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El Ojo del Lago February 2010


Saw you in the Ojo

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Richard Tingen

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Alejandro Grattan-Domínguez Tel: (01376) 765 3676, 765 2877 Fax: (01376) 765 3528 Associate Publisher David Tingen Graphic Design Roberto C. Rojas Jazmin Eliosa Special Events Editor Kay Davis Associate Editor Jim Tipton Contributing Editors Paul Jackson Henri Loridans Feature Editor Jim Tuck (Honorary) Staff Photographer Xill Fessenden Staff Writers Mildred Boyd Ilse Hoffmann Floyd Dalton Fred C. Dobbs Sales Manager Tania Medina (045) 33 1140 3570 tania.medina@mac.com Office Secretary Iliana Oregel ADVERTISING OFFICE Av. Hidalgo # 223, Chapala Mon. thru Fri. 9am - 5pm Sat. 9am - 1pm Tel. 01 (376) 765 2877, 765 3676 Fax 01 (376) 765 3528 Send all correspondence, subscriptions or advertising to: El Ojo del Lago http://www.chapala.com ojodellago@prodigy.net.mx Ave. Hidalgo 223 (or Apartado 279), 45900 Chapala, Jalisco Tels.: (376) 765 3676, Fax 765 3528 PRINTING: Quadrimag S.A. de C.V. El Ojo del Lago aparece los primeros cinco días de cada mes. (Out over the first five days of each month) Certificado de Licitud de Título 3693 Certificado de Licitud de Contenido 3117.

FEATURE ARTICLES

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COVER STORY

Bill Mesusan examines the myth and the man behind one of the 20th century’s most mysterious novelists—the enigmatic author known as “B. Traven”

8 Cover by Dani Newcomb

14 LITERATURE Another short story from Jose Amador’s book, Mexican Memories, this one with the intriguing title of “Almost Pregnant.”

COLUMNS THIS MONTH 6 Editor’s Page 7

OP-ED

24 CRIMES AGAINST CANINES

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Bridge by Lake

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Uncommon Sense

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Thunder on Right

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Wondrous Wildlife

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Faith/Fables

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Welcome to Mexico

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Ask Carolyn

38 TRAVEL

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Magnificent Mexico

Carol Bowman begins a three-part series about her long trip to Antarctica. The segment is beguilingly entitled “First Leg to the End of the World.”

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Lakeside Living

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Child of Month

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Notes from Nestipac

52 HUMOR

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Feathered Friends

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New Lease

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Planting for Future

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Hearts at Work

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Joyful Musings

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World of Ours

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LCS Newsletter

Thetis Reeves on one of cruelest “sports” ever devised by Man, the raising of pit bulls to fight, often to the death.

28 EGOCENTRICITIES Bill Franklin writes about one of life’s most annoying problems—what to do when your hair simply won’t behave.

Gail Nott wonders if watching too much advertising can result in the death of a few million of her brain cells. Sounds like a plausible assumption to us!

54 PROFILE Nina Discombe writes about one of Lakeside’s most prominent musicians, a young Canadian whose achievements would give most people a huge ego.

Reserva al Título de Derechos de Autor 04-2007-111412131300-102 Control 14301. Permisos otorgados por la Secretaría de Gobernación (EXP. 1/432 “88”/5651 de 2 de junio de 1993) y SEP (Reserva 171.94 control 14301) del 15 de enero de 1994. Distribución: Hidalgo 223 Chapala, Jalisco, México. All contents are fully protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without the written consent of El Ojo del Lago. Opinions expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the views of the Publisher or the Editor, nor are we responsible for the claims made by our advertisers. We welcome letters, which should include name, address and telephone number.

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COVER STORY

PUBLISHER

Index...

El Ojo del Lago February 2010

LAKESIDE LIVING

 D IRE C TOR Y 

40 MAGNIFICENT MEXICO

VOLUME 26 NUMBER 6

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By Alejandro Grattan-Dominguez

God Bless Our Fourlegged Friends

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he two most often heard complaints by foreigners living here at Lakeside used to be about the callous and sometimes cruel treatment of animals, and the bureaucracy’s fondness of needless paperwork. The latter (as Jesus is said to have remarked about the poor) will perhaps always be with us; but the treatment of animals has greatly improved. When this writer first moved to Lakeside 23 years ago, it was not unusual to see large packs of dogs running loose, or lying dead along side the highway—dogs dying of hunger, or being severely mistreated, often for sheer sport, sometimes with thin steel rods which could break the animal’s spine. I once witnessed a man whipping a heavily-laden burro with just such a bar. When I objected, he sneered that we gringos must think that animals have souls. Mexicans knew better, he contemptuously observed. Today, thanks to hundreds of animal-loving volunteers (both foreigners and Mexicans), and organizations such as Lakeside Spay and Neuter Center, Lakeside Friends of the Animals, Lakeside Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Preserve, Anita’s Animals and the Animal Shelter, the situation is much better. Moreover, the attitude toward animals has greatly changed among the locals; e.g., one now sees Mexican children walking little dogs on a leash, with the animals often sporting sweaters during the colder months. Yet more changes in attitude are needed. For a country as religious as Mexico, there seems little awareness of the many loving references to animals in the Bible, e.g., as the prophet Nathan told King David about the lamb and a poor man, “From his morsel the lamb would eat, and from his cup it would drink, and in his bosom it would lie, and it came to be as a daughter to him.” Samuel 12:1-3 It also seems many people here have no appreciation for the intelligence of animals—especially that of

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dogs. It is well-known that seeingeye dogs are a great help to thousands of blind people, but dogs can also be trained to assist the deaf, as well. Some dogs, hearing the bell at the front door, or the buzzer on the oven timer, or a smoke and fire alarm, are trained to alert their owners to the situation. A dog owned by a woman confined to a wheelchair has been taught to pick up her telephone and to lick stamps for the mail. Another dog responds to a 120 commands, and even gathers cans and packets from supermarket shelves. Pets benefit the elderly, as well. They often give purpose and meaning at a time when the elderly feel alienated from society. The medical benefits of this are well-documented. The Toronto Star has reported that “Companion animals are associated with lower stress, fewer doctors’ visits and even better survival rates after heart attacks.” The love and devotion between Man and many animals can, however, be a bit intense, as these few over-the-top examples humorously illustrate: In divorce cases, the custody of a pet can be hotly contested, and is at times awarded as part of the settlement in property disputes. People have even named pets in their last will and testament as beneficiaries, often making them the recipients of sizable wealth. So though Mexico still has a way to go in its treatment of animals, the U.S. has often gone too far. The ancient Greeks espoused moderation in all things, a prescription for happiness in both countries.

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Alejandro Grattan


By Maggie Van Ostrand

Mexico’s Gift to Opera, Rolando Villazón

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don’t know anything about opera, and accidentally proved it to my date a long time ago at a screening of Franco Zeffirelli’s La Traviata. Halfway through the movie, I whispered, “What a rip off. All they did was copy the plot of Garbo’s movie, Camille.” How did I know that the Verdi opera film, based on Dumas’ 1848 novel, was written long before Garbo was even born? At least my date was enough of a gentleman not to laugh aloud; he merely snickered behind his hand. So, on Christmas Eve, when I was trapped into seeing a new filmed opera called La Bohéme, I determined to keep my big trap shut. Except for you, of course. I just have to tell you about it. Emilio Rolando Villazón Mauleón is the world’s next great tenor, at least equal to Placido Domingo. You don’t have to know anything about opera to appreciate Villazón’s voice. When you hear him sing, your jaw drops, your eyes glaze over, and the hairs on your arm stand to attention. My goose bumps had goose bumps of their own. This, I thought, is a voice for the ages. Villazón was born in 1972 in the Mexico City suburb of Fuentes de Satelite. At the age of 11, Villazón entered the Mexican Academy of Performing Arts (where he later met his future wife, Lucia), studying acting, music, modern dance and ballet. That would account for the graceful perfection of his later onstage movements. His father used to bring home records from his job at Columbia/ Sony, including Placido Domingo’s “Perhaps Love.” Villazón loved Domingo’s voice and bought every record of his that he could, except opera. Back then, he didn’t even like opera. In fact, he had decided to study for the priesthood. Luckily for us, fiancée Lucia sent him on an intense soulsearching mission, which ended with Villazón’s painful decision

to not become a priest. When he was 18, Villazón sang in a school play, with baritone Arturo Nieto in the audience. Nieto went backstage and invited Villazón to take instruction from him to develop his “really big voice.” When Villazón arrived at Nieto’s studio and saw a photograph on the wall of Nieto with his idol, Placido Domingo, he was so impressed that he decided to take up Nieto on his offer. Two years later, after singing before an audience of 1500, Villazón met with his mentor, a Catholic priest, who told him that his destiny was opera, and persuaded him to try out for the conservatory at once. Villazón auditioned next day, singing an aria from La Bohéme, using a pillow as his lover, Mimi. To finance his studies, Villazón taught history part-time. Lucia, now a psychologist, threatened not to marry him if he refused to pursue his dream. Smartly, he listened and continued his studies, now under Enrique Jaso. In Villazón’s case, it seems destiny was spelled L-U-CI-A. He started performing in small parts, easily winning two national opera competitions in Mexico. He has since graced the most famous opera stages on earth, performing the lead male roles in the greatest operas ever written. After voice problems in April 2007 forced cancellation of performances at Carnegie Hall and the Metropolitan Opera, today, Villazón’s voice is back, as superb as ever. His schedule includes performances in Mexico in June of 2010. Though Villazón did not become a priest, the Divine One gifted him with the voice of an angel. If I again see La Traviata, this time starring Rolando Villazón, I won’t even think about Garbo. I’ll be too busy in the faraway land to which his soaring, celestial voice has transported his audience.

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B. Traven’s Mexican Enigma By Bill Mesusan

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ovie director John Huston awoke in his Mexico City hotel room to discover a shadowy figure standing at the foot of his bed. Huston switched on the light to get a closer look at the mysterious stranger. The man handed Huston a business card. It read: “Hal Croves. Translator. Acapulco and San Antonio.” The year was 1947. Huston had journeyed to Mexico to work with B. Traven, enigmatic author of The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. The diminutive Croves handed Huston a letter from Traven. The author was unable to meet with him. “Old and intimate” friend Croves was well qualified to advise about Mexico and locations. The director suspected Croves and Traven were the same man. Huston, who’d seen his fair share of human nature, including eccentric characters in film and real life, went along with the author’s game. He

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hired Croves as T Technical Advisor hi d C h i l Ad i for Treasure. Later, unable to reconcile the author’s powerful voice and emotional depth with Croves’ “Casper Milktoast” personality, Huston changed his mind. Actor Humphrey Bogart had no doubts. When shown a photograph of Traven from the 1920s, “Bogie” immediately recognized

El Ojo del Lago February 2010

him as impersonator Croves. Who was this mystery man? If novelist B. Traven had a history nobody knew the details. He appeared in Mexico out of nowhere. Among two dozen people B. Traven was said to be: Jack London, Ambrose Bierce, Mexican President Adolfo Lopez Mateos, a leper, and the illegitimate son of Kaiser Wilhelm II. Traven used three dozen names during his lifetime. He worked hard creating a tangle of aliases, false trails, and forged documents. His life became a series of lies and fabrications. There was one uncontroversial fact. B. Traven wrote compelling, hypnotic prose and was a masterful storyteller. Between 1925 and 1940, Traven’s literary output was enormous. The Death Ship, published in Germany, in 1926, provoked comparisons to Melville and Conrad. This compelling novel of life in the stokehold of a ship became an overnight success. It was followed by The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. Traven quickly became a best selling author in Germany and Russia. His “proletarian adventure stories,” bringing to life the turmoil of his adopted Mexico, sold in the millions and were translated into fifteen languages. Under the alias Traven Torsvan, the immigrant joined an archeological expedition into Chiapas as team photographer. He stayed on to research the hard-wood industry when befriended by Montería (lumber camp) owners. During the1930s, Traven wrote an epic treatment of the birth of the Mexican Revolution. These six “Jungle Novels”—Government, The Carreta, March to the Montería, Trozas, The Rebellion of the Hanged, and The General from the Jungle— chronicled suffering by Indios in the mahogany plantations of Chiapas. There were problems. European readers believed his documentarylike stories were based on first-hand experiences--a fiction the author encouraged—but, Traven failed to grasp many details of the mahogany trade. This led to criticism on technical grounds, especially his errors concerning ox-cart drivers: work hours, log weight, ox-team size, and status as the best-paid, most respected montería workers. The indigenous people of Chiapas had inspired Traven with their communal spirit and love of the land. He envisioned a new world, based on anti-capitalistic values, taking shape in post-revolutionary Mexico. He mistook a microcosm—unique conditions at work in Chiapas—for the

multitudinous nature of Mexico as a whole. Traven portrayed the most oppressive mahogany plantation as symbolic of all montería operations; but, workers at San Quintín, where physical punishment was nonexistent, returned voluntarily every year. This inaccuracy alienated people who’d befriended Traven. The author suddenly wasn’t welcome in Chiapas. On the plus side, Traven was one of the few outsiders of his times writing with compassion about the lives of Third World inhabitants. His genuine caring for the underdog shines through in every novel. Traven’s immense productivity ended in 1940. Disillusionment over results of Mexico’s Revolution eroded Traven’s enthusiasm. The radical Traven was even disappointed by the progressive efforts of Lázaro Cárdenas—nationalization of Mexico’s oil industry and railroads—because they were initiated by a central government, not individuals and trade unions. The vision sparking his imagination conflicted with the rock-hard reality of modern politics. In 1948, release of the film The Treasure of the Sierra Madre thrust Traven back onto the world stage. The Traven/Croves mystery created a cottage industry among journalists and scholars attempting to decipher his true identity. Down through the decades the Traven enigma continued. Biographers, forced to resort to chronology in reverse, worked from the present backwards. Two schools emerged: Traven was an American born in Chicago (as he always claimed), or he was German anarchist Ret Marut. BBC documentary filmmaker Will Wyatt spent the late 1970s investigating records, documents, and people’s memories. In London, Wyatt caught a break while researching Marut’s incarceration in Brixton Prison, in 1924. A name emerged and was linked to a Polish birth certificate. Hermann Albert Otto Macksymilian Feige was born on February 23, 1882. His birthplace was Schwiebus, Germany (Swiebodzin, Poland after WWII). Otto, left with his maternal grandparents by poverty-stricken parents, became the object of their adoration. At age six, his parents broke his heart by separating him from his grandparents. This repatriation scarred Otto for life. He detached himself from parents and siblings and became a loner. Otto’s parents added insult to injury


in Mexico during the 1950s and 60s. by refusing his scholarship to TheoCroves was present at the filming logical School. They apprenticed the of Rebellion of the Hanged (1954) village’s star pupil to a locksmith. as B.Traven’s “authorized represenConscripted into the German army tative.” The tales are similar to the at age twenty, Otto served the mandafilming of The Treasure of the Sierra tory two years. Upon discharge, the Madre. On location, it was a public now ardent socialist returned to the secret that Croves was B.Traven. family home and initiated a political Croves was given credit as screencampaign in his village. His parents writer. In reality the script was writthought he’d stir up trouble. There ten by American screenwriter John was a fight. Otto left home never to Bright who was blacklisted in the return. US and lived in exile in Mexico. A new identity, Ret Marut the Croves’s name was a front for Bright. actor, emerged. Failed actor Marut Credit for the script has since been evolved into the successful anarchist restored. editor/writer of Der Ziegelbrenner, Macario (1959) is after a politically provocative Treasure the best-known magazine. In 1919, he B.Traven film. It was joined the failed Munich nominated for an Oscar as Rebellion. Facing execubest foreign film and for tion, Ret went underground the Palme d’Or in Cannes fleeing for his life. (1961). According to filmMarut turned up in Lonographies, the screenwriter don. Fearing deportation to was Mexican author Emilio Germany, anarchist Marut Carballido who won awards confessed his identity to for the screenplay. London police. For once During this period perhe’d given his true name, sonal friends called him Hal but German police came Croves. Most knew he was up empty-handed. Otto’s Traven. Hal Croves died mother, afraid his radical “B. Traven” in Mexico City, in 1969. politics would bring trouCroves was eulogized in ble, lied to police. a ceremony in Chiapas as writer B. Marut landed in Tampico where Traven. His ashes were scattered by he began as engineer/photographer plane over the jungles of southern Traven Torsvan and morphed into Mexico, giving life to the land that novelist B. Traven. nurtured his creative spirit. During the 1930s the rising Nazi In his will, Mexican citizen Party banned and burned his books. Traven Torsvan admitted he used the This left Traven fearful another Gernames B. Traven and Hal Croves as man regime was out to get him. If pseudonyms. The schism between Traven’s paranoia seems obsessive, Traven’s life on the surface and the his history gave him cause for condepths he plumbed in his novels was cern. The world-famous author now never reconciled. had three potential enemies: agents It fell to film director John Husof the former Berlin Government, ton to immortalize Traven’s legacy. disgruntled Montería owners, and Awakening at dawn to discover Nazis. a mysterious stranger in his Mexico The brilliant, eccentric Traven City hotel room, John Huston probpromoted a potent mystery concernably never imagined he was encouning his identity. Perhaps Traven cretering one of the most enigmatic figated his enigma as a smoke screen, ures of the 20th century. a marketing ploy to keep his books before the reading public long after he’d ceased writing novels. Traven once wrote “. . . the biography of a creative person is absolutely unimportant.” The numinous aura surrounding his biography created the opposite effect. The sad irony: questions about his identity eclipsed interest in his novels. He’d miscalculated. B. Traven’s Mexican enigma continued. In 1951, Traven was granted Mexican citizenship under the name Traven Torsvan. He’d reverted back to the identity he’d devised in Tampico. Then, as Hal Croves, he wrote screenplays for films adapted from B.Traven books. Most were filmed

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BRIDGE BY THE LAKE By Ken Masson

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here is great satisfaction in arriving at and making a contract that none of your competitors in a duplicate event managed to find. Such was the case in this deal played at the Lakeside Bridge Center in Riberas recently. North began proceedings with a bid of 1 heart and South responded 1 spade. North had an awkward rebid with 18 high-card points, a broken 6-card heart suit, a good 4-card diamond suit and Aces in each of the short black suits. North solved the problem by treating her hand as a game-force and made the jump-shift bid of 3 diamonds. South now considered 3 No Trump but realized that would be a sign-off so South decided to temporize with 3 spades. Normally this would show a six card suit but South considered that the quality of his suit would compensate for the lack of a sixth card. To his pleasant surprise, North now raised him to 4 spades and visions of slam flashed before South’s eyes. Without further ado, South launched into Roman Key Card Blackwood (1430). In this form of Blackwood, responder considers the king of the agreed trump suit as well as all four Aces as “Key Cards”. A bid of 5 clubs would show 1 or 4 Key Cards, or 5 diamonds (as in this case) would show Zero or 3. (5 hearts would have shown 2 Key Cards, without the trump Queen; 5 spades, 2 Key Cards with the trump Queen). South naturally assumed that his partner’s 5 diamonds showed 3 Key Cards (and not zero) and signed off

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in 6 spades. West led the 7 of hearts which caused declarer no inconvenience whatsoever. South let the opening lead come around to his hand and won East’s Jack with the Ace. Three rounds of spades quickly gathered in all the enemy trumps and now it was a simple matter to set up the hearts by playing the 9 to the king and ruffing a heart in hand to set up the suit for three pitches. South now played a diamond to the Queen and when this held he had 13 tricks. No other pair had managed to find the slam, the key to which was South’s 3 spades rebid. This was really a win-win bid as South intended to pass a 3 No Trump bid by North but left the door open to the possibility that North held something along the lines of her actual collection. West had a problem in selecting his opening lead as the lead of either minor could well have cost a trick. A trump lead would probably have been the selection of most experts but in fact, on the lie of these cards, slam could not be defeated by any lead. So the lesson of this hand was, when you are in a game force auction, try to find out as much about partner’s hand before signing off. There may be a better place to play than in the “obvious” contract. Questions or comments: email: masson.ken@gmail.com

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UNCOMMON COMMON SENSE By Bill Frayer

Can You Look Outside Your Paradigms?

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remember an article written by a physics professor who had included the following question on an exam: “Explain how to determine the height of a tall building with the aid of a barometer.” He presumably wanted the student to use atmospheric pressure to solve the problem. The student claimed there were many ways to accomplish the task. One suggestion was to go to the roof of the building and tie a rope to the barometer, lower the barometer to the street and measure the rope. Another was to drop the barometer to the street, timing its fall, and using a simple equation, determine the height of the building. He also proposed putting the barometer on the sidewalk, measuring the shadow of the barometer, the shadow of the building, and the height of the barometer. Using a proportion, he could calculate the height of the building. His final solution was to knock on the superintendant’s door and say, “Hello sir. Here I have a fine barometer. If you tell me the height of this building, I will give you this barometer!” This student was a creative thinker. He was able to break through the barometer “paradigm.” A paradigm is a particular pattern of thinking. The barometer paradigm is that a barometer can only be used for measuring atmospheric pressure. The student shattered that paradigm. In 1962, Thomas Kuhn discussed the idea of paradigms in his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. He suggested that scientific innovation usually occurred when scientists found ways to break exist-

Bill Frayer

ing paradigms. Copernicus did it by suggesting the sun, not the earth, was the center of the solar system. Einstein did it when he proved that time and space are relative values, not constants. The concept of a computer changed forever when IBM moved from the “mainframe” to the PC. The original computer paradigm was the computer as a giant calculator. In fact one early computer pioneer famously remarked that he didn’t think the world would need more than 4 or 5 computers. This paradigm was broken when the idea of software, based on binary code, allowed a computer to do virtually any task. The mechanical watch paradigm was broken by the invention of the quartz movement. The epicenter of watch development shifted from Switzerland to Japan because the Swiss suffered what Kuhn called, “paradigm paralysis,” and stuck with their old methods. How often do we get so stuck in our own paradigms that we fail to think creatively outside the box and conceptualize new paradigms? I suspect that the older we get, the more susceptible we are to “paradigm paralysis.” Here’s a brain teaser. To solve it, you need to shift your paradigm. Imagine a room with a single light bulb hanging by its cord from the ceiling. The room is sealed; no light can escape. Outside the room are three switches. One turns on the light bulb; the other two do nothing. You may manipulate the switches in some way, then open the door and determine which switch is the live one. Once you have opened the door, you cannot touch the switches again. You are not to dismantle the switch box or use any kind of electric meter. You cannot see light under the door with the door closed. It’s a difficult puzzle. I’ll reveal the solution next month. My email is billfrayer@ gmail.com if you think you’ve solved it. Next month, more about some contemporary paradigm-breaking pioneers.

