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The important thing about the “demonstrate, scaffold, release to write” approach is that it actively and explicitly teaches students. Yes, it is true that it allows students to draw on their repertoire of skills and strategies. It is required that we demonstrate the process that writers use. It even allows teachers to demonstrate the process used to write and scaffold students to practice the steps of the writing process. But the most important thing about it is that it allows us to release students to independently work on skills we have taught. The important thing about the “demonstrate, scaffold, release to write” approach is that it actively and explicitly teaches students. DEMONSTRATE, SCAFFOLD, RELEASE TO WRITE APPROACH by Kelly and Sam


The important thing about Rationale is that it’s a synchronized progression through writing.

Yes, it’s true that we teach a repertoire of strategies. It allows the removing of scaffolding as quickly as possible. It even allows students to work on more challenging tasks and work on their own personal interests. But the most important thing about rationale is that it is a synchronized progression through writing. RATIONALE by Jeff, Melissa, Lisa, and Carol


The important thing about scaffolding in writing is that it should be a gradual release with many guided steps. Yes, its true that it progressively becomes more challenging.

It will help students to build upon what they already know. It even will help students think about the logical structure of their topic. And that teaching involves rallying students to tackle a progression of writing challenges. But the most important thing about scaffolding in writing is that it should be a gradual release with many guided steps. HOW DO YOU CALIBRATE THE CHALLENGE LEVEL OF INSTRUCTION? By Krista, Charlotte, and Valerie


The important thing about revising across grade levels is that expectations are different at each grade level. Yes, it’s true that the level & intensity of editing/revising increases with each grade level. It starts with adding details to drawing in Kindergarten. It even progresses to revising mechanics of writing in third grade and becomes revising for content in fifth grade.

But the most important thing about revising is that expectations are different at each grade level. REVISION ACROSS THE GRADES by Stephanie, Pam, and Nancy


The important thing about writing paper is that it should physically support the writing process and the genre in which the students are writing Yes, it is true that the writing paper in grades 3-5 differs from that used by K-2 writers K-2 writers usually write in booklets and start their writing with a picture, and the paper on each page of the booklet includes a blank space for their drawing.

Yes, it’s true that in grade 3 children still use booklets for their writing and each page helps them to chunk their writing. But the most important thing to know is that it is very important for children of all ages to write on paper that supports the writing process and fits the genre.

HOW DOES THE WRITING PAPER USED DIFFER? By Kelly and Sarah


The important thing about a writer's notebook is that it embodies a “writerly” life. Yes---it is kept by a wide-awake writer. It can help you decide which stories to develop into a major piece of writing.

It is used to collect small ideas. It is used to collect BIG ideas. And it can also be used to keep track of goals, progress, and conferences. But the most important thing about a writer’s notebook, is that it embodies a “writerly” life.

NOTEBOOKS by Margo


The important thing about process in writing is that we first teach by genre and focus. Yes, it’s true that generating topics and ideas are taught specific to genre and focus. It teaches them to generate ideas on their own. It even allows them to think about details of their own lives as writing pieces. And as they develop, they learn to live with a writer’s consciousness. But the most important thing about process is that we first teach by genre and focus. REHEARSAL FOR WRITING – PROCESS VARIES BY GENRE AND FOCUS by Lori, Dina, and Amy


The important thing about writing is that it is a rehearsal. Yes, it’s true that notebooks embody a “writerly” life It supports the consciousness. It even keeps you alert to potential topics. And makes you a magnet to that topic. But the most important thing about writing is that it is a rehearsal. A BIG PART OF REHEARSAL INVOLVES GENERATING IDEAS by Jenn, Shoshannah and Craig


The important thing about rehearsal is that writers explore alternative ways their writing may be written. Yes, it’s true that they may rewrite the ending. It may include revising leads and introductions. It even can include a change of topic sentence and different action and dialogue. The important thing about rehearsal is that writers explore alternative ways their writing may be written. REHEARSAL INVOLVES WEIGHING POSSIBLE STRUCTURES by Krista, Shelby, and Dale


The important thing about rehearsal is that it gets better with experience. Yes, it’s true that the more skilled and experienced a writer becomes, the more that writer can do. It takes practice and time. It even may cause frustration. And become extremely time consuming. But the most important thing about rehearsal is that it gets better with experience. WITH EXPERIENCE‌REVISION AND REHEARSAL by Cheryl, Tara, and Celine


The important thing about drafting is that velocity is key. Yes, it’s true that writing needs to be “strong and long.” It needs to be fast and furious. It even comes from being full of one’s subject. And keeping one’s eye on that subject. But the most important thing about drafting is that velocity is key. DRAFTING by Christa and Amanda


The important thing about revision is that it evolves as children mature as writers. Yes, it’s true that it takes time for writers to see their drafts through a variety of lenses. It involves asking questions to focus their efforts to revise. It even can involve the use of mentor texts to rehearse those qualities in their writing. And looking through the draft, come to a deeper understanding of the content. But the most important thing about revision is that the writer can answer the question, “What am I trying to say?” The important thing about revision is that it evolves as children mature as writers.

REVISIONS by Amy and Rhonda


The important thing about editing is that it involves far more than just spelling and punctuation. Yes, it’s true that those pieces are important, but writers can use other resources to assist students with their conventions. It is important that we use mini-lessons, mid-workshop teachings, share sessions and homework assignments to scaffold, or create a growing list of editing skills for students. It even requires writers to re-read each draft successive times with a new lens. And encourage writers to re-examine conventions that pose problems and rely on resources and one another to edit work.

But the most important thing about editing is that teachers teach the writers to edit on their own through the use of conferencing, and the teacher teaches the writer other strategies to help them further develop their skills. It is also necessary to keep the next to final draft as it reflects the students work. EDITING by Allison, Janet, and Malinda


The important thing about cycling through the entire writing process is that children are kept productive, engaged and purposeful throughout the entire process. Yes, it’s true that children need to have a sense of how a narrative or an essay tends to go. It is just as important that they have a sense of how the process of writing that kind of text is apt to go. It even can seem that the gathering of entries and collecting of information is the end, but it’s not. And we want children to plan their writing, anticipating the day they’ll revise it and, better yet, anticipating the day they’ll send the text out into the world. But the most important thing about cycling through the entire writing process is that children are kept productive, engaged and purposeful throughout the entire process. CYCLING THROUGH THE PROCESS by Deb, Gabrielle, and Kelly


Calkins guide to the common core writing workshop chapter 4