL teams next year, but Schertenleib is focused on the returning players’ development, not the increased likelihood of a few more wins next year. “I am excited to see how much

Fay Aitcheson/submitted photo

Tonasket’s Collin Aitcheson was honored as the Caribou Trail League Wrestler of the Year prior to last weekend’s District 6 meet in Cashmere.

Tigers 3rd at districts Eight to regionals, three earn championships By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CASHMERE - Tonasket’s wrestling team earned a third place finish at the Class 1A District 6 tournament in Cashmere Feb. 7-8 qualifying eight (plus three alternates) for regional competition this weekend. “Cole (Denison), Trampas (Stucker) and I are very proud of this team,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “Of course we would have liked to win a few more matches, but overall I thought we wrestled very well and battled hard.” Quincy won the team title with 315 points. The Tigers’ 228 was just behind Chelan’s 237.5 in the battle for second place. Okanogan (149) was fourth, followed by Omak (136.5), Cascade (101.5), Cashmere (99) and Brewster (89). Collin Aitcheson (120 pounds), the Caribou Trail League’s Wrestler of the Year, as well as Jorge Juarez (132) and John Rawley (195) won district championships in their respective weight classes. Dyllan “Peaches” Walton (126) and Austin Knowlton (170) took second. “They dominated their weight classes,” Mitchell said of his three champions. Peaches and Austin also had outstanding tournaments and showed up to scrap and fight hard.” The top four finishers earned regional tournament spots. Vance Frazier (106) finished third, while

Rade Pilkinton (113) and Frank Holfeltz (182) took fourth. Trevor Peterson (126), Ryan Rylie (145) and Caleb Lofthus (152) finished fifth and can advance as alternates if another wrestler ahead of them can’t compete. Zach Lofthus (160) finished sixth, while Austin Rimestad (132), Eithan Knowlton (145) and Lucas Vugteveen (170) also picked up victories. The District 6/7 Regional meet will be at Freeman (near Spokane) on Saturday, Feb. 15, with the top four finishers in each weight class advancing to the state finals at the Tacoma Dome, Feb. 21-22.

Aitcheson named wrestler of year Tonasket’s Collin Aitcheson was honored at Saturday’s district championship meet with the Caribou Trail League’s Wrestler of the Year trophy after being named as its recipient earlier in the week. Aitcheson, a senior, has turned in a dominant season. Against in-state opponents, no one has scored back points against him and he’s been taken down just once, in a victory over a top-ranked wrestler from 2A Othello. His only losses came at the prestigious Tri-State tournament in Idaho last December, featuring competitors from multiple states and all school sizes. “It is quite an honor for him that the other coaches of our district recognize not just Collin’s skill but the sportsmanship he displays,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “I think (the award) may have made him a little more nervous during the tournament but he wrestled well and got the job done, winning the district title.”

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Boys Basketball Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall W L W L

*Okanogan 14 0 21 0 *Brewster 12 2 16 4 *Chelan 8 6 10 10 *Cashmere 8 6 12 8 *Omak 4 10 8 12 *Cascade 4 10 5 15 Quincy 3 11 8 12 Tonasket 3 11 9 11 *Playoff qualifier

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L

Liberty Bell 8 2 14 5 Lk Roosevelt 4 5 9 9 Bridgeport 2 7 4 14 Oroville 2 7 4 14 Manson 1 9 1 18 *Top 3 advance to playoffs

Cent. WA League So. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L

Kittitas 7 0 14 4 Riverside Chr. 5 2 9 9 White Swan 5 3 8 11 *Top 2 advance to playoffs

GIRLS Basketball Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall W L W L Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tigers’ Kathryn Cleman hauls in a long pass from teammate Baylie Tyus (rear left) during Tonasket’s season-ending loss to Quincy on Friday, Feb. 7. commitment we will get to basketball fundamental development this summer,” she said. “My goal is to work on individual skills, team building, and game experience. Our JV team really took off this year, I could not be more pleased with them. “Hopefully that success they had will carry over into the part of the year where players really have the time to hone their skills and create separation between the OK players and the good ones. Summer is definitely the time to do that. I have some eighth graders that I think will be good additions to our program as well. We may even have enough interest to form two teams and that would be amazing.”