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HOLA TO AJIJIC! By Scott Richards

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he last plane my wife and I are planning on flying for a very long time, finally landed in Guadalajara from Istanbul three weeks ago delivering us to this enchanting pueblo of Ajijic. Two years, thirty-six flights and almost 100,000 air miles, we find ourselves home. A couple of middle-aged nomads hopping around the world looking for paradise, our Shangri-la only to find it within ourselves all along and not on any map, have finally put their suitcases away. Twenty-one countries later, we have both decided that if we have a problem living here, we better get over it. We have run out of countries and even continents. Literally, where on earth would we go to find it better than this? We love the weather, the music, food, art and most importantly, the warm and welcoming hearts of the people. From our recent travels, Americans are not always welcomed everywhere in the world anymore. It is a real pleasure learning the language and interacting positively with everyone we meet. We sold everything in 2008 in Orlando, Florida where we lived for the last twenty-five years performing our proper nine to fives, taking trips every three months in order to keep the will to live alive. It finally dawned on us that we had our lifestyle in reverse. We should be living the life of our vacations. Life is short and we aren’t getting any younger. Although satisfied in my work having a small art gallery and picture frame shop for almost three decades allowing me to meet interesting clients and handle many exceptional, historic and moving pieces of art, I and my wife sought more than material gain and a dead end consumer existence. It was the soul and heart that needed feeding; badly and soon. The world is full of great places to live but we invariably encountered political, cultural, language and emigrational differences or hindrances disqualifying one after another. The adventure of a lifetime was becoming a nightmare of airports, suspicious food and customs agents. Traveling constantly is more arduous than first suspected; it’s really unsettling to view your luggage as next of kin. Living in villages throughout the South Pacific, surviving ancient Thailand trains,

Tuk-Tuks, attempting to live the life of the people whose country we were in and eating from the market of where ever we were was our goal. This monumental mission was becoming real work on our parts, unpacking, settling, another box of Imodium, money, packing up, more money, arriving, unpacking our lives over and over again until we began questioning the wisdom of our quest and possibly our own sanity. We originally left the States to learn to live with less and love it, but here in Lakeside, we get to have everything we need. Most of the countries we have lived in did not have hot water at the kitchen sink, almost no ice and hot showers were not a given. After two years on the road, our little casita is first world living and we love it. My wife and I have enjoyed numerous trips and adventures in Baja and the Pacific coast as well as interior cities, never thinking we would end up in Mexico, but we have long ago learned never to say never. So we say Hola to Ajijic and its colorful wonders.

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ALMOST PREGNANT By Jose Amador Translation by Elizabeth Sellars

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here’s a place in my mind where I continuously go, and it’s where I keep my memories. The other day, walking among so many, I tripped over one that took me to the decade of the 1950s, when I frisked about like a colt in the town of Tonaya, too small for me because there wasn’t much entertainment. Fortunately for my yearnings, some cousins operated the town’s movie theater and also went to Tuxcacuesco and Tolimán for the same business. To make their work less monotonous, they invited me to accompany them. Sometimes I did go with them, as much for the ride as to meet girls. Making those journeys was difficult. Even though the distances weren’t far, gaps lay in the roads. No bridges existed and sometimes you had to cross a river several times, which meant no return to Tonaya until early the next morning. On one such visit to Tolimán, we

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announced the event of the evening with our sound equipment, and then set ourselves up in the field for the show. That night I sold tickets and met a young woman with skin of the waning moon, thin as the cornfield before it ripens, with eyes as large as a deer’s and black hair that fell over her shoulders like a waterfall. With a few glances we immediately established an attraction, and with a few words I realized that she stood out from the rest of her country-women.

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During the screening, I confirmed that she had an open manner when she told me that she had studied in Zapotlán, that her family had a softdrink distributing company, and that she had been the queen of the town festivals. All that cluster of knowledge and attractions secured my interest, and I felt that she had taken a place in my heart. So I continued going to Tolimán with my relatives. Those visits increased our meetings and my affections. During one of the visits, before returning to Tonaya, I conquered my fears and in a letter declared my love for her, asking if she would be my fiancée. On the following visit I was fearful when I went to find her, to hear her answer to my proposal. She replied, “I’m going to say yes.” Our affection secured with those words, we began to express it in the language of lovers, with caresses and kisses. Even though an arroyo and river of desire, we had not yet joined in the ocean. Nevertheless, don’t think that this relationship that I’m relating to you was all roses. Some affection is attacked, as this one was by jealousy. She continuously pressured me to swear that I wasn’t deceiving her. And I answered, joking, that I had

never been unfaithful, and that I never would be again. That response bothered her as much as her brother bothered me. He was very jealous and constantly spied on us. But love has many paths, and obtaining permission from my parents, I took one path, after negotiating the road and the rivers of the rainy season, so that I could see her for a special date. It was a day in the country at La Taza, a fresh-water spring in the community of San Pedro. Goldfinches, sparrows and mockingbirds competed to surpass the song of the river, as the figs and other large trees competed to provide the most shade. She separated herself from the group and met me under a tree as luxuriant as our affection. When we felt ourselves alone with our longings, the film of passion began. Our breathing touched, unchaining a storm of caresses and kisses, and allowing her underskirts to rise. With a look of fear, she resisted. And with good reason. In those days, to scare away the beaked bird, there was only one method: the same that if it’s not done, the bread burns in the oven for not taking it out in time! But that afternoon the opportunity was the size of a rainbow, and not to let it go, I promised her that nothing would happen, assuring her that I would take the necessary precautions. So she agreed that we would slide only to the edge of the layer of passion. I returned two more times to see her, and our feelings already had jelled into an illusion. But one day while I passed time in Tonaya, an urgent telegram arrived from her, asking me to meet her. Not being a diviner, I feared something was wrong. Without explaining the trip to my cousins, nervous and annoyed, I rushed off to see her. As we talked that night at the back entrance to her house, she spattered me with her fears. At that moment I realized that the distance between a picnic and panic is twenty-eight days, as she confessed to me that she believed she was “almost pregnant.” “What are you saying?” I fearfully asked her. “I believe that I am almost pregnant,” she answered. As I was a novice in the moves of love, it seemed logical to me that she could be “half pregnant” because of the way we had made love. But I was totally frightened, because I had never half impregnated anyone. Being a gentleman, I assured her of my quest to resolve the serious matter, and as I embraced her with this intention, her brother appeared.


He was as angry as a scorpion. He carried a pistol, and as he approached I saw that he had every desire to convert me into a spirit. I wonder if it was the prayers that my mother had said to the Virgin of Tonaya, or because their mother had removed the bullets from the gun, or simply because the pistol jammed…. It is certain that the fright ran through my veins, wrinkling the illusion that I had nurtured for her and making me swear that I would never return to see her. But her affection, the caresses, the memories and my curiosity to know

how her “half pregnancy” turned out were so strong that four months later I returned to see her. Accompanied by my fears I went disguised as a beggar, standing in the plaza in front of her house. From there I could see that her profile did not correspond to a “half pregnant” woman, which made me suppose that she had made an involuntary mistake, or that she had tried to trick me into marrying her. But from this story, besides the distressing experience, I also received ten pesos and sixty centavos in alms.

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THUNDER ON THE RIGHT By Paul Jackson paulconradjackson@gmail.com

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find it quite perplexing that atheists by and large feel utterly compelled to try and destroy everyone else’s faith in a God. Just look in the book stores—in the past few months we have had The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins, God is not Great: Why Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher Hitchens, and Atheist Manifesto: The Case Against Christianity, Judaism and Islam by Michael Onfray, and many, many more. Atheism must now has become a profit-driven business purses full of lucrative amounts of devilish cash. It is a polar opposite to fanatical TV evangelism, but in a way strangely parallel to it. All these authors and the flotsam and jetsam of their adherents haunt TV and radio shows and other public forums trying to tear people’s beliefs to bits. Myself, for sentimental and romantic reasons at least, I hope there is a Supreme Being, and there is plenty of evidence for the existence of God. Yet I am not the least interested in convincing anyone to join my side. I have said over the years I care not if someone is Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Ismaili, Hindu, Sikh or whatever: if they treat me decently I’ll be their friend. I don’t want any of them to try and convert me to their particular faith, yet neither do I want to destroy their beliefs in the faiths they have. Live and let live, I say. But atheists seem to have this unholy mission in life - hope you got that touch of humor - to make people who currently feel comfortable in their beliefs start to feel not

Paul Jackson

only uncomfortable but downright miserable. Dawson, the most articulate of the current crop of atheists, insists once we realize 70 or 80 years of absolute existence is all we have and there is no Heaven then we can really start to pack every minute of happiness into the few decades we have. There is nothing else, so enjoy this life to the full. A simplistic philosophy. The shaky foundation to Dawkins’ argument is most believers are already enjoying life to the full and packing everything into it. They see an afterlife as a bonus. Hitchens, whose political columns I never miss, and normally applaud, points out the supposed absurdities of various religions in an attempt to say they are all crazy. If God created pigs - if pigs are good enough for God - why do Jewish people deplore pork, and why is Islam so violent in God’s name? Well, because of the climate, eating pork in the Middle East was a risky business, and I’ve met many a Muslim who is a kind and tolerant individual. That said, I can’t see how those strange religious types in the Deep South of the USA can fool around with snakes and speak in tongues. But there will always be individuals who will pervert their own religions. Way, way down from the socalled “intellectual” set of atheists who can at least articulate with some eloquence their case - are a group of only semi-literate types who, meanspirited, exhibit a malevolent, malicious mendacity towards religion. Maybe Sigmund Freud would peer at then and suggest these types have hidden sexual problems. Every time they see a cigar, they picture a Christian cross. When they see a happy and carefree Tom Sawyer novel, they picture a Talmud or a Koran. Or are they just miserable and want to pass on their misery to others? Me, I’m just quietly happy in my own simple religious beliefs, and may you be happy in your beliefs, too.

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A CHANCE REUNION By Margie Harrell

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eing an avid walker, I knew I had found my paradise in Ajijic, Mexico with its narrow calles that are more conducive to walking than driving. Each day I would set out on a quest to discover what was around the next corner, never being disappointed at what I found. Another part of living in Mexico is to enjoy the pleasure of having a maid, a custom I accepted wholeheartedly. Her name was Imelda and she was the best, always doing more than was asked of her. When I first settled in the village, the lakeshore was still open to nomads to pitch a tent and make a home. I marveled at how they were able to make something out of nothing and seemed quite happy in doing so. A lean-to, a fire pit and life was good. Imelda lived just off the shore in a small shack with her family which included five children When I left Mexico three years later to live in Nevada with my new husband, I vowed to return. It was a long five years before that was to happen but I immediately went looking for my Imelda. Days of walking the streets were fruitless as she had moved. I chose to imagine that life had been good to her and she had moved on to better things. Soon my short vacation was over and as the time drew closer for me to return home, I was saddened that I wasn’t able to connect again with her. Feeling a little downtrodden I set out on a walk that I knew would lift my spirits as it was another beautiful day on the shores of Lake Chapala. Usually the dogs of the village didn’t concern me but on this day I noticed a

rather surly one up ahead of me so I decided to cut through a lane to the next street. As I rounded the corner I practically knocked down a woman coming from the opposite direction. “Perdoneme,” I mumbled as our eyes met briefly. In a heartbeat we both stopped in our tracks. “Imelda! Senora!” we said in unison. Could it be possible that my detour had brought me right where I was supposed to be that very afternoon? I felt like I had just found a longlost family member. Imelda pointed to her house which I had passed many times before but never managed to see her. Life had indeed been better to my friend as she now had furniture and a decent kitchen to cook those wonderful Mexican dishes. As the children offered me sodas and cookies there was a warm feeling all around the room. Eduardo her son had been a teenager when I left but was now a grown man and helping out with the household expenses. He proudly showed me the typewriter I had given him years before to further his education. The little five-year-old sitting on my lap I had held as a newborn. I am sure she was wondering who this new friend was that mama kept hugging. All too soon it was time for me to leave as I vowed it wouldn’t be another five years before I returned again. My trip back in time had been the frosting on the cake as once again Mexico had planted a seed deep in my heart saying, “This is your true home. You may leave for a while but we will see you again.” A short detour around a corner and a friendship was renewed. It happens in Mexico all the time.

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Wondrous Wildlife By Vern and Lori Gieger

wildlifemexico@wildtravellers.org

Birds of a Feather

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e would like to dedicate this months column to a very dear friend and a true friend of the animals: Linda Wood, a longtime resident of Ajijic passed away Dec. 29th after a courageous battle with cancer. Linda loved all animals but her passion was parrots. It was because of Linda that we came to understand how intelligent and amazing parrots are. Linda always said she wanted to go where all the animals go; somehow I think she has her own flock now, soaring high above us. Parrots are beautiful and intelligent birds. Unfortunately, people who purchase them as pets are often

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disappointed when they get to know the other aspects of what makes a parrot a parrot. Parrots are charming, social, loving, and comical; they are also emotional, noisy, easily bored, destructive and messy. Whoever coined the phrase “bird brain� was not referring to parrots, and smarts that surpass dogs and


cats sometimes their owners. A parrot’s intelligence may rival that of a four-year-old child, with the emotions of a two-year-old. Because parrots are brainy, they need interaction, attention and toys they can destroy. It also means that a parrot can absolutely not be locked in a cage all day. They need stimulation. It is important to add new toys, change the cage setup every week or two to keep them on their mental toes. This can be a costly endeavor. Yes, some parrots can talk. However, human language and cute tunes are not the only things to escape that hooked beak. They love to hear themselves make noise, any noise, they scream at any opportunity, especially when you’re on the phone. Some of the noise can be curbed, but it is part of their social structure. They love to chew, shred and otherwise destroy whatever they can get their beaks around; not only that $20 toy you just got them, but also the couch, the TV remote and other items in your house. This can be dangerous behavior the possibility of electrocution or poisoning exists. They cannot be left unsupervised. In the wild, the forest floor is their litter box. The remains of their

meals (parrot poop) distributes seeds around their habitat. This is an important link in the delicate “web of life” of the rainforest. However, just because a bird moves indoors, does not mean their manners improve. Food scraps and bird-doo are going to be left in a parrot’s wake. It is not uncommon to see parrots for sale, but remember, without proper legal documentation, it is illegal for you to have them. Before you buy, be sure the vendor can give you the correct legal documents. Possession of any bird or wild animal without proper legal documentation is a federal crime. Most of the birds for sale on the street are not legal, are usually sick, and will most likely die. You may think that by buying the parrot, you are saving it, but in reality, you are supporting an illegal trade, and creating a market, encouraging people to catch and sell wildlife. Think of it this way: for every one bird that makes it to the market three died. Parrots have become one of the most threatened groups of birds in the world, primarily because of international trade and habitat destruction. An estimated 50,000 wild parrots are caught or plucked from their nests in Mexico each year.

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OF O F F FAITH AITH A AND ND F FABLES ABLES By Bob Haynes bzhaynes@gmail.com

Choosing What We Believe

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n her book “Dreams Are Whispers from the Soul,” Marcia Wieder said: “All obstacles are either what I refer to as “internal,” something you believe about your life, or they are “external.” If the obstacle is external, we must develop a plan to try and change it. If the obstacle is internal, the most important task is determining whether it is “real” or simply an “illusion.” We must be willing to look within ourselves and realize the fact that we can choose to believe either that the obstacle is impossible to circumvent or we can allow ourselves to choose to believe that it can be overcome.” In my own life experience I sometimes am presented – at least in my mind – with obstacles which seem to block my way. What I have learned is that some of these obstacles might just be illusions and I have chosen to believe they are real. “Our attitudes and beliefs impact our thoughts and feelings which in turn, shape our choices and decisions. Beliefs either move us forward or hold us back, but what many of us forget is that we choose what we believe,” Wieder said. Fact is, Wieder said, “You can choose to believe something that will empower and move you forward, or believe something that will limit and hold you back. On a challenging day, when you may have buckets of doubt, this becomes the critical moment to choose a belief that will support you.” In other words, beliefs can be

limiting or positive. That’s not to say it’s easy to choose the positive belief. To do so, says Wieder, takes willingness, courage and practice. I read somewhere that trials are really only lessons that you failed to learn, presented once again. If you made a faulty choice before, you can now make a better one, and thus escape all pain your original decision brought you. I have also learned that sometimes those faulty choices are made from ignorance; at other times they simply represent what Daniel Boorstin called the ‘illusion of knowledge.’ He wrote: “The greatest obstacle to discovering the shape of the earth, the continents and the oceans, was not ignorance but the illusion of knowledge.” Daniel J. Boorstin, historian and educator, 1914. As we begin our journey into 2010, it seems to me that we might need to recall those words of wisdom about both obstacles and keep in mind the concept of the illusion of knowledge. Sometimes we are too quick in our decisions to take a direction and later learn the sad truth of realizing that when the decision fails to reach the conclusion we wanted is not ignorance, it was simply that we thought we knew we were on the right path when we really were not. M. Scott Peck said: “The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled. For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.” The world condition today has placed all of us in positions of how to overcome some very important obstacles… However, we can choose the positive approach or the negative approach to overcoming them. Yes, we face opposition, but I’m reminded of what Stephen Covey said. “Opposition is a natural part of life. Just as we develop our physical muscles through overcoming opposition – such as lifting weights – we develop our character muscles by overcoming challenges and adversity.” Shalom!

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Fashion Tips For 2010 By Joseph Keenan and Mark Sconce

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et’s begin with a few observations by Joseph J. Keenan in his seminal work “Breaking Out of Beginner’s Spanish,” University of Texas Press, Austin. “Far be it from me to tell you how to dress on vacation or when prowling the barrio, but do remember the Spanish dicho: Como te ven, te tratan (‘How they see you, they treat you’). Dressing down has not yet caught on in most Latin cultures, perhaps because millions of people dress that way for reasons not related to fashion. You don’t have to dress to the nines to go buy a Coke, but you should at least be in the low sevens. Otherwise, your clothes will be saying things about you that your mouth never would. “What gringos often do, since we seem to be talking about them, is to covert their Sunday barbecue outfits back home into all-purpose wear for their introduction to Latin culture. What they would never wear to church they don’t think twice about wearing to a Colombian cathedral or Guatemalan village church.

If you intend to show the local people that you respect their culture, the best way to start is by letting your clothes speak for you. And the clothes that speak best are the ones that cover knees and shoulders, at least away from coastal cities. You don’t have to care about any of this, of course, but if you do, remind yourself that sin and skin are still closely linked in many minds.” With this good advice in mind, I present below some fashion tips from some surprising sources. “It is only shallow people who do not judge by appearances. The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible.”-Oscar Wilde “A good exterior is a silent recommendation.”-Publilius Syrus “Looking good is not an end in itself. It’s a metaphor for our inner being. Ponder this. Society doesn’t applaud people’s looking bad. Looking bad means we feel bad about ourselves. It also suggests that things aren’t right with our character.”Charles Hix “Grace is the absence of everything that indicates pain or difficulty, hesitation or incongruity.”-William Hazlitt Your dresses should be tight enough to show you’re a woman and loose enough to show you’re a lady.”Edith Head “Never underestimate the power of what your wear…After all, there’s a small bit of yourself sticking out, at the cuff and at the neck. The rest of what the world sees is what you hang on the frame.” Oscar E. Schoeffler “The way to go from rags to riches is to start by getting a decent set of rags.”-Leonard and Thelma Spinrad “Never offend the eyes of other people. If you don’t make yourself attractive as possible, you are very egoistic.”-Erte “Always buy one good dress instead of three cheap ones.”-A mother’s advice quoted by Michele Slung “Beware of gaudy exterior. The wise will infer a lean interior,”Charles Simmons

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A TALE OF 400 PIT BULLS By Thetis Reeves

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ast July, an unprecedented animal rescue mission took place. In coordinated raids in Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, Texas and Oklahoma, task forces of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies seized over 400 pit bull terriers and arrested 30 people involved in dog-fighting operations. Most of the dogs were placed by the Humane Society of Missouri in an undisclosed emergency shelter in St Louis, where vets and animal-behavior specialists took on the task of examining them. That some could not recover from severe injuries or illnesses and would have to be put down was expected. But each one of the others would have at least the chance for a better life pending thorough physi-

cal and behavioral evaluations. When this story broke, reporters were asked not to disclose the location of the shelter nor name those arrested, because indictments were pending. Legal ownership of about 40 of the dogs was also in dispute. I should have known when I first read about the rescue of so many pit bulls that the story would take on a personal aspect for me. My niece, Alexis, who loves all dogs, especially cares about pit bulls. (She is the treasurer of Pit Bull Rescue Central, a group dedicated to the care of and public education about the breed.) She was one of the hundreds of volunteers, whose travel expenses were covered, who took time out from their jobs and personal lives to come to the shelter to help feed,

care for, clean up after and socialize the dogs during their evaluations. If you imagine that several hundred abused and traumatized dogs gathered in one place would be a scene of utter misery that is far from how one reporter described his visit several months later. He wrote in the St. Louis Post Dispatch, “Be prepared to face a cacophony of barks and growls, but also a warehouse full of wagging tails.” The dogs were desperate for attention, jumping high in the air and bouncing off chain link fences. They’d already grown used to the care and kindnesses they’d never before experienced. The puppies’ behavior was no surprise—unless trained for aggression, puppies are puppies. But even Bonnie, a battle-scarred survivor with a missing front leg, strained to be petted. “Pit bulls have gotten this bad reputation because of some of the people who own them,” said Humane Society investigator Tim Rickey, who led the July raid. “Their love for humans is the reason why this breed is in trouble. They will take the abuse.” The grim prediction that less than 10 per cent of the dogs were likely to be saved gave way to a much bright-

er reality. Months after the raid, 60 per cent of the hundreds of dogs and puppies rescued were expected to survive and be fit to be placed in sanctuaries, half-way houses for old fighters, humane shelters across the country and adoptions into private homes. Guilty pleas were entered in federal courts in connection with the arrests made at the time of the raids. Since then, a number of the dog-fighting operators have been sentenced to prison time. “This intervention is a momentous victory in our ongoing battle to end the cruel, criminal dog-fighting industry,” said Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society of the United States at the time. “With each raid we get one step closer to ending this cruel blood sport.” There is one dog whose good fortune since rescue I’m able to follow avidly and that is Fanny, the seven-year-old adopted by my niece. It isn’t clear that Fanny was ever a fighter, but she was found on the premises where fights took place. She now is the third pit bull in the house, along with Tonka and Gracie. Tonka and Gracie were both raised from puppies in loving homes before they came to live with Lexie. With great care—Lex is a super-responsible dog owner—Fanny was introduced to her new home. Besides Tonka and Gracie there are cats in residence. They have their private spaces, but all are on speaking terms and fraternization is not unheard of here. All is well at my niece’s home. Another once-abused dog destined for hardship learns about life as a beloved pet. This remarkable rescue mission did the same for several hundred other cruelly treated dogs. For further information on Pit Bull Rescue Central go to: www. PBRC.net

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George G eorge C Carlin’s arlin’s V Views iews o on n How H ow w to to Stay Stay Young Young

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. Throw out nonessential numbers. This includes age, weight and height. Let the doctors worry about them. That is why you pay them. 2. Keep only cheerful friends. The grouches pull you down. 3. Keep learning. Learn more about the computer, crafts, gardening, whatever, even ham radio. Never let the brain idle. “An idle mind is the Devil’s workshop.” And the Devil’s family name is Alzheimer’s. 4. Enjoy the simple things. 5. Laugh often, long and loud. Laugh until you gasp for breath. 6. The tears happen. Endure, grieve, and move on. The only person who is with us our entire life is ourselves. Be ALIVE while you are alive. 7. Surround yourself with what you love, whether it’s family, pets, keepsakes, music, plants, hobbies, whatever. Your home is your refuge. 8. Cherish your health: If it is good, preserve it. If it is unstable, improve it. If it is beyond what you

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can improve, get help. 9. Don’t take guilt trips. Take a trip to the mall, even to the next county, to a foreign country but NOT to where the guilt is. 10. Tell the people you love that you love them at every opportunity.

