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Saw you in the Ojo

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Richard Tingen

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Alejandro Grattan-Domínguez Tel: (01376) 765 3676, 765 2877 Fax: (01376) 765 3528 Associate Publisher David Tingen Graphic Design Roberto C. Rojas Jazmin Eliosa Special Events Editor Kay Davis Associate Editor Jim Tipton Contributing Editors Paul Jackson Henri Loridans Feature Editor Jim Tuck (Honorary) Staff Photographer Xill Fessenden Staff Writers Mildred Boyd Ilse Hoffmann Floyd Dalton Fred C. Dobbs Sales Manager Tania Medina (045) 33 1140 3570 tania.medina@mac.com Office Secretary Iliana Oregel ADVERTISING OFFICE Av. Hidalgo # 223, Chapala Mon. thru Fri. 9am - 5pm Sat. 9am - 1pm Tel. 01 (376) 765 2877, 765 3676 Fax 01 (376) 765 3528 Send all correspondence, subscriptions or advertising to: El Ojo del Lago http://www.chapala.com ojodellago@prodigy.net.mx Ave. Hidalgo 223 (or Apartado 279), 45900 Chapala, Jalisco Tels.: (376) 765 3676, Fax 765 3528 PRINTING: Quadrimag S.A. de C.V.

FEATURE ARTICLES

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COVER STORY

Mildred Boyd writes about Gonzalo Guerrero, a seaman from Spain who was taken prisoner by the Maya—which turned out to be the best thing that ever happened to him.

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11 COMPLAINT CORNER M.A. Porter loves Mexico but there are a few things about her adopted country that are starting to get on her nerves.

COLUMNS THIS MONTH 6

Editor’s Page

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Op-Ed Page

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Bridge by Lake

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Uncommon Sense

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Thunder on Right

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Planting for Future

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Faith and Fables

34 BOOK REVIEW

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Joyful Musings

Kay Davis reviews Bob Drynan’s novel Domain of the Scorpion and finds it an “exhilarating reading experience.”

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Lakeside Living

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Magnificent Mexico

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This World of Ours

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Feathered Friends

Jim Tipton’s tale about one of the last conversations between an old man and his son, and about the woman the father was never able to forget.

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New Lease on Life

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Hearts at Work

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World of Wine

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Paw Prints on Heart

54 LOVE STORIES

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Notes from Nestipac

Bob Harwood writes of the profound love he has always had for something as gorgeous as . . . the English language.

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Welcome to Mexico

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Havoc in Motion

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LCS Newsletter

20 HUMOR Bob Tennison was once a flight attendant and has lived to tell many funny stories about his experiences.

48 FICTION

El Ojo del Lago aparece los primeros cinco días de cada mes. (Out over the first five days of each month) Certificado de Licitud de Título 3693 Certificado de Licitud de Contenido 3117. Reserva al Título de Derechos de Autor 04-2007-111412131300-102 Control 14301. Permisos otorgados por la Secretaría de Gobernación (EXP. 1/432 “88”/5651 de 2 de junio de 1993) y SEP (Reserva 171.94 control 14301) del 15 de enero de 1994. Distribución: Hidalgo 223 Chapala, Jalisco, México. All contents are fully protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without the written consent of El Ojo del Lago. Opinions expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the views of the Publisher or the Editor, nor are we responsible for the claims made by our advertisers. We welcome letters, which should include name, address and telephone number.

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PUBLISHER

Index...

El Ojo del Lago August 2009

LAKESIDE LIVING

z DIRE C TOR Y z

36 MAGNIFICENT MEXICO

VOLUME 25 NUMBER 12

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By Alejandro Grattan-Dominguez

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hat follows is an announcement that will run in the August debut issue of our new sister-publication El Ojo del Mar. The decision to expand into Mexico’s Gold Coast was not made lightly. The move will entail a great deal of time, expense and effort. What has given us great confidence in going forward with the enterprise is the wonderful experience we have had with our literary contributors, advertisers and loyal readers here at Lakeside and in Guadalajara for the past 25 years. We will always be grateful for that and hope we have their best wishes as we move into what will be heretofore non-chartered territory for us. ******************** Hola Amigos! After 25 years of serving the Lake Chapala and Guadalajara areas, we are expanding our operation to Mexico’s fabulous Gold Coast. We will distribute 10,000 copies of El Ojo Del Mar monthly in Puerto Vallarta, Manzanillo, Mazatlan, Barra de Navidad, San Blas, Guadalajara and Chapala. One mission of El Ojo Del Mar is to inform and entertain our readers. Another is to provide an outlet for the creative expression of local writers and photographers. We cordially invite writers and photographers living along the Pacific coast of Mexico, and elsewhere, to submit articles or photos. Several fine writers from coastal communities are represented in this issue, and we expect more as our magazine becomes better-

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known here on the Gold Coast. Regardless of your interests—current events, art or book reviews, fiction, legal matters, health issues, hobbies—please send them to us. Poets and photographers are equally welcome. We also encourage associations and charitable organizations to send us information about events in upcoming months. Contact Editor Alejandro Grattan at grattan@prodigy.net.mx Advertisers should contact Bruce Fraser, Director, Special Projects and Marketing, at 333559-2046, or at the number or email below. We are delighted to be here in one of the most exciting parts of Mexico and are committed to making the same high-caliber contributions to your communities, as do your other fine English-language publications. 01-800-7653788 info@eloj o d e l m a r. c o m Gracias!

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Alejandro Grattan


By Maggie Van Ostrand

You Got To Know When To Fold ‘Em

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hen Kenny Rogers sang, “Ya got to know when to hold ‘em, know when to fold ‘em …” in his hit, “The Gambler,” he was singing about more than playing cards, he was singing about life with Josefina. With all that’s going on in the world today, I should probably be more upset about unchecked crime, crooked politicians, and the faltering economy. But no, I’ll leave those worries to people who can do something about them. What really concerns me is my laundry, and that I’m unable to fold it as well as Josefina. She really knows “when to hold ‘em and when to fold ‘em.” Nobody does it better, not even the dry-cleaner. Josefina, housekeeper extraordinaire, can fold T-shirts into a perfect rectangle; one so perfect that whatever printing is on the T-shirt front is precisely centered in the final fold. She can fold fat and fluffy towels so that the ends come together perfectly without using a ruler (like me), and those she folds could be used in a Vogue ad for Cannon Towels. In fact, Josefina can actually fold fitted sheets. I’m not making that up. In the few minutes it takes her to finish doing it, you can’t tell the difference between the folded flat sheets and the folded fitted ones. Her corners are as crisp and sharp as the edges of a new envelope. If she ever sees the way I fold things, she won’t faint, that’s for sissies; instead, Josefina will giggle behind her hand, the way she did when she spied me spraying green paint over the brown stains my dogs left on the lawn grass. But I digress. Everybody has something they can do well, and sometimes life is simply trying to figure out what that thing we do well is. For me, if I can eliminate things I can’t do, what’s left will be my answer. I can’t do calculus or anything else with numbers; I can’t open jars without either a wrench or a man, and I can’t figure out why auto mechanics can talk to men without looking at their chests the way they look at ours. I can’t always understand exactly what poets mean in their poems, can’t cook anymore without a pair

of scissors, some pliers, and a box of Band Aids, and I don’t get how a battery works even though I read the explanation in an encyclopedia. However, I may be getting closer to finding out what I can do well because now I can also eliminate folding laundry into a decent shape. When I attempt to fold like Josefina, laundry comes out like a bag full of deflated soccer balls that’s been out in the rain too long. On the other hand, Josefina has been doing everything well for her entire life. She’s one of the world’s great cooks, sews beautifully, can keep a garment looking new after 20 years of heavy wear. She’s a wonderful wife and mother, and saves money on electric bills because her smile lights up the room. If I could, I’d take Josefina everywhere I go and hope the reflection of her talent might bounce a little off me. It’s like a line in another Kenny Rogers’ song, “Planet Texas”: I seen London, Paris, Budapest, Kashmir and Tokyo and there ain’t no sight like a desert night looking down on Mexico. Kenny Rogers looking down on Mexico from Texas has nothing on the saints who look down from Heaven on Josefina. Would you believe there are no fewer than five patron saints of laundry? Clare of Assisi, Hunna, Lawrence, Martha and Veronica…and Josefina can fold fitted sheets every bit as well as they can.

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The Renegade Spaniard By Mildred Boyd

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onzalo Guerrero, a seaman from Palos, Spain, was serving aboard a caravel bound from Panama to Santo Domingo in 1511 when disaster struck and the ship went down. All fifteen of those aboard were able to reach and launch a lifeboat only to drift aimlessly in adverse currents for two weeks before finally foundering on a coral reef off the coast of what is now the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. It was hardly a safe haven. The group was immediately surrounded and taken prisoner by the local Maya. Some were sacrificed almost immediately; the rest were put in cages to be sacrificed later or sold as slaves. A few escaped into the interior only to be enslaved by other, though less bloodthirsty, masters. In 1519, when Cortez reached the island of Cozumel and heard rumors of enslaved Spaniards on the mainland, he sent a boat with soldiers and a small “fortune” in the colorful glass beads so prized by the natives. They were ordered to either rescue or ransom the captives. Sadly, after eight years, only two men were still alive. One was the priest, Geronimo de Aguilar, who had remained a slave and true to his vows of celibacy, had never taken a woman. He gladly accepted the beads, bought his freedom and hastened off to where Gonzalo Guerrero was living, bearing the good news and more beads. To his astonishment, Guerrero, who had actually fared much better in the Mayan society, declined being rescued! Although Cortez fails to mention the second man at all in his dispatches to the Charles V, gossipy old Bernal Diaz del Castillo’s True History of the Conquest of New Spain reports Guerrero’s arguments in great detail. “... I am married and have three sons. The Indians look on me as a chief and a captain in wartime.” Adding, “... my face is tattooed and my ears are pierced. What would the Spaniards say if they saw me?” Guerrero’s wife interrupted asking angrily, “Why has this slave

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come here to call my husband away? Go off with you, and let us have no more talk.” Aguilar argued a little more, reminding him of his Christian faith and the danger to his everlasting soul but Gonzalo was not to be convinced. In truth, there was no reason why he should have been. The man had sense enough to know that he was far better off than he could ever have dreamed of being as a common sailor with only backbreaking toil and a watery grave for a future. He had married the daughter of Nacham Chan, the Chieftain of Chetumal. In so doing he had become a wealthy aristocrat in his own right and the nakum (captain) of the tribe. Furthermore, he had already committed treason in the eyes of his compatriots by teaching potential enemy warriors Spanish fighting tactics and how to defend themselves against guns and steel weapons. Perhaps he was wise not to add that he knew very well that the Spanish would call him a traitor. When Aguilar reported that Guerrero had led the Maya attack against Cordoba’s vessels the year before, Cortez prophetically replied, “I wish I had him in my grasp! It will never do to leave him here.” Aguilar, after some trials and tribulations, rejoined his countrymen and, having learned the Mayan language during his captivity, served Cortez well as translator until they reached lands where only Nahua was spoken. Marina, the slave girl Cortez later acquired, did speak both tongues and, until she learned Spanish, the awkward three-way translation worked well. Guerrero, however, disappears from the history books only to surface again some years later in the rumors of a mysterious white man


leading the lowland Maya warriors into battle against groups of armed and armored Spaniards—and winning! Years later, serious expeditions were mounted to conquer the Maya. In June, 1536, a bearded, tattooed foreigner dressed as a Mayan warrior was found among the dead after a battle between Pedro de Alvarado and a local Honduran cacique. The man, killed by a harquebus shot, was assumed to be Guerrero, who had come to the aid of the cacique with thirty canoes filled with warriors. Some historians have claimed that he never existed, at least not as the romantic traitor/hero of the stories. There seems no doubt that a sailor named Gonzalo Guerrero did sail on that ill fated voyage but everything else, they claim, is nothing but hearsay. Aguilar could have made up the tales damning Guerrero if only to emphasize his own loyalty in answering Cortez’ summons. The Spanish could have manufactured the stories of a white renegade war leader to excuse their own poor showing against pagan Maya forces. They make much of the fact that Guerrero’s name never appears

in Mayan records though it would hardly be surprising if he had adopted a new name more fitting to the society he had embraced. True, there is no evidence from Guerrero’s own hand to confirm the story, but it is documented by others. Cortez, Diaz, Oviedo and other contemporaries wrote of him. Francisco de Montejo even entered into correspondence of a sort with him. When, during his first Yucatan campaign he discovered that Guerrero was the ruler of Chectumal, he tried to woo him with a longish letter offering friendship and a complete pardon. Guerrero replied, writing on the back of Montejo’s letter, that he could not leave his Lord because he was a slave and mentioning his obligations to his wife and children. Later chroniclers depicted him as the worst of traitors if not the devil incarnate. The people of mixed blood, who make up the majority of Mexicans today, have no doubts. To them, Gonzalo Guerrero is a cult hero and he and his Mayan spouse, Zazil Ha, were the progenitors of their race. In 2005, the people of Akumel, which he supposedly founded, erected a statue of him as “Padre de Mestizos.”