Omak 38, Tonasket 28 TONASKET - Tonasket threw a

scare into playoff-bound Omak on Tuesday, Feb. 4, keeping things interesting until the final minute of a 38-28 loss to the Pioneers. The Tigers trailed the defensive struggle 16-12 at the half. Omak opened the second half with a 14-2 run, but the Tigers stormed back late in the fourth quarter. Kylie Dellinger hit a 3-pointer to cut into the Omak lead, and Baylie Tyus hit backto-back triples to cut the deficit to six points with a minute to play. The Tigers had a chance to cut it further as Omak missed the front end of a one-and-one, but the Pioneers corralled the offensive rebound and converted their next free throw opportunities to put the game out of reach. Kathryn Cleman led the Tigers with 13 points, with Dellinger adding eight.

*Cashmere 14 0 20 0 *Brewster 12 0 18 2 *Okanogan 9 5 15 5 *Chelan 8 6 12 8 *Cascade 7 7 13 7 *Omak 4 10 9 11 Quincy 2 12 5 15 Tonasket 0 14 3 17 *Playoff qualifier

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L

Oroville 8 1 12 6 Lk Roosevelt 7 2 9 8 Bridgeport 3 6 5 13 Manson 3 7 5 13 Liberty Bell 1 9 2 17 *Top 3 advance to playoffs

Cent. WA League So. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L

White Swan 8 0 16 3 Kittitas 4 3 6 11 Riverside Chr. 1 7 3 15 *Top 2 advance to playoffs

Schedules Feb. 12-22

Thursday, Feb. 13 GB - Oroville at Liberty Bell (Var/JV), 6:00/7:30 pm BB - Oroville at Liberty Bell (JV/Var), 6:00/7:30 pm Friday, Feb. 14 WR - Oroville qualifiers at Kittitas (Regional tournament), Day 1, 4:00 pm Saturday, Feb. 15 WR - Oroville at Kittitas (Regional tournament), Day 2, 10:00 a.m. BB/GB - Oroville Playoff tiebreak (if necessary) Tuesday, Feb. 18 BB/GB - Oroville District play-in games (if necessary) at Eastmont Wednesday, Feb. 19 GB - Oroville District championship game (if necessary) at Wenatchee, 8:30 pm BB - Oroville District game (if necessary) at Wenatchee, 4:00 pm Saturday, Feb. 22 BB/GB - Oroville District loser-out game (if necessary), 11:00 am/1:00 pm Friday-Saturday, Feb. 21-22 WR - Oroville and Tonasket qualifiers at Tacoma Dome (State Finals)

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Page A14

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 13, 2014

JUNIOR CHEER

OBITUARIES Marv is survived by his wife, Peggy, at home; son, Todd Morton (Diane) Renton; daughters, Viola (Larry) Rosser, Omak, Trace (Jerry) Paul, Okanogan, Tresa (Lee) Bannister, Colfax; grandsons, Jerame, Lonnie Paul and Collin Bannister. A memorial service will be announced and planned at a later time when all of the family can be together. Donations may be made in Marv’s name to the “Friendly OK Car Club” care of Paul Yarnell, 13 Middle Lane, Omak Wa. 98841. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket is in care of arrangements.