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BAD HAIR DAY By Bill Franklin

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ost people don’t know how to comb their hair. That’s because they don’t really know what they’re up against. What you are up against are 100,000 hair follicles on your head that sprawl, go their own way, and that don’t care about you. So the first thing to know about combing your hair is that you’re outnumbered. But you have your allies. You have water and sprays and semi-clean brushes, but your allies are unreliable and the bottom line is, you don’t have a chance. Combing your hair turns out to be asymmetrical warfare at its worst. But still, you do have half a chance, some mornings anyway, to catch those little follicles napping and bend them to your will. It’s worth a try. It’s actually a requirement if you’re employed, and who knows? Maybe someday you’ll have a day just like the one I had. And having a day like I just had is why I believe in miracles. Rare though it may be, when the stars are aligned and your karma has kicked up a notch, there is such a thing as a good hair day. And there is nothing quite like a good hair day. Although these days mine seem to be fewer and farther between, when I have one, an especially good one, I can’t help but feel I’m bound for glory. Today was just one of those great days. It had glory written all over it. I looked in the

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mirror and realized I had the kind of hair any sea captain would need to ride the wind and bring his battered ship in. I of course don’t have a ship to bring in. I have the hair for it but I’m lacking the boat. Or you could say I had a kind of Custer’s last stand kind of hair day. Custer, dashing figure that he was, had the misfortune of turning a really good hair day into a bad one. But I’m quite sure Custer looked very good with those blond locks flopping around in the prairie until... just until...well you know the rest. And Custer does provide us a moral lesson here. No matter how good your hair looks, it won’t save you in times of extreme duress. My hair, today at least, hatchet magnet though it would have been in days of yore, is still not immune to the horrors of bumping into car roofs or doorways or for that matter, Indian attack. But today, lucky me, I’ve got myself a hair day. But the problem with a great hair day is you want someone else to see it. It doesn’t do much good if I am the only one confirming the obvious. I’m sure others feel the same way. I know Andre Agassi did. Agassi would rather lose the French Open than have a bad hair day. Apparently when bad hair was in the balance, he opted for bobby pins to save his particular day. And that brings me to another moral hair lesson. If your good hair


day depends on bobby pins, it is not a good hair day. It’s a bad one. No matter what you think of Sarah Palin, it can’t be contested, her hair looks good. She had so many more better hair-days than McCain I began to wonder why she wasn’t running for president. I bet whoever picked John over Sara never had a good hair day and didn’t know what to look for in a candidate. I’ve been looking at old films of Bobby Kennedy. He wouldn’t leave his hair alone. He would give these profound speeches, promising everything good and vilifying everything bad while constantly in midsentence checking his hair with the quick-handed once-over. One time I counted five quick-handed onceovers inside of a two minute speech. Which brings me to another moral hair lesson. When trying to save the world, leave your damn hair alone. I’m not sure what makes for a good hair day. You can’t bottle it. It’s not a Brylcreem thing or a don’t move or I’ll kill you hair spray thing. Good hair days are largely mystical events, shrouded in intense mystery. I have tried though, spending hundreds of dollars to capture the essence of good hair by buying only name brand conditioners. I am

willing to spend that kind of money because I know that deep down inside, greasy hair violates my sense of my inner sea captain. Which brings me to another moral lesson. Sometimes in life it is better not to squeeze hair together in some ungodly way, making it sticky and feeling hemmed in. Rather let your hair go rogue sometimes, waving with abandon. It is that waving with abandon look that today’s Hollywood directors hate but that I like. When it comes to being dashing and having George Custer levels of debonair, a little rogue will do you.

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Welcome to Mexico! By Victoria Schmidt

Watch Your Step

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here’s a joke around town that you can always tell who is a newcomer in Mexico by their injuries. The ankle braces, knee braces, arm splits and, of course, black eyes are dead giveaways. Most often these are injuries suffered by walking the infamous cobblestone streets, and uneven sidewalks. It doesn’t take long before someone takes a hard fall. The walking wounded doesn’t often include Mexicans. They seem very adept and light on their feet. I watched a young woman rushing along the sidewalk and crossing the cobblestone street in her stilettos. “How can she do that?” I watch in amazement. I can’t walk in stilettos period. I believe the Marquis de Sade invented them. Who but a cruel sadist would invent shoes that have toes that come to a sharp point, and place them on a three-inch platform forcing the woman’s toes to be pushed even harder into that infinitesimally small space? And then balance those shoes on a heel no larger than a head of a pin! And yet there is a Mexican beauty running in those stiletto heels on a cobblestone street. Even in sandals, flip-flops and tennis shoes, expats seem to take frequent falls. Do we spend too much time looking skyward? Do we gaze at everything else but the ground we walk upon? Do our trifocals blur the terrain? Of course, these falls must be kept in a category separate from those falls from resulting from the propensity for some of us to over-indulge. The terrain is difficult enough when we are stone cold sober! I find the absolute most dangerous spot to be the tianguis. Maybe that’s because we spend too much time looking at the wares of all the various vendors. A good friend took a terrible fall at the tianguis just days before her son’s wedding. She was loaded down with purchases and fell right onto her face, requiring a few stitches by her eye

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socket. She showed up at the wedding with two black eyes, a puffy face, and bruises over her shoulders and side. Sitting in Mexico isn’t safe either. Have you ever been sitting at LCS and had an avocado bonk you on the head? It’s happened. Another lesson learned: don’t sit under fruit trees. But for me, the greatest culprit has not been the streets or sidewalks. Oh no. My downfall (pun intended) is the ubiquitous white plastic chairs. These insidious premanufactured molded plastic excuses for seating are everywhere feigning security, luring me. They pretend to offer me a moment of respite from my journey, or a seat to hold me while I enjoy lunch with my friends, or a place to rest while socializing at a party. But they feign security. For not once, not twice, but three times since I came to Mexico, these chairs have unceremoniously dumped me on my caboose! I now know, that these chairs become dry, brittle and crack, that they need TLC but they don’t get it. Because they are nothing more than advertising for a beer distributor and are “borrowed” not owned, no one seems to inspect them. The many restaurateurs and perhaps even the distributorship itself just seem to wait until they break before rotating out bad or damaged chairs. Well! None of them are to be trusted—especially if you are a “person of substance.” After those three falls, I am very careful, and I often, when given a preference may chose to go to establishments that offer “real” chairs. I may even start keeping a folding chair in my van—just in case! I take my safety and comfort seriously: NO stiletto heels and NO white plastic chairs!

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Feria Artes Ajijic

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n Saturday and Sunday February 13 and 14 the first major professional Art Show for the visual arts will take place in Ajijic at the new CENTRO LAGUNA mall, on the Libramiento and in front of Walmart. This important event in our community life is the first collaborative group show h organized by the members of www. lagunaartesplasticas.com, Grupo de Artistas Plasticas de Jalisco. The artists are both from Lakeside and from Jalisco and this first single location show will in the future replace the previously organized Art Walks which did not allow other very gifted artists from out of town to participate. Fifty-two artists will exhibit sculptures, paintings, photography, drawings, engravings, glass art and collages, etc. in a professionally organized setting in the very attractive and modern inner courtyards

off the th new mall. ll Additi Additionall artisti tic side shows such as food art, ice sculpting and dance performances will take place simultaneously and we hope that the new mayor of Chapala, Jesus Cabral, will attend the opening ceremony on Saturday 13 at 11:00pm to cut the ribbon. All visitors will receive a copy of the attractive 20-page show catalogue. One of the reasons for such an important event, is our hope that it will grow from 52 artists this year, to include in the future the hundreds of extremely gifted visual artists who live in Jalisco with little or no possibilities to exhibit or sell their work. Such a well-organized and well-advertised Feria of interregional importance, which will attract possibly thousands of visitors to Ajijic, will contribute to the growing reputation of Ajijic as an artist village and to the development of local tourism and hence of the local economy. Together, all of us, residents and art lovers, can improve the quality of our cultural scene by giving our support to this great event. Hours are: Saturday February 13 from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm Sunday February 14 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm.

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I don’t travel by dogsled I wear a toque not a fur hat Winter is not all year round I live in a house not an igloo I AM A CANADIAN We are the second largest country in the world We didn’t copy our money from the game Monopoly The parliament building is not made of ice The maple leaf is our national symbol We are the best hockey players

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You do not have to be a dog lover, only human By Jackie Kellum

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here is an event that occurs periodically around Lakeside. Although most sights are quite pleasing to the eye, this new sight is distressing. We at times see several men either standing at the side of the Carretera in Ajijic on various corners, or in the market walkways on Wednesdays. These men, generally from Guadalajara, have very small puppies of various colors and “breeds” (usually only a few weeks old) squashed together in small cages stacked on top of each other. These enclosed “inmates” are the product of “puppy mills.” You may or may not be familiar with this polite term that is used to describe forced repeated dog reproductions for profit for individuals or groups. If you could see the inhuman conditions that occur at this type of place, you would turn your head away in horror and a sense of nausea. If you would like to avail yourself for the sake of knowledge, look on the web. YouTube has a video of this type of place. I would suggest that you do not view any of these sites that have pictures or video prior to or immediately after a meal. In our northern or “native” countries such as individual US states or Canada, there are laws against this cruel practice. As a matter of fact, it is also against the law in Jalisco, Mexico where we live. But like all laws that govern the protection of safety, justice, health, humanity and the list of life’s quality values, it doesn’t get acted upon to stop cru-

elty until each individual gets involved. Many years ago, in 11th century Italy, a priest, Francis of Assisi, became known as the Patron Saint of animals, as well as the environment and other things. There is an annual feast each Sept. 7- Oct. 4th in honor of him and his loving caring for all animals. There is a blessing ceremony of animals in Chapala during this period each year. If humanity could recognize the value and need for loving care and respect for animals so many centuries ago, why can we not now use our voice to protest against the cruel treatment of these innocent creatures we see before our eyes in these wire cages? There have been many formal health studies that outline the health benefits of having a family pet. A person does not have to have a dog as their family pet to understand and appreciate the value and benefits a person obtains from a dog’s unconditional love. I know myself firsthand about these benefits as I have four local “rescue” dogs in my family. We already have far too many local mistreated, mal-nourished, abandoned puppies and dogs that are un-spayed/un-neutered and repopulating in our Lakeside. We do not need our community “importing” caged puppy mill puppies from those persons whose sole motive is profit. These puppy sellers aim for American, Canadian and European buyers because we have kind hearts and fat wallets. Our animal shelters and various animal rescue groups, and individual kind- hearted vets are already overflowing with “unwanted” cats/dogs all through the year that are healthy and available for adoption. Please spay/neuter your current pets, adopt pets from our local animal agencies, and please do NOT contribute to this cruel animal practice for profit. DO share this information with your friends. Please be part of the Solution!

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Ask Carolyn By Carolyn Comedo

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EAR CAROLYN: I am an eight year old school boy. I was born one month after my parents got married and weighed eleven pounds. I am normal except my right arm is six inches longer than my left. Why? EARLY DEAR EARLY: You may have stretched your right arm by trying to hang on until after the wedding. DEAR CAROLYN: I am an eighty-two year-old widower. I suffer from hemorrhoids, arthritis, flatulence, diabetes, heart disease, dizzy spells, halitosis, high blood pressure and incontinence. My problem is that my hair is thinning. Do you think it’s a sign of something serious? HAIR TODAY DEAR HAIR: Yes I do. Thin hair will definitely reduce your sex appeal.

was already married so I sent him packing. Later I heard that he had died so I got married again to José. Then I discovered that the rumour that Eduardo had died was not true. Shortly after this, José passed away. My questions are: Am I a widow? Am I a bigamist? Who is my real husband—Eduardo or José? I must know these things so that, during confession, I can tell Father Alonzo with which man I committed adultery. Also I need to know if I must get divorced before I can marry again as Eduardo wants to rekindle our old romance. MARY WIDOW

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DEAR CAROLYN: What is testosterone? HE-MAN DEAR HE: Not what but who. Angelino Testosterone (1899-1952) was a well-known Italian tenor who died due to a prolonged orgasm he contracted while performing the role of Alfredo in Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata. DEAR CAROLYN: Some years ago I met Eduardo on a double date. He swept me off my feet and we eloped. Soon I discovered that he

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AMSIF in San Juan Cosala By Sally Bahous

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acing the square in San Juan is an old house painted yellow and trimmed in blue; during the Revolution it was a hospital and before that it functioned as the home of the priests who tended the old church whose side wall forms the back wall of the house’s courtyard and whose decaying tower now sports a cactus instead of a bell, looming large over the green courtyard. AMSIF has rented this house for the past five years, using it as a school for the women of San Juan Cosala. Here, Mexican women teach Mexican women who want to learn more about a large variety of subjects from nutrition to language to caring for the very young and the elderly. In the past year, an oven has been installed and some of the women who have been trained in baking pastries now have a paying job baking for the small cafe in the building that serves coffee, tea and desserts every Tuesday through Saturday. AMSIF is a 36-year-old organization founded by Carmen Moncayo and Marisa Arroyo in 1973 in Mexico City in order to help women in poor neighborhoods recover their dignity through programs that would encourage their self-realization. Since then, AMSIF has spread through Mexico. Today, here are thousands of women attending programs in hundreds of centers. AMSIF is officially recognized by the government as an organization which has served to strengthen families as well as the women it educates. San Juan Cosala’s AMSIF project was begun six years ago by Aurora Jacobo with help from Alicia Salcido. AMSIF (Mexican Association for the Integral Empowerment of Women and their Families) seeks to liberate women through education. Recently, the San Juan Cosala AMSIF has added a program of English language training for children. At AMSIF, empowering

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women also includes strengthening the family by encouraging the training of children. In San Juan, if women want to attend classes but have no one to care for their young children, Blanca Favela takes charge of the children in the courtyard, teaching them songs and games while their mothers study. Though AMSIF cannot take complete credit for the increased cleanliness of San Juan, the women and children are trained in recycling and provide colored ties for sale used in the area’s recycling of garbage. “We teach the women and the children what can most help them and the village,” says Lety Colunga, current director of the program. Alicia Salcido organized the first AMSIF Pig Bash fund raiser because each AMSIF program is dependent upon the women who run it for funds. For the past six years, the women of the Racquet Club and San Juan Cosala have held fund raisers for AMSIF in the Racquet Club palapa. Thanks to the generosity of Pedro Palmer, this fund raiser has been able to provide enough money for renting the facility, for improvements, supplies and equipment, freeing the women who teach to concentrate on giving the village women the courses they need. This year’s AMSIF Pig Bash will be held on February 25th from four to seven; tickets are available at the Racquet Club Office or from Chairperson Grace Holman at 387-761-0400. Grace explains the fund-raiser as simply another example of Lakeside’s “neighbors helping neighbors.”

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The Looming 40% Drop in The Market Saw you in the Ojo

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First F irst LLeg eg tto o tthe he E End nd o off tthe he W World orld Buenos B uenos A Aires ir res tto oE Ell C Calafate alafate Part P art 1 By Carol L. Bowman

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hile planning our recent odyssey to the tip of the South American Continent, I found Cape Horn referred to, in a romantic sense, as “the end of the world”. I pondered that there is no end when going east to west or west to east; just round and round. When traveling north to south, however, there comes a point where one can’t go any farther as the solid Antarctic Polar icecap prevents further navigation. The excursion began in Buenos Aires, Argentina, after a necessary, ten hour overnight flight from Houston, Texas. We roamed around this beautiful Argentine capitol with its European flair for a few days before flying another 1700 miles southwest to El Calafate, the gateway to southern Patagonia in Santa Cruz province, Argentina. The only runway at Calafate International Airport can accommodate 727 and 737 aircraft. With a mere, thin sliver of land separating touchdown from the glacial blue, Lago Argentino, I held my breath, anticipating a ditch in the icy waters ahead. Whew! Close one. I knew the time to turn my total trust and being over to the experts of Patagonia had arrived. We entered an eco system, a landscape, a way of life completely foreign to anything I had ever experienced. The main street of El Calafate, Avenida la Libertador, looked strangely similar to the set of Northern Exposure. In the distance, snow capped Andes mountains groaned from the weight of the fierce winter, but signs of early October, southern hemisphere spring showed. Originally settled as a shelter for wool traders at the turn of the 20th century, El Calafate experienced its official Argentine founding in 1927, when the government offered land deals to settlers to populate the town. The harsh climate and complete isolation required hardy souls

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with guts and determination to survive there. The calafate bush, the town’s namesake and only vegetation dotting the barren landscape, budded with delicate yellow flowers, making way for future dark blue berries. It is said that if you eat a calafate berry, you will return. I plan to consume many. El Calafate’s population, tripling over the past 10 years, shot up from 8,000 people in 2000 to 24,000 as 2010 nears. The interest in global warming, the massive Perito Moreno Glacier in Los Glaciares National Park, 50 miles from town and the fashionable trend toward exploring Patagonia spurred this growth. The town now boasts lodges, ecotourism companies, hiking gear shops and even a casino to entertain and prepare travelers for their Patagonian expeditions, guided or independent. The expanse and desolation of the Patagonian steppes, where only scrub grass grows, felt formidable. The land, beaten by dry winds, its atmosphere depleted of all moisture while crossing over the Andean range, shouted with emptiness. Only the very young and courageous or incredibly crazy would tackle this hostile environment alone. The estancias or sheep farms range in size from 10,000 to 70,000 hectares (2.5 acres per hectare). An occasional gaucho, mending fences with his border collie or kelp dogs trailing along, Andean condors soaring overhead, llama family guanacos and of course sheep by the thousands stood out as the only living things. Andean condors, the largest flying land bird in the Western hemisphere, with an average wing span of 10 feet, filled the sky. The first one that soared above without so much as a flap of a wing thrilled our inners. Then the sightings became so common that the “wows”


trailed off, but we respected the bird’s majesty every time one circled above. A hike along El Calafate’s coastline brought us to Redonda Bay. Fronting Lago Argentino, the first unlikely discovery of this trip unfolded. Pink flamingos, scattered about the bay in huge numbers, live here all year without migration. Wind howling against our three layers of clothes, we watched as these normally tropical, rosy birds danced in the icy, glacier fed water. Patagonia, 540,000 square

miles of wonderment, a quarter of which belongs to Chile and the rest to Argentina, acquired its name from the Spaniards. The original inhabitants, the extremely tall Tehuelches, left giant footprints in the snow from covering their feet with animal skins. The Spanish explorers called them “Patagones”, after a giant named ‘Patagon’ in a popular novel of the time. The vastness of Patagonia amazed us, but Perito Moreno Glacier in Los Glaciares National Park waited to weave its spell. Stay tuned.

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Phone: (376) 766-4774 or 765-3676 to leave messages Email: kdavis987@gmail.com Events are listed by date, like a calendar: past events, then those planned for the future. Some organizations offer multiple events/dates, and these items appear toward the end of the column.

Libby Townsend with photo

December 6 at Plaza Bugambilias a photo Exhibit opened in Ajijic’s smallest gallery, the Guadalajara Reporter Newspaper office. The exhibit was up through January 6 as part of a celebration at the mall. On December 21, CASA, the Culinary Arts Society of Ajijic, celebrated with a Christmas party at the home of Ken and Anita Caldwell. The two food categories were Botanas and Libations. In Category A, Botanas, Chris L’Ecluse won 1st place for Stuffed Dates while Wayne Palfrey took

second place with a Spinach Chili Tartlet, and Alice Huston won 3rd for Stuffed Portobella Mushrooms. In Category B, Libations, Monica Malloy won 1st place for Grandpa Bobby’s Eggnog. Donna Carnall won 2nd place for an appetizing-looking Strawberry Champagne, and Mary Ann Waite took 3rd with George Bailey’s Irish Cream. People’s Choice went to Ken Caldwell for Fa-La-La Lillet Punch. A good time was had by all. CASA winners: Chris All who are interested in joining are enL’Ecluse, Wayne Palfrey and couraged to call Patrick Winn at 766-4842 or Alice Huston email patriciowinn@hotmail.com. He would like you as his guest. The Lakeside British Society celebrated the 90th birthday of one of their members, Charles Morgan. The party was hosted by Ceri Dando, along with members of the Air Force Association of Canada, 904 Wing. Charles joined the RAF in June 1937 and served in various assignments as an armourer and later as an instructor. He was seconded to The Fleet Air Arm before being demobilized in 1946. January offered an exhibit at the Centro Cultural de Ajijic on the plaza. The display consisted of photos by Jill Flyer and Luis M. McCormick, both known in the US and Mexico. Paintings by Rick Present were also displayed. Look for their work at Quattro, a new gallery at Colon #9. January 15 at Galería Dos 90th birthday of Charles Morgan, center, Lunas was the opening of middle row. an art show. All of the woman multi-talented, what they create is worth viewing. Linda Richards’ art work has a soft effect. Gloria Palazzo and Judy Dykstra-Brown work with several media. And Xill Fessenden’s photography is almost a legend. January 16 there were two book signings of significance. At Galería Dos Lunas, Neil McKinnon, Robert Bruce Drynan, James Tipton and Kenneth Clarke gave well-performed readings of different and interesting material, some of it quite amusing. Look for Tuckahoe Slidebottle (Neil McKinnon), Domain of the Scorpion and/or What Price Liberty (Bob Drynan), Seven Years a Mariner (Ken Clarke) and any of the books of poetry by Jim Tipton who will recite at the Lake Chapala Society Open Circle on Val-

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entine’s Day. Later, at La Nueva Posada, Richard Rhoda and Tony Burton signed books for their joint release of Geo-Mexico: the Geography and Dynamics of Modern Mexico, a fascinating new book with Art Opening over 100 original maps & graphics covering Mexico in surprising depth. For example, did you Jirafa (giraffe) know that Mexico’s Copper Canyon is larger than the US Grand Canyon? That Mexico is in the top 15 in population, by Jill Flyer economic size and land area? That Mexico’s renowned poverty program, Oportunidades, is being copied in New York City? This book is a “must have” reference guide. January 20 – 22 the Sixth Annual Lake Chapala Writers Conference met at the Hotel Real de Chapala in La Floresta. The conference set new records for attendance and the participants raved about the speakers and the interaction amongst themselves. One of their challenges was a Worst Sentence Contest. Judged by Jay White, the win-