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BRIDGE BY THE LAKE By Ken Masson

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en Masson has been playing, teaching and writing about bridge for 35 years. Originally from Dublin, Ireland, Ken has been living in Toronto since 1967. He and his wife and bridge partner, Rosemarie, are now in their third year wintering in Lakeside. The bidding on this hand was fairly standard in the modern game and was probably repeated at many tables in a matchpoint duplicate game played at the Lake Chapala Duplicate Bridge Club. With East and West passing throughout, North opened 1 diamond and South responded 1 spade. North rebid 2 clubs and South made a conventional call known as “fourth suit forcing”, in this case 2 hearts. This alertable bid announced the values to force to game and asked partner for a further description of his hand. The fourth suit call does not promise any particular holding in the suit bid. In this deal, North rebid his clubs to show 5-5 in the minors (and also denied holding as many as 3 spades, since he had already denied 4 by not supporting partner at the first opportunity). South now finished the bidding with a call of 3 No Trump. West led her fourth best heart, the 8, and declarer played low from dummy. East played the 10 (third hand high) and declarer followed with the four. East continued with the heart 3, covered by South’s 7 and now the defenders had to be careful. Since West had no entry to her long hearts, she had to duck

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this trick and hope her partner had a quick entry plus one more heart to get back to the winners in her hand. And so it materialized. Declarer won the heart Queen in dummy and immediately took a successful spade finesse, winning the Queen. He continued with the diamond 10 and, with the King conveniently located in the West hand he was able to run 5 diamond tricks. Alas, he then ran out of steam and when he had to switch to clubs, East won the first trick with the Ace and promptly returned his last heart to defeat the contract. Technically, declarer erred when he failed to play the heart Queen from the dummy at trick one. His best chance on this deal was that West held all the outstanding high cards (the Aces of hearts and clubs and the King of diamonds) or that West held the diamond King and the hearts were 4-4. These chances would not have prevailed in this case and the contract was doomed so long as the defenders kept their communications open. Questions or comments: email: masson.ken@gmail.com

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NOT IN THE SCRIPT By Jay Koppelman

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wasn’t crazy, I knew that. I also knew that going to a psychiatrist for couple’s therapy is common in modern society, so I agreed to accompany my girlfriend of over one year with the mutual goal of strengthening our healthy though sometimes fragile relationship. Jealousy had always been our biggest obstacle and as we walked hand-in-hand into the waiting room, we each gave a little squeeze of assurance and settled into a love seat to wait our turn. We must have waited for some time because when I looked up my girlfriend was poking her head in the office and after a brief conversation she came back to where I was sitting. “She’s like twenty,” she said, frowning. Suddenly the doctor’s visit might not be so bad, I thought. “Wow. A twenty-year old female shrink. God I hope she’s hot.” No, on second thought, my girlfriend will know if I think she’s hot. That would suck at our first session. “God I hope she’s not hot,” I thought. “Please make her old and nasty so I don’t fantasize about her in the office or they’ll know. My girlfriend will know ‘cause she’s got that intuition thing and the psychiatrist will know because they just know. They’ll know like when I go into the ice cream parlor where that sexy Goth chick works to buy more miniature spoons and then my cell phone rings. It always rings. Within like seven seconds it always rings. The office door opened and a nice-looking couple stepped out. “They look healthy,” I thought. “Come on,” my girlfriend said and as we walked in I could see that the psychiatrist was hot. “Just think of her like she’s your sister, man,” I told myself. She knocked around a few questions like what do we do? Why were we there? Then she looks over the top of her librarian glasses at me and says, “How many sexual partners have you been with?” The shock I felt was the kind where you no longer know what’s going on or where you are or how this could be happening. “Including her?” I asked pointing at my girlfriend who was now sitting straight up and not blinking. I could feel the breath coming out her nostrils and wondered if the guy who invented dragons had gone through a

similar experience. They both stared at me with the strength of united sisterhood. Weren’t there at least some foreplay questions we could touch on before we got to intercourse? Oh, what had I gotten myself into? They knew. I knew they knew. They knew I knew they knew. They had become omniscient. They were like those people you see on the Discovery Channel who know if you are telling the truth by looking at your pupils. Or were those the guys on the Poker Network? It was all blending together now. “I’ve gotta be honest,” I told them, trying to look at my girlfriend. “Not including you,” I said. “Not including you....” The room was spinning now and she started to shake me. “Get up,” she was saying. “Get up. It’s us. Our turn, sleepy” and she gave me a nice smile. I pulled myself off the couch and stretched my arms back almost laughing out loud. We walked into the office and I smiled at the middle-aged doctor who sat before us. “Ha!” I thought. “She wasn’t hot at all.” Things were going to be alright. Nothing could be worse than that. Nothing. She turned to my girlfriend, looking over her thick glasses. “How many sexual partners have you had,” she asked?

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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ear Sir: Ken Crosby in “MILITARISM DAY” (July issue of the Ojo) tells us what we need to hear. He makes a good case, backed by historical references. The military recruiters troubled me when I was a teacher at Austin High School in Houston, a school that was almost 100% MexicanAmerican. I knew those recruiters weren’t going to the west side of town where the wealthy kids drove to Lamar High School in sports cars. The N.Y. Times publishes the names of the dead from Iraq and Afghanistan and a disproportionate number of them are Hispanic—very likely from my old school if their hometown was Houston. And Ken Crosby is right to decry the shameless conflation of service with illegitimate policy. The proliferation of bumper stickers that proclaimed “I Support Our Troops” really meant “I Support George Bush.” But America needs a strong military and those who serve take an oath to obey the orders of the President.

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A kid from the barrio around Austin High School cannot be responsible for the integrity of presidential orders. But a soldier is responsible to obey them—even while facing death. All of us, and families in particular, need to find some meaning in the loss of warriors in the service of our country. The fallen were honoring a sacred oath, even if the commanderin-chief was contaminated with impure motive. We should respect and celebrate Memorial Day for the sake of human values. Let’s vote the bums out of office, but honor the troops, living or dead. Signed: Fred Mittag Villas de San Pablo

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FALLS By J. Manuel Cordova, M.D. mdjmcordova1204@yahoo.com (376) 766-2777 (part 2)

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ur past comments about falls consider an elevated risk factor for aging people. That is true if we consider the reason behind falls and fall injuries. Usually a fall occurs when one’s center of gravity moves outside of his or her base of support and insufficient, ineffective, or no effort is made to restore balance. Classification protocols have been developed to help explain how falls occur. One of the classifications used is called Extrinsic. Extrinsic refers to falls caused by environmental factors, slips, trips, in addition to the relationship with irregular balance. Intrinsic conditions are a result of deficits in balance, mobility, cognitive or sensory functions. Non-bipedal falls, such as falling out of bed or other non-classifiable falls are considered Intrinsic. Personal reactions and characteristics in conjunction with medicines and behavioral factors can alter resting balance and affect older people, which can also be a factor in falling. Your body posture responses to challenges posed by the environment, or posed simply by movements such as a change from sitting to walking can cause instability and result in a fall. Observation may suggest that one factor dominates more often in certain falls, but it is the interaction of multiple factors that cause most falls. What can I do about Risk Factors? Multiple studies over the past 15 years in the community and nursing homes have identified a number of factors that increase an older person`s risk of falling. Studies show that the risk of falling increases with the number of risk factors a person has (muscle weakness, age, history of falls, balance deficit, use of assistive device, visual deficit, depression, arthritis, etc.) While most characteristics may not be modified, the most important modifiable risk factors for falls are

balance, strength, and gait impairments. We think of the five senses of sight, hearing, smell, touch and taste, but often don’t realize that the ‘sense of balance’ is a major factor in preventing falls. Prevention is the most important thing to remember. FALL PREVENTION IN THE HOME Most falls occur inside the home! The type of fall will determine the severity, but whether it is minor or major, ‘prevention’ is always the best remedy. Even a ‘minor’ fall can cause permanent damage and require extensive rehabilitation time. The bathtub and shower is the #1 accident location inside the home. Have hand rails installed and always use some type of rubber pad to stand on while taking a shower. Be very careful getting in and out as well. Steps inside and outside the home contribute to many falls. Whether it is a single step or a stairway, they both can be very dangerous. Many times a single step can do more damage than a stairway because you forget it’s there or don’t see it. Install proper hand rails and put colored tape on the floor to help prevent accidental falls. Liquid spills undetected can quickly cause an accident. If you have any sources of leaks in your home, make sure you take care of the problem before someone is injured. As much as we all love our pets, they often cause falls because they get under our feet. Remember the risk if you have a pet in the house and look down first before starting to walk. Our pets want to be close to us, but avoid hurting yourself and your pet by being extra careful. Getting in and out of our vehicles is another area that requires extra attention. Hopefully, your vehicle is ‘people friendly’ for getting in and out.

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UNCOMMON COMMON SENSE By Bill Frayer

“When I was a Kid…”

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efore moving here, I lived in New England, where citizens still make decisions about spending in small towns using the venerated “town meeting.” The citizens gather, usually on a Saturday in March, and vote on the proposed budget for the coming year. These meeting can take all day, or longer, because people get the chance to argue for and against each budget item. This leads to some interesting theater. I remember when the local school district in my town was discussing a budget item to fund a new computer lab for the high school. I remember vividly an older gentleman, about 80 years old, in a flannel shirt and red suspenders, stand before the group and loudly proclaim, “We ain’t had no computers when I was in school, and we done turned out jes fine!” Of course, I thought, computers did not likely exist in his day. Nevertheless, there was a loud round of applause for this argument. Why? Why are people so reluctant to change? Why is the “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” argument so popular? Well, I have to admit, sometimes it’s correct. Change for change sake makes little sense. On the other hand, sometimes change is a good thing, even necessary. So what’s the problem? The problem is rejecting change, out of hand, without examining it. We are all programmed to resist new

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Bill Frayer things. We are comfortable with tradition and routine. Change makes us uneasy. But we should avoid the temptation to resist change without examining the reasons. This happens a lot in the workplace. When a supervisor announces a change in procedure or policy, the workers are almost always against the idea. Their opposition is very normal and should be expected. Often, however, once the change has been implemented, it is a good thing, and the same people who were opposed to it see its value. Tradition is a good thing. Institutions like families, churches, and groups of friends find ritual and tradition very satisfying. Unfortunately, it can be used as an excuse to resist changes that might be beneficial. In the 19th century, Ned Ludd led a sometimes violent movement against the mechanization of the English textile industry. His followers broke into factories and tried to destroy the machines with sledge hammers. Needless to say, they were not successful in stopping the mechanization of their labor. Today, people who strongly oppose the development of technology, are called Luddites, in memory of Ned Ludd. I am thinking to myself as I type


this column on my laptop, how I was once a Luddite about computers and resisted using them. Once I learned about the advantages of word processing, of course, my resistance softened. And today, as a retired Mainer living in Mexico, I would find my life without a computer intolerable! Religions are often accused of appealing to tradition to resist change. The celibacy requirement for Catholic priests comes to mind. But I can think of another, very different, example as well. The Dalai Lama, the leader of Tibetan Bud-

dhism has suggested that we need to embrace change in all aspects of our lives. Buddhism teaches that we only have the illusion of permanence, and that all life is changing constantly. He has even made the remarkable claim that if science discovers facts that contradict Buddhism, then Buddhism must change. An extraordinary claim for a religious leader! If the Dalai Lama can embrace the necessity of change, then so can we. Next month, I’ll examine our tendency to appeal to emotion.

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THUNDER ON THE RIGHT By Paul Jackson paulconradjackson@gmail.com

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tenet of professional political journalism is that whether one is Conservative, Liberal or Socialist, one never initially views any new issue from a preconceived partisan viewpoint. Every new pronouncement or policy must pondered objectively, and then probed for its weaknesses or strengths. An individual who didn’t do this, lost all sense of objectivity, and went after politicians with blind hatred, was CBS’s Dan Rather, who is now jobless, after even his Liberal-inclined network itself realized its loss of credibility was doing it immense harm. This philosophy came back to me when Bob Woodward, he of Watergate fame, recently made a dinner speech to a select group of political types in Calgary, Alberta, and proclaimed he starts every endeavor from a neutral position. That allowed him not only to start the revelations that would eventually topple President Richard Nixon, but also to spend an unprecedented seven hours one-on-one with President George W. Bush for background work for his book Bush’s War. Woodward is a true pro, start to finish. Myself, back up in Canada, and as a Conservative commentator, I doubt there is a single Conservative, Liberal or New Democrat (Socialist) Member of Parliament who would not return my phone calls. Some may not like my positions, but they know there is no rancor behind them. On a TV show last month I was asked for my opinion of President Barack Obama. My reply, “Obama is a remarkable individual by any account.” Now, that doesn’t necessarily mean I agree with Obama’s policies, but it is an honest reply. Think about his background, and ponder how he achieved the highest office in the most powerful nation in the world. He is surely a remarkable man. As an aside, so was Harry Truman, who started off life as a timekeeper on the Sante Fe Railroard and slept in hobo camps at night. Likewise, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan were remarkable individuals. As a boy during the summer, Nixon’s family was so poor he never wore shoes. Reagan’s father was a congenial drinker, and his mother took in laundry. Both men rose from lowly beginnings, but against

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Paul Jackson all odds achieved greatness. Reagan in particular, for he finally ended the abomination of Soviet Communism. Truman confronted Soviet leader Josef Stalin’s enslavement of Eastern Europe in the 1940s, drew the line and said no further, and saved Western Europe from the same fate. Then he rebuilt war-shattered Western Europe with the Marshall Plan. Republican, Democrat, whatever. One has to cut through one’s own particular political partisanship and accept in fairness the reality. For instance, two of my favorite magazines are National Review and the New Republic. I enjoy reading Michael Kinsley’s leftwing reasoning as much as I enjoyed William F. Buckley’s conservative viewpoints. Both ponder issues so rationally. When I see and hear inflammatory language and rhetoric from various individuals, the only rational thing to do is turn the page or turn the hearing aid off. For instance, we all know Reagan and Margaret Thatcher were not “Fascists.” They were free enterprisers, the antithesis of Fascism, which was developed by Benito Mussolini, who made his name as the editor of a prominent Italian Socialist newspaper. In his early years, the police even fingered Mussolino as a dangerous Marxist. Likewise, Adolf Hitler’s National Socialist German Workers’ Party speaks for itself. Both Mussolini and Hitler wanted a statecontrolled economy, Reagan and Thatcher the exact opposite. And insults hurled out that George W. Bush is a “crook’ simply makes the hurlers of those insults look utterly ridiculous. Bush may have made some wrong decisions—may have been incompetent like Jimmy Carter—yet history will decide that. But he was surely not a crook. If he had been, why has he never been charged with criminal offences? Again, we see that angry, bitter, disillusioned individuals can never stand aside and view personalities or policies objectively. They blame their own failed lives on others, and react with intolerance. Very scary.

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By Judy Baehr 766-2695 jdbaehr@aol.com www.greatgreens.org

Evolution Is Us

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’d been out in the garden observing the rampant evolution of bugs, worms, blight and fungus from small to gigantic, when I sat down with the newspaper to rest and spied the headline: “Mammals Evolve Faster in the Tropics” (http://www. aut.ac.nz/news/aut-news/evolutionfaster-in-the-tropics). I immediately knew that highly evolved readers like you would want to know this. To be smug, it is obvious here at Lake Chapala that we are a bit more evolved than creatures north of the border. Granted, we may be too old to benefit from tropical evolution and pass on our genes to future generations, but we can try! After all, most of us consider that “old” is just a state of mind caused by severe northern winters and can be overcome readily with sunshine and easy living. It’s never too late to try evolution! As to the bugs, bats, birds, fungus and blight, the news article fully supported my observations on life in the tropics. But I wanted an expert opinion, so I called Wendee Hill, one of the founding directors of ACÁ. “Yes, it’s true,” said Wendee. “We can grow several crops of lettuce a year, and using heirloom varieties, we pick the best of the crop for seeding the next crop. In this way, the heirloom varieties continue to evolve, and because of the

multiple crops per year, they evolve faster than they would in colder climates with a shorter growing season.” That settles it. I am going out to evolve with the tropical wildlife. In the meantime, if you would like to observe evolved plants instead of watching bats, birds and beetles, look for ACÁ’s naturally evolved species of lettuce and veggies at the Lake Chapala Society and SuperLake, or call ahead and come out to the farm for a tour. Upcoming Summer Food Market Tours: Abastos Tour: 8/04 and 9/07; Organic Tour: 8/22 and 9/26. Tickets are at ACÁ Eco Center (Jaltepec), Diane Pearl Gallery and with Berta on the Patio at LCS. Food Workshops: Thursdays 12 to 3 at the Eco Training Center. Open to the public. No fee and no need to register in advance. Show up at the farm when you can and be prepared to WORK. The ACÁ farm and Eco Training Center is in Jaltepec on the mountain side of the carretera. If you have questions email acaecotalks@gmail.com Upcoming Food WorkshopTopics: August 6th Kitchen Herb Planters & Baskets; 13th Oils and Vinegars; 20th Medicinal Herbs; 27th Natural Cleaning Products and Insect Sprays; September 3rd Mad about Tea; 10th Spice Blends; 17th Using Herbs in Sauces.