Marvin Morton

Darlene Cook

Marvin Edgar Morton

Darlene Dee Cook

Marv Morton, 81 of Omak, died at home with his family beside him on, Feb. 3. Born March 16, 1932 in Cle Elum, Wash. to Helen and Edgar Morton. The family later moved to Ellensburg where Marv’s dad was coach of the Ellensburg Cowboy’s Baseball team. This influence paved a great path of playing and loving baseball for Marv. After graduation from Ellensburg High School in ‘51, he attended Central College of Washington, he was signed to play with the St. Louis B r o w n s Baseball team but was called to active duty during the Korean War. He was trained as an aircraft engine mechanic in Norman Oklahoma and stationed at the U.S. Naval Air Station, Patuxent River, Maryland. The summer of ‘53, he played on the Navy baseball team. We all loved hearing about games against legends such as Willie Mays who was serving for the Army. After leaving the service Marv played the saxophone in nightclubs all over Eastern Washington and began cooking in restaurants during the day. In ‘68, he bought a café in Omak and named it, Marv’s. His famous Cheese Soup is still talked about to this day. In later years, he opened up a Boot Repair business until his retirement. Hunting and Fishing were big loves of his, along with family time at the cabin years earlier on Omak Lake. Marv was a member of the Friendly OK Car Club and past member of the gun club. “Pops” was a very special grandpa to all three of his grandsons, he will be truly missed by all who knew him as he was easy to love and always shared a quick laugh or smile.

Jean Curtis

Jean Elaine Curtis

Jean Elaine Curtis, 86, of Oroville, Wash., died February 5, 2014 at North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket. She was born to Max and Julia Fiarbairn on January 24, 1928 in Wenatchee, Wash. Jean lived most of her life in Oroville. She married W.R. (Bill) Curtis on August 1, 1948, who preceded her in death after 79 years of marriage. Jean was best known for her love of horses and the ability to train, ride and show them. She could be seen riding or driving her horses around town. She is survived by her four children: Dean, Donald, Corene and David Curtis; brothers Bob and Jim Stribling; sisters Pat Morgan and Alice Rice; five grandchildren; nine great grandchildren and two great great grandchildren At Jean’s and her family’s request, no services will be held. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the United States Armed Forces Legacy Project c/o US Bank, P.O. Box 854, Tonasket, WA 98855 Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Darlene Dee Cook, age 63 of Tonasket, died on February 4, 2014 at her home. She was born on February 1, 1951 in Coulee Dam to parents Arthur (Buck) and Ethel Cook. At a young age the family moved to Tonasket where Darlene grew up and began her love of horses and rodeos. She was Rodeo Queen at the first all girls rodeo in Grand Coulee and also was Rodeo Queen for the Tonasket Rodeo. She married Allen Brown and together they lived in California for a time and then moved back to Tonasket and later divorced. Darlene married Barney Lucas and together they commercial fished and lived on their boat in Alaska. They divorced and Darlene moved back to the Tonasket area where she worked for Smith and Nelson Warehouse and currently she was working at Grant’s Market as a cashier. Over the years, she belonged to different horse riding clubs in the area. Darlene had a love for animals of all kinds, especially dogs and cats. Darlene is survived by her mother, Ethel Cook of Tonasket; two sisters-in-law, Virginia (Jinni) Cook of Spokane and Norma Cook of Spokane; five nephews, Don Cook, Monte Cook, Casey Cook, Corey Cook and Paul Inlow. Darlene was preceded in death by her father, two brothers, Phillip and Ronald Cook, and one sister, Audrey Inlow. Memorial Services will be held on Saturday, February 15, 2014 at 2 p.m. at the Tonasket Community Church with Pastor Leon Alden, officiating. Memorials may go to any local animal shelter. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements. INLAND MONUMENT CO.

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Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket Junior Cheerleaders charmed a Senior Night Crowd at Tonasket High School with a full halftime show during last Friday’s girls basketball finale. The group practiced with Jamie Barker’s winter cheerleading squad and performed a mix of dance tunes and cheers.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville 8 - 8:30 Holy Grounds - Coffee, Tea & Conversation 8:30 - 9:45 Service@8:30 10 - 10:35 L.I.F.E.  10:35 - 11:00 Holy Grounds 11:00 - 12:00 Service @ 11:00 6 p.m. - 7:30 Pursuit (Pursuing God & Friendships) Pastor Claude Roberts Come enjoy song service with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Trinity Episcopal

Tonasket Foursquare Church

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place 415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

www.gazette-tribune.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


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