Worst Sentence Contest: Jay White, Judge; Nina Discombe, Judy Dykstra-Brown, Tom Hally the winners ners were Judy Dykstra-Brown, Nina Discombe and Tom Hally. February 13, 6 – 8 p.m., Lakeside Friends of the Animals are holding a cocktail get-together at the Billy Moon Estate by invitation only. It is a means of saying “thank you” for helping their organization speak for those who cannot speak for themselves, the animals Lakeside. Call 766 – 1170 or email johnnyfm1m@prodigy.net.mx. February 21, 2 – 4 p.m., Love in Action Center is hosting a Garden Party at the Center located on Pedro Moreno #76, Chapala. The cost for admission is $250 pesos and includes refreshments and cash bar, live music and dancing, a tour of the Center and a visit with the kids. On February 25, 4 – 7:30 p.m., a pork roast BBQ dinner will be served at the Raquet Club for the benefit of AMSIF. Dinner will be served at 4 p.m. with the cash bar open at 3:30 p.m. The donation is $150 pesos per person. A silent auction will be part of the fun. Contact the Raquet Club office at 387-761-0129. AMSIF stands for Asociaciόn Mexicana para Superaciόn y Integraciόn de la Familia, the Mexican Association for Improvement and Children at the LIA Center Integration of the Family. It is a national group founded in Mexico City in 1973 to promote gender equity and empowerment of women and families through improved health and education. Programs are taught at 209 centers in 21 Mexican states. On March 11 the School for the Deaf and Children with Special Needs will hold their Black and White Ball: One Thousand and One Nights. Lakeside’s most elegant formal affair will feature an Arabian theme. Guests will be greeted by an elaborately costumed Sultan, later entertainment by a belly dancer. The function will be held at the beautiful Villa Encantada Eventos in Chapala. Tickets available February 15 at $750 pesos per person. Contact Chairperson Jim Lloyd at 766-3070 or Leslie Martin at 766


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A number of otherwise well-informed people are under the impression that the Maya, as a people, are extinct. In fact some six to eight million Maya scattered across southern Mexico and Central America might truthfully paraphrase Mark Twain in saying, “The reports of our death have been greatly exaggerated.” Their great cities may be in ruins and their ancient cultural achievements lost and forgotten, but the Mayan people are still very much alive. Perhaps one of their present-day heroines said it best. “We are not myths of the past, ruins in the jungle or zoos. We are people and we want to be respected, not to be victims of intolerance and racism.” (Rigoberta Menchu, a K’iche’ Maya and Nobel Peace Prize winner, 1992) These people are proud of their heritage. They wear the traditional clothing and follow the social, political and religious

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customs of their ancestors. Even though they long ago became Christians, many of them see no reason to neglect the ancient deities. On the contrary, they consider it a vitally important duty to appease the old and often vengeful gods lest they destroy the universe for the fifth time. The largest populations of contemporary Maya inhabit the southern Mexican States and the Central American countries of Belize, Guatemala and portions of Honduras and El Salvador. The governments of these areas have belatedly begun to recognize their existence by offering on-line classes for grammar and proper pronunciation of their languages. As it did in the distant past, the term “Maya” embraces many distinct populations, societies, and ethnic groups,

each having its own particular traditions, culture, and historical identity. In Yucatan, they call themselves Yucateca, in Quintana Roo there are also Yucateca as well as Kekchi and Mopal. Tabasco is home to the Chontal Maya and Chiapas plays host to the Lacandon living in what has been since 1971 the 614,000 hectare Montes Azules Biosphere Reserve, In the Chiapan highlands you will find the Tzelzales, Tojobales, Ch’ols and Totziles All these peoples have managed to maintain substantial remnants of cultural and linguistic heritage. A few have adapted to modern ways but most cling to their individuality and ancestral traditions. They often speak one of the Mayan tongues as their primary language and defy anyone or anything to change them. Possibly the most militant in resistance to change are the Tzotzil Maya of


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the Chiapas Highlands, especially those living in or near the town of Chamula. The most traditional are the Lacandon, a small population of only 66 families, who live in the Lacandon Jungle of Chiapas and who had little contact with outsiders until the late 20th century. They originally came from the Campeche/ Petén area and moved into the rainforest at the end of the 18th century, 1000 years after the ancient Maya had supposedly disappeared. Chiapas was for many years one of the regions least affected by the reforms of the 1910 Revolution. This state of affairs remained stable until the 1950s when other groups of Mayan subsistence farmers, encouraged by the government, moved in, increasing pressure on the already threatened rainforest, The Zapatistas of the ELZN, which launched a rebellion against the Mexican state in 1994, declared itself to be an indigenous movement and drew its strongest and earliest support from Chiapan Maya, including the Tzotzil, Tzeltal, Tojolabales and Ch’ol. The largest group of modern Maya live on the Yucatan Peninsula, identifying themselves simply as “Maya” with no further ethnic subdivision and speak a language called simply “Yucatec Maya.” These people were some of the very first exposed to Europeans when a party of Spanish shipwreck survivors came ashore in 1511. One of the sailors, Gonzalo Guerrero, is credited with founding the Mestizo caste by marrying a cacique’s daughter and producing a family. Later Spanish expeditions to the region by Cordoba, Grijalva and Cortez, along with devastating epidemics of European diseases reduced the Yucatecan Maya population to less than 10,000 by 1850. Today there are 1,000 times that many people who speak Mayan and at least 3,000,000 more who are of Maya origin and bear ancient Maya sur-

names such as Pech, Camal, Xiu, Ucan, Canul, Cocom, and Tun. In 1847, after three centuries of persecution, the remaining Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula erupted into a revolt that blazed for several years and then simmered for another fifty. Known as the Caste War of Yucatan, it was fought by the indigenous peoples against the Spanish and their descendents. It was one of the most successful modern Native American revolts. For a short while the Maya were back in power and the ephemeral Maya state of Chan Santa Cruz was even recognized as an independent nation by the British Empire. It was not until 1976, however, that a full-blooded Maya gained any real power. Francisco Luna-Kan was elected governor of the state, serving from 1976 to 1982. As a Doctor of medicine, then a Professor of Medicine, his first political office was as overseer of the state’s rural medical system. Currently there are dozens of politicians from Deputies and Mayors to Senators from a full or mixed Maya heritage from the Yucatan Peninsula. Guatemala boasts the largest and most traditional Maya populations in the western highlands. Members of the country’s 17 or more tribes of indigenous Maya form the majority of the population and have political control in at least six of the state’s departments. Here the Spanish colonial pattern of keeping the natives legally separate and subservient continued well into the 20th century. This resulted their choosing to maintain traditional customs rather than enter Hispanic society at the very bottom. Considerable identification with local and linguistic affinities, often corresponding to pre-Columbian nation states, continues. Many people, especially the women, wear traditional clothing that displays their specific local identity. While the Yucatan Maya can point with pride to their po-

litical champions, the Guatemalans have gone them one better with a Nobel Peace Prize winner and a woman at that! Rigoberta Menchu has devoted her life to promoting indigenous rights for her people. She and other like minded people from all over the world have been so successful that someday the modern Maya may rise and reclaim their ancient Empire! Chan Kin, spiritual leader of the Lacandon Maya, who lived over a hundred years, predicted that when the last of his people dies, the world will come to an end. It would seem as if we had better pray they remain alive and well south of the border.

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Yvonne De Carlo dances to “Song for Scheherazade”

– 2274. The school provides for deaf children, teaching them sign language, how to speak, do sculpture, carpentry and arts. The school provides all types of hearing aids to improve their quality of life. On March 19, the 10th Annual Cruz Roja Fashion Show will begin at 3 p.m. at the Hotel Real de Chapala in La Floresta. A cold buffet will be served. General admission is $400 pesos and tables for 10 will be $4,500 pesos. Sales begin February 15 at the Cruz Roja table at the Lake Chapala Society or through June Cooper (766-4939). Ten Platinum tables will go for $6,000 pesos, including drinks, special botanas, buffet and first choice (Feb. 1 – 13) of preferred table location. This is always a hot event. Make arrangements soon. In March Los Cantantes del Lago will put on their Spring Concert on the 20th at 7 p.m. and the 21st at 4 p.m. Tickets are $200 pesos. Contact a member of Los Cantantes for tickets, or contact Jan Feise at 766 – 2691, jan.feise@gmail.com. The American Legion post #7 schedule for

February: Feb 1 – 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Quiche Brunch Feb 3 – 9:30 – 1:30 a.m. – US Consulate Feb 6 – 4:30 p.m. – Candlelight Dinner Feb 7, 14, 21, 28: 12 – 4 p.m. Legion Grill: burgers Feb 13 – 4 p.m. – Valentine’s Day Dinner Dance (pork loin, tix $85 pesos) Feb 22 – Banderas Bay Trip Feb 25 – 3 p.m. Lone Star Feb 28 – 2:30 p.m. 2010 Winter Olympic Hockey Finals Contact Barbara Prince at 765 – 3418 Commander Tom Keehnen announces the launch of the Post’s new web site: www.americanlegionchapalapost7.org. The new site Valentine’s contains current information on the Post, Auxiliary, day-to-day activities (card clubs, membership, Roll Call magazine, up-coming events). Day at the Legion Contact clark.miller@hotmail.com. Dilia’s Latin Jazz received a standing ovation at The Secret Garden on January 12. If you missed that show, there will be two more up-coming at El Bar Co on February 8. Jazz vocalist Dilia teams up with award winning Executive chef Alex Sgroi for two shows. The 5 p.m. performance includes a multi-course culinary experience. At 8:30 p.m. the show will be accompanied by hors d’ouevres and cocktails. Dilia is backed by a quartet: Ricardo Raygosa on Keyboards, Chelo on Drums, Cesar Coronat on Bass (Guitar) and Juan Pablo Hernandez on Sax and Flute. Their shows have received consistent rave reviews. Listen for dinner jazz like Contigo Aprendi, a gentle acknowledgement of how we affect and are affected by those we love. On February 14 at the Secret Garden, Dilia and her musicians will perform a special show of romantic music. The show is an evocative evening with a chocolate fountain, dancing, champagne and roses, lit by candles that promise to rekindle romance. Call the Secret Garden quickly to reserve space for this one. Starting January 15, the Lake Chapala Society offers an exhibition and sale at the LCS Library. The paintings and tapestries of Janice Kimball of Aztec Studios consist of 40 pieces that extend through the main offices. These are pre-hispanic designs that include images of magical serpents and fire-breathing dragons of the Aztec period, as well as elegant royal images of the Maya. The new board at LCS has appointed Terry Vidal as LCS’s first Executive Director. The plan is for volunteer coordinators to manage the day-to-day operations with little, if any, change in services. The board will oversee the Executive Director, Aztec priest on top of temple, concentrating on establishing policy, developing long range strategic plans, and displayed at LCS fundraising. The board seeks input from

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members and the community on how they can provide the best services possible. Lakeside Little Theatre news: LLT’s fifth show of the season is Sandy Wilson’s The Boy Friend, a new 1920’s musical directed by Allen McGill. Performances are January 16 – 24. Rehearsals are underway for the last show of the season, Michael Cooney’s Cash On Delivery. This fun farce about a con artist, welfare fraud, and a whole lot of mistaken identity is directed by Bob Coull. Performances are April 3 – 11. If you would like to volunteer behind the scenes, the LLT is always looking for people to train in lighting, sound, wardrobe, props, make-up, stage managing and other positions. Contact Don Chaloner at 766-1975 or email at 77dondo@ gmail.com. The Music Appreciation Society (MAS) program: February 9 – Three Sopranos: opera arias, duos, trios March 23 – Two Guitarists Extraodinaire: Juanito Pazcual and Russian, GrPlaybill for The Boyfriend isha Goryachev – classical style Tickets for a single performance are $250 pesos per person. For more information, call 765 – 6409. See note re taxi service following VIVA listing at the end. Open Circle at LCS on Sunday mornings at 10:30 a.m.: Feb 7 John Allan Fraser – Vegetating with Verve Feb 14 Jim Tipton – poetry for Valentine’s Day Feb 21 Barbara Schermer – Healing Through Astrology Feb 28 Charlie Fagan – Mysticism and Religion Mar 7 Bill Sanders In January Todd Stong addressed the future of Lakeside infrastructure over the next 20 years. “...We need low-tech solutions ... since over 50% of those who walk this earth exist on less than $2/day.” Here are some of his suggestions: Rainfall collection with focus on low cost storage, the best move for 1000 rural villages in Mexico where water comes only four months a year. Slow sand filtration which provides potable water with no chemicals, easily adapted for purification of water from the lake and from shallow wells. Waste stabilization ponds produce a product that can be used for raising fish (it consumes algae that emerge from the excess ni- Todd Stong on preparing trogen) and then can be used to irrigate fruit/ for our growth needs nut trees. VIVA! La Musica’s schedule: contact Rosemary Keeling for any of these bus trips (766 – 1801) to the Jalisco Philharmonic Orchestra, and for tickets contact Marshall Krantz at 766 – 2834. Tickets are 200 pesos for members and 250 pesos for non-members. Feb. 7 at 12:30 p.m. (matinee) - Enrique Radillo, Conductor with Jorge Federico Osorio at the piano: Concerto for piano and orchestra by Ponce; Concerto for piano and orchestra No. 2 by Liszt. Feb. 12 at 8:30 p.m. - Enrique Radillo, Conductor with ‘Homage to Martha González de Hernández Allende’: Enrique Florez, guitar; La Huasteca by Mijangos/Castro/López/ Morales, Concerto for guitar and orchestra by Bacarisse. Feb. 19 at 8:30 p.m. - Hector Guzman, Conductor with Barbara Padilla, Soprano; Pinata by R.X. Rodriguez; The Miraculous Mandarin by Bartok; Operatic arias and Mexican songs; Huapango by Moncayo. Taxi service for patrons of both MAS and VIVA can be arranged for after the show at audtaxi@gmail.com or patrons may sign up at the Auditorio fifteen minutes prior to the scheduled opening. Cost will be paid by those using the taxi. You will need to provide name, number of passengers and address at the time of reservation.


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CHILD

of the month

By Rich Petersen

Evelyn Dayán Pérez Alvarez

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e’d like to introduce you to two-year-old Evelyn Dayán Pérez Álvarez, seen here in the arms of her mother Marcela. Evelyn lives with her parents and 11-year old brother in San Juan Cosalá. Mom is a housewife and her father, Román, is a house painter. Evelyn was born with a severely adducted (in-turned) left foot. Shortly after being born she was sent to the operating room for surgery to try to correct this condition, but unfortunately the surgery was not successful. She was then put in a cast to try to force the foot into a more normal position. This, too, did not help. When her mother first brought Evelyn to our Niños Incpacitados intake session last April, I was amazed to see her actually walking and running about on the side of her inturned foot—not of course on the sole of the foot since it was so badly twisted. The little girl had adapted to her condition and was using her left foot as best she could. This past October Evelyn underwent another surgery, this time to actually readjust the bone of her foot into the correct position. You can see in the photo a metal device attached to the bottom of both her shoes to maintain the left foot in a straightened position. She will have to wear this until she is five years old, but not constantly. Her mother was instructed to remove the metal

bar for a specified time each evening so Evelyn can learn to use her “new” foot. For now she goes without the brace for an hour each day. With each visit back to her orthopedist’s office, and according to how well she is progressing, the time without the brace will be extended until, hopefully, her left foot has returned to its normal position. At our last monthly meeting, her mother told us that Evelyn is already started standing on her own and walking a bit during the time without her brace. Niños Incapacitados assists many children with orthopedic problems, some more serious than Evelyn’s, and all requiring therapy sessions, special shoes and/or leg/hip braces. We are always happy to bring you news of “success” stories such as Evelyn’s. Niños Incapacitados welcomes you to our monthly meetings—the second Thursday of every month, 10:30 a.m. in the garden area of La Nueva Posada. Volunteers and new members are always needed to help with ongoing fundraising activities to help the children in our area whose families are in need of financial help to assist with medical expenses. For further information and to read about other children enrolled in our Program, please visit our website: www.programaninos.org, email info@programaninos.org.

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LCS News Release January 28, 2010

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he Lake Chapala Society board has now been in office for over three weeks and is making great progress in taking LCS into the future. At our board meeting last week, we adopted the first phase of our new governance structure and appointed Terry Vidal as LCS’ first Executive Director. Terry, with the help of our volunteers, will soon be defining an operational structure headed by volunteer coordinators to manage the day to day operations. Members will see little, if any, change in services provided. The board will oversee the Executive Director and ensure effective operations. More importantly, the Board will be concentrating on establishing policy, developing long range, strategic and annual plans, and fundraising. We will be seeking input from not only current and former LCS members, but the larger community of expats, nationals, business and government interests to help us understand how we can provide the

best services possible. We want to ensure effective communications at LCS beginning with this message. You will be receiving regular emails from your Board and the Executive Director. There will be a “Member’s Only” Kickoff event on Super Bowl Sunday, February 7th, between 2 PM and 4 PM, to meet and greet each other and the new Board. We think you will like the new LCS, and hope you will take part in helping us plan for the future. We welcome your input!

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GRINGAS G RINGAS & G GUACAMOLE UACAMOLE By Gail Nott

Advertising

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am fearful that U.S. television programming may have resulted in the death of a few million of my brain cells. This conclusion is based on the fact that I am now watching and listening to commercials, and I don’t understand them. We have all spent hours wading through insurance forms and listening to the drone of an insurance agent. Now I learn that if you deal with a duck, I think its name is AFLAC, you can get health insurance. At least the crap you get from the duck can fertilize your garden. Maybe it is the result of too much holiday cheer, but I still haven’t figured out what three green men, covered in blue paint, throwing themselves against a wall, are trying to sell. At first I thought they were marketing a new psychotropic drug to control aberrant behavior. Sure, I am going to give my money to an investment firm who is encouraging people to paint their bodies and selfabuse. Daily, I see the joggers, tennis players, and folks off to the gym. I appreciate this commitment to exercise and having a great body. Seems to me, however, there is an easier way. AII you have to do to have great buns and ABs is buy exercise videos. Watching well-toned male bodies in spandex, doing a rigorous exercise program, certainly will increase my heart rate and respiration. I have been obsessing about keeping my stove and counter tops clean. It is scary to think that a squad

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car, with sirens blazing, may pull into my driveway, and two policemen will rush through my kitchen door with a spray bottle. Sure, the neighbors are going to believe that all this is over a little grease! Hour after hour I am inundated with advertisements for dot coms. Perhaps someone can clarify for me what a dot com is? From the decline of the NASDAQ, I guess not too many people are buying them. Of course a runny nose, watering eyes and sneezing are annoying; I have allergies. You better believe I plan to buy a medication that can cause a heart attack, stroke and high blood pressure. I want some relief. I always thought I was a good pet owner. Now I am told that unless I feed my dogs a special food they won’t be able to catch a Frisbee 10 feet in the air, or retrieve a tree from a lake. This explains why my dogs never quite make it to the yard to pee. Madison Avenue has too much confidence in my ability to reason and comprehend. I still don’t understand why Viking warriors would want to ransack my neighbor’s house if I charge Christmas presents on my credit card!

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MUSIC IS HIS MISTRESS By Nina Discombe

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classical violinist, a thirtyone-year old who makes sushi and savors Shostakovich, an entrepreneur with a Governor General’s award, Chris Wilshere would, if he won the lottery, become a news junkie, a ski bum, a philanthropist and a father. In early March, when the jacaranda blossoms are floating down on the carretera, Chris Wilshere will bring The Northern Lights’ orchestra back to Ajijic for its eighth season, and, by popular demand, there will be two evenings of jazz, sandwiched between Mozart and Shostakovich. Though many of the Lakeside ladies are in their blue-rinse years and the gentlemen are toting suspenders, most would agree with John Philip Sousa that, “Jazz will endure as long as people hear it through their feet instead of their brains.” Recently I had a chance to talk to Chris in his parents’ lovely home on the shores of Lake Chapala. “You and Drew Jurecka are no longer the Peter Pans who wowed the girls in Chapala. I was wondering if losing your original slant – your youth, your spontaneity, the baggy shorts at the afternoon concerts at the Nueva Posada – has caused you concern.” “Let me use an analogy to answer you. I may not approve of greasy hamburgers, but that won’t stop me from making you a gourmet hamburger. I haven’t compromised what I believe in, just because I’ve changed the ingredients.”

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“February is a good time for gigs and teaching jobs in Toronto, yet your musicians are willing to forgo $2000 (Canadian money) in income to join the festival. What’s the big attraction, other than the weather and free room and board?” “The chance to play with great musicians. The venue. Their CVs. Not to mention the flowers, the camaraderie and the cervezas. I don’t have to twist their arms.” I am curious about the challenges of orchestrating 26 musical egos. Are musicians, I wonder, anything like actors – highly strung, sensitive, prickly – impossible to billet? “I’m careful who I invite. If I hear that a musician is temperamental, it won’t matter how many competitions he or she has won. Once the plane lands, I have to impose on our patrons and my parents’ friends for lifts, lunches and laundry, so compatibility is muy importante.” “I read somewhere that you don’t play mariachi music, yet I saw a picture of you in a sombrero, fiddle in hand.” “That was a montage,” he says, laughing. Friends in Toronto superimposed the sombrero on an old photograph.” And for a split second, I see past the CEO who must keep his spon-


sor Scotiabank smiling. I see the Toronto schoolboy who loved downhill racing, and the undergraduate, who earned a few bucks playing his fiddle at St. Lawrence Market. “You play, you teach and you’re an entrepreneur. Which hat do you prefer wearing?” “That’s like asking how I’d rate steak, sushi, and Korean food. I like each one equally and for different reasons, but playing would probably come first. I can’t imagine my life without music.” “And what about teaching?” “If I won the lottery I’d also open a music conservatory, though conservatories are never money makers. Eight years ago, when I started giving master classes, some students had to walk six miles to Chapala for a lesson.” His wife, Priscilla, walks towards us into the dining room, where we are seated at the glass-topped table. She is a beauty even without makeup, tall and slim like Chris. She excuses herself and heads for the kitchen. “Duke Ellington called music his mistress. You’ve been married three years. If you’ve spent all day practicing, does Priscilla ever feel like second fiddle?”

“Back to the food analogy. I like sushi and steak for different reasons, just as I love the violin and my wife for different reasons. Sometimes, I have to explain that to her.” “What are, if any, some differences musically between Canadians and Mexicans?” “Mexicans will play with the music. They aren’t afraid of emotion.” “Mexico is your new home. You’ve spoken of how inspirational it has been for you – the beauty, the slower pace - but I was wondering if you ever get homesick.” Ever the diplomat, Chris chooses his words carefully. “I miss my friends. I’ve made new ones, of course, but ...” I hear the wistfulness of those who have fallen in love with the Sierra Madres, but who can’t get the Canadian Shield out of their blood. For seven consecutive years, to the delight of his audience, patrons and sponsors, Chris Wilshere has pulled the rabbit out of the sombrero, enticing The Northern Lights back to Mexico, promising his musicians camaraderie and standing ovations – good reasons for music to be their mistress for one short week, when the streets of Ajijic are petalled in purple blossoms.

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The Continuing Adventures of Mildred and Suzette By Katie B. Goode

If You’ve Got It… did “ W hen know?”