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THE MYSTERIOUS BALKANS By Terry Hogan

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rieste, just the name is evocative of intrigue and adventure. Trieste is in a little known corner of Italy that has a great literary history. The café culture is conducive to long conversations in beautiful old outdoor cafes. The harbor comes right into the middle of town and makes one feel like traveling somewhere. One can visualize spies passing information, and lovers making the little hotels places of assignation. One of my favorite places along the coast is the double-walled city of Dubrovnik. The city was founded in 376, and the double-walled part was built in the Dark Ages. During the communist years Tito let this be a very liberal place allowing the sale of western books, and there was pretty much freedom of speech. During the Serbian ethnic cleansing the city was shelled; fortunately the damage was mostly repairable. I think the Serbians are a bunch of philistines and have the sensibility and intelligence of dead clams for shelling this historic treasure. I don’t believe in ethnic cleansing but in the case of the Serbs themselves, I’d make an exception. I discovered during the trip that my ticket allowed me to get off the ship at Corfu. I had read Lawrence and Gerald Durrell and knew they had lived here many years past and wrote lovingly enough to peak my curiosity. Corfu has the most flora and fauna of any of the Greek islands and is a very beautiful island. I rented a small cottage remembering what Gerald Durrell had suggested, that sleeping with

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my mouth closed would protect me from the waste product of the geckos that lived on the ceiling and lived off insect larvae and mosquito eggs. I spent the week exploring the island and reading Greek history and mythology. Then I sailed for Piraeus. We traveled close enough to land to see some of the country side. I could imagine Agamemnon leading his men to fight the Trojan War. Later I would visit Turkey and the ruins of Troy. When we speak of history with respect to Greece we can go back in time in thousand year jumps with plenty to fill the time in between. In Athens it was easy to walk or take a cab. In 1950 the population was 50,000 and by 1975 the population was 3 million and growing. Today, the population is 10.9 million. Later when I lived in the Greek Islands, I would meet the children of the islanders who had moved to Athens to earn the spoils and discovered that their parents looked younger than their children did. Maybe there is something to the old and simpler ways of life.


Amaranta Santos – Singer Extraordinaire By Kay Davis

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os Cantantes del Lago have made their impact on Lakeside, and one of their many talents is a bi-lingual contralto named Amaranta Santos. Where did this “larger than life” voice come from? Originally, Mexico City. Amaranta does not understand the fear many of us have of driving there because it is home to her and just another large city. But it is more than that. It is also a place rich with history and of many delights. It was there that she began singing with her musical family who picked up guitars, swept along with the 60s and 70s music, plus the historical music of Mexico. Amaranta has had few opportunities for formal vocal training, but that magnificent voice projects like that of an opera singer—or folk singer. You can hear her clearly when she sings. Her music embraces the listener. But it isn’t just the voice that grabs us. Her nuances are subtle: a twist of a fan here, hand on hip there, a raise of the eyebrow, a dance step, or even when a prop drops and she recovers it with a swoop between notes. Who is this woman who entertains us with her personality as well as her voice? For one thing, she is young. Her uncle invited her to move Lakeside, a job assured with a real estate company that needed her talents, maturity and “savoir faire.” The real estate market has been sluggish this year, but Amaranta has kept it going and entertained us at the same time. Raised in the capital of Mexico, Amaranta went on singing tours around the United States, showcasing not only some of Mexico’s music but its culture, as well. Later, she became administrator for a circus that was based in Los Angeles, California. A circus with the “big top.” Amaranta’s

job was to get permits for the animals, veterinarian certificates, temporary business permits, etc. needed to put up the big tent. The big cats were especially temperamental. Beautifully cared for, they were magnificent animals but they needed daily walks, opportunities for play and mental challenges. There were also four elephants who loved the owner of the circus as if he were part of their own family. Elephants form strong family bonds. Once, when a female became seriously ill, the owner remained in the stall with her, giving her medicine, water and whatever nourishment she could take. When he finally dozed off, exhausted but afraid of what he would find if he fell asleep, he was awakened by a gentle tap of the elephant’s trunk on his cheek. She had made it through the crisis and was showing him her gratitude. For Amaranta, such moments added to her understanding of the quality of life we share with others, all others. The border may present cultural challenges but we are, at heart, more similar than different. Since Mexico is my adopted home, I am glad to see the border turning slowly into a dotted line. In my experience, Mexicans such as Amaranta have welcomed me and so many of my culture to share the joy they offer us. Mucho gusto, Amaranta. It is my pleasure to have met you and to hear you sing.

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DON’T DO ON’T TB BLAME LAME T THE HE W WRIGHT RIGHT B BROTHERS ROT THER RS By Bob Tennison

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hen I was a flight attendant, we would not have made flight announcements like some heard by passengers today. We would have found ourselves facing our supervisor for a reprimand. You may have heard or read some of these before. But will enjoy again. Hostess to boarding passenger on a crowded flight, “Okay, people, we’re not picking out furniture here, so just find a seat and get in it.” On landing, “Please be sure to take all of your belongings. If you’re going to leave anything, please make sure it is something we’d like to have.” One airline policy required the First Officer to stand at the door as passengers deplaned, smile and say, “Thanks for flying with us today.” One day, he had hammered the ship into the runway on landing, so he had a difficult time looking the passengers in the eye. Finally everyone had deplaned except for a little old lady. She stopped in front of him and said, “Sir, do you mind if I ask you a question?” He replied, “Well, no ma’am. What is it?” The little lady quietly questioned, “Did we land, or were we shot down? After a turbulent landing in a thunderstorm in Memphis, a Northwest Airways flight attendant announced, “Please take care when opening the overhead compartments, because sure as hell everything has shifted after a landing like that.” During a final approach, the captain was really fighting the wind. After an extremely rough landing, the attendant announced, “Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to Amarillo. Please remain seated with your seat belts fastened while Captain Kangaroo bumps what is left of our airplane to the gate.” This emergency briefing got everybody’s attention. “Your seat cushions can be used as a flotation device in case of an over-water emergency landing. Please paddle to the shore and feel free to take it with you with our compliments.” After a very hard landing in

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Denver, a Southwest Airlines flight attendant came on the intercom with, “That was quite a bump, and I know y’all agree. I am here to tell you, if it wasn’t the airlines’ fault, it wasn’t the pilot’s fault, it wasn’t the flight attendant’s fault, it was the asphalt.” Following a wild landing in Phoenix, the attendant announced, “Ladies and gentlemen, please remain in your seats until Captain Crash and the crew have brought the aircraft to a screeching halt against the gate. Once the smoke has cleared and the warning bells are silenced, we’ll open the door and you can pick your way out of the wreckage into the terminal.” Another arrival announcement included, “We’d like to thank you for flying with us today, and hope the next time you get the insane urge to go blasting through the skies in a pressurized metal tube, you’ll think of US Airways.” Taking off from O’Hare in Chicago and after reaching a comfortable cruising altitude, the captain made an announcement on the intercom, “Ladies and gentlemen, this is your captain speaking. Welcome to American Airlines flight number 293 non-stop from Chicago to Dallas. Weather ahead is perfect. Therefore, we should have a smooth flight. Now sit back and relax. OH, MY GOD!” This followed by dead silence for what seemed an eternity to the passengers. After a several minutes he returned, “Ladies and gentlemen, I am sorry, but while I was talking to you, the flight attendant accidentally spilled a cup of hot coffee in my lap, and you should see the front of my pants.” A passenger in the rear of the coach section yelled, “That’s nothing. You should see the back of mine!”

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OF O F FAITH FAITH A AND ND F FABLES ABLES By Bob Haynes bzhaynes@gmail.com

Seven God-Given Basic Needs Of Man

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ETIREMENT: What a wonderful word, we thought, as we stepped down from our professions in the marketplace. And, for a while it was indeed like the song “What a Wonderful World.” Then we began to deal with something we hadn’t had to deal with for some time— boredom. As we looked around we saw other people actively involved in ‘things’ or ‘activities’ or ‘hobbies’ that seemed to satisfy them. We wondered what it was that we needed to do to ‘wake up’ our lives. Then by chance, we stumbled on this Bible verse: “The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and care for it.” That must be it, we said. Perhaps we need to really get more involved in this community and area and by doing so we can “lose ourselves” so we can “find ourselves.” Many of us learned about Maslow’ hierarchy of needs when we were in college; however, what we are dealing with now in retirement is perhaps even more essential to us. Oz Hillman, the author of TGIF -a daily devotional on the internet—had this to say: “Man was created to have seven basic needs. Each of us has a need for dignity, authority, blessing and provision, security, purpose and meaning, freedom and boundary, intimate love and companionship. When we go outside God’s provision to meet these needs we get into trouble.” The danger, said Hillman, is not including God in our daily lives. No

matter how active or inactive we are, that exclusion will mean that what we are doing can become our sole source of purpose. And that leads to a performance-based life. That’s a subtle trap, he said. What happens then is we become fixated and subconsciously think that we are acceptable to others only when we perform well in our work. Our values begin to be linked solely with our job or business. Our values then are not centered in the Lord. When troubles come (and they do) we are devastated unless God is our central focus. As we retirees strive to become more active and involved, perhaps we should heed Hillman’s advice. Here in the Lake Chapala area one can find large numbers of people who practice an active lifestyle of participation. However, there are others—just as talented or gifted or whatever you want to call it—that are bored and are, in all honesty, just wasting time away. Psychologist Roger Elliott, put it this way: “No man is an island —Without regular quality contact with other people, mental condition, emotional state and behavior can suffer quite drastically.” Elliott’s version of the seven basic needs include: (1) The need to give and receive attention; (2) Being aware of the importance of the connection between our mind and body; (3) The need for purpose, goals and meaning;(4) The need to connect with something bigger than oneself; (5) The need for creativity and stimulation; (6) The need to feel understood and connected; and (7) The need to feel a sense of control. Viktor Frankl once pondered the question: “What is the meaning of life?” That question is not something you ask someone else; it is one that you must ask yourself. When we no longer have jobs to go to every day we can be thankful for that word-RETIREMENT. However, we also need to reflect and then act upon our God-given basic needs in order to live productive and happy lives. Shalom!

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Joyful Musings By Joy Birnbach Dunstan, MA, LPC, MAC

Bring Back That Lovin’ Feeling

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here may be no better feeling in the world than being in love. New love is fueled by a chemical soup that makes the sun shine brighter, food taste better, and touch feel exhilarating. Unfortunately, those chemicals diminish after around eighteen months or so, and then it’s up to us to keep a relationship vibrant and strong. Don’t let that old Righteous Brothers song become the theme in your house: “You’ve lost that lovin’ feeling, Now it’s gone, gone, gone.” Long-term relationships require maintenance to keep that lovin’ feeling alive. After a decade or two, it’s easy to take each other for granted. Those little things you once found endearing become irritating annoyances. Compliments and words of appreciation disappear as criticism and complaints take over. Conversation dwindles to mere exchanges of information about the chores for the day. Romance, and often your entire sexual relationship, becomes a thing of the past. “Now there’s no welcome look in your eyes when I reach for you. And now you’re starting to criticize little things I do.” Closeness fades as each partner retreats into a protective cocoon of silence or verbal attacks. To put the life back in your relationship, intimacy needs to be restored. Intimacy is a close, affectionate and loving personal relationship with another person, that sense of deep connection that comes from sharing ourselves with a trusted partner. Besides sharing ourselves, it also requires accepting, listening, and embracing another as he or she opens and shares with you. Trust is key. Who wants to be vulnerable and open with someone who tells us how stupid or lazy or overweight we are? Intimacy can be enhanced through lovemaking, but it is important to remember that sexual intimacy must follow emotional intimacy, especially for women.

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Foreplay is what happens in the 24 hours before you have sex. Creating intimacy requires paying attention to your relationship by investing time and energy in it. It’s great to have your own personal interests, but it’s also important to have common activities, hobbies, and interests you can share with your partner. Bring play and fun into your lives. Even everyday chores can be fun when done together with a lighthearted attitude. Laughter is essential, but don’t forget there is a big difference between humor and sarcasm. Share your thoughts and feelings openly and honestly with each other. This aspect of intimacy is clearly expressed by thinking of it as “into-me-see.” Notice, remember, and comment upon the great things about your beloved. One of the hallmarks of a good marriage is a ratio of a minimum of five positive comments to every one complaint. Create a peaceful and relaxing home and environment, and a bedroom conducive to lovemaking. Bring romance back into your marriage. This can be a simple as a caring note left on the kitchen table or a surprise bouquet of flowers. Kiss. Kiss at least ten seconds every day. This may be one long kiss or ten short ones, but kiss. Bring your best self to the relationship. Don’t waste energy complaining about and trying to improve your partner. You’re the only one you can change, so be the kind of partner you’d like to have instead of trying to change your partner. “If you would only love me like you used to do. We had a love, a love you don’t find everyday. Bring back that lovin’ feeling. . .” (Editor’s Note: Joy is a practicing psychotherapist in Riberas. She can be contacted at joy@dunstan.org or 765-4988.)

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By Bill Frayer

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lone, getting my brain scanned, In Guadalajara The kindly radiologist told me With sad eyes, “I think you have a tumor In your brain.” And showed me a large shadow On the MRI which looked, well, big.

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I rode home in the cab In the dark, alone, Thinking over my life. “How odd, that it should come To this.” I pondered.

“I’ll get the full version.” As the whiskey fortified my spirit.

“Well,” I thought, as I entered my bright empty home At midnight, “If I’m doomed, I might as well enjoy an Irish whiskey before bed. “So I sipped on a generous Jamison, As I marveled at the kaleidoscopic hallucination At the periphery of my right eye And enjoyed the calm, surprised at myself. “Tomorrow,” I admonished myself,

Good thing. The overnight study Reversed the calamitous finding And I was forced to face That I had no tumor And would likely live To face more unknown risks. No easy exit yet.

I slept soundly, knowing I’d deal With any new reality In the morning.

I think it was the whiskey. I think I deserve another.