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you Suzette asked her friend, Mildred, wearing her most sympthetic look. Mildred’s eyes teared as she looked beyond the restaurant’s terrace to the green and red flag waving over the malecon. “I was at a party. I saw Patsy on the other side of the room and wanted to say hi.” “So…?” “So I waved. But when I stopped, my arm kept on going. Undulating. Back and forth, back and forth, back and forth.” “Oh, it couldn’t have been that bad…” Mildred bit her lip, embarrassed. “It hypnotized five people at the next table.”

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Suzette pulled her shawl tightly around her. “Is that when you knew?” “That I was getting… old?” Mildred looked around the nearly empty restaurant. “Yes,” she whispered. Eduardo passed by to see how his favorite gringas — and their pitcher of margaritas — were doing. From the look on their faces, they were talking about something very important, like the big charity auction

El Ojo del Lago February 2010

he knew they were planning, so he decided not to bother them, even to tell Mildred that a line of salsa was trailing down her white Mexican wannabe dress. “And now?” Suzette prodded. Mildred swiped a tear from her cheek with a tortilla chip. “And now, I worry that if I raise my arms on a breezy day I might get airborne.” Suzette watched an ultra-light buzz the lake and imagined Mildred, arms spread wide, soaring high above it. Mildred noticed Eduardo gesturing to the front of his shirt. She wiggled her fingers to him in a delicate wave. “Maybe they’ll put me on the menu,” she said to Suzanne, trying to lighten the mood. “Huh?” “An appetizer. Bat wings de Mildred!” Suzette felt under her wrap and jiggled her arm. “You think that’s bad. I could be the main course. Deep-fried funky flab fillets.” “Yeah. Remind me not to rest my arm on the table. Someone might mistake it for a pork loin,” Mildred laughed. “Or a great floundering halibut!” Suzette said, getting into it.

Mildred held her hands to her face in mock horror. “Watch out for that fork!” They both laughed, a little too loudly, then clicked their glasses together and paused. Suzette motioned to Mildred, who finally noticed the salsa salsa’ing down her front. Eduardo sighed in relief and returned to empty the last of the pitcher into their glasses. It was a slow day, but he could always count on his regular lunch ladies to keep things interesting. “What do you think, Eduardo?” Mildred asked, stretching out an arm and letting her flab swing free. “Am I growing baby aliens in there?” “Señora Mildred?” Eduardo asked, suddenly remembering the ladies at table four had asked for their check. “What would he know,” Suzette sighed, admiring Eduardo’s muscles, visible under his white waiter’s shirt. “Men don’t get arm flab.” Mildred sipped her drink, lost in thought. “The worst thing is I didn’t even see it coming.” “Yeah. It sneaks up on you,” Suzette said, studying her half-empty glass. Mildred’s eyes squinted into


slits. “Blubbery bundles of bad news. Mistletoe on the oak tree of youth!” Suzette brightened with an idea. “Of course, we could exercise…” Mildred’s look was pure disgust. “You mean torture sessions where you touch the ceiling with your elbows while lifting weights heavier than your firstborn?” Suzette watched an old woman below the restaurant sweeping twigs into piles, and felt guilty about worrying about such trivia as arm flab. “As things go, it’s really a no-thing. I mean, we’ve got plenty to eat, the sun is shining, and no one’s shooting at us, so why should we complain about you-know-what?” Mildred stared at Suzette, wondering if she knew her friend at all. She took a deep breath. “Old lady arms are one of the first markers that our youth has vaporized on the vine, that we’ve scooched past middle age and gone right to grannyville, that we’re heading for the big flabfest in the sky!” “But what can we do about it?” Mildred took one last swallow of her drink and was hit with a tequila-inspired epiphany. Her eyes widened. “What?” asked Suzette.

“I’ve been a fool! I’ve been looking at this all wrong. What we need is an attitude of sass-itude!” Mildred looked at the ladies across the terrace at table four and raised and waved both her arms. “My name is Mildred and I have bat wings!” she shouted. The ladies forced smiles and quickly turned back to figure out who owed what. But Mildred would not give up the fight. She stood. “Do not go quietly into the arm flab night, hermanas. Wave! Wave those arms. Wave them proudly. We are not ashamed,” Mildred said, the flab on her arms doing the tango. Eduardo looked worried about his favorite customer and her margarita consumption as table four made a quick departure, glancing over their shoulders at the ranting crazy woman. “Flash the flesh in the old lady sisterhood salute! Greet your fellow flabettes with pride. Flaunt that flab!” Suzette, a true friend, stood, dropped her shawl to the chair, stretched out her arms, and muttered under her breath. “Anything but those dang exercises.”

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The Ojo Crossword

ACROSS 1 Disgrace 6 Back talk 10 Western Athletic Conferences 14 Animal skins 15 Barette 16 Alignment 17 Widely known 18 Opaque gem 19 One of Columbus’ ships 20 Money 21 Very, very tiny 23 TV lawyer Matlock 24 Handout 26 Chinese religious person 28 Wine bottle 31 Phoenix’s BB team 32 Admiration 33 Rumor 36 Child 40 Unconsciousness 42 Record 43 Baker’s need 44 Otherwise 45 Creator of Mickey, Minnie and Donald 48 Pride 49 Uncollected 51 Pith 53 Covering to keep away flies (2 wds.) 56 The other half of lwo 57 Fib 58 Pencil end 61 Flux 65 Efficiently 67 Has 68 Ablaze 69 GS 70 Spring flower 71 Apple drink 72 Fastener 73 Use a keyboard 74 Out-of-date

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DOWN 1 Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries 2 Prefix ten 3 Evils 4 Beehive State denizen 5 Clock time 6 Scottish people 7 Dog food brand 8 Asian nation 9 Divide (2 wds.) 10 Compass point 11 Where you were at crime time 12 Ice cream holders 13 Sparse 21 Ammunition 22 Metal container 25 Carry 27 Capital of Norway 28 Spice 29 Absent without leave 30 Precious stones 31 Virgo 34 Glided 35 Distress call 37 Affirm 38 Sego lily’s bulb 39 Frozen rain 41 Long time 45 Pistons home 46 Ruler 47 Thanksgiving vegetable 50 Petite 52 Craft paper 53 Bright light 54 African country 55 Shouts 56 Outlaw James 59 Askew 60 Nip off 62 Caps 63 Mined metals 64 “as you ____” 66 Shrill bark 68 American College of Physicians (abbr.)


Feathered Friends By John Keeling

Violet-crowned Hummingbird

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he violet-crowned hummingbird is a mediumlarge hummingbird, four inches long, and is one of the two common hummingbirds here on the lakeshore that you will see visiting your flowers or at your hummingbird feeder. (The other common hummingbird is the broadbilled hummingbird.) You can recognize the violentcrowned by the straight red bill with black tip, a really white breast and throat, and if the sun is shining on the bird you may be able to see the violet-blue crown on the top of the head. The back is a greeny bronze. The sexes are similar, though the female is a touch less brilliantly colored. When sitting on a branch it will often exhibit a very erect posture. If you go walking in the hills as I do, you will often hear the sounds made by this bird. You will hear the characteristic tuc, tuc, tuc or tsew, tsew, tsew, as well as the whir of its wings as it flies rapidly past you. At this time of the year the trees with large white trumpet blooms are a good place to look for these birds. They need to feed every few minutes throughout the day, principally taking the nectar from long trumpet-shaped blooms by quickly inserting and retracting a tongue which can protrude a good distance out of the bill. They also have the ability to catch and eat very small insects on the wing, which occurs particularly when feeding the young. If you use a hummingbird feeder here, you will almost inevitably have seen how aggressively territorial this

species can be. One of them will want the feeder for itself and will drive away all other birds. This behavior may be observed if you come too close to the nest, in which case the female is liable to dive-bomb you and even hit you, in order to drive you away. Its normal resident breeding range is from north-east Mexico to southeast Mexico, and is a rare bird in south-western Arizona. It may retreat to warmer altitudes in the winter, and may move at any time in search of better flowers with each season. The normal breeding period is April to August. A tiny cup-shaped nest is built eight to forty feet off the ground in a bush or tree, being constructed of plant material and pieces of lichen all held together by spider’s webs. The female lays two eggs and sits for two weeks before hatching occurs, It appears that the males have little to do with incubating or raising the young. John Keeling and his wife lead ‘Los Audubonistas del Lago’ which is a loose-knit group of people interested in birds. To receive notices of events please leave your e-mail address at www.avesajijic.com.

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A NEW LEASE—on Life! By Judit Rajhathy, B.A., RNCP, D.Ac.

Wanna Have Sex? Exercise and Sexual Functioning

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e all know that regular exercise reduces the incidence of many chronic diseases. The benefits of regular daily physical activity are numerous. Physical benefits of regular exercise include protection from cardiovascular diseases such as stroke and hypertension and from other chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis and obesity. Psychological benefits include “stress relief, mood elevation, increased self-image and self-confidence” (Krucoff and Krucoff 2000). But did you know that regular physical exercise can improve your sex life? It only makes sense that if your body feels strong and your mind feels balanced, your interest in sex can also improve. Sound good?? Read on... It is also true that if one has a better body image one feels more inclined toward sexual behavior. On a more physiological level, regular sexual activity activates the sympathetic nervous system and encourages blood flow to the genital regions, thereby enhancing not only pleasure but performance - listen up guys and yes, gals too! Apparently there is a saying in the erectile dysfunction world that “penis health is heart health” since in order to have an erection the penis must swell with blood. Blocked arteries and other circulatory diseases such as a consequence of dia-

betes where peripheral circulation is affected can impair sexual activity. In the Electronic Journal of Human Sexuality (vol 7, Oct. 5/04) several studies are quoted where even low levels of exercise can keep “equipment” in better working condition! In fact, a study of 31,742 professional men ages 53-90, found that “men over 50 who kept physically active had a 30% lower risk of impotence compared with inactive men” (Bacon, Mittleman, & Kawachi, 2003). The same principal would hold true for women and clitoral health. Need we say more? And what about endurance? Stamina? How can you perform in bed if you huff and puff walking up the stairs? Exercise releases endorphins - so does sexual activity. Runner’s high is similar to the bliss and contentment felt during sexual activity. It is the same mechanism so that the more you exercise and engage the same type of endorphin release activity the better the sexual arousal and pleasure in bed. It has been suggested that you can liken your cardiovascular time on the treadmill or elliptical to training for a sexual marathon! How do you like them apples? A simple equation is: people who exercise more have more sex. This may be due to the fact that people who exercise feel stronger and more vital and are more tuned in and expressive with their bodies in general. Exercise improves one’s confidence as well and hence more interest in sexual activity. Exercise or regular movement can also lead to other activities such as yoga, martial arts or dance, all of which are beautiful expressions of a body in motion. Being more in touch with our bodies can release feelings of sensuality which, in turn, can result in sexual expression. See you at the gym!

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Judit Rajhathy


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Hearts at Work —A Column by Jim Tipton

“A Test”

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n 1964 I was living in San Francisco, in a boarding house on California Street, two blocks up from Chinatown, where I paid ninety dollars a month for room and board. I spent most evenings at the famous City Lights bookstore, where I poured over books and looked for beautiful young women who liked poetry and Buddhism and coffee shops. Late one winter afternoon I learned that Maxwell Maltz would be delivering a lecture that very evening. I had read his recent book Psycho-Cybernetics, which popularized “success conditioning,” a method of self-improvement based on “reprogramming” the subconscious, changing the “internalized” words and sentences. The sponsors had scheduled the lecture in a building in a fading neighborhood whose streets were filled with homeless people. As I entered the lobby with its worn tiles and dim lighting, I saw a man, apparently very drunk, lying on the floor in a pool of his own urine. His arm stuck out at a strange angle, as though broken, and he was obviously in pain. Part of me wanted to help him, but another part of me wanted to appear cool and groovy to the comely young women who were there to attend the lecture on personal growth. Along with the rest, I walked around him and climbed the stairs to the lecture room above. But at the top I looked back. I watched a woman, of middle age, bejeweled and wearing a luxurious fur coat, enter the lobby, obviously there to attend the lecture. Without hesitation, she walked right over to the moaning man, knelt down beside him, touched him, tried to comfort him, and determined that his arm was, indeed, broken. I could hear him beg her not to call the police. She promised she would not. Then she asked someone to step outside to the pay phone to call a social agency with which she was somehow already familiar. The rest of us stood watching, transfixed, and knowing that we

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hi by. b had passedd him Given a choice between getting a good seat to learn more about “personal growth” or helping a suffering human being, that wealthy woman in her jewels and furs— whom some had mocked as she entered—was the only one among us who “passed the test.” That incident affected me a lot. A couple of years later when tens of thousands of Hippies invaded the lovely old city, stripping the parks of flowers to pass out to tourists on the cable cars, and “borrowing” books from my beloved City Lights bookstore, and shouting crude curses to the young soldiers who were shortly to be serving their country in Vietnam, “called to duty” whether that war was legitimate or not—I remembered that woman who was so beautifully dressed in a city that had until recently prided itself on elegance and who was herself “called to duty” that cool January night when she walked in and saw a man who was crying, lying in his own urine, his arm broken—a man whom the rest of us had passed by. I paid little attention to the lecture. Because of that woman I was thinking about my life. She never got to hear about Psycho-Cybernetics at all because she waited below with that suffering man until help arrived. I thought of her today while I was looking at a card I bought years ago from the Tools for Change catalog. It says: “Always hold firmly to the thought that each one of us can do something to bring some portion of misery to an end.”

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Jim Tipton


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Joyful Musings By Joy Birnbach Dunstan, MA, LPC, MAC

The Chemistry of Love

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emember that exhilarating, dreamy feeling of a new love? You’ve just met Mr. or Miss Perfect, and you can’t think about anything else. A simple kiss sends a tingle through your whole body; making love is magical. Then, as often happens, months and years go by, and one or maybe both of you, would just as soon watch a Seinfeld re-run as wrestle naked between the sheets. What happens that changes a lusty new romance into an occasional half-hearted marital duty? Contrary to fanciful notions about perfect love, recent research is uncovering evidence that the euphoria of romantic love is truly an altered state of consciousness induced by a potent combination of biochemicals. When we come into contact with someone who strongly attracts us, our brains become saturated with phenethylamine (PEA), a naturally occurring, amphetamine-like neurotransmitter and several other excitatory biochemicals. In this frenzy of infatuation we see the “love is blind” thinking so typical of the newly smitten. Have you ever reminded a lovestruck friend that the new partner is a practicing alcoholic, has lost three jobs in a row, and was divorced just two months ago only to be told, “No problem, we can work that out.” This delusional thinking combined with an intoxicating soup of neurotransmitters stimulates libido and mobilizes people to actively pursue

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lovemaking. With our erotic thermostat set way high, we can’t get enough of our partner. It must be true love. But like any drug-induced state, over time we develop a tolerance to its effects. Studies show that this passionate bliss usually burns out after about 18 to 36 months. Levels of PEA and related substances begin to drop, and couples either move on to renew the excitement elsewhere or must learn to function without the adrenaline-like boost. Along with changing PEA levels, sexual desire is strongly affected by a second widely varying chemical, testosterone. Both men and women produce testosterone, although men produce it in much higher quantity. Everyone has a natural baseline level of testosterone, with the so-called “high-T” individuals tending to be significantly more sexually interested and responsive than the “lowTs.” When a low-T person is with a high-T partner, and they are faced with the inevitable drop in PEA levels, a previously hidden desire discrepancy becomes apparent. The high-T partner may feel disappointed or betrayed by the diminishing interest of their mate. Low-T partners, meanwhile, are likely to feel bewildered by the loss of their previously supercharged libido as well as pressured by what now seems like an insensitive, pushy partner. Mutual anger, disappoint-


ment, and sadness can infuse what was a loving, passionate relationship and further reduce desire with arguments, negativity, and power struggles. So what does all this basic chemistry really mean in terms of maintaining harmonious loving relationships? Just because the old thrill is gone doesn’t mean the love has stopped. We can’t do much to change our innate body chemistry, but we can accept that we are physically different from one another and learn to honor our differences instead of fight them. Recognizing

that much of our sexual passion is rooted in natural body rhythms allows us to let go of the guilt, shame, and blame that might otherwise occur. When the blame-shame game ends, there is an opportunity to focus on learning ways to satisfy both partners’ needs without ignoring their basic differences. The difference in desire is no longer a personal assault, and hope is renewed for a loving partnership. Editor’s Note: Joy is a practicing psychotherapist in Riberas. She can be contacted at joy@dunstan. org or 765-4988.

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Notes From Nestipac

By Phyllis Rauch rauchlosdos@yahoo.com

God Has No Hands but Ours

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while back a few kind foreigners decided to make Christmas happier for the older folks of Nestipac. They had observed the many street and school posadas, children’s parties and piñatas, but suspected that not much was being done for the many seniors who hobbled the streets in their rebozos or huaraches or catching a last bit of sun in a dark doorway. It was decided that dispensas (food packages) and warm blankets would be welcomed by the oldsters. The helpers appealed to my housekeeper Mari, since she is very active in the church and also known for helping out with advice or her telephone when others are in need. Mari prepared a list of 40 names, including two recent widows as well as many seniors. By gathering estimates from the super markets for the dispensas and bargaining with Aurrera for the blankets, the budget was stretched to include 20 dispensas, and 17 blankets, One expat discovered some inexpensive sweaters in the second-hand stores. Everything was stored at Mari’s house, and she sent out invitations to those on her list. “Come to my house at 4pm on December 22nd.” Of course, given the date, a pleasant surprise was expected, and received. Those who could not attend (some of whom are still working, ironing for others, for example) sent word asking to come the following day. Mari said it was like the story in the Bible of Elijah and his miraculous jar of oil that never ran dry. Even though it seemed that many more than 40 of Nestipac’s poorest turned up at the door, there was always another blanket, another sweater in the box. Mari met one of the eldest men at church. Since the night was chilly, she asked him why he wasn’t wearing his warm new sweater. “Well, Doña Mari, it’s been so many years since my wife and I have received any Christmas presents, we decided to wrap up her dispensa and my sweater and give them to each other as presents tonight.” Observing the rough, rope huaraches that the man was wearing, Mari

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asked him if his feet weren’t cold. “Pues, un poquito. Sometimes my feet crack and they bleed a little bit, but it doesn’t matter, ni modo.” Mari went down to the Christmas fair on the plaza to buy something for her granddaughter. This delightful child, so beloved by many, already had presents waiting under her small tree. Mari passed up all the toys, and finally spent her hard-earned pesos on three pairs of warm socks and three pairs of stockings for the old couple. She wrapped them and took them to the house. Giving them to a daughter she said, “Hide them someplace where it will be a nice surprise.” When it was time for the old couple to go to bed, he called out to his wife and daughter. “Come quick! There’s something in our bed. I think it’s a viper.” The women came running. “There,” he said, pointing, “look at that strange long lump. It has to be a snake.” The daughter said, “No Papa, it can’t be. There’s never been a snake in the house.” “It can’t be anything else. I’ll get my machete.” Before letting the socks and stockings get turned into confetti by her father’s machete, the daughter threw back the covers. “Papa, look at the gifts the Christ Child left for you. It’s presents, not a snake.” It’s February now, and the elderly of Nestipac are planning a Valentine’s Day party. They are looking forward to making tamales and atole for their new foreign friends.

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Geography Of A Woman

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etween 18 and 22, a woman is like Africa: half discovered, half wild, fertile and naturally beautiful. Between 23 and 30, a woman is like Europe: well-developed and open to trade, especially for someone of real value. Between 31 and 35, a woman is like Spain: very hot, relaxed, and convinced of her own beauty. Between 36 and 40, a woman is like Greece: gently aging but still a warm and desirable place to visit. Between 41 and 50, a woman is like Great Britain: with a glorious and all conquering past. Between 51 and 60, a woman is like Israel: has been through war, doesn’t make the same mistakes twice, takes care of business. Between 61 and 70, a woman

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is like Canada: self-preserving, but open to meeting new people. After 70, she becomes Tibet: wildly beautiful, with a mysterious past and the wisdom of the ages, an adventurous spirit and a thirst for spiritual knowledge. GEOGRAPHY OF A MAN Between 1 and 90, a man is like Iran, ruled by nuts.

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By Judy Baehr 766-2695 jdbaehr@aol.com www.greatgreens.org

What’s the Beef ?

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t’s no surprise that ACÁ, the organic demonstration farm at Jaltepec, is a proponent of the health value of vegetables and fruit. But this month by reader request, we are focusing on the other side of the plate, where many of you like to put beef. Here’s great news: you can enjoy beef and be healthy at the same time by buying LOCAL beef that is grass-raised and hormone-free, as opposed to factory-farmed grain-fed cows full of hormones and antibiotics. Unlike in the U.S. and Canada, where grass-raised beef can be costly and hard to find, almost all beef sold in local meat markets is naturally raised AND it costs less than the factory-farmed grain-fed antibiotic and hormone-injected stuff you get at the big box stores. True, you may find it easier to pick up a wrapped package of factory-farmed beef at one of those big box stores (no Spanish required and they even take plastic!) than to practice your Spanish, figure out the names of cuts and stand in line along the sides of bloody beef at the meat store. But given that the steak thus bought will be hugely better for you, will you try it? “Part of the rise in obesity [in developed countries] can be attributed to the changes in the way we raise beef and other animals,” writes Dr. Nicholas Perricone, MD, CNS, and best-selling author. “Grass-fed

beef is up to three times leaner than grain-fed beef, and can have up to 15 fewer calories per ounce than meat from a grain-fed cow.” “Like wild salmon,” notes Dr. Perricone, “grass-fed beef is an excellent source of high quality omega-3 essential fatty acid as well as CLA, a fatty acid that has a number of health benefits. But because of the dietary change from grass to grain, levels of CLA dramatically decreased in meat and dairy products.” Yes, you can enjoy both beef and good health. But, please try to eat most of your meals farther down the food scale. A 2006 report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), quoted in Scientific American, notes that “our diets and, specifically, the meat in them cause more greenhouse gases…to spew into the atmosphere than either transportation or industry. Current production levels of meat contribute between 14 and 22 percent of the 36 billion tons of ‘CO2-equivalent’ greenhouse gases the world produces every year. It turns out that producing half a pound of hamburger for someone’s lunch…releases as much greenhouse gas into the atmosphere as driving a 3,000-pound car nearly 10 miles.” If and when you do eat steak, may I recommend putting some ACÁ Great Greens alongside? And please don’t tell me if you chicken-fry the steak. It’ll just get me started again.

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THERE ARE ALWAYS CONSEQUENCES By David Moss

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he phone rang a few minutes ago. My friend said he was canceling our lunch together. “It was just too cold,” he told me, “to go out.” We made the usual global warming jokes and wondered who had had the bright idea to hold an international meeting on global warming, in Copenhagen during a northern European winter. Not only did Europe experience seriously cold weather but President Obama had to rush back to Washington before record breaking snows covered the eastern United States. And it has just gone on getting colder with more and more snow. There were no binding agreements made in Copenhagen, to reduce carbon in the atmosphere; but when the spin-meisters had their turn, you would have thought great progress had been made. Although the spin-meisters did not take claim for it, the extreme cold wave did coincide with the meeting on global warming. What is interesting is that our earth, all by itself, had decided that some extra cooling was due this winter. And this was not the first time! Just a few hundred years ago during the Medieval Warm Period, temperatures were higher than they are today. Then around the mid 1300s the Little Ice Age began and lasted to around 1850. A 500-year time span. Popular winter festivals were held on the frozen River Thames in London, England; while in the US one could walk from lower Manhattan Island, on the ice, to Staten Island. Mother Nature then switched from this cold period and

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the current warm period began. It has taken our world some 150 years to reach the current degree of warming. How long could it take for our scientists to show proof that our world is actually cooling once carbon pollution begins to be reduced? Politicians and their policies are by their nature short term. Remember it took 150 years for the current warming period to reach this level. So what could go wrong? For one, it could turn out that carbon levels in the atmosphere have only a minimal effect on global temperatures. Mother Nature and the presence or absence of sun spots are probably major players in the cyclical cooling and warming of our planet. One has to admire the scientists who talk about controlling the carbon in the atmosphere to reduce global temperatures by one or two degrees. They must be kidding. Right? To believe that humans can micromanage the climate, so accurately, demands a lever of faith greater than imagination or common sense can credit. If they should succeed however, and world temperatures go down about 3 degrees, then perhaps we can throw some carbon up into the air to warm it up a bit. It is important to keep in front of one’s mind that when thinking


about reversing global warming, which has been with us for some 150 years, that any changes, when and if they occur, could be as low as one hundredth of a degree each year. An amount so small that it could not be accurately measured or taken into consideration, especially when to all other appearances global warming was continuing as usual. And of course there are always consequences. The International Community might actually expect countries, provinces and states to reach their mandated lower levels of carbon that they put into the atmosphere. China has a serious problem, in part, because the United States has shipped so much of its industrial production to China from the US. Very clever these American CEOs. All the time we were thinking they were only interested in making products for less money, while all the time they were really exporting carbon pollution! Countries with a high-birth rate and a large population could encourage their citizens to move elsewhere. Lowering carbon emissions by a percentage point or two may not be too difficult to achieve. But what happens then? What draconian measures will need to be enacted as pol-

iticians realize that getting carbon levels down is very difficult and the world just goes on being warm? Then the mandated lower levels of carbon kick in and the International Community insists on action. First will come the warnings to reduce the level of carbon pollution. Then sanctions will have to be enacted for non compliance. And lastly military action against the offending country. Will we go to war which China to get them to reduce their pollution? Will we bomb the offending smoke stacks? Will we avoid bombing the factories that make our cars, our refrigerators, our toys, our televisions and much, much more. The trust we must have in our politicians, to set achievable-reduced-carbon levels, may be one of the most important political actions we have to consider in future elections. We must be sure that any reduction is based on the science we have today. Reductions based on future science have no merit. Is it worth achieving a reduction in air pollution? Surely, the answer is an emphatic yes! Cleaning up our world is, without question, a task that needs doing and doing properly.

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AMIGOS DEL LAGO Courtesy of Eileen Collard

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ake Chapala was accepted as a member of the international Living Lakes organization in 2003 in recognition of its importance to Mexico and its endangered status. The Living Lakes network is a global partnership of environmental organisations striving for the protection of lakes and wetlands worldwide and was launched by Global Nature Fund in 1998. Now, 11 years later, the network consists of 55 partner lakes represented by more than 80 member organizations from all over the world. All partners subscribe to a common vision of managing lakes in a sustainable way. Last February, Lake Chapala was declared an Internationally Important Wetland by the Ramsar Convention and joined a large network of such “Ramsar sites” around the world and more than 100 such Ramsar sites in Mexico. This status was granted after submission of a detailed application on the part of the Mexican government, with the support of environmental activists in this region. The designation means a commitment that the Ramsar Convention and the Mexican government work together to manage and preserve Lake Chapala in the future. The conference is the 13th International Living Lakes Conference, titled “Lake Management-Challenges in a Changing World.” Public sessions will be held in Guadalajara on March 22 and 23 and will be in English. There will be

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an admission charge for those sessions, including plenary and roundtable discussions on topics related to the economics, ecology, and social dimensions of lake management. (For the complete program, see http://www.globalnature.org/ bausteine.net/file/showfile.aspx?do wndaid=7111&sp=E&domid=101 1&fd=2.) The objective of the conference is to exchange experiences regarding the elaboration and implementation of lake management plans and to work toward developing a Ramsar management plan for Lake Chapala. Conference participants will include regional, national and international community leaders involved with managing lakes and wetlands. 150 participants from more than 50 countries are expected to attend. Also in attendance will be media representatives from around the world who will observe, learn and report on the steps Mexico is taking to preserve the natural legacy of Lake Chapala now and for future generations. Our local Amigos del Lago de Chapala organization is hosting the conference. Planning has been under way for many months. We hope that many local people will participate in the preparations, hosting, and the conference activities themselves. For more information, call KARUNA (766-2610).

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THE MAGNIFICENT CAT By Ruth J. Davis

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s I stand guard over those who enter this eatery, I’ll wager no one rea1izes what a magnificent animal I am. Nor do they give any thought to my historical background! So let me tell you about myself. The cat’s first association with humans began at the end of the Stone Age 5,000 years ago. We were considered a member of the household for most Egyptians. They used us to hunt birds and fish and to destroy the rats and mice that infected their stacks of grain along the Nile River. We were considered to be so important that the Egyptians passed laws to protect us. Deliberately killing a cat was punishable by death. Eventually the Egyptians came to worship the Cat Goddess, Bastet, and all cats became sacred. When we died our bodies were mummified and we were buried in special cemeteries. The fate of cats underwent a drastic change in Europe during the Middle Ages. In many people’s minds, we became objects of superstition and we were associated with witches and black magic. We were hunted, tortured and sacrificed. Often we would be sealed within the walls during the construction of houses. The humans thought this act would bring good luck to the occupants of the house and would keep away anything evil. Many superstitions arose during this period of our persecution that is still evident today. Such as “Don’t let a black cat cross your path or you will have bad luck.” Back in the days when houses had thatched roofs, small animals, dogs, mice, rats and cats would hide in the straw of the roofs for warmth. When there was a heavy rain, or as the Southern folk say, “a belly washer of a rain,” water would wash us from the roofs and we would fall to the ground. So another saying was born. “It’s raining cats and dogs!” And what about the saying “a cat has nine lives.” Do you know how that came to be? It is said that a mother of nine hungry children put

nine fish on a plate to feed her children. A hungry cat saw the fish and ate them all. Having overeaten, the cat died and when he approached the Pearly Gate, St. Peter told him “You were bad eating the food of nine hungry children!” St. Peter kicked him from the Pearly Gate. The cat fell to Earth and bounced back to Heaven. St. Peter told him again that he was bad and kicked him back to Earth again, and once more the cat ended back up in Heaven. This occurred nine times, for each hungry child. And the phrase “a cat has nine lives” came to be. There are many superstitions associated with cats. A few of them are: “Dreaming of a white cat means you will have good luck” “It is unlucky to see a white cat at night” “If a cat washes behind its ears it will rain” “If a strange black cat appears on your porch it means prosperity” “A cat sneezing is a good omen for anyone that hears it” By the 17th Century we began to regain our place as companions to humans and controllers of rodents. Cats have been portrayed in many famous works of art by such famous painters as Leonardo da Vinci, Paul Gauguin and Pablo Picasso. We bring happiness and laughter through movie cartoons, such as “Felix the Cat” and “Tom and Jerry.” There was even a Broadway musical show written about us, Cats by Andrew Lloyd Weber. Who can possibly forget Jellicle, the Cat, singing “Memories” from that show? So the next time you see a cat, just remember what magnificent creatures we are.

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THE MEXICO ANSWER DUDE By Michael Green

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ear Answer Dude, I am thinking about renting a car and driving myself around during my visit to PV. Do you have any advice? John C. Seattle Hola Juanito, What a great idea! Did you come up with that all by yourself? Just take this simple quiz to see if you are up to the task: 1. The car in front of you has his left turn signal on. What does this mean? a. He is turning left. b. Pass him on the left. c. Nothing, the signal is broken and the driver has not bothered to fix it. d. He is daring me to pass and I should do so immediately even if I have to swerve into oncoming traffic. 2. A group of pedestrians are waiting to cross the street in a marked crosswalk. What should you do? a. Stop immediately and allow them to cross safely. b. Slow down a little bit so that they can get across if they run. c. Swerve around them so that they do not slow me down. d. Speed up so that if I hit one, he will die and not be able to sue me. 3. What is the procedure to follow when you encounter a stop sign? a. Stop, look, listen, yield to other traffic and then proceed with caution. b. Slow down a little bit, but only if I am in my own neighborhood. c. Speed up so that I can get through the intersection before the other jerk gets there. d. Stop signs do not apply to me; they were invented to slow the other guy down. 4. You have to shop in a tienda downtown, but there are no parking spaces available on the street. What should you do? a. Continue on around the block and look for another space or possibly park in the garage. b. Take any available spot, even if it is marked “no parking.” I will just be there for a minute. c. Pull over to the side, block the cars that are parked and put on my emergency flashers. d. Stop in the middle of the street, so I can take care of my business. The other cars should know better than to be in “MY” parking place. 5. What is the purpose of the

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horn? a. To warn other drivers of impending danger. b. To say “hi” to friends and let everyone else know that I am here. c. To let the idiot sitting in front of me at the stoplight know that the light is about to turn green, so he may as well go now. d. Horn? Why would anyone ever honk at me, I own the road! 6. Besides driving, what other actions are you able to perform while operating a motor vehicle? a. Nothing, I pay strict attention to the driving conditions and keep two hands on the wheel at all times. b. I can talk on my cell phone and still keep my eyes open for “transitos”. c. I am able to talk to my passenger about the Chivas game while swerving through traffic and cursing at other drivers. d. Anything and everything. I can give change for a $50 peso bill, issue a receipt, talk to my buddy, and honk at cute girls while drag racing all other traffic. I have never lost a race and have scratches and dents on my vehicle to prove it. Scoring: Give yourself 1 point for each letter “a” you selected, two points for each letter “b”, three points for each letter “c” and four points for each letter “d”. Results: 7 and below. You are a hopeless case and should not even be trusted to ride in a taxi much less drive a car here. 8-13: You show promise and have potential to be a bona fide “local” driver. 14-19: Your advanced driving skills make you a candidate for a taxi driver. 20-24: You are the king of the road and have a great future as a local bus driver. (Ed. Note: Michael Green is a realtor in Puerto Vallarta and moved there in 1997 to take advantage of the unsurpassed lifestyle PV offers. He has survived the local roadways by employing guile, guts and determination. Mike can be reached by e mail at: pvgetaways@hotmail.com)

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CIRCLING SOUNDS By Jeannette Saylor

I hold a sea shell close to my ear And feel the splash of the incoming tide Two porpoises skim the mighty power Flashing ebony tails in their carefree flight. My sandals crunch sand as I shuffle the beach As I wait to watch the sun disappear Dusk is humming a lullaby song to me Spreading some stars and drawing its place As people come close to be near the sea. Sea anemones stretch among salty rocks And clams snuggle inside protective shells I pause to hear slaps of a volleyball team And hear guitar strums from a distant place As I watch surfers drag their Hobe boards. The charcoal smells brown in a pit nearby How I wish to join that family tent Someone is singing a yippy-yi song And laughter embraces this kinship clan With silence I watch the dipping sun As it fades and quiet hushes the beach. I total the prongs of the various sounds As people join with a special regard They are clapping their hands for the sunlight show Seagulls near the pier watch the turquoise tide And I hear the winds breathe the sun a goodnight.

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THIS WORLD of OURS By Bob Harwood bharwoodb@hotmail.com A New Global Dynamic

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January Letter to the Editor suggested that “in his idealistic internationalism Harwood seems oblivious to the real world of national politics”. I do not consider the Copenhagen Climate Conference an utter failure. I deem it a modest step forward in a daunting task as 192 nations seek consensus on distributing responsibility for salvaging the habitat we share—and convey, or sell, to domestic constituencies commitments made. Three major groups emerged,(1) developed nations historically responsible for global warming and by far the heaviest per capita carbon emitters, (2) developing nations with much lower per capita emissions whose total emissions are now rising rapidly, and (3) poor and threatened nations needing technologies and substantial assistance to cope with looming disaster. President Obama must now work with a dysfunctional Congress operating under archaic rules. Canada’s minority government no longer speaks for the nation on this issue. Provincial leaders weren’t “undermining Canada’s position” at Copenhagen. Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia, with 75% of the country’s population, were simply demanding more aggressive action. Canada’s multiple Fossil of the Day awards were for the only nation to renege on its Kyoto ratification—as Harper from oil sands Alberta did on becoming Prime Minister.

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Admittedly, Copenhagen’s accomplishments were expressed in general terms: A rise in global temperature must not exceed 2 degrees. Poor and threatened nations must be helped to cope with global warming. Measurement of each country’s performance to commitments must be objective. I don’t deem Europe sidelined as China and America wrestled to extract reciprocal concessions. Europe’s per capita emission are already half those of North America! Copenhagen confirms there is no way all nations can sit down as equals to achieve consensus on complex issues. There will always be power structures within. The UN is not invalidated but it too must adapt. Five nations have a Veto Power that all too often has paralyzed action on vital issues. Now a powerful new voice has emerged in the four BASIC developing countries and for the first time the world’s poorest nations are also being heard. A new UN power dynamic must better reflect two cornerstones of democracy, representation by population and avoidance of obscene economic disparities. America represents less than 5% of humanity, four of the five veto powers a total


of less than 9%. The BASIC four developing nations represent 40%. Obscenely, one billion people go to bed hungry every night while in the First World obesity has become the looming, life-shortening health issue. Commitments to meager UN Millennium Development Goals, already well behind schedule, must be met by 2015. Tasks await one and all. We must also recognize that earth’s vast oceans are being destroyed far more rapidly than our own environment—with a huge impact on global warming. We must utilize abundant environmentally sound alternatives to power economies of the future as surely as fossil fuels and cheap oil ushered in the Industrial Revolution and the present era. America, where self serving short term perspectives brought the global economy to the brink of disaster must address a dysfunctional system in which short term constituency level interests dominate Congress. China, which saw the most rapid transition to an open economy in human history, must make like progress on human rights. Canada with five parties must eventually embrace proportional representation to more fairly represent Canadians

as a whole. And all nations must move toward the EU model where 27 nations subordinate parochial short term interests that a continent might war no more and a more equitable society be achieved for all. In a restructured United Nations may we yet envisage the day when “the common sense of most shall hold a fretful realm in awe, and the kindly earth shall slumber, lapped in universal law.” Tennyson, 1842. Bob Harwood

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LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY 16 DE SEPTIEMBRE #16-A AJIJIC, JAL, MX WWW.LAKECHAPALASOCIETY.ORG

News

February 2010

From the President

Your Board has now completed it’s first month in office and the progress is beginning to show. We have begun to implement the new LCS governance structure and have appointed Terry Vidal as our first Executive Director. Without changing any of the current day to day activities and service to our members, Terry is beginning the process of building his management team of volunteer coordinators. When his staff is in place, Terry and his team will have full responsibility for all operational aspects of LCS. I’m sure he will have more to say about this in his message to you. The Board has established its standing committees which include Management, Finance, Program, Fundraising and Community Relations. Each committee is chaired by a board member and deals with issues according to its mandate. This is where the deliberations on policy and planning begin. Each committee will then report to the full board for final approval of its recommendations. The Board’s actions are then passed to the Executive Director for implementation. There you have LCS’ governance and management structure in a nutshell. You’ve already seen some small improvements in communications. Board meeting dates have been posted on the website and bulletin board and the first of regular messages has been emailed to the members. Look for additional ways in which we will keep you informed and will seek your input. Remember, communications is a two-way street. Don’t forget to come to the LCS Kickoff Party on Sunday, February 7th from 2:00 to 4:00PM to meet and greet your fellow members and Board and Terry Vidal, our Executive Director. We’ll have some food and music and a cash bar and lots of opportunity to mingle with old friends or new ones. You’ll still be home in time to watch the Super Bowl which kicks off around 6:00PM. When you’re on the LCS grounds, be sure to stop and say hello to one of your board members who will be wearing a yellow name badge. We want to get to know you, too. Howard Feldstein President

Members Only LCS Kickoff Party on Super Bowl Sunday, February 7th from 2:00 to 4:00PM Meet and Greet each other and the new LCS Board before going to watch the Saints and Colts dual it out! On the Back Lawn and the Neill James Patio Snacks provided by the Secret Garden and El Norteño Arrachera. Cash Bar. 50/50 Lotto.

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LCS

News

February 2010

From the Directors Desk A new era has begun at LCS and I am proud to be part of it. Initially members will see little if any change in services as we go through the transitional period of re-organizing the operational structure and how we do business in general. In the long run, I anticipate that Members will see a vast improvement in the delivery of services, and the quantity and quality of services. By April, we should have clearly defined long-range goals, and 3 year strategic goals to take us forward. With a consistent approach to planning, we can budget ourselves appropriately and within 12 months a new, more relevant and vibrant LCS will emerge. Volunteers are the core of LCS. Please give them the recognition they are due with a pat on the back and a hearty smile when they assist you. I will be working closely with volunteer leaders to assure that team work and customer service are top priorities. There is a lot of work to be done. With all of the talent within our membership we’ll get it done. Don’t be surprised if you are approached and asked to give us some of your talent as we forge ahead. It will be greatly appreciated. I’ll be reporting to you in this newsletter regularly. Terry Vidal

This is the governance structure the Board approved during the January meeting. The Strategic Planning Process continues with more focus groups being planned in February.

FILM AFICIONADOS Films & discussion 2nd and 4th Thursday every month in the Sala at 2PM. Feb. 11th- THE HURT LOCKER- Academy Award nominee for this year. Intense anti-war film outstanding in its direction. Feb. 25th- BREAKER MORANT- From Australia. In honor of the death of Edward Woodward, star of this film, we’ll see this film again (shown here 9 years ago) and resurrect the Boer War.

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LCS

News MONTHLY SCHEDULED EVENTS

February 2010

Library News!

LCS Board Meeting: 2nd Thursday at 10:30 LIBRARIES Book & Video M-SAT 10-2:00 Talking Books TH 10-1:00 Nov-May, 10-12:00 June-Oct MEDICAL/HEALTH INSURANCE Blood Pressure M & F 10-12:00 Cruz Roja Sales Table M-SAT 10-12:30 Cruz Roja Monthly Meeting 1st W 2-4:00 Health Care Week 6-12 Feb 2010 Hearing Aids M & 2nd & 4th SAT 11-3:00 IMSS M & T 10-1:00 MDabroad T 10:30-11:15, Jan-March 2010 NYLife/Seguros Monterrey Insurance T & TH 11-2:00 Optometrist TH 9-5:30 Safe Insurance W 11-2:00 Jan–Dec 2010 Skin Cancer 2nd & 4th W 10-12:00 Sign–up in Office SkyMed W 4-6:00 INFORMATION Ajijic Rotary Club M 9-1:00 Becerra Immigration F 10-1:00 Costco W 10-2:00 Loridan Legal T 10-12:00, Jan-Dec 2010 LINK M 10-12:00, Nov-April US Consulate 1st W 11:30-2:00 Sign up LESSONS Children’s Art SAT 9-12:30 Country Line Dancing T & TH 10-11:30 Exercise M-W-F 9-10:00 Have Hammers Workshop M 10-12:15, F 2:30-4:30 Intermediate Hatha Yoga T & TH & SAT 2-3:30 Primitive Pottery F 10-1:00, SAT 12:30-3:30 LCS Dec 09-March 2010 SOCIAL ACTIVITIES AA MTH 4-6:00 ACA Talks T 12-2:00, Sept 09-July 2010 Beginner’s Digital Camera W 12-1:00, Oct 09-May 2010, July-Dec 2010 Bid Euchre T 10-12:00 Computer Linux Class F 9:30-10:30 for 2009, Friday 2010 Computer Windows Club F 10:30-11:45 for 2009, Friday 2010 Creative Writer’s Group M 2-4:00 (Closed group) Digital Camera W 10:30-12:00,Jan –April 2010, July-Dec 2010 Discussion Group W 12-1:30 Film Aficionados 2nd4th5th TH 2-4:30 Gamblers Anonymous W 12-1:00 Genealogy Last M 2-4:00 Great Books 1st & 3rd TH 2-4:15 Individual Counseling M-TH 3-4:00 Lake Chapala Green Group 1st T 3-4:30 LCS Learning Seminars T 12-2:00, Dec 09-April 2010 LCS Lecture Series (Rhoda) F 12-3:00, Jan-April 2010 Mac OS 1st M 12-1:30 Mac User 3rd W 3-4:30 Mah Jonng F 10-3:00 Music Jam F 2-3:00 Masonic Lodge #31 2nd & 4th W 4:30-8, 4th T 3-4:30 Needle Pushers T 10-12:00 Neil James Lectures Dimitar 2nd & 4th TH 12-1:00, Feb-April 2010 Open Circle SUN 10:30-12:15 Quilt Guild 2nd T 12-2:30, Quilt Show 10-3:00, Nov 9,2010 Scrabble M & F 12-2:00 Tournament Scrabble T 12-3:00 Mar-Dec, 2010 Transition Mexico 2nd M 11-1:30 Feb-Dec, 2010 Times subject to change.

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El Ojo del Lago February 2010

The Mexican and Local Authors collections, housed together at the rear of the Library, are growing. Flower and plant lovers might want to take a look at local author Steven A. Frowine’s beautiful books on orchids and gardening. Many new books on Mexican architecture, houses and gardens have been added, as well as Mexican fiction. As always, thank you for your generous donations to the Library. You make a significant contribution to our efforts to enrich all the Library collections. Following are some of the new titles added to the Library’s collection. Many more will arrive soon.

Fiction The Sum of Our Days by Isabel Allende The Widow’s Season by Laura Brodie Just Take My Heart by Mary Higgins Clark Nine Dragons by Michael Connelly Secret of the Seventh Son by Glenn Cooper Artic Drift by Clive Cussler The Bodies Left Behind by Jeffery Deaver Broken Window by Jeffery Deaver The Fourth Order by Stephen Frey Calamity’s Children by Joaquin Hawkins The Sign by Raymond Khoury Decked With Folly by Kate Kingsbury The Girl Who Played With Fire by Steig Larsson The Swimsuit by James Patterson No More Dying by David Roberts A Change in Altitude by Anita Shreve The Lucky Ones by Nicholas Sparks All the Horses of Heaven by James Tipton Once Smitten, Twice Shy by Lori Wilde

ACA Eco Talks February 2 ---- Ground Hog Day Tour (at the Farm) February 9 ---- Foods that Heal February 16 ---- Beans, the musical Fruit February 23 ---- Living Lakes Tuesdays at Noon in the Gazebo

Spanish Classes Sign-up and information on the Blue Umbrella Patio every Friday. Next 7 week session begins March 8 thru April 23.