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CREATIVE PUNS FOR “EDUCATED MINDS”

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. The roundest knight at King Arthur’s round table was Sir Cumference. He acquired his size from too much pi. 2. I thought I saw an eye doctor on an Alaskan island, but it turned out to be an optical Aleutian. 3. She was only a whiskey maker, but he loved her still. 4. A rubber band pistol was confiscated from algebra class because it was weapon of math disruption. 5. The butcher backed into the meat grinder and got a little behind in his work. 6. No matter how much you push the envelope, it’ll still be stationery. 7. A dog gave birth to puppies near the road and was cited for littering. 8. A grenade thrown into a kitchen in France would result in Linoleum Blownapart. 9. Two silk worms had a race. They ended up in a tie. 10. Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana. 11. A hole has been found in the nudist camp wall. The police are looking into it.

BREAD PITT 12. Atheism is a non-prophet organization. 13. Two hats were hanging on a hat rack in the hallway. One hat said to the other, ‘You stay here; I’ll go on a head.’ 14. I wondered why the baseball kept getting bigger. Then it hit me. 15. A sign on the lawn at a drug rehab center said: ‘Keep off the Grass.’ 16. A small boy swallowed some coins and was taken to a hospital. When his grandmother telephoned to ask how he was, a nurse said, ‘No change yet.’ 17. A chicken crossing the road is poultry in motion. 19. The short fortune-teller who escaped from prison was a small medium at large. 20. The man who survived mustard gas and pepper spray is now a seasoned veteran. 21. A backward poet writes inverse. 22. In democracy it’s your vote that counts. In feudalism it’s your count that votes. 23. When cannibals ate a missionary, they got a taste of religion. 24. Don’t join dangerous cults: Practice safe sects.

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A TRUE BAG LADY By Margie Harrell

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hey go by many names depending on what part of the country you are from. Handbags, totes, clutches, bolsas and the one I have never been able to understand, pocketbook. Even on a good day mine wouldn’t fit into my pocket. Whether they are five inches wide or three feet deep I call them purses. I am in awe of any woman who doesn’t carry a purse. However does she deal with life’s little emergencies when they crop up? Anyone who has raised kids knows you had better have band-aids, antibiotics and cookies at the ready or your day can go downhill real fast. I just found out my new daughter-in-law doesn’t even own a purse, can you believe that? She also wears skin-tight jeans with no visible pockets. She tells me all she ever needs is her car key and Blackberry. I would hate to be at close range when she lets out with a hearty sneeze. Many spring-clean the house when the weather turns nice, I tackle my purses. Do I really need that empty aspirin bottle and what is that gooey mess in the side pocket? I finally gave up carrying my blood pressure cuff around. I decided I might need my portable hair dryer instead. When asked “if your house was on fire, what would try to save” the answer for me is easy, the purse. I could literally live for days off the contents. Mints, granola bars, water, cheese and crackers plus a few Mexican pesos and Canadian dollars just in case we are ever invaded by our neighbors. Living in Las Vegas it was only a matter of time before it happen. I was mugged and as I lay on the ground with blood spurting from a head wound, the last thing I saw was my

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beautiful purse being spirited away on the back of a bicycle. I wasn’t so concerned about the money but the twit had absconded with my favorite Ralph Lauren bag. Hours later when my son, the ex-cop, went hunting for the “perp” he followed a bloody tire track and lo and behold, there it was, empty but undamaged. My aching head suddenly felt better. At last count I own 37 purses/ totes/handbags, you name it but in my defense, some of them have been gifts. Television info-mercials are my downfall. The other day I saw a new purse that has interchangeable outer covers. You just unsnap one and slip on a different color. It has my name written all over it. Today I decided to take the bull by the horns so I took daughter-in-law purse shopping. She ended up choosing something that wouldn’t hold a roll of life savers. Oh well, I have planted the seed, my work is done. On the way home I noticed my neighbor is having a huge garage sale. Perhaps she has a bag or two she wants to unload. I’ll just go and have a quick look.

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CONFUSED C ONFUSED A ABOUT BOUT S SUNSCREENS? UNSCREENS? By Mary Molinari

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ou know that premature aging of skin and skin cancer are harmful effects of the sun. You are also aware of the benefits of using a sunscreen. But (SPF 15? SPF 30? Zinc oxide? or is it titanium dioxide? UVA? and UVB ?) all those brands and terms leave you baffled! So lets start with the basics: How does sunscreen work? Sunscreens aid the body’s natural defenses in protecting against harmful ultraviolet radiation from the sun. They contain chemicals that work by absorbing, reflecting or scattering the sun’s ultra violet radiation on the skin. This helps prevent sunburn and other skin problems. How do I begin? First you are going to look at the SPF number and if there is protection against UVB and UVA rays. UVB and UVA rays? The sun gives off two types of harmful–ultraviolet (UV) radiation. One is the Ultraviolet B (UVB) ray which affects the outer layer of your skin. It is primarily responsible for

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sunburns. The other is the Ultraviolet A (UVA) ray which can penetrate into the thickest layer of your skin causing cancer and premature skin aging. Excessive exposure, however, to both forms of UV rays can lead to skin cancer. So what is this SPF? SPF is an acronym for Sun Protection Factor. It essentially measures the effectiveness of sunscreen. The number refers to the product’s ability to stop your skin from burning. Levels of SPF range from 2-80 and therefore vary in their ability to protect the skin from sun damage. Generally, the higher the SPF rating, the greater pro-

El Ojo del Lago August 2009

tection, and the longer you are able to stay in the sun before burning. But…be careful ! The Sun Protection Factor number only applies to UV-B rays. The SPF does not indicate protection from UV-A rays. So then how do I know which is best for me? There are formulas based upon time it takes for you to burn in the sun and multiplying it by a SPF number. Unfortunately, there are too many variables to make this reliable. Dermatologists recommend you look for labels that specify broad or multi spectrum UVA and UVB protection, are water resistant and have an SPF of 15 or higher. To be effective against all UVA rays it should contain avobenzone, zinc oxide, or titanium dioxide. The only way to determine this is to look at the ingredients. Because of the altitude in Mexico and if you are light-skinned, spend a lot of time in water or direct sun, a SPF of 30 or higher may be a better choice. Do products expire? All sunscreens should be stable and at their original strength for at least three years. Is a sunblock the same as a sunscreen? No, sunblock works in a different manner than sunscreen but does

blocks both UV-A and UV-B rays. Some feel it is a better option for skin protection, but it is not as commercially available as is sunscreen. What is the best way to apply sunscreen? Apply: Liberally (a handful) to clean, dry, sun-exposed skin areas 15-30 minutes before exposure to the sun for proper absorption At least every two hours, this is more critical after swimming or perspiring heavily. Even “water-resistant” sunscreens may lose their effectiveness after 40 minutes in the water. Sunscreens rub off when you towel dry so reapply. No matter your race or ethnic origin. People with dark skin do need sunscreen. Lip balm with SPF 15 once every hour while you are in the sun and after activities that remove it from the lips such as eating and drinking. When overcast because 80 per cent of ultra-violet radiation is still present. When in the shade, concrete and water reflect harmful rays. Last word Sites for approved sunscreens http://www.dermatology.ca http://www.mayoclinic.com/ health/sunscreen

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Domain of the Scorpion By Robert Bruce Drynan Reviewed by Kay Davis

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ob Drynan’s pulsepounding thriller is set against the backdrop of the Vietnam War at its peak, in the midst of narcotics trafficking and Marxist guerrilla activities in Columbia and Venezuela. Ex-marine Ryan Haggarty, working in Venezuela as a petroleum geologist, meets Anne Ferguson, a school teacher at the International School in Caracas. Assaulted in a dark corner of the marketplace, she fights her opponents and he jumps in to rescue her, but once the crisis has been dealt with, she shows signs of shock and he takes her to his place to keep an eye on her while she rests. They begin the slow dance of courtship and on a tour of the cathedral, Ann bumps into two men, one of whom she recognizes at a Marine function. Later, on a trip to Angel Falls, Ryan and Anne are propelled into a deadly fight for their lives. They are unaware that they possess knowledge that could expose a corrupt U.S. Army officer involved in a merger between a Columbian drug cartel and Marxist insurgents. The Scorpion, a shadowy figure who runs the cartel, wants Ryan and Anne eliminated. Thus, a deadly cat and mouse game ensues with police, military, guerrillas, the Scorpion and the CIA hot on their trail. The Scorpion takes Anne hostage, forcing Ryan to focus his efforts on finding her and getting her out safely while the Scorpion’s men continue to pursue him. The chase leads to a showdown in a crumbling old Spanish fortress within the torrid coastal rainforest of Panama. Domain of the Scorpion is both a moving love story and a thinking person’s psychological thriller. For a first novel it does a lot of things right. The story moves along from one exciting challenge to another, broken occasionally with gentle, human scenarios. For instance, during the pursuit Ryan and Anne have to rely on each other. Raised in Montana, she is good with guns. He, a war hero, can effect strategies to keep them alive and to strike back. Then, while hiking out of Venezuela and into Columbia in an attempt to outrun the killers, Ryan and Anne stop at a pool at the base of a waterfall. There they bathe and speak of their hopes for a future together. Such touching scenes are few amidst all the action but heartfelt, and they

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make the characters come to life. The only drawback might be the rapidly changing scenes from Ryan and Anne to “the bad guys.” We learn about meetings between the drug king and rebel insurgents in their hopes that, working together, each can aid the other, a frightening aspect that actually began happening twenty-five years later. We learn that the CIA agenda includes saving Ryan and Anne only as a side issue and that they might become expendable. And the US embassy has a man working for someone on “the other side.” Scenes flashing between all these characters can become confusing unless you “keep your eye on the ball,” as the expression goes. Despite the high-speed pace, I found the storyline exhilarating, at times thought-provoking or tender. And the tour of Venezula, Columbia and Panama added to my understanding of Central America and the Latino history in the Americas. Robert Bruce Drynan writes from first-hand knowledge, having lived in Venezuela and Colombia between 1966 and 1982. Today he resides with his wife in Mexico where he is completing his next book, What Price Liberty. He may be reached at domainofthescorpion@gmail.com. (Ed. Note: Domain of the Scorpion may be ordered from your local bookstore or purchased from: www. amazon.com or www.booksurge. com. There will be a book-signing event on August 20, 12:00-2:00 PM at the Sunrise Restaurant across from the entrance to Lower Chula Vista. There is another signing at Super Lake on Aug 13-14 from 1012 am.)

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Sep 3

Phone: (376) 765-3676 (Ojo office for message – I’ll call back) Email: kdavis987@gmail.com Events are listed by date, like a calendar: past events, then those planned for the future. Some organizations offer multiple events or dates, and these items appear toward the end of the column. July 3 Chapala Country Club members and guests gathered for a festive joint celebration of Canada Day and the Fourth of July. The 18th green was transformed into a game area, featuring a miniature golf course, a putting mousetrap, golf pitching over a sand trap and horseshoes. The CCC House Committee, chaired by ErPerry, Yara & AJ at Chapala Country Club nie Sowers, organized the event. July 12 was the grand opening of Efrén Gonzalez’s new gallery and studio. The new facilities are large enough for every kind of display in a series of rooms on two floors, and the building is close to the school for his young trainees. There was a room dedicated to their charming artwork. Those of us attending enjoyed works excellent local artists, including photographers Jill Flyer, Xill Fessenden and Rebecca Ford. In the back yard there was a guitarist, Louis Pavao, a Portuguese-blooded, Hawaiian soul musician who has adopted Ajijic as his retirement home. July 21 Sydney Gay and the Amazing Axtell Puppets performed at La Bodega. This was an original show created by singer-actress Sydney Gay, aided and abetted by her engaging puppets, Sam (the grandfather), Mister Froggy (who warned us to beware of the Flim Flam Man), Miss Tortuga (the turtle, performed with the assistance of Joy Phoenix) and Lulu (the alligator). Sydney has a beautiful voice. It was Lulu, the alligator, however, who stole the show with her vow to choose vegetarianism and her song on the Alligator Waltz. The show was charming, spirited and full of song but with a se- Sydney & Lulu with Joy Phoenix &Tortuga rious side to it on values. July 29 was a DIF sponsored, unique fashion show: Wig Out with Yoli in Riberas del Pilar. All colors, all lengths shown, benefit for Abused Women. ACÁ, officially known as Asociaciόn Comunitaria de Auto Suficiencia, A.C., offers workshops (emphasis on “work”) Thursdays from 12 – 3 at the ACÁ Eco Center in Jaltepec. Here is the schedule for August: Aug 6 Kitchen Herb planters & baskets Aug 13 Flavored Oils & Herbal Vinegars Aug 20 Local Medicinal Herbs, prevention & uses Aug 27 Safe Cleaning Products, Homemade Insect Sprays

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Mad Hatters Party, All about Tea & Tea Biscuits

ACÁ Tours: Abastos Bus Tour (guided): Aug 4, Sep 7 $200 pesos Organic Bus Tour: Aug 22, Sep 26 Tickets and information at ACÁ Eco Center, or tickets from Bertha at LCS, Diane Pearl or ACÁ Eco Center. The American Legion post #7 schedule for August: No US consulate/social security this month. Sundays, all month: 12 – 3 p.m. Legion Grill (burgers, beans, salad) Aug 1 – Battle of the Legions chili cookoff (Legion #7 vs. Legion #9) Aug 3 – 11 a.m. Legion Executive Board Meeting; 1 p.m. Events Mtg Aug 4 – 11 a.m. Auxiliary Executive Board Meeting Aug 7 – 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Yard Sale Aug 10 – 5 p.m. Enchilada Contest Aug 20 – 5 p.m. Are You Smarter than a Fifth Grader? Aug 27 – 3 p.m. Lone Star gathering – be a Texan! Sep 14 – 5 p.m. cocktails, dinner – Fiesta de Mexico (advanced tix only) Menu: fajitas, guacamole, refried beans, rice & flan Entertainment: Los Pios from Guadajara Info: Barbara Prince, 765 – 3418 or bprince32@gmail.com Legion Post #7 Trips: Regional Museum of Guadalajara, Aug 7, 9 a.m. This museum, located in front of the “Rotunda of Illustrious Men” is a beautiful building, housing a mammoth from the Pleistocene Era and found in Catarina, Jalisco in 1918. There is a vast collection of archeological findings from western Mexico, Colima, Nayarit, Sinaloa, Guanajuato and Michoacán. Upper floors display exhibits from the conquest and colonial times; temporary exhibits change every other month. Cost of trip is $300 pesos per person, including bus, entrance to museum and a bilingual guide, lunch separate. Departing the legion at 9 a.m., the bus aims to return to Chapala by 4 p.m. Contact Susannah Kelly, Opals from Magdalena 765-3757. Hacienda de San Andres, Magdalena Opal Mines Aug 21, 7 a.m. (yes, 7) At the hacienda, with its 892 hectares, founded originally by Don Zenon Orendain in 1800, you can see bullet holes in the walls from the War of Independence, the Revolution and the Cristero War. You will learn the history surrounding this place. Magdalena offers an open mine where opals can still be found on the roads, or you can dig for them. Cost of the trip is $1,125 pesos per person, air conditioned transportation. There will be fresh water in Magdalena and lunch in Tequila, followed by an hour for shopping. Contact Susannah Kelly, 765-3757. The American Legion post #9 is also devoted to serving veterans, raising funds through charitable events and serving the community. Post #9 current activities include support for a youth soccer team, scholarship support for the Hacienda La Labor School, maintenance of the school, and contribution to a scholarship fund for the Golden Strings. Meetings are the second Wednesday of each month at the Smokehouse Cantina at 12 noon. Turn onto the divided street across from Mom’s. Look for the American Legion sign on the right. Contact Tim Stern, Commander at americanlegionajijic@gmail.com. July 25 was a fiesta day at the Lake Chapala Society. It was definitely not business as usual. Food booths, drinks (including libations) were scattered around the campus. There were family fun activities, and music to entertain one and all. A judge presented awards to winners in the category of Kid’s Art. Their art was also for sale with an additional cash award to the artist selling the most. Each summer LCS sponsors this popular fiesta as a fund-raiser for its