LCS

News

February 2010

Health Care Week is February 6-12 For the diabetic testing, people should plan to eat a high carbohydrate breakfast ( such as pancakes or oatmeal or yogurt & granola, along with toast, fruit, or juice, etc.) TWO hours before your glucose (blood sugar) test. Remember to sign-up in the Services Office if the tests you want require registration. SATURDAY FEBRUARY 6, 2010 3:00 Hearing Aid Help Hearing Aid Room MONDAY FEBRUARY 8, 2010 9:00 – Osteoporosis Testing * $ Parking Lot of Maskaras Clinic This test is being given in the Maskaras parking lot because the equipment is too large to be accommodated at LCS 9:30 – 12:00 Diabetic Testing Clinic Room 10:00 – 12:00 Blood Pressure / Talking books room TUESDAY FEBRUARY 9, 2010 10:00 – 12:30 Pneumonia shots * $ Clinic Room WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 10, 2010 10:00 – 12:00 Skin Cancer Screening * Clinic Room THURSDAY FEBRUARY 11, 2010 9:00 – 2:30 Optometrist Clinic Clinic Room FRIDAY FEBRUARY 12, 2010 10:00 – 12:00 Blood Pressure Blood Pressure / Talking books room * Advanced sign up necessary $ There is a charge

Needed! Looking for volunteer gardeners and pond expertise. Please See Terry in the office if you can help.

The 2010 LCS Directory should arrive prior to the end of the Month. An email will be sent out informing you when it has arrived so you can come in and get it!

FRIDAY MUSIC JAM THE MUSIC JAM HELD ON FRIDAYS AT 2 PM IF YOU PLAY AN INSTRUMENT AND WOULD ENJOY PLAYING WITH OTHERS TRY IT OUT. PLAYERS SIT IN A CIRCLE AND TAKE TURNS CHOOSING A TUNE FOR THE GROUP TO PLAY. THIS JAM WILL FEATURE OLD-TIME TUNES EVERYBODY KNOWS.

Saw you in the Ojo

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Service

EMERGENCY NUMBERS

www.tel.chapala.com

DIRECTORY Cell: (045) 331-350-6764

* ADVERTISING

* BEER & LIQUOR STORES

- EL OJO DEL LAGO Tel. 765-3676

* ANIMAL CLINICS/PET SHOP - ACUARIO REPUBLICA Cell: (045) 333 441 3563 Pag: 51 - ANIMAL CARE Tel: 766-3062 Pag: 69 - DEE’S PET CARE Tel: 762-1646 Pag: 79 - FURRY FRIENDS Tel: 765-5431 Pag: 78 - LAKESIDE SPAY & NEUTER CENTER, A.C. Tel: 766-0821 - PET SHOP Pag: 69 - SALUD ANIMAL Tel: 766-1009 Pag: 79

* ART GALLERIES/HANDCRAFTS - AZTEC STUDIOS Pag: 28 - BELVA & ENRIQUE VELAZQUEZ Tel. 766-0162 Pag: 79 - CATHY CHALVIGNAC Tel: 766-5381 Pag: 50 - DIANE PEARL COLECCIONES Tel: 766-5683 Pag: 35 - EL PALOMAR Tel: 01 (33) 3635-5247 Pag: 51 - JUAN CARLOS RICO-GARDEN ART Tel: 765-4689 Pag: 22 - LAGUNA ARTES PLASTICAS Pag: 32, 64 - MEXICAN ART & DECO Cell: 01 (33) 1437-1848 Pag: 36 - THE AJIJIC ART HOUSE Tel: 765-5097 Pag: 86

- AUTOMATIC GARAGE DOOR OPENERS Tel: 766 - 4973, Cell: (045) 33-3157- 6536 Pag: 54

* AUTOMOTIVE Pag: 65 Pag: 64 Pag: 17 Pag: 64

* BANK INVESTMENT -O&A Tel: 766-3508 - MULTIVA Tel: 766-2499

Pag: 29 Pag: 49

Pag: 26

* BEAUTY - AFRODITA Tel: 766-6187 - JAMES DON SALON Tel: 01 (387) 763 1933 - MARY KAY Tel: 765 7654 - SARA’S BEAUTY SALON Tel: 766-3518

82

Pag: 76

- HUNTER DOUGLAS Tel: 766-0026

Pag: 21

Pag: 79 Pag: 81

Pag: 86 Pag: 65

- PAPELERIA TRINIDAD Tel: 766-2400

* BOUTIQUE / CLOTHING STORES - ARATI Tel. 766-0130 - CUGINIS OPUS BOUTIQUE Tel/Fax: 766-1790 - FIAGA BOUTIQUE Tel: 766-1816 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - LEATHER GALLERY Tel: 766-2845

Pag: 32 Pag: 21 Pag: 38, 79 Pag: 57 Pag: 54

* CEILING FANS - VENTILADORES DEL OCCIDENTE Tel/Fax: (33) 3631-6619, 3634-9982

Pag: 10

* CHURCHES - LAKE CHAPALA BAPTIST CHURCH Tel: 765-2925 Pag: 12, 78

* COMMUNICATIONS Pag: 58 Pag: 34

Pag: 20

* COMPUTING SERVICES - AJIJIC COMPUTING Tel: 765-4156 - CAFE INTERNET AJIJIC Tel: 766-3626 - COMPUTERLAND Tel: 765-7595 - NEW WORLD TECHNOLOGY Tel: 766-4343

- ALFREDOS BAZAR Tel: 766-2980 - SUZY’S CONSIGNMENT SHOP Tel: 766-5458

766-1760 765-4444 766-5555

- TEMPUR Tel: (52) 333-629-5919, 333-629-5961

Pag: 58

* GARDENING Pag: 63 - GARDEN CENTER Tel: 765-5973

Pag: 70

Pag: 76

* HARDWARE STORES - FERRETERIA Y TLAPALERIA GALVEZ Tel: 766-0880, Fax: 766-2440 Pag: 75

Pag: 18

* HEALTH

Pag: 11 Pag: 17 Pag: 15

- AUDA HAMMETT- Clinical Hypnosis - WEIGHT WATCHERS Tel: 01 800 710 3378

Pag: 64 Pag: 41

* HEARING AIDS - LAKESIDE HEARING SERVICES Cell. (045) 33-1511-4088

Pag: 81

Pag: 10

* HOTELS / SUITES Pag: 07 Pag: 24 Pag: 60 Pag: 08

* DRY CLEANING/LAUNDRY Pag: 77

* FINANCIAL SERVICES

- CASA BLANCA Tel: 766-4440 - HOTEL LA CASONA Tel: 01800-700-8877 - LA NUEVA POSADA Tel: 766-1444, Fax: 766-2049 - MIS AMORES Tels: 766-4640, 4641, 4642 - QUINTA DON JOSE Tel: 01-800-700-2223

* FITNESS

Pag: 63 Pag: 03 Pag: 62 Pag: 71

* HOME APPLIANCES - TECNICOS UNIDOS Tel: (376) 765-4266

- CANADIANS IN MEXICO Tel: 766-4828 Pag: 37 - INTERCAM Tel: 766-5978 Pag: 21 - LAKESIDE FINANCIAL ADVISOR DAVID LESNICK CFP CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER Fax: 001(623) 327-1277 Pag: 19 - LAKESIDE MORTGAGE CONSULTANTS Tel: 766-2914 Pag: 54 - MORTGAGE MONEY Tel: 766-5797 Pag: 80

Pag: 16

Pag: 81

* INSURANCE - EDGAR CEDEÑO - MEXICO PROTECT Cell: (045) 33-3106-6982 Pag: 30 - LLOYD Tel: 766-0152, 766-3508 Pag: 29

* JEWELRY - ALEX Tel: 766-3775 - KAFRÍ DE MÉXICO Tel: 766-4156

Pag: 28 Pag: 73

Pag: 80 Pag: 13 Pag: 76 Pag: 43

Pag: 24 Pag: 57

- ACUATECNIA DE OCCIDENTE Tel: 01 (33) 3811-8761, 3812-1288 Pag: 31 - ARCHITECT GERARDO ROMERO MORALES Tel: 766-2594 Pag: 61 - CABO DO MUNDO- INTERIOR DESIGN Tel: 766-0026 Pag: 09, 21 - CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING Tel: 766-3626 Pag: 13 - ELECTRICIAN & PLUMBER Armando Marquez V. Tel: 766-3568 Pag: 78 - IRRIGATION SYSTEMS Tel. (33) 3135 3645 Pag: 57 - SURO & ARCINIEGA

El Ojo del Lago February 2010

- AJIJIC DENTAL Tel: 766-3682 - C.D. MARÍA LUISA LUIS VILLA Tel/Fax: 766-2428 - C.D. SANDRA ANAYA MORA Tel: 765-3502, 765-5444 - DRA. ANGELICA ALDANA LEMA DDS Tel. 765-5364 - DRA. DOLORES RUSSELL D.D.S. Tel: 766-2881, 766-0075 Cell: (045) 333-108-7727 - DR. ALBERTO DON OLIVERA Tels: 765-4838, 765-4805 - DR. FRANCISCO CONTRERAS Tel: 765-5757 - DR. HECTOR HARO, DDS. Tel: 765-3193, 765-6974

066 765-2308, 765-2553 766-3615

Pag: 60

* DENTISTS

- DEL MAR Tel: 766-4278

* CLEANING SERVICE

- EASYCALL MEXICO Tel: 766-4980 - HANDY MAIL Tel: 766-3813 - MAILBOXES, ETC. Tel: 766-0647, Fax: 766-0775 761-0363, Fax: 761-0364

Pag: 70

* COPY CENTER

Pag: 50 Pag: 31

Tel: 01 (33) 3823-0779, 3817-0299 - ULTRA Tel: 765-3446 - VSF PAISAJISMO - Landscape Design Tels: 01 (33) 3044-0371, 72 - WARWICK CONSTRUCTION Tel: 765-2224 Cell. (045) 331-135-0763

* BLINDS AND CURTAINS

* CONSTRUCTION

* BED & BREAKFAST - CASA DE LAS FLORES Tel: 766-5493 - CASA DEL SOL Tel: 766-0050 - CASA TRES LEONES

Pag: 80

* CONSIGNMENT SHOP

* BAKERY - BRENDA’S BAKERY BOUTIQUE Tel: 765-2987

- BETO’S WINE & LIQUOR Tel: 766-5420, Cell (045) 333-507-3024 - MODELORAMA Tel: 766-2678, 765-2055

- PROFESSIONAL WINDOW WASHING Tel: 765-4507 Pag: 34

* AUTOMATIC DOORS

- FERNANDO’S Cell: (045) 331-323-6289 - GRUPO OLMESA Tel: 766-3780 - LINEA PROFESIONAL Tel. 766-2555, Fax. 766-0066 - RON YOUNG-MECHANIC Tel: 765-6387

Pag: 31

EMERGENCY HOTLINE AMBULANCE - CRUZ ROJA FIRE DEPARTMENT POLICE Ajijic Chapala La Floresta

- CHANGE OF PACE Tel: 766-5614

LEGAL SERVICES Pag: 71 - MAGO’S OFFICE Tel: 765-3640

* FLOWER SHOP - CRISANTEMO ROJO Tel: 766-4030

* LIGHTING & DECORATION Pag: 65

* FUMIGATION/PESTS - FUMIGA Tel: 762-0078, (045) 33-1155-7059 - FUMI-TECH Tel: 766-1946, Cell. (045) 333-369-3737

- LIGHTING & DESIGN CENTER Tel. 766-3506

Pag: 53

* MEAT/POULTRY/CHEESE Pag: 50 Pag: 78

* FURNITURE - AJIJIC ART DESIGN Tel: 765-5882 - ARDEN MEXICO Tel: 765-3540 - ARTE AMANECER Tel: 765-2090 - DIRECTORS CHAIR Tel: 763-5836 - KARVY Tel: 765-6601 - RICARDO FERNANDEZ Tel: 766-5149

Pag: 11

Pag: 35 Pag: 46 Pag: 50 Pag: 60 Pag: 36 Pag: 59

- TONY’S Tel: 766-1614, 766-4069

Pag: 18

* MEDICAL SERVICES - BODY SENSE CLINIC - PODIATRIST Tel: 766-6080 Pag: 72 - DERMATOLOGIST Tel: 766-1198, 765-2400 Pag: 77 - DERMIKA Dermatologic Center Dra. Monica Ramos Tel: 766-2500 Pag: 27 - INTERNAL MEDICINE SPECIALIST & GERIATRICS Dr. J. Manuel Cordova Tel: 766-2777 Pag: 30 - DRA. MARTHA R. BALLESTEROS FRANCO Cell: (045) 333-408-0951 Pag: 19 - HOSPITAL ANGELES DEL CARMEN


Tel: (01) 3813-0042 - HOSPITAL BERNARDETTE Tel: 01 (33) 3825-4365 - ISILAB Tel: 766-1164 - MEDICOS ESPECIALISTAS Tel: 766-5357 - PINTO OPTICAS Tel: 765-7793 - PSYCHOTHERAPIST Cell. 044-333-408-7632 - RED CROSS Tel:765-2308 - SURGERY HOST Tel: 766-3145

Pag: 12 Pag: 33 Pag: 35 Pag: 27 Pag: 39, 41 Pag: 20

Pag: 52

* MALL - CENTRO LAGUNA Tel: 01 (33) 3560-2670

Pag: 87

* MOVERS - BALDERAS Tel: 01 (33) 3810-4859 - LAKE CHAPALA MOVING Tel: 766-5008 - SEYMI Tel: 01 (33) 3603-0000, 3603-0256 - STROM- WHITE MOVING Tel: 766-4049

Pag: 06 Pag: 12 Pag: 16 Pag: 17

* MUSIC/EVENTS - SHRINER’S BBQ RIBFEST Tel: 765-2552 - NORTHERN LIGHTS - NIGHT IN VEGAS

Pag: 59 Pag: 55 Pag: 62

Tel: 766-1152, 766-3369 Fax: 766-2124, Tels: 765-2877 Fax: 765-3528 - CHULA VISTA NORTE Tel: 766-2177 Cell: (045) 33-3841-8867 - EL DORADO Tel: 766-0040 - EAGER Y ASOCIADOS Tel: 766 1917, 1918 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 01 (33) 1568 9254 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: (387) 763-1974 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 766-5905 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 766-2867 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 766-3334 - GEORGETTE RICHMOND Tel: 766-2129, 766-2077 - IMPULSA REAL ESTATE Tel: (+52) 669 913 2745 - LAGUNA VISTA Tel: 766-5740 - LLOYD REAL ESTATE AJIJIC Tel: 766-0040 - MICHEL BUREAU Cell. (045) 333-129-3322, Home: (376) 765-2973 - MIGUEL RUEDA ROMAN Tel: 765-6557 - RIVIERA ALTA Tel: 766-1169 - TOM AND DIANNE BRITTON Tel. 766-5249 (home) Cell. (045) 33-1298-5722

Pag: 88

Pag: 59 Pag: 02 Pag: 51 Pag: 74 Pag: 68 Pag: 70 Pag: 76 Pag: 78 Pag: 13 Pag: 43 Pag: 67 Pag: 02

Pag: 28

Pag: 29

* PERSONAL ASSISTANCE - JUSTUS HAUSER Tel: 763-5333, Fax: 763-5335 Emergencies: 01 (33) 3441-8223 Pag: 05 - NEWCOMERS ILSE HOFFMANN Cell: 33-3157-2541, Ilse40@megared.net.mx www.mexicoadventure.com/chapala/guadalajara.htm Tel: 01 (33) 3647-3912

* PHARMACIES - FARMACIA CRISTINA Tel: 766-1501 - FARMACIA EXPRESS II Tel: 766-0656 - FARMACIA MASKARAS Tel/Fax: 765-5827 - FARMACIA MORELOS Tel: 765-4002 - FARMACIA SAN PAULO Tel: (378) 763-0506 - FARMACIA UNICA Tel: 766-0523

Pag: 79

Pag: 11, 70 Pag: 27 Pag: 54 Pag: 14 Pag: 22

Pag: 53

- AJIJIC ELECTRONICS S.A. DE C.V. Tel/Fax: 766-1117, 766-3371

Tel: 766-4030 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - MONTE COXALA Tel: (387) 761-0111, 761-0326 - RESPIRO SPA Tel: (045) 33-3157-7790 - TOTAL BODY CARE Tel: 766 3379 - VILLA BORDEAUX Tel: (01-387) 761-0494

Pag: 65 Pag: 57 Pag: 25 Pag: 34 Pag: 19 Pag: 26

Pag: 34

* THERAPISTS

Pag: 38

Pag: 49

- DRA. MA. LUCÍA VELASCO MEDRANO Physical Rehabilitation Cell: (045) 33-3954-6966 Pag: 71 - PROFESSIONAL REHABILITATION Tel: 766-5563 Pag: 36

Pag: 18

* TOURS

Pag: 61

Pag: 65

Pag: 06 Pag: 66

- CHARTER CLUB TOURS Tel: 766-1777 - GRUPO TURQUESA Tel: 766-5435

Pag: 09, 11, 15 Pag: 73

* TREE SERVICE - CHAPALA TREE SERVICE Tel: 762-0602

Pag: 81

* WATER - TECNO AQUA Tel: 766-3730, 766-3731

Pag: 15

* SCHOOLS

Pag: 03

- COLDWELLBANKER CHAPALA REALTY Tel: 766-1152, movile: (045) 33-1175-9632 Pag: 72 - FOR RENT Tel: 765-6462 Pag: 24 - FOR RENT Tel: 766-3527 Pag: 80 - FOR RENT Tel: 01 (33) 3122-4676 Pag: 70 - FOR RENT Tel: 766-2518 Pag: 77 - RENTAL LOCATERS Tel: 766-5202 Pag: 57 - ROMA Tel: 766-3163 Pag: 20

Pag: 16

* WEAVERS - CLC Tel: 765-5498 - INSTITUTO TERRANOVA Tel: 766-2401 - TANGO LESSONS Tel: 766-5885

Pag: 69

- TELARES LOS REYES Tel: 766-5640

Pag: 35

Pag: 53 Pag: 77

* SECURITY SYSTEMS / WIRE FENCES - S.O.S.E Tel: 765-4921

Pag: 75

* SELF STORAGE - SELF STORAGE-BODEGAS CHAPALA Tel: 766-0661, Tel/Fax: 766-1045 Pag: 61

* SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS * REPAIRS/ MAINTENANCE - SERVICIO BELTRÁN Tel: 766-4586, 765-3949 - WATCH & CLOCKS Tel: 765 5190, Cell: (045) 33-1331-9226

Pag: 80

Pag: 80

- ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Tel: 766-5961 - EL BAZAR DE LOS NIÑOS Tel: 765-3147 - LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY Tel: 766-1140

Pag: 81 Pag: 73 Pag: 78-81

Pag: 69

* RESTAURANTS/CAFES/CLUBS

* SPA / MASSAGE

Pag: 71 Pag: 77 Pag: 80 Pag: 61

* PHOTOGRAPHY - MARTHA HERRERA Cell: 333-821-2378

- LA CASA NOSTRA Tel: 765-4187, Fax: 765-5815 - THE BLUE HOUSE Tel: 766-1256

* SATELLITES/ T.V.

* PAINT Pag: 36

Pag: 71

* RETIREMENT/REST/NURSING HOMES

Pag: 66

* RENTALS/PROPERTY MANAGEMENT - FMC Tel: 766-3596 - PAINTING AND MORE Tel: 766-2343

Tel: 766-4253 - MOM´S DELI & RESTAURANT Tel: 765-5719 - NUMBER FOUR Tel: 766-1360 - PAJARO MADRUGADOR Tel: 763-5836 - PEDROS GOURMET Tel: 766-4747 - PEPE’S & AURORA’S Cell. (044) 33 1265 7900 - PEPITO’S Tel: 766-2060 - THE GARDEN Tel: 766-1381 - TABARKA Tel: 766-1588 - TOMAS Tel: 765-3897 - TONY’S Tel: 766-1614, 766-4069 - YVES’ Tel: 766-1851

Pag: 58

* POOL MAINTENANCE - EQUIPMENT AND POOL MAINTENANCE Tel: 766-1617 Pag: 39

* REAL ESTATE - 1ST CHOICE HOMES LAKESIDE Tel: 765-2484 Pag: 39 - AJIJIC HOME INSPECTIONS Tel: 766-2836 Pag: 11 - AJIJIC REAL ESTATE Tel: 766-2077, Fax: 766-2331 Pag: 03 - ALL IN ONE REAL ESTATE SERVICE Tel: 766-1161 Pag: 05 - ALTERNATIVE REALTY Tel: 766-5575 Pag: 18 - AMBIANT Tel: 01 (33) 3146-0543 Pag: 61 - BEV. & JEAN COFELL Home Tel. 766-5332 Office Tel. 765-3676 Pag: 54 - COLDWELL BANKER CHAPALA REALTY

- AJIJIC TANGO Tel: 766-2458 - CAFÉ ADELITA Tel: 766-0097 - CASA DEL WAFFLE Tel: 766-1946 - CHAC-LAN Tel: (387) 761-0111, 761-0326 - CHILI BANG BAR Tel: 766-1919 - DAVID’S CAFE Tel: 766-2341 - EL BAR-CO Tel: 766-0452 - EL JARDIN DE NINETTE Cell: (045) 33-1410-4064 - GO LE CLUB Cell: (045) 33-3502-6555 - LA BODEGA Tel: 766-1002 - LA NUEVA POSADA Tel: 766-1444, 766-2049 - “LA TAVERNA” DEI QUATTRO MORI Tel: 766 2848 - LA VITA BELLA Cell: 33-3476-6577 - LAS CABALLERIZAS COXALA Tel: 766-0744 - LAS MENINAS Tel: 766-0664 - LOS TELARES Tel: 766-0428 - MANIX Tel: 766-0061 - MELANIE’S

Pag: 68 Pag: 50 Pag: 03

- AFRODITA Tel: 766-6187 - BODY SENSE CLINIC Tel: 766-6080 - HYDROPOOL

Pag: 52 Pag: 72

SAW YOU IN T HE OJO

Pag: 25 Pag: 29 Pag: 13

The Ojo Crossword

Pag: 26 Pag: 38 Pag: 14 Pag: 19 Pag: 03 Pag: 53 Pag: 22 Pag: 25 Pag: 63 Pag: 55 Pag: 62