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Just who and what was she really, this woman who has become symbolic of Mexican womanhood? Was she an Oriental Princess or just a lowly slave? Was she a candidate for sainthood or only a common whore? Was her style of dress elegant or did she dress like a tart? Was she a real

person or merely the product of someone’s overactive imagination? Though some claim she never actually existed, her story is amazingly detailed for pure fiction and many of those details are easily verifiable. To begin with, the title by which she is known translated as “The Chinese Pueblan,” is not correct. In those days, “China” was a term used for all Asians, so it does not conflict with the recorded story. In it, her name was Mirra and she was born in India to a noble family but was kidnapped by Portuguese pirates while still a child. She later escaped, took refuge in the Jesuit Mission of Father Francisco Javier and was converted to Catholicism. At her baptism Mirra took the Spanish name of Catarina de San Juan. By some weird coincidence, she was recognized a few years later, and taken captive by the same pirates. This time there was no escape and she was taken to Manila to be sold as a slave. Since she was twelve or fourteen by this time and already showing signs of great beauty, she perfectly fitted the description given by Diego Carrillo de Mendoza, Viceroy of New Spain, of the young woman he wished bought for his personal slave. The merchant cap-

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tain faithfully fulfilled this commission but, on returning home, he either sold the child for ten times what the viceroy offered or gave her freely to his friend, Don Miguel de Sosa of Puebla. Both versions are on record. Take your choice. The childless Don Miguel and Dona Margarita were delighted to have the beautiful young girl. Though they loved her and treated her as their own daughter, it was not until 1624, when Don Miguel died and manumitted her in his will that she gained her freedom. No longer a slave and now about 18 years old, she had fulfilled that early promise and blossomed into an extremely attractive young woman. It would have been no wonder if she had had suitors but, here again the stories conflict. She either married Domingo Suarez, a man of Chinese birth, or immediately entered a convent. If she did marry, she must have been quickly widowed for she was


undoubtedly living in a Jesuit convent shortly afterward. Whether she actually took vows as a nun is doubtful, since she is said to have worn her colorful native saris to the end of her life. She did lead an ascetic life, however, and soon began having visions of angels and long conversations with the Virgin Mary. At first she was considered slight1y mad but, in time, she came to be revered as a holy woman and prophetess. Until her death in 1688 at the age of 82, she was venerated by the people and often consulted by the clergy. Her burial in the Sacristy of the Jesuit Temple of Puebla is indicative of the respect in which she was held. It is still popularly known as La Tumba de la China Poblana, Tomb of the China Poblana. How, then, did the cognomen of this saintly woman come to be associated with a group of females of questionable, to say the least, virtue? There seems to be no possible relationship between the

original China Poblana and her modern namesakes except a shawl! Mirra’s native dress was the sari, a costume which consists most1y of a long strip of bright1y colored silk which can be draped in many ways, from demure to highly provocative. The China Poblana costume, which did not appear until long after her death, also featured a long shawl but there all resemblance ends. The rest of the costume has nothing to do with India and was not worn until nearly a century after Catarina’s death. The contemporary version consists of a white blouse lavished with embroidery, beads and sequins and low cut enough to expose considerable cleavage, a skirt called a castor which is also beaded and sequined in geometric or floral patterns, a white underskirt adorned with something called enchilada stitching, an intricate crisscrossing of lacework around the bottom edge which peeped coyly from under the castor. A belt called a loop, either of brocade woven or heavily decorated cloth, silk-embroidered satin shoes, a scarf to fill the low neckline for church going and the shawl worn looped over the elbows and sweeping the floor on either side, complete the colorful costume.

As for the wearers, it was long ago agreed that they are extraordinarily beautiful in both face and figure. La china is usually described or painted as pleasingly plump but never fat, slender waisted and graceful in all her movements. In contrast to the respectable and fashionable ladies of the early days, her dusky brown skin, lustrous black hair and sultry dark eyes and luscious lips never needed cosmetics and she would have viewed the Victorian corset with horror as suitable for an Inquisition torture chamber. The picture of her laughing, flirting and dancing the jarabe Tapatio has become a living symbol of Hispanic femininity. Since her entire fortune was invested in her wardrobe, she was also usually as poor as the proverbial church mouse. One writer notes that the Sunday modesty scarf usually wound up back in the pawn shop by Tuesday. An observer once remarked that in Mexico “there is no place for a woman who is not a saint or a prostitute.” At different times and in different places La China Poblana has managed to be both saint and sinner but never, never could she be considered ordinary!

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programs. Healthcare Week in July ran as a community service, including blood pressure monitoring, pneumonia shots, hearing testing, hearing aid testing, diabetic and skin cancer screening. There was an optometrist and a seminar on what to do before Cruz Roja arrives. Cruz Roja provides Kids at Hacienda La Labor School our community with receive two new classrooms life-saving services, and should you should need help, there are ways you can help the ambulance team and the medical support group so they can help you better. The Lake Chapala Society’s Board of Directors has adopted a new governance structure including establishment of the position of Executive Director. This action will professionalize LCS’s operation and bring it into line with the best practices recognized by non-profits the world over. The new structure outlines the decision-making powers of the Annual General Meeting, the Board of Directors, Board Standing Committees and the position of Executive Director. The new Executive Director will be accountable to the Board of Directors and recommend to the Board and ensure implementation of the general orientations, strategies, plans and policies of the organization. The Executive Director ensures the efficient management of resources, programs, services to clientele and operations of the organization. To this end the Board of Directors has initiated a strategic planning process with the assistance, at no charge, of Conrad LeBlanc from New Brunswick, Canada. Conrad is a consultant and group facilitator who has led strategic planning and governance workshops for non-profits across Canada and the New England states for the past 20 years. He is also an LCS member with a Master of Arts in Philosophy. Conrad has worked as a high school teacher, community developer, family counselor and organizational developer. Retired “in principle,” he continues to act as a consultant in the areas of strategic planning and decision-making structures. For full information and a chart of the flow from vision to results, check the LCS website at www.lakechapalasociety.org. While you are there, check photos on the July 25 fiesta. You may find yourself, or someone close to you, having fun. Lakeside Little Theater: In the July column I mentioned the success of the summer play Passengers. There were two actors who particularly caught the hearts of the audience. I listened to comments, and part of the appeal, certainly, was that these were good characters as written, but it was how they were portrayed that gave them heart-wrenching appeal. Maureen, the street person from scenes three and eight, was played by Katie B. Goode. Her costume lent charm to that character, but nothing could take away from her acting. Chris L’Ecluse played the ticket seller at the bus station in scene seven, and it was her debut appearance. Her lines were spoken as conversationally as if she were sitting beside each of us, and it made her character seem real. We

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cared about these two characters. Facilitation by Graham Miller and his enthusiastic group of new directors (Don Chaloner, Fred Koesling, Russell Mack, Ann Swiston, Harry Walker, Michael Warren, and Liz White) led a large and talented cast through the play. There will be two auditions in August, first for the political comedy Regrets Only, written by Paul Rudnick and directed by Barbara Clippinger. Auditions will take place Friday & Saturday, August 7 & 8; four women and two men are needed. Performances will be September 26-October 4. For scripts & information, contact Trish Conner at 766-5233 or email Barbara at barbclip@gmail. com. The second August audition is for the classic murder-mystery The Mousetrap, written by Agatha Christie and directed by Roseann Wilshere. Auditions are Friday & Saturday, August 28 & 29, looking for three women and five men. Performances are October 31-November 9, with no performance on November 2. For scripts & information, contact Diane Jones at 765-2414 or email at dianetheatre@ yahoo.com. If you would like to volunteer behind the scenes, the LLT is always looking for people to train in lighting, sound, wardrobe, props, make-up, stage managing and other positions. Contact Don Chaloner at 766-1975 or email at 77dondo@gmail.com. To reserve a seat at all of this season’s line-up of shows, be sure to come to the Season Ticket Renewals & New Sales event in the LLT lobby on September 8 & 9 from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Season tickets for six shows is $800 pesos per person, compared to $150 pesos for individual tickets. See you there! Mexican Holiday for August: August 25 Mezcala celebrates fiestas patronales honoring La Virgen de la Asunciόn (Virgin of the Assumption). #11 - Open Circle at LCS on Sunday mornings at 10:30 a.m.: Aug 2 Robert Kleffel – a scientific view of happiness Aug 9 Ann Lewis – Fun getting there: Jerusalem, Cairo, Petra Aug 16 Blue – Chinese astrology: outer, inner, secret YOU Aug 23 Jim Tipton – poetry Aug 30 Alice McNamara Sep 6 Tim Schubert On July 19 Arden Murphy talked about recent discoveries about the causes of many illnesses we thought we understood, at least the basics, and how easily life style changes could have avoided or alleviated symptoms. VIVA! La Musica’s schedule at the Auditorium in La Floresta (7:30): Aug 27 Jose White Quartet from Aguascalientes Sep 10 Opera The Elixir of Love by Donizetti conducted by Luis Arden Murphy Rodriguez, 50 person chorus, 4 soloists, costuming and more Oct 8 Cuauhtemoc García Jazz Flute combo Per concert $200 pesos for members, $300 pesos for non-members, except the September opera which will be $300 pesos for members, $400 for non-members Auditions: Aug 9 for VIVA scholarships; contact Rosemary Keeling at 766-1801 Future: September – Mariachi Festival, Degollado theater, Guadalajara; overnight in a hotel; contact Rosemary Keeling at 766-1801; November 14-28 Internacional de Musica de Morelia; 20+ concerts, many free; Rosemary Keeling, 766-1801


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THIS WORLD of OURS By Bob Harwood bharwoodb@hotmail.com

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anted: A vacation replacement for Obama. Herewith a sampling of job expectations. International Engagement. While Obama’s Cairo address was a good start in changing the tone of American diplomacy further challenges loom. There is a long way to go to achieve a just resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian standoff. Israel threatens preemptive action against Iran as international agencies condemn its disproportionate response that cost so many innocent lives in Gaza. A fractured Iraq assertively transitions to independence while violence continues. A forces surge in Afghanistan is instructed to avoid the euphemistically labeled collateral damage that drives Afghans to the Taliban. In neighboring Pakistan millions, many of them women and children, become refugees as the government attacks rebel regions. North Korea goads the world with nuclear saber rattling and missile launches. America seeks to rebuild relations with a distrustful Russia. An election outcome in Iran at utter odds with projections led to violent demonstrations instantly carried to the world via a democratized Internet. Appropriately, Obama resisted accusations of not “standing up to Iran”. An Iranian government of questionable legitimacy would love to blame unrest on American interference, not on Iranians seeking reform. In 1953 it was American and British clandestine interference that toppled a legitimate democratic government in Iran to usher in an era of dictatorship and religious division to protect their oil interests in the region. As we preach democracy and reform to others we must reflect on how incomplete some of our own progress has been,—on segregation and discrimination, on women’s right’s issues, on recognition of same gender relationships, on curbing the power of money in our imperfect democracy. Health care reform. Here too there are complex vying interests.

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In the American ethos state run anything is anathema. Defenders of the status quo boast of the best health system in the world ignoring 46,000,000 uninsured, costs escalating out of control, and the damning fact that America’s per capita health care costs are double those of most other First World countries yet America ranks low or last on many health outcomes! Obama has extracted from a reluctant AMA and drug companies significant concessions previously rejected. Profitable private insurers providing highly selective coverage attack concepts of public sector competition. On this file too there is a long way to go with many political / financial agendas as powerful, well heeled lobbyists lurk in the wings. Financial regulation. The details of tough new financial regulatory strategies are being shaped and defended daily against special interests who label it as yet another intrusion into an ethos of unfettered (or unregulated?) free enterprise. Obama’s personal popularity remains high but there is growing nervousness over the long term impact of the soaring bill. Unemployment ranks swell before programs to create new jobs gain momentum. The financial health of many states is at risk. The politics of “Buy America” risks escalating into a disastrous retreat into protectionism. These are but three of the many active files confronting a multitasking Obama daily. Those seeking employment as his summer replacement must (a) pass a Mensa IQ test, (b) meet Olympic Triathlon physical standards, and (c) meet Oxford Union or Harvard Law Society oratorical standards.