Saw you in the Ojo

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AA- Meets daily at 10:00 am. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday at 4 pm. Marcos Castellanos 51-A. 766-5961. ACÁ- Teaches youths, families sustainable agriculture, Joco and Jaltepec. Meet 14th of month. For more Information 387 763-1568. A COURSE IN MIRACLES- Saturday 2:00 pm 16 Sept #34, Unit 6, 766-4882 No charge. Ongoing. AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA 904 WING- Meeting 2nd Friday of every month in May, June, July & August. From September to April we meet the 2nd and 4th Friday. Contact Don Slimman 765 4141. AJIJIC QUILT GUILD - Meets second Tuesday monthly. Guests & New Members Welcome. ajijicguild@gmail.com AJIJIC SCRABBLE CLUB- Tuesdays and Thursdays noon-3 pm at LCS Ken Gosh Pavilion. Dan Stark 766-0411. AJIJIC WRITERS’ GROUP- Meets 1st and 3rd Fridays at 10 am. New Posada. Coffee. Meeting followed by lunch at the New Posada. AXIXIC MASONIC LODGE #31- Meets 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of each month at 5:00 pm. Contact the secretary at 763-5346 for details. AMERICAN LEGION OF CHAPALA POST- #7 General Membership meets 11 am 2nd Thursday. Tel: 765-2259. AMIGOS INTERNACIONALES- Every Wednesday 6 to 8 pm, Nueva Posada; informal friendly group meet to make new friends. AMIGOS DEL LAGO A.C.- Working to improve the ecology. See www.amigosdelago.org or contact us at info@amigosdelago.org. AMITIES FRANCOPHONES- Meets every 3rd Saturday at 1 pm contact: Roland and Camille at 766-0149. rvanhoudt@prodigy.net.mx. ANIMAL SHELTER- Provide shelter and new homes for dogs and cats. Tel: 765-5514. ANITA’S ANIMALS- Free loving dogs and cats. call (01 387) 761-0500. www.anitasanimals.com. ASA- Ajijic Society of the Arts. Meets every 1st Monday of the month at Nueva Posada, 10 am. BRIDGE AT OLD POSADA- Monday 1:15 check in. Mary Andrews 766-2489. BRITISH SOCIETY- Lunch meeting the 1st Saturday of each month, 1pm at Manix Rest. 765-4786, chapalainn@prodigy.net.mx. CARD & DOMINO CLUB- Wednesday, Friday & Sunday. Call for times. We will teach; make friends! Tel. 766-4253, Cell: (045) 33-1295-6485. CANADIAN CLUB OF LAKE CHAPALA- Meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month, September through April. Social hour: 3:00 pm, program 4:00 pm. Visit www.canadianclub-chapala.com. CASA DE ANCIANOS- Provides support for elderly citizens, 765-2497. CENTRO DE DESARROLLO AJIJIC- Provides family planning and reproductive health education. 766-1679. CHILI COOK OFF- Providing a carnival for residents raising charitable funds, 763-5038. DAR- (Guadalajara)- Daughters of the American Revolution, meets monthly Sep. through June. Cell:333-897-0660 or Tel: (376) 766-2284. DAR- (At Lakeside)- THOMAS PAINE CHAPTER meets every 3 Wednesday at 12:30 noon, September thru June. Tel: 766-2981 or 762-0834. EASTERN STAR ESTRELLA DEL LAGO CHAPTER #10- 1st Wed. at 1:00 pm at Hotel Monte Carlo. 766-3785, www.oesestrelladellago.org. E.R.I.C.- Provides support for the construction and renovation of educational buildings. 766-2866. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS- GA Meeting held every Wednesday afternoon at 3:00 PM in the Doctor’s office at the Lake Chapala Society Charlie K. at cell: 331-445-2136. GARDEN GUILD- promoting the interest in the development of local gardens with an accent on the exotic species available in central Mexico. GERMAN MEETING- 2nd Thursday, 1:00 pm. La Nueva Posada. Call Thea 765-2442 or Hannes 765-3094. GOLDEN STRINGS OF LAKE CHAPALA, A.C.- Rehearsals at auditorio de la Floresta. Tuesday & Friday, 3-6 pm. HASH HOUSE HARRIERS- Every Saturday at 8:30 am at La Nueva Posada. IRISH SOCIETY OF MEXICO- Meets second Monday 4 pm at La Nueva Posada, Ajijic. Contact Brian Cronin, at 765-5071. JUNIOR LEAGUE DE GUADALAJARA A.C.- Av. San Francisco #3332. ligagdl2@prodigy.net.mx, Guadalajara, Jal. Tel. (33) 3121-0887. LAKE CHAPALA DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB- Meets every Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1:15 p.m.. www.chapalabridge.com. LAKE CHAPALA GARDEN CLUB-Promotes an interest, appreciation and better understanding of botanical subjects. 766-2637. LAKE CHAPALA SHRINE CLUB.- Meets the 3rd Tuesday of every month at 1 pm in the Nueva Posada. Perry King at (376) 763-5126. LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY - LCS- 16 de Sep. # 16-A Ajijic, Open Monday - Saturday, 10 am to 2 pm. www.lakechapalasociety.org. 766-1140. LAKESIDE COMMUNITY AWARDS- We benefit all the community by honoring lakeside’s most talented. 766-3232. LAKESIDE FRIENDS OF THE ANIMALS - Board meets last Monday every month. Contact Ellie McEvoy at 765-2523 or John Marshall at 766-1170. LAKESIDE LITTLE THEATRE A.C.- Balanced theatrical entertainment, English-speaking, 765-5942. LAKESIDE SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF- The 4th of each month. Nueva Posada 10:30 am. Call 766-2280, www.lakesideschoolforthedeaf.org. LAKESIDE WILDLIFE RESCUE & REHABILITATION- Rescue & rehabilitation of wild animals. 765-4916. LAKE SPAY AND NEUTER CENTR A.C.- Provides shelter and helps curtail the over-population of animals. 766-3813. LCS EDUCATION CENTER- Provides classes in language and other topics for both Anglo and Mexican community. 766-0499. LCS STUDENT AID FUND- Provides financial support to area students to enroll in university, vocational and high school program. 766-0716. LINK- Assisting foreign community. Desk at Lake Chapala Society-Monday, 10 am-noon. LITTLE BLUE SCHOOLHOUSE- Provides financial assistance for students at school for disabled children in Chapala 766-1552. LOS NINOS DE CHAPALA Y AJIJIC, AC Providing educational scholarships to Lakeside children 376-766-1688, www.lakesideninos.org. LOVE IN ACTION- Shelter for abused and abandoned children. For volunteers and donations. Anabel Frutos 765-7409, cell: 331-351 7826. MAS- Music Appreciation Society. Concerts from fall to spring. Classical music and dance concerts. For info call Beverly Denton, 765-6409. MISION SAN PABLO- Helping 60 orphaned children ages 2-14 yrs, Bonnie Shrall - Bonnie@shrall.com #766-0009. www.misionsanpablo.org. NAVY LEAGUE, LAKE CHAPALA COUNCIL- Meets the third Saturday for lunch at 1 pm, Manix Rest. 766 4750 or 766-1848. NEEDLE PUSHERS- Sew dresses, knit or chet sweaters for local kids. Every Tues. 10 am at LCS. Call Gay at 766-2902. NIÑOS Y JOVENES CARAVAN- Delivers foodstuffs and used clothing to orphanage in San Juan. Call Reuben Varela, 01-387-761-0828. OPEN CIRCLE- Fostering body, mind & spirit, every Sunday at the LCS from 10 am to 12 noon. 765-3402 or frankdburton@yahoo.com. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS- Every Tuesday & Friday 12 pm at Marcos Castellanos 51-A, in Upper Ajijic. Tel: 766-2575 or 766-1626. PROGRAMA PRO NIÑOS INCAPACITADOS DEL LAGO AC.- Assisting Lakeside disabled children www.programaninos.org , 763-5010. PASOS MILAGROSOS (MIRACULOUS STEPS.)- Helping Handicapped Children Through the Magic of Horses. Saturdays 8-2. www. pasosmilagrosos.com RED CROSS VOLUNTEERS- Meets 1st Wednesday at 2:00 pm at the Sala LCS. New members welcome. ROTARY CLUB OF AJIJIC- Meets every Tuesday at 1:00 pm at Hotel Real de Chapala. Contact at 766-3302. SCIENCE OF MIND STUDY GROUP- Discussion group every Tuesday at 10 AM Lake Chapala Center for Spiritual Living at Nicolas Bravo #17 Ajijic; contact Rev. Tim at 766-0920 or tim@revdoctim.com. THE GENEALOGY FORUM- Meets monthly on the fourth Monday in the Sala at LCS, from 2:00 to 3:45. UVA - University/Vocational Assistance (Little Chapel by the Lake a.c.)- Sue Torres, 766-2932 or Lynn Hanson 766-2660. VILLA INFANTIL ORPHANAGE- Provides financial support for children. 766-3396. www.friendsofvillainfantil.org VIVA LA MUSICA - Bus trips to the symphony, summer concert series, call Rosemay Keeling 766-1801. www.ajijicviva.org. VOLUNTEER HEALTH RESOURCE GROUP- Meeting last Saturday of each month at LCS in sala, 10:30. VOLUNTEERS OF THE CRUZ ROJA- Sponsors fund raising events and provides administrative and support services to the Delegation.

(NOTE: If there is any change in the above, please advise us so that corrections may be made. Call: 765-2877)

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All Saints Lutheran Church Worship Service 11:00 am 4600 Avenida Tepeyac, Guad. Tel. (01 333) 121-6741. Abundant Life Assembly of God Carr. 140 next to Mail Boxes etc, Tel: 766-5615. Center For Spiritual Living Celebration Service, 5pm Fridays, Nicolas Bravo #17 Ajijic. 766-9020 or tim@ revdoctim.com. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Services in English and Spanish, 10 am, Riberas del Pilar Bishop Wyvell Tel. (376) 765-7067, Bishop’s residence (376) 766-1532. Church of the Holy Spirit Services Sun. 10 am, Albaro Obregon #119, Chapala Tel. (376) 765-4210. Grace Baptist Church 5th Sun. Evening service 6 pm, Pedro Buzeta No. 970, Guad. Tel. (013) 641-1685. Lake Chapala Baptist Church Mid-week service, 9:30 am, worship service, 10:45 am. Santa Margarita #147, Riberas del Pilar, Tel. (376) 7652925, 765-3329. www.lakechapalabaptist.com. 7th Day Adventist meet at Madeira 12 in Rancho del Oro, 9:15 am to Noon. Potluck follows. 765-2165. Little Chapel by the Lake Sun. services 11 am, Chula Vista,. Jal, Tel. (376) 763-1551. Lake Chapala Jewish Congregation Santa Margarita 113, Riberas del Pilar, Tel: 765-6968. For information and service times, please call Pres. Elliot Gould. contact us@lakechapalajews. com. Web site: www. lakechapalajews. com. Lakeside Fellowship Sun. worship 11 am, Javier Mina #49 Ajijic, Tel. (376) 766-0795. Saint Andrew´s Anglican Church Calle San. Lucas 19, Riberas del Pilar, Sunday 2 services, 9 am & 11 am. www.standrewsparish.net. San Andres Catholic Church Services 9:00 am. Ajijic, 766-0922. St. John’s Catholic Church Between Av. Vallarta & Av. Lazaro Cardenas, Guad. Sun. 11am. (013) 121-8131. The Lake Chapala Unitarian Universalist Fellowship meets Sundays at 10:30 a.m. at the Jewish Community Center behind Mateos in Riberas del Pilar (Santa Margarita 113). For additional information call Steve at 766-5507 or email: trudycrippen@earthlink.net. Check out our website at www.lcuuf.org.


CARS

FOR SALE: Chrysler Town & Country LXI 7 passenger van, fully loaded, leather, only 54,000 miles. $9950 USD 763-5015 FOR SALE: 1993 Mercury Villager (same as Quest, complete power train is Nissan), 7 passenger van, A/C blows cold, non-smoking, one owner, original paint $4950 USD 763-5015 FOR SALE: Classic 1992 Honda Accord with Mexican plates in immaculate condition inside and out with extremely low mileage. In 2009 rebuilt automatic transmission, new radiator, and repainted. Price $3500.00 USD. Call Jim or Rhoda at 766-3785 WANTED: Looking for us car, maybe 2004 on must be us plated. In good or even better condition. Price to be reasonable. Contact: Frank Raimo WANTED: Parts for 1995 Oldsmobile Cutlass.Tires,Tire Rim,Radio Ariel, Oil Dip Stick. ETC. Contact: Thomas Law. FOR SALE: 2000 Trailer 10’ long 6’7” wide new tires, Ladder rack for top, back door in a pull down ramp and has a side entrance door, trailer weight 1,463 lbs. $2000 USD. Call: (376)766-2951 FOR SALE: 1983 CLASSIC MERCEDES 4 DOOR. Air Conditioner, AM/ FM Stereo, Automatic Transmission, Leather Interior, Sun Roof, Power Windows, Power Steering, Power Locks, near immaculate condition, Price $7,000. USD, Call: Heinz Stapff at 765-3587 FOR SALE: Will sell cheap if sold this month had car sold, buyer could not raise cash, will get you USA plates & title in your name, car is loaded and excellent condition. Call: Joe Dean at 766-0782, deejoe@ prodigy.net.mx WANTED: Right rear lamp assembly for 1988 Caravelle. Contact: Frank Raimo FOR SALE: 1997 Pontiac Bonivile. Engine runs good. Mirrors gone. Dings and dents. Needs paint job. Air-conditioner and driver side window motors need fixing. Contact: Heinz Stapff at 765-3587. Price $4000 USD.

ELECTRONICS WANTED: Epson Stylus Photo printer 1270, 1280, 1290, r1800, r1900. Call: Norm Tihor at Cell: (045) 331-431-7264 FOR SALE: Magicjack plugs into a usb port in your computer. Get free unlimited long distance for one year to the USA and Canada. Current cost for annual renewal is $19.95. Price $60 USD. Contact: Joe Slaiman FOR SALE: New DVD recorder. 387761-0827, $200 pesos FOR SALE: HP Pavillion XE 783, 700 Mhz Intel Celeron Processor, 384 Mb RAM, 30 Gb Hard Drive and rewritable CD drive. Microsoft Windows XP Pro, 3,000 pesos or best offer. Contact Belle at 765-5773 FOR SALE: Good laptop. Works fine. Legit XP Home; CD/DVD player/burner; swapable 3.5” floppy; Three batteries, will take PC-MCIA Wireless card; 2 USB ports, no screen issues. $2000. Call: David: (376) 763-52-48 FOR SALE: Wireless Receiver. LagunaNet wireless receiver complete with antenna and cable. Price $200 USD. Excellent condition. Contact: Heather

Leonard

PETS & SUPPLIES

FOR SALE: White with apricot ears, this little female must have a good home filled with love and patience. Age 5 months. $1000 pesos. Contact: Gina Rolfe FOR SALE: English Saddle. 18” seat, brown leather with suede leather knee rolls, stirrup irons and leathers, web girth, horsesize snaffle bridle with 5” bit and reins, pad. Nearly new. $2,500 pesos. Contact: Yvonne Altenderfer FOR SALE: Midwest Canine Camper single door, folding soft crate for large dogs - 70 to 90 lbs. 43”L X 28”W X 32”H. About 20 lbs. Comes with carry case. $50.00 USD or peso equivalent.

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

FOR SALE: Palliser brand all-leather recliner couch. Approximately 1.5 years old. Perfect for relaxing in front of the TV. $400.00 USD. Contact: Jim Spowart FOR SALE: Lightweight electric lawn mower. Perfect for small lawn or for trimming around landscaping. Works great. $200 pesos. Contact: Jim Spowart WANTED: I need a GOOD 2 or 4 drawer file cabinet. Must have rollers and not be a cheap piece of do-do. Prefer metal or heavy wood. Call: David at (376) 763-5248 WANTED: Would like to exchange two new Twin beds with frames, mattresses and head boards with one Queen Size bed. Contact: Khalil Khan FOR SALE: UPS BATTERY BACK UP. Connect 1 pc, electrical line surge suppression, telephone line surge suppression, ups battery back up with regulated power supply. $50 USD Contact: Cheryl Edwards BEST OFFER FOR: A brand new Sony 6.2 surround system. 4 tower speakers, 2 centre speakers (front & back), 2 subwoffers (front & back), 1 1000 watt amp. $500 or best offer. Call: Cheryl Edwards at (376) 765-2648 FOR SALE: Rustico style heavy pine living room set 3 seater sofa, loveseat, armchair. Green stripe on beige in like-new condition. Priced to move at 3800p or $300 USD FIRM . Contact: Sherry Hudson FOR SALE: Dining Table and 6 Chairs $5,000 pesos or best offer, call 766-3103 or email arjay333@gmail.com FOR SALE: Less than one year old green sectional. 7.5 feet by 7.5 feet. 9,000.00 pesos. Call:: Paul Burnworth at 766-0460 WANTED: If you have a newer Vita Mix blender stashed away I would be pleased to purchase this item. Heavy duty juicer also wanted. Contact Kenn kennquinn@yahoo. ca or call 763-5824. FOR SALE: Computer desk holds computer, monitor, keyboard, mouse and speakers, Lightweight and portable. $150 pesos. Contact: Jim Spowart FOR SALE: Complete double bed with black wrought iron headboard, frame on legs, mattress & boxspring, both in good, clean condition plus quilted mattress pad/ protector. REDUCED- Now 1500p / $120 USD Firm. Contact: Sherry Hudson FOR SALE: Rustico heavy pine dining table, 41x66 rectangular w/ butcher block type top. 6 lattice-back chairs w/

upholstered seats in yellows & blue, still wrapped in plastic. 3500 pesos or $275. Contact: Sherry Hudson FOR SALE: Moving to furnished apt, so selling contents of 1BR apt. Includes fridge, stove, micro, settees, tables, TV, double bed, etc. All in used but good shape. Load & pickup yourself in Jocotepec & take 10% off all prices. Contact: John Haskett FOR SALE: Adustable cloth covered, swivel office chair. $350 pesos. Contact: James Bily WANTED: Need EUROS for trip to France in the spring. Contact: David Harper FOR SALE: Sanaire 30” wide White Range Hood like new, with light and electric fan. Can be vented. New cost $159 USD will take 950 Pesos. Call 765-5773 FOR SALE: Breville Juice Fountain, Model JE95XL. Used only twice; in original box. We find we do not use enough. Contact: Brian Way at 766-1127 WANTED: I will be living in San Antonio for the month of February and am seeking access to a piano, or the loan or rental of a digital piano. Please contact me by email before January 30/10. Local references can be supplied. Contact: Marie Metcalfe FOR SALE: New toaster, used once. We duplicated our purchase. $ 150 pesos or best offer. Call: Martin Barats at 7664266 FOR SALE: New rustic coffee table, 66x109cm., with 4 glass sectional top. Too big for us. First $500 pesos takes it. Call: Martin Barats at 766-4266 FOR SALE: New and Used Floor Tiles. Reasonable. Call. 766-2164 FOR SALE: One New folding table 24”X 6’ = $70USD. 3ea.New folding tables 24”X 8’ = $90USD. Call: James Bily at 7663212 WANTED: I DROPPED MY TV! so would like to replace with working 24-27” set. anyone upgrade at xmas? Contact: Karen Jones FOR SALE: The ultimate irrigation system controller. Wireless. Monitors your system 24/7. You define the actuation point based on rainfall. Set it and forget it! This is a great conservation and money saving device. $30 USD Contact: Jim Spowart FOR SALE: Queen iron bed frame, must sell to enable room for workspace, very good condition. $100 USD. Contact: Karen Jones WANTED: our daddy needs some equipment! hospital bed, wheelchair, walker with wheels, oxygen generator etc...Call Kim or Gill at 766-5291 FOR SALE: DeLonghi SafeHeat oilfilled heater with thermostat - turns on and off automatically, 3 variable heat settings Max. Med. Min. with indicator lights. 600, 900, 1500 lets you control electric usage. 700 pesos, Call: 763-5015 FOR SALE: Godin Seagull 12 string guitar for sale. Very good condition with B-band pickup system installed. Price $350 DLLS or peso equivalent. Call: James Kellum at (387) 761-0020. FOR SALE: Medicine cabinets, almost new 3 door mirrored wooden medicine cabinet, 30 inches by 30 inches and 6 inches deep, 3 shelves. $1000 pesos, Call: 766-4105 FOR SALE: Sony speakers from

bookshelf stereo system, 13h X 9w X 11d. $500, Call: Karen at 331-364-2195 WANTED: Looking for gently used recliner, reasonably priced, for therapeutic use. No plaid. Call: Karen at 331-3642195 FOR SALE: Queen size duvet/cover, shams and bed skirt in rust/gold/green. Virtually new condition. $450, Call: Karen at 331-364-2195 FOR SALE: 4’x 8’ Brunswick pool table, elegant style ‘Bradford’ model, mahogany color finish, like new condition, includes triple light, dark wood cue stand, four breakdown cues, balls, rack. Price $2,300 USD. Contact: Richard Bray FOR SALE: Folding massage table with detachable head rest. Legs adjustable. $2,500 pesos. Contact: Yvonne FOR SALE: Electric Meat Slicer, Brand General. Vacu-Base like new. $500 Pesos. Call: 766-2164 FOR SALE: Oster 6 slice toaster oven. Warm, bake, toast, etc. 500 pesos, 7664105 FOR SALE: New home music system consisting of vertical CD player, am/fm radio, remote control, MP3 ready. $1200 pesos, Call: (387) 761-0827 FOR SALE: Beautiful and unique, hand carved Pink Cantera, 4 Tier Fountain. Brought all the way from Michoacan. Is too big for our yard. $400 0r BO. Call Veronica at 765-3446 BEST OFFER FOR: Brand NEW 3 wheel electric scooter. Hydraulic lift for loading in and out of the vehicle... 2 sets of ramps 1 nearly new wheel chair... 2 sets of wheeled walkers. Will sell separately. Ask for Suzi at 766-4456 FOR SALE: Double espresso and steam outputs comes complete with manuals and electric coffee grinder, restaurant quality.. Price $3,000 USD. Call: Heinz Stapff at 765-3587 FOR SALE: Custom made black ornamental iron fence, 1 meter tall, 45 meters long, including 2 gates. Paid $24,650 pesos eight months ago. Best offer gets it. Call: R. Weaver at 766-1358 FOR SALE: Heavy duty wrought iron drapery rod with decorative ends on rod. Usable rod length 65” to 72”. Decorative end pieces and a further 9” for one piece or 18” for the 2. Price $ 45.- USD . Contact: Yolanda Mc Gaughey FOR SALE: Two sets of luxurious satin finish fully lined pinch pleated drapes. Thick lining will keep light out for good night’s sleep. One pair: 66” wide & 9 ft. In length $28.- second pair: 41” w & 80” long. $ 18.Contact: Yolanda Mc Gaughey FOR SALE: Ladies size 9 med. beige washable leather shoes. Worn once, but too tight Price $45.-USD. Contact: Yolanda Mc Gaughey FOR SALE: Fisheye lens FC-E8 for Nikon CoolPix digital cameras. Originally developed for scientific or industrial applications, Fisheye lenses are now also widely used in advertising, commercial and general photography. $100 USD. Call David Tingen at (376)765-3676

Saw you in the Ojo

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El Ojo del Lago February 2010


Saw you in the Ojo

87


El Ojo del Lago  

February 2010 Issue

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