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Bob Harwood


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Find Feathered Friends By John Keeling

Motmots Among Us

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ne of the most colorful residents of the Lakeshore is a brightlycolored tropical bird called the Russet-Crowned Motmot. It is easily recognized by its greenish body, reddish-brown cap, black line through the eye, blue patch below the eye, and long tail. Janet Zimmerman reported in the early seventies that these birds nested regularly in Chula Vista. They still nest there, and currently two young birds can be seen at the edge of the golf course since hatching in June. Occasionally, Los Audubonistas del Lago arranges a ‘Bird Viewing’ to observe these birds. This year I have sighted motmots in the ravine above Riberas del Pilar, above El Tepalo waterfall, and in upper Ajijic. There are a number of different motmot species which inhabit ranges from northern Argentina to central Mexico. They are typically found in the trees of humid forests, but our local species, which is found only in Mexico and Guatemala, is adapted to drier forest and scrub such as we have around here. These birds are easily missed as they will take up a shaded perch on the lower branch of a tree and sit there without moving for long periods of time. A birder scanning the trees and bushes will quickly see such a sitting bird because of its color and shape. Often it will not fly away immediately upon being discovered, but will calmly endure the study of its bold colors through the

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binoculars binoculars. The Motmot builds its nest in a deep burrow constructed in a bank a few feet above the ground. The eggs need 20 days to hatch, and another 30 days are required before the young birds can fly. They eat such things as large insects, small lizards and tree frogs. The tail of the Russet-crowned motmot has a unique tennis-racket shape. It is interesting that the young birds have ordinary straight tail feathers, but the material of the feather is weaker half way down its length so that when the bird is active or is preening itself these bits easily fall off, leaving a circular shape at the end of the tail. This is in contrast to the widely cited but erroneous reports from a famous explorer that the birds purposely pull out these portions of the tail in order to produce the unique paddle shape. (Ed. Note: Los Audubonistas del Lago is a loose-knit group of people interested in birds. To receive notices of events please leave your e-mail address at avesajijic. com)

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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ear Sir: Firstly, I apologize, I don’t have access to a computer, but felt compelled to write to you about Mr. Bill Frayer’s article— “Uncommon Sense—When expert opinion is questionable,” (July 2009, El Ojo del Lago, P: 14, 15.) As a Canadian, and a physician who lived in the Ajijic area and worked in family practice and emergency medicine for a number of years, I know the importance of trust and clinical security one must have in his or her physician on clinical guidance. Mr. Frayer wrote an excellent and thought-provoking article about his personal medical and his personal challenge as a patient. Happy to read, it worked out as a physician trained in clinical practice—undergraduate M.D. Mexico, post grad US internships, I know how personally frustrating and psychologically debilitating it is for a physician to make the wrong clinical decision for his or her patients. Medicine is vast and each physician has their own expertise in medicine, and yet all of us have made mistakes in our clinical judgments including myself. In the same July issue, P.52, “A New Lease—On Life,” by Judit Rajhathy, “Many are Nutrionally, Not Medically Ill,” is an outstanding medical article. We as consumers, she states, must take responsibility for our, own health. Judit is right on the money about our health care—the key is preventive medicine through diet and exercise. We look after our investments, homes, etc., and yet we spend little investment in preventive medicine, until we become sick. Lakeside is so very fortunate in physicians and health care providers

in preventive medicine. I have been reading your excellent magazine for years and have read countless testimonials about outstanding physicians, some trained in the U.S. I remember reading Victoria Schmidt’s articles on how much she admired Mexican medicine. Some feel it is superior to the U.S and Canada according to your writers. I have had the privilege as a Canadian working in Canada, USA and México in the emergency medical services, it doesn’t matter where you train it is your responsibility to treat patients as you would liked to have been treated in medicine. Remember the golden rule in medicine, a good oral history and clinical exam are the most important foundations in medicine, not just ordering a large amount of tests. Take charge of your life and health care, don’t be afraid to challenge your physician, ask for a consult if you are not happy about your diagnosis. Research your illness; learn all you can about it. Start exercise, eating right; it is never too late. Stop smoking, cut back on alcohol, assess all your medications. LCS is another network of excellent medical resources and health lectures. This is an outstanding organization of medical advice—while living in México over the years I had the honor and privilege to give many lectures in family practice and emergency medicine. As Judit Rajhathy stated in her article, we only have one body—treat it with care and respect, eat right, exercise. As I now think about my first day of medical school my professor quoted from the father of medicine. Hippocrates —“Life so short, the craft so long to learn. Stay healthy and spiritual in mind and body.” Respectfully, Dr. Brian W. Jones, B.A; B.E.D; O.C.T; M.D. (A.C.L.S, Canada) Family/Emergency Practice México drilau@yahoo.com

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That Old Woman over by Beulah By James Tipton this land “S on, I’m gone to

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leave you is flat, wet, and poor…sort of like that woman I used to poke around with over by Beulah. But some years when it’s not too hot, or too cold, or too wet, you can coax enough cotton out of this land to keep you intergh left ested in Missouri, with enough over for taxes and some fun now and then with a willing Mexican woman. “Pa, when I was a boy…that woman in Beulah…she used to come over here and help you out with the cotton.” “Son,” the old man said, unable to sit up, “Susanna came over here to help me out with you. The only cotton that Beulah woman was ever close to was the cotton she stuffed into ears when I was trying to talk to her.” “I just remember Susanna was a Mexican lady.” “Lady? Susanna Salazar? Son, Susanna was no lady. Every man between here and Beulah can tell you his own stories about Susanna.” “Pa, you know those stories were started in country bars by overheated farm hands who wanted to be heroes to their buddies. When I was a boy I thought Susanna was beautiful. I used to get up in the middle of those hot summer nights just to stare at Susanna’s slender body, covered with tiny pearls of sweat, sleeping beside you.” The old man worked his own body over to one side of the bed,

struggling to be comfortable. “But ‘beautiful’? Son, you can’t really say a woman is beautiful unless she’s got a good set of these.” With his two bony hands he cupped the papery skin on his sunken chest. “Pa, Susanna Salazar was the closest thing I ever had to a mother, but you were so damn mean she never would stay more than a month or two.” “Son, you ought to save calling your old man ‘mean’ for after the funeral.” “Pa, the doctor says you’re failing fast, and so if you’ve got any faith left you better fess up a little right now.” “And you’re just the man to help me, Son?” “I’m the man here beside you right now, Pa, and I saw a lot when I was a boy.” “Are you going to be glad when I’m gone?” “Pa, I’m going to miss you when you’re gone.” “Thanks, Son.” “Pa, did you ever miss anybody when they were gone?” “Well, Son, maybe I did and maybe I didn’t.” “Who’s one of the ‘maybe I dids’?” “You, Son, when you went off to basic training.” “Pa, you’re breathing too hard.” “Son, I’m just thinking, probably the last thinking I’ll ever do. I’ll be happy to be done with it.” “What are you thinking about, Pa?” “Son, there’s only one other thing I know for sure I’m going to miss after I’m dead.” “Pa, what’s that?” “I sure am going to miss that old woman over by Beulah.”

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A NEW LEASE—on Life! By Judit Rajhathy, B.A., RNCP, D.Ac.

No Wonder I Can’t Lose Weight! Insulin Resistance and You

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nsulin resistance is a ‘condition in which the cells of the body become resistant to the effects of insulin...as a result higher levels of insulin are needed in order for insulin to have its effects. Insulin resistance can be viewed as a pre-diabetic condition and is linked with obesity. The question is: does excess body fat cause insulin resistance or does insulin resistance cause excess body fat? The verdict is still out on this one! Who is at Risk? • Those overweight with a body mass index over 25 (many people over 40) • Those who have close family members with type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure or arteriosclerosis • Anyone over 40 years of age • Men with a waist size over 40 inches and women with waist size more than 35 inches • Those who have had gestational diabetes or glucose intolerance • Those with high blood pressure, high blood triglycerides with low HDL cholesterol • Those with a sedentary lifestyle • Those who have a fatty liver —accumulation of fat in the liver Diagnosing Insulin Resistance Syndrome An estimated one in three Americans is insulin resistant, which puts them at a high risk for developing type 2 Diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A solid questionnaire along with lab tests can suggest a diagnosis of insulin resistance. Regular medical checkups and blood work are essential! Helpful Supplements Chromium is a mineral that is required for the hormone insulin to work effectively. 200 mcg can make a difference. It can help weight loss. A good daily multi-vitamin/mineral along with extra calcium/magnesium and fish oil to help reduce triglyceride levels. Note that these

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supplements need to be checked with your medical provider because they can alter any medications you might be taking. If all else fails, medication is a last resort, along with diet and exercise of course. Lifestyle Change—Diet and Exercise Utilizing a low glycemic diet is a must so that the need for insulin can be reduced. Some carbohydrates are broken up and absorbed by the body faster than others (high glycemic foods) and as a result increase the blood glucose level more rapidly and require the secretion of more insulin to control the level of glucose in the blood. These foods are refined sugars, white bread, white rice, refined corn and wheat products (mashed potatoes, bagels, fries, etc.) Best to eat foods with a low glycemic index such as high fiber foods (whole grain bread, brown rice), non-starchy veggies such as broccoli, leafy greens, cabbage, cauliflour, asparagus and lean proteins. A Finnish study shows clearly that diet and exercise reduced the development of diabetes by a whopping 58% and several other studies following this one proved similar results. The combination of aerobic and resistance training is particularly beneficial for preventing insulin resistance and helping control blood sugar. Ideally one should engage in this type of exercise a minimum of 30 minutes per day minimum five days a week. If one has physical limitations there are other options. Bottom line: fat stores need to be decreased. So the gym awaits your arrival! (Judit is the owner of Change of Pace fitness Center and is the author of the Canadian bestseller Free to Fly: A Journey Toward Wellness. She can be contacted at 7665800) Judit Rajhathy

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Hearts at Work —A Column by Jim Tipton

“You cannot “kill time without injuring eternity….” --Henry David Thoreau

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s I write this I am in my sister Nancy’s cabin in a lovely little woods in the rolling hills of north central Ohio. It is a Sunday afternoon in July, cooler than usual, and the flowers are at their summer best. Her little black cat, Midnight, is sleeping nearby on an old-fashioned rag carpet. This morning my two siblings— my sister Nancy and my sister Peggy—and their husbands and I took my ninety-five year old father to the church he attended with my nowdeceased mother for many decades, the very church in which all three of us were baptized by immersion. The old familiar congregation has been declining both in numbers and in vitality and most of the members are seventy years or older. Nevertheless, we and they were all able to sing the opening hymn with gusto—“How Great Thou Art.”

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Here at L Lakeside H k id we expatriates i also are a community of older people, although in our case retirees in the north seem to be arriving often enough to more than replenish those among us who have moved on to, hopefully, the “higher realms,” to begin all over again as expatriates, as one elderly member at The Lake Chapala Society pointed out to me

El Ojo del Lago August 2009

one day. We are no longer pursuing careers, or raising children, or moving into larger and larger houses, or even climbing 14,000 feet mountain peaks. Many of us, however, remain active spiritually—and how appropriate it is that our final years allow us the leisure to be devoted to our spiritual lives, to move even closer to God. With much less time remaining to us in our earthly sojourn, these are not years to be wasted watching re-runs of Friends, or playing computer solitaire, or even sitting around drinking coffee and eating donuts and talking about everything that is bad about America or Mexico, about Bush or Obama. We have already “killed” enough time in our lives. Let’s not “kill” our final years by wasting them on frivolity. Remember the famous passage in Ecclesiastes? “To every thing there is a season, and a time for every purpose under Heaven.” Pete Seeger turned this into a hit song for the Byrds, “Turn, Turn, Turn.” What “season” is this for us? What “thing” fits this “season” of our lives?” “What purpose?” This is a season to speed up our spiritual growth. To do this we must

eliminate non-essential relationships, and we must no longer spend time in the company of those who would deplete our energies, who would distract us from our paths. We are, when all is said and done, souls living only temporarily in time and space, and in our final years we must identify more and more with our souls, and with higher worlds beyond time and space. This is the time to purify our minds, to clean up our lives, to become more spiritually aware, to turn toward higher realities. St Paul says “The fruit of the spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. [Galatians 5:22-23] For starters let’s master those qualities. Meditation is really more about “waking up” than sitting back in a chair and relaxing. Paramahansa Yogananda writes, “By deep meditation and living a God-centered life, calm the waves of thought and desire that constitute our ordinary perception of reality. Then, in superconsciousness, you will behold everything as it really is.”

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A Profound Love of the English Language By Bob Harwood

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have always had a profound love of the English language. We engage our senses and our minds when we deal with language. Touch is engaged when we write or type. Sight is engaged when we read the written word and even he who cannot see can, via the medium of braille, read the written word. We speak and another hears the spoken word. If she cannot hear we call her deaf. And her very deafness may make speaking difficult. One who cannot read we call illiterate. But literacy is not a simple yes or no phenomena. It is a continuum. The adage ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’ expresses a basic truth. But it took words to convey the power of that metaphor! We use words to create pictures that will engage the mind of reader or listener and the level of engagement will be a function of their respective language skills. Winston Churchill’s oratory rallied a nation on the brink of invasion and contributed significantly to victory in the greatest war in human history. The writings of Dickens create the richest of canvasses portraying another era, another milieu engaging our minds and hearts but also our social conscience. How might we depict a man moving from point A to point B? If our vocabulary is limited to he walks or he runs we can draw no more than a two dimensional figure, black on white. A richer command of language gives us a broader spectrum of colors, permitting endless subtle variations in the images we create. To bring movement and mood to the figure our brush can spread somber shades of grey or even black, suggestively sinister, that he might slink or sidle or slither. The vibrancy and pomp of primary colors might have him parade, or march, or strut. The delicacy of pastels can portray softer themes that he might saunter or stroll, meander or wend his way. Each word triggers unique images. As we incorporate elements of time, habit, or condition we further refine the word pictures we create—he walks, he walked, he must walk, he used to walk, he will walk, he may walk. The possibilities are open ended.

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These daubs of color from our pallette of verbs are but a beginning. Texture can be added as brush strokes fine and bold refine the initial images. He may furtively slink or proudly strut, but what of the man himself? Is he wrinkled with age, bent with his years? Or is he a youth, a lad, a mere stripling? Is he lithe, agile, vigorous? Scale and perspective are achieved as we strategically place the figure in context, perhaps as Pissarro was prone to do, on the curve of a path that leads the eye through harvest fields to this focal point and on to ever more distant mist shrouded hills distinguished by subtle variations of hue. But not all works of art are literal portrayals. An Impressionist, a Monet of language, may soften the sharp edges of literalism with simile and metaphor, or personification to create a more subtle image—as idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean (Coleridge: The Ancient Mariner) or—Sleep that knits up the raveled sleave of care (Shakespeare: Macbeth). An author of the Abstract School, a Picasso perchance, may embark on the intricacies and subtleties of satire and allegory. Thus Jonathon Swift in 1726 bitterly attacked the injustices of his day in Gullivers Travels, a volume that, read on another level, is the most beguiling of children’s stories. Or to invoke a more contemporary analogy—in computer terms the human mind is the greatest of all processors. Our ability to formulate thoughts to write or speak, or to understand the work of others, must utilize language and our degree of fluency in it as its raw material. Words are the bits and bytes with which our mind, our in house computer, functions. The greater the language skill, the greater the vocabulary, the greater the memory on which our mind computer may draw. Computers can do marvelous things. They can respond to instructions from the hu-


man voice. They can translate from one language to another. With scanners and optical recognition they can regurgitate an existing printed passage. But computers, limited by their sequential binary natures, cannot begin to compare with the human mind and its massively parallel ability to formulate and express, to receive and interpret, the infinite subtleties of language. It is the essence of our being if we are to live other than in isolation. This love of the English language has formed a powerful, consistent thread through more than eight decades of my journey.

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The World of Wine By Ceci Rodriguez

Wine Storage

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irst of all, I would like to clarify the last article, in which I wrote some contradictory information about the position of the wine bottles. I didn’t mention that in order to avoid wine contamination with a tainted cork, it is better to store the bottles upright, but, at the same time, it is necessary to keep them lying down because the cork needs to be wet. I mentioned all this because I was trying to explain the advantages of the screwcaps. Of course, you won’t know that your wine is contaminated until you open it; this is a risk that we take when we buy a bottle of wine. Another important fact for keeping our wines in good condition, is our own wine cellar. Of course, the best are the ones underground, made with natural soil, a stone floor, or a room built for this purpose. Modern houses or apart-

ments rarely have adequate space One option is to get “artificial wine cellars” that come in a variety of sizes and prices. In case we want to store our bottles, and don’t have a special room, we can find the best room or closet in our house. Then we should meet certain basis criteria in terms of temperature, humidity, level of light, and lack of odours, and of course, far from noise and vibrations. Our cellar has to be dark, just use light when looking for a bottle. Wine should never be stored next to a boiler, a stove, or domestic electronics, even for a few weeks. This means that we should store it as far away as posible from the kitchen. Strong odours like solvents, detergents, chlorine, etc., could taint the aroma of the wine. Temperature: The standard temperature of the cellar has less effect on the wine than fluctuactions between hot and cold. The ideal is 15ºC (59ºF) or a little less. Humidity: Its importance is frequently underestimated. It should be between 75% and 85%. If there is insufficient water vapour in the atmosphere, moisture will evaporate from the corks, they’ll become dry and start to deteriorate. High humidity conserves the corks but can cause mold to develop on their exposed surfaces.

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PAW PRINTS ON MY HEART By Gudrun Jones, Co-Founder & President of the Lakeside Spay & Neuter Center

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eing a Volunteer at the “Dog Ranch” is wonderful, but it is not easy, it is hard work and there are times when your heart will ache, and even break a little when a new dog comes to the Ranch—a dog that is unwanted, abandoned and unloved. Sometimes it takes a while for these animals to trust again, for the tail to give a spontaneous wag when you come into view or the quick lick of the hand if you happen to reach into their kennel; however, your heart will never be shattered for there is a joy in being among these animals and in knowing that you are making a difference in their lives. There are many people who are not afraid to show that animal welfare is an important aspect of life. They are the ones who keep us going and they are the ones who eventually will change the world as far as animals are concerned. One of our youngest volunteers is eight-year-old Yara De Bois from Mesas, Arizona who was visiting her grandmother. Volunteering at the Ranch became one of the highlights of her vacation. Watching this delightful little girl interacting with our magnificent mutts proved to me that dogs and children go together. To the dogs, Yara was the favorite and every tail wagged when she appeared. To Yara each dog was special. If you have a grandchild visiting, bring him or her to the Ranch and let them experience what animal care is all about. At this time I would like to take the opportunity and thank all the Volunteers who work for the Lakeside Spay and Neuter Center, whether dog walkers, cleaning crew, or other. These are the people who know that when you give the gift of your time, you’ll get back as much as you give maybe even more. If you would like to volunteer, come to the Ranch and help us spread the message of responsible pet ownership and animal protection. Let us work together and in time we will achieve the impossible dream where there are no more street dogs, only pets. In time we hope that every animal is a wanted one; maybe not impossible at all. Dog of the month is Emily. She is about 8 years old and a real sweetheart. She is medium to large in size, her coat is fawn colored but age is beginning to show and has painted her muzzle gray.

Emily would be perfect for someone looking for a companion and a friend. She does not care if you don’t want to take her for long walks or throw balls for her to fetch. All she wants is to be by your side and comfort you and also let you comfort her. She is healthy, has a fierce bark but is a gentle soul. Emily was a pet, and I would like nothing more than for her to be someone’s pet again. Our wish list for the Ranch includes collars, leashes, building material, fencing, dog houses, food dishes and enough food for each dog each day. For more information call Gudrun Jones 766-3813.

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Notes From Nestipac By Phyllis Rauch rauchlosdos@yahoo.com

How’s Business?

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aving spent 40 years at the side of a successful, professional artist I was often asked, “How did the exhibit go?” or “Did you sell a lot?” This isn’t the most tactful thing to ask an artist, but I think people usually mean well. So I had to think up a number of answers which while truthful, didn’t necessarily tell the whole truth: “There was a great turn-out at the opening.” “Liz Taylor and Richard Burton turned up.” “The museologist hung the show so beautifully that I cried when I walked in the door.” You get the picture. I’m in another business now, working as the owner of the small, home-based Los Dos B and B. Recently I’ve observed than no one here is asking me “How’s the hotel

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business?” It’s small comfort (but some) that a great majority at Lake Chapala, whether working in hotels, restaurants, shops, real estate, or as tour guides, is struggling. We are all reeling together under the triple whammy of the world recession, the influenza scare, and the purported downfall of the country due to drug wars (according to Anderson Cooper.)


We all know how much the northern press loves to exaggerate Mexico’s ups and downs. The U.S. government usually follows suit, even putting up warning signs on the border. We who have loved and lived in Mexico know how idiotic these scare tactics are. We also know how difficult they are to do battle with. Family and former guests, many of whom are now good friends, do write asking “How’s business?” My first instinct was to follow the old pattern…to try to find ways of putting a positive spin on the current situation. But, for better or worse, I’m not pulling any punches. I’ve been telling those Mexico fans that she’s hurting and that she needs champions to defend her. I’ve told them I’m healthy, still solvent, and haven’t seen any drug lords striding down the streets. But that we need their neighbors, friends and families to come here and see for themselves. And in this column, taking off my rose-colored glasses, I feel like a lioness defending her cubs when I growl, “Shut up CNN and Sixty Minutes!! Wake up all of you who never having crossed your southern border dare to judge a fabulous country and its people on the basis of biased news

reports and ancient prejudices. “What about your own eternally dirty laundry? Take a closer look at your drug wars, gangs, crime statistics, tampered Tylenol, tainted food, pedophiles, serial killers, children who can’t read? It is we who should fear to cross your borders.” Whew. Do I feel any better? Not really. Partly because I am preaching to the choir. All of us who have elected to make Mexico our home know how lucky we are. Know how much safer, healthier, happier we feel here than in those places we left behind. Know how clean the air is, how deeply blue and uncontaminated the sky. Know how supported we feel by our warm and caring Mexican neighbors. We also know, that when up north all the leaves fall, the temperatures drop, the world turns gray, Mexico will come into her own once more. The snowbirds (who know the truth) will return. And many thousands more will decide to pack their shorts and sandals, ignore the nay-sayers, make up their own minds, and discover for the first time what the rest of us have known all along. Then we’ll reply once again, “Yes, folks, business is great!”

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All the Horses of Heaven By James Tipton Reviewed by Bill Frayer

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n his introduction to James Tipton’s newest volume of poetry, All the Horses of Heaven, Michael McClintock observes that Jim appears to be “the horniest and healthiest man over sixty in the Western world.” Perhaps. For Mexican sensuality and erotic images suffuse Jim’s poetry in this volume. Anyone who has heard Jim read his poetry at the Ajijic Writers’ Group or at Open Circle is familiar with Jim’s penchant for beautiful breasts, sensuous brown legs, and his thorough enjoyment of encounters with gorgeous Latina women: At the market she holds her pendulum above a can of peas. Later holding it over me she invites me in. The poems in this volume are all short poems of about five lines. Jim has been working on these short “haiku” and “tanka” poems for many years. I recently received a copy of William Higginson and Penny Harter’s 1989 Haiku Handbook. Several of Jim’s early haiku poems are featured in the volume. Although he does not always stick to any strict formula for these short poems, he has developed a wonderful ability to capture a powerful emotional moment in just a few lines of verse. The poems in this volume are really about living a full, loving experience in Mexico, experiencing its beautiful women and its romance, and the perpetual search for ideal love. Some of the poems are about sexual fantasy and lust, while others capture bittersweet romantic moments: This late spring all day long I wanted to change into a lilac blossom… one thing she loves. Although these verses reflect the sexuality and sweet irony of love, they are often very funny, reminding us not to take our passions too seriously. I sometimes get the feeling, reading Jim’s work, that his lust is really for the sweet, lusty moments of life, to be savored and enjoyed. Love’s yearnings and love’s losses always have comic potential in Jim’s eyes: “I am looking for a man a lot less saintly than my husband. What’s your name?”

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The Indian girl beside her baskets lifts out a full brown breast to feed both her baby and the tourists. Of course, good poetry is ultimately about images. A good poem creates an image and expects the reader to conceptualize the meaning using his or her own experience and sensibility. To me, the best poetry makes us think and feel, and helps us touch our own vulnerable selves with poignancy and beauty: What invisible garden has decided to share its delicate orchids with our more visible ones this wet summer evening? An interesting feature of Jim’s recent volumes of short poetry is that they are bilingual. Each poem appears in English and in Spanish. Translating poetry into another language is not easy, and Jim had a number of collaborators, although the primary translator is his wife Martha Alcántar. The translations give the readers the additional benefit of being able to practice their Spanish! This is Jim’s third volume of short haiku or tanka poetry in the last year. Proposing to the Woman in the Rear View Mirror and Washing Dishes in the Ancient Village are available in local bookstores and from the author (spiritofmexico@yahoo.com). All the Horses of Heaven is available from the author and also from the publisher at www.themetpress.com. The price is $12.95 USD. All three books are available in Ajijic at Diane Pearl’s Colecciones at the corner of Colón and Constitución. Jim Tipton will be reading from these collections at Open Circle at the Lake Chapala Society on Sunday, August 23, at 10:30am.

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William Schrader 1929-2009 In Memoriam

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ong time Vista del Lago resident Bill Schrader died on June 23 at the age of 80. Bill was born on April 14, 1929 in Ludington, Michigan. After attending the Indiana Institute of Technology, where he earned degrees in Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Bill served his country by enlisting in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. His military service included a tour in the Philippine Islands where he served as a radio operator. Bill’s civilian career included engineering assignments for General Motors, RCA, Gould Manufacturing and Honeywell Corporation. Early in his career, Bill found time and had the talent to earn his private pilot’s license and served in the Civil Air Patrol. Bill and Betty retired and moved to Lakeside in 1993. During his 15 years here Bill volunteered to serve the Lakeside community in many ways, such as: Lake Chapala Society Facilities Director/President, The Humane Society Maintenance Director, Vista del Lago/Treasurer, Haack Foundation/President, Vista del Lago. In addition, Bill enjoyed his retirement years as a writer of many short stories and is the author of three novels, Kiss My Tears Away, The Lonely Road and The Healing Road. A dedication ceremony and memorial for Bill Schrader was held at the Lake Chapala Society on

July 2, 2009, attended by his wife, Betty, daughters Cyan Schrader, Pia Heldt and son-in-law Phillip Heldt and many friends from the Lakeside community. Bill proposed and designed the LCS Gazebo and at this ceremony the facility was named “The Bill Schrader Gazebo” by the President of the Lake Chapala Society, Nancy Creevan. Bill Schrader was a familiar and friendly face for years Lakeside and will be sadly missed by his many friends and neighbors.

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Welcome to Mexico! By Victoria Schmidt

The Streets of Chapala

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walk the streets of Chapala daily with my dog, Boo, and I am always impressed with how quickly things can change and the constant activity on the streets. Like our favorite little abarrotes on the corner, the one my husband walked to every night— it disappeared in the course of a day. They were there one night, and the next afternoon we drove by—and the shop was completely empty. No note, no going out of business sale. Just gone. Our little homeopathic farmacia, open one day, closed the next. It is now an Internet access store. (And I have yet to see anyone in it.) The same thing happened to the lady who does our alterations. Here and then gone. Things change here within a blink of an eye. Restaurants are something else that come and go with great regularity. I’ve learned that if we want to try out a new restaurant, we’d better

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do it within the first few weeks, or it may be gone quickly. Some will relocate, but most just cease to exist. A native of Chapala told me that the reason so many businesses change so often is that the landlords give a good rate for a new tenant, and then as they see business building, they feel they could boost the rent when the lease comes due. Or they decide they want to rent to a family member, and family always comes before tenants. This seems a plausible explanation. What always seems to stay the same, however, is the constant work that goes on. This morning I passed some CFE workers repairing a meter, and a gas truck delivering gas.


The streets are alive with the sounds of independents selling their wares through their loudspeakers, or simply shouting out their windows. Up the street there’s a pile of broken cement outside of one home tossed out from demolition work inside. And further up the street there is a pile of sand piled outside another home as building is going on inside. Along the way are the maids sweeping and the gardeners clipping. They are out there working hard every day. In the mornings, I see the parents escorting their uniformed children to the local schools, and sometimes, as I pass those schools, I hear the children playing beyond the walls. Squeals of laughter and shrieks of delight play within my ears and bring a smile to my face. Sometimes I schedule my walks, just so I can hear those sounds. My favorite walk is when I walk along the newly-finished malecon. I watch the fishermen in the lake, the birds being fed, and pass by all the other pedestrians enjoying the beautiful waterfront walk. I like to sit on the bench and watch the water, and wonder who may be sitting on the opposite shore. I started out being a stranger in this town. I’d walk among the people, but I didn’t feel as though I

was one of them. I was just a gringa passing through. But now that I’ve been here for a while, as much as the street signs, I’ve become a part of this place. My neighbors’ smile and wave as we go by, some call out after my dog, or me and some even stop to talk. Since most of my neighbors are Mexican, those conversations are as brief as my Spanish, but they always leave me with a warm feeling in my heart.

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The Ojo Crossword

ACROSS 1 Teddy _ 5 Land measurements 10 Onto 14 Convexity 15 National capital 16 Planted seeds 17 German city on the Rhine 19 Run away 20 Promissory note 21 European country 23 Looks over 26 Ancient German letters 28 Cut grass 31 Conger 32 Ravenous 33 Serving of corn 34 Home to Denver and Boulder 37 One of the Stooges 39 Vanish 40 African antelope 42 Computer rate 45 No stitching 49 The other half of Jima 50 Baseball time period 53 U-boat 54 Kitten’s cry 55 Sound 56 Sugar-free brand 58 “Too_” (MC Hammer song) 60 Single 61 On top 63 Strutting 69 Clothing decoration 70 Bedspread feather 71 German “Mrs” 72 Child’s transportation 73 Lurked 74 September (abbr.) DOWN 1 Pal 2 Flightless bird 3 Abdominal muscles (abbr.) 4 Stringed instrument need

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5 Organization concerned with civil liberties (abbr.) 6 Scoundrel 7 Rio de Jainero 8 Making mistakes 9 Milder 10 Defunct football league 11 Multiple molecule compound 12 IOU part 13 North northeast 18 Aurora 22 Sanctuary 23 Part of a min. 24 Executive 25 Both 26 Uncultured 27 Card game 29 Canoe propeller 30 Ironic 32 Held 35 Often poetically 36 Tearing down 38 American sign language 40 DNA component 41 Pester 42 Masculine pronoun 43 Ram’s mate 44 An oarlock 45 Sister for short 46 Eastern Time 47 Take to court 48 South by east 51 Sounds 52 Dummy 56 Vane direction 57 Vassals 59 Dueling sword 60 Giant 61 Loose gown worn at mass 62 Thai 64 Hubbub 65 Stiffen 66 Wrath 67 Catnap 68_ feeling


Havoc In Motion By Jay White

Mama and the Rottweiler

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y mother, in her fortieth year (1951), might have been mistaken for Elizabeth Taylor coming and Susan Hayward going, and was frequently asked by strangers if she were in “show bidnis.” Naturally, the next door neighbor, Miz Barr, a stout lady, hated Mama with intensity bordering on insanity, and watched our house almost constantly from her kitchen window—you could see her shadow on the curtain. The neighbor on the other side, a pensioner from the Great War named “Hawkshaw” Hawkins, owned a Rottweiler bitch that only had one pup at a time—which pup, at ten months old, had invariable achieved the size and general demeanor of a yearling rhinoceros, and was meaner than two acres of copperheads. Old Hawk kept his dogs tied up and he tormented them until they were nothing but devils; then he sold them to junk yards or oilfield supply depots or self-storage places for guard dogs, and got a good price. There was a seven foot high fence around his property but he kept the dogs on chains anyway and these chains were about eight feet long. One morning his latest protégé, named Sugar Pie, thoughtlessly jumped over the fence and hanged himself. Mama was in the back yard watering when he did it, and she threw the hose down and rushed to the dog’s assistance. Uncle Carl was on our roof fixing our air conditioner and he told me about it when I got home from school. “Your mama was watering the lawn in a mighty fetching halter top and tennis shorts when that big ol’ pup jumped the fence, but his chain only let him down on this side to a point where his toes just touched the top of the ground, and stretched out like that he was just about as tall as Opal was herself. She had him around the chest and pinned to the fence with the length of her body and was trying to shinny him up it far enough to loosen his collar and let him down. She was doing this by trying to hunch him up an inch at a time with pelvic thrusts, and the whole time the pup was help-

Jay White

ing by pushing down on her shoulders with his front paws and down on her hips with his back paws and making a kind of strangling sound like a canine demon in throes of sexual rapture. “Then,” Uncle Carl hooted through his laughter, “Then…the pup’s collar broke and your mama fell down on her back and her legs flew up with the pup between them struggling to regain his breath and his feet and it must have been about then that Miz Barr glanced out the window and saw what she “thought” was going on and called the cops.” “Good Lord,” I said. “What happened then? “Well,” Uncle Carl said, wiping the tears from his eyes with his hanky, “by the time the squad car got here, Opal and the pup had got themselves untangled and Mr. Hawkins had come and got his property and mama was back watering the lawn when the cops walked back and wanted to know what was going on. Mama smiled her smile of puzzled innocence and said, “Why nothing at all, officer.” “We got a report of animal abuse.” Mama fluttered her eyelashes and turned her head in an attitude of gorgeous disbelief, and the bedazzled cops went next door to speak to Miz Barr about the nasty penalties for filing a false police report.

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LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY 16 DE SEPTIEMBRE #16-A AJIJIC, JAL, MX WWW.LAKECHAPALASOCIETY.ORG

News

August 2009

“From Vision to Results”

Board of Directors initiates a transparent strategic planning process The Board of Directors of The Lake Chapala Society has initiated a strategic planning process with the assistance (at no charge) of Conrad LeBlanc, from New Brunswick, Canada. Conrad is a consultant and group facilitator who has facilitated strategic planning and governance workshops for non-profits across Canada and New England States for the past 20 years. He is also an LCS member (see his profile on page 4). Following a presentation by LeBlanc to the LCS Board of Directors, it was agreed, based on the motto “failing to plan, we plan to fail”, that LCS programs and services will greatly benefit from such a process. The net result will be that everyone making decisions at LCS would focus in the same strategic direction with agreed upon priorities, goals and objectives. The consultant suggested that LCS, as an organization, should answer the following 3 questions: • Where are we going? • Who decides what? • What resources do we need to get there? (Human, material, technological resources and the financial resources to pay the first three). Answers to these 3 questions will become tools in the hands of LCS for planning its success: • The Strategic Planning Process will provide the answer to the first question. • The answer to the second question is a decision-making structure with clearly defined decisionmaking powers outlined in: 1. a Governance Structure, 2. an Operational Structure and 3. a revised Constitution & Bylaws. • The answer to the third question is found in the Business Plan (5 years) and the Annual Budget (1 year). The first step of the Strategic Planning Process began on June 9, 2009 when the consultant held the first of 17 interviews which were concluded in July. All interviewees received the questionnaire prior to the interview. Each interview lasted from 1.5 to 2.5 hours for a total of 26 hours. The consultant is compiling the information gathered during the interviews and writing a Strategic Plan Working Document with the following content: 1. Vision Statement 2. Mission Statement 3. Mandate 4. Statement of Values 5. Situation Analysis 6. Long-Term Goals. The interviewees will participate in a Strategic Planning Workshop with the intent of improving the Work Document for purposes of recommending it for Board approval. LCS members and all local residents will be invited to submit their comments to LCS or to the Consultant. Based on the feedback received, the Consultant will submit a final report for the Board’s approval. The Board will recommend the Strategic Plan to the December Annual General Meeting (AGM) of LCS members. During the AGM, members will be invited to prioritize the long-term strategic goals. According to the Consultant, this initiative should definitely consecrate the importance of transparency of the decisionmaking process within The Lake Chapala Society.

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LCS

News

August 2009

LCS Adopts New Governance Structure During the July meeting of The LCS Board of Directors, The Lake Chapala Society adopted a new governance structure, including the establishment of the position of Executive Director. This action will professionalize LCS’s operation, and bring it into line with the best practices recognized by non-profits the world over. The new structure outlines the decision-making powers of the Annual General Meeting (the Membership), the governing Board of Directors, its’ Standing Committees and the position of Executive Director. There are five standing governance committees of the Board: • Management

• Program

• Fundraising

• Marketing

• Audit

Proposed decision-making powers of the Annual General Meeting (the Membership) and the Board of Directors will be submitted for approval by the members at the October board meeting this year. If ratified, an election for 12 staggered board positions, not 6 un-staggered positions, will be presented at the December Annual General meeting. The key thing to understand, is that LCS will go from an operating board, to a governing board with a paid professional to oversee the day-to-day operations of the Society and its business. The Executive Director will be instrumental in the reorganization of the operational structure of LCS. Accountable directly to the Board of Directors, the Executive Director will recommend to the Board a reorganization of existing programs and services provided to members and the Mexican community. This reorganization of programs and services will be the result of effective consultations with existing staff and service volunteers of LCS. Nancy Creevan, Board President: “The intent of the restructure is to clearly determine who is responsible for what. Basically, the Board and its standing committees, guided by the Executive Director, will establish strategies, plans and policies that will provide the necessary framework for LCS activities. Once the Board has made a decision, it will automatically land on the desk of the Executive Director for implementation purposes. This will provide LCS with much needed stability and consistency in policy development and day-to-day management of the operations. This is just the beginning of the restructuring. This is a work in progress and I hope this is an opportunity to welcome the input from staff, service volunteers and members to give LCS the tools that will ensure the future sustainable success of the organization” This process has come to fruition due to the contribution of Mr. Conrad LeBlanc, a consultant in strategic planning and governance structure, from New Brunswick, Canada. Mr. LeBlanc is an LCS member and resides in Ajijic during the first three months of the year.

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LCS

News MONTHLY SCHEDULED EVENTS LCS Board Meeting: 2nd Wednesday at 11:30 SERVICES • Blood Pressure Check-up - Monday & Friday 10 - 12 • Hearing Aids - Mondays & 2nd and 4th Saturdays 11 - 3 • LCS Office, Information desk, library and video library Monday thru Saturday 10 - 2 • Insurance Information AIG Insurance – Friday, 11 - 2 BUPA Medical Ins. – Wednesday, 10 - 12 NY Life Insurance – Tuesday & Friday, 11 - 2 • Immigration & Legal Info – Monday & Friday, 10 – 12 • IMSS - Monday & Tuesday, 10 -1 • Legal - Tuesday 10 -12 • Optometrist -Thursdays, see sign-up sheet at eye clinic • Talking Books Library – Thursday, 10 - 12 • U.S. Consular Visit – Not coming in August, return September 2. 12 – 2 and the list sign-up begins at 11:30 on the Neill James Patio • San Javier Hospital Rep. - 2nd Weds. at 11 LESSONS • Country Line Dancing - Tuesday & Thursday, 10 -11 • Intermediate Hatha Yoga - Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday, 2 - 3:30 • Exercise Class - Monday, Weds & Friday, 9 in the Gazebo GROUPS • Alcoholics Anonymous - Monday & Thursday, 4:30 • Chess Players - Wednesday, 2 - 5 • Computer Club (Linux) - Monday, 9:30 - 10:30 • Computer Club (MAC) - First Monday, 12 - 1:30 • Computer Club (Windows) - Monday, 10:30 - 11:45 • Creative Writing - Monday, 10:30 - 11:45 • Digital Camera Club - Wednesday, 10:30 - 12 • Discussion Group - Wednesday, 12 - 1:30 • Film Aficionados - Thursdays, in the Sala, 2 - 4 • LCS Learning Seminars - Tuesday, 12 - 2, Sala • Mah Jongg - Friday, 10 -2 • Needlepushers - Tuesday, 10 - 12 • Open Circle - Sunday, 10 - 12 • Scrabble Group - Monday & Friday, 12 - 2:30 • Genealogy - last Monday, 2 - 4 • Tournament Scrabble - Tuesday & Thursday, 12 - 3 • Quilt Guild - 2nd Tuesday, 10 -12 • Write Your own Story - Monday, 4 - 6 OTHER STUFF • ACA Fresh Veggies – Available Daily on the Patio • Children’s Art Classes – Saturday, 10 - 12 • Kid’s Shop Class - Monday, 10:30 - 1:30; Friday 2 - 4 NOTE: Times and offerings are subject to change. Check with the LCS office if you have questions.

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El Ojo del Lago August 2009

August 2009

OPEN CIRCLE SPEAKERS Aug 2 Robert Kleffel A scientific view of happiness Aug 9 Ann Lewis Getting there is half the battle: Jerusalem to Cairo & Petra Aug 16 Blue Chinese astrology: the Outer, Inner and Secret YOU Aug 23 Jim Tipton Aug 30 Alice McNamara Paradigm shift - The notion of a major change in a certain thought-pattern - a radical change in personal beliefs, complex systems or organizations, replacing the former way of thinking or organizing with a radically different way of thinking or organizing. When a paradigm is replaced by a new one, albeit through a complex social process, the new one is always better, not just different.

Open Invitation - Strategic Planning To LCS Members

Beginning Tuesday, August 11, an open work session regarding elements of the strategic planning process will begin. Your input is solicited. Meet in the Board Room at noon. Work sessions should last no more than 2 hours. Open work sessions - Tuesdays at Noon!

The Grounds

We want to thank everyone for their compliments regarding the gardens. This is an ongoing project and all volunteers are welcome. We’ve repaired a few leaks in the library, and repaired several serious leaks at the Wilkes Center. The septic tank servicing the Neill house will require some attention as we diagnose why its level seems to fluctuate with the water table... In mid June, a white egret was seen eyeing the front goldfish pond. Over several days it appears it decimated the fish population. Fortunately a “lunker,” a small breeding population and lots of minnow size goldfish remain. If any one sees a white egret that walks like a penguin, s/he is probably the guilty culprit! Ken Caldwell email: kwcaldwell2001@yahoo.com


LCS

News

August 2009

Biggest July Fiesta EVER! Saturday, July 25, was the day of the biggest July Fiesta EVER in the history of LCS: 722 tickets sold! It was also the most FUNfilled fiesta we’ve ever had! Food by local non-profit groups, bar by Cruz Roja, LIVE auction, great entertainment, book sale, video sale, children’s art sale and more! The 50/50 raffle winners were Steve Martin (4000 pesos) in the morning and Linda Samuels (4250 pesos) in the afternoon. Thanks so much to all of you who volunteered, especially Paul Boorah, Mildred Boyd, June Cooper, Bob Crisafi, Brenda Dawson, Chuck Giles, Julia Hennessey, Jimmy Kaye, Tom Keane, Charlie Klestadt, Barbara Madren, Norm and Jane Pifer, and Yvonne Tomasic. A huge thank you goes to donors of items and services, especially Ajijic Cultural Center dance classes; Arden Furniture; Cruz Roja International Volunteers; Copy Ribera; Cruz Roja Mexicana de Chapala; Diane Pearl Collections; Lake Chapala Shrine Club; Lakeside Barbershop Singers; Lakeside Spay & Neuter Center; Lankam Dancing School of Chapala; Luis Enrique; Mateo’s; Purely Canadian; Carolyn Simpson; Sol Beer; Thomas Paine Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution; “Total Entertainment by Bob Chris”; and Phil Weston. And, of course, thanks to everyone who bought a ticket and came to enjoy the event! It wouldn’t have been possible or nearly as much fun without each of YOU!

MEMBER PROFILE - CONRAD LEBLANC

Conrad LeBlanc holds a Masters in Arts in Philosophy from the University of Moncton. During 20 years, he has been a consultant and a group facilitator with national, provincial and regional non profit organizations, government agencies / departments and small and medium size businesses. He specialized in the areas of strategic planning / management, decision-making structures (governance and operational) and human resources management systems. During 14 years, he has held the position of first Executive Director of two provincial organizations (Planned Parenthood, Canadian National Institute for the Blind – New Brunswick Division) and the first Canadian school community center for francophones in a minority situation (Centre communautaire Sainte-Anne). He has worked as a high school teacher, community developer, family counselor and organizational developer. As a volunteer, he has acted as the founding president and officer of many non profit community and provincial organizations. He was elected on the Municipal Council of the Village of Memramcook and was responsible for the economic, cultural and tourist development of the Village. He is retired “in principle” and continues to act as a consultant in the areas of strategic planning and decision-making structures. He is currently President of La Société du Monument Lefebvre (a national historic site and cultural center), La Solitude (spiritual development center) and a Foundation for the school community center in the Village of Memramcook.

LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY

16 de Septiembre #16-A, Ajijic, Jalisco LCS Main Office: 766-1140 www.lakechapalasociety.org Office and services open Monday – Friday, 10 to 2 and Saturday 10 to 2 Grounds are open until 5

LCS BOARD OF DIRECTORS President - Nancy Creevan Vice-President - Open Secretary - Mary Ann Waite Sr. Director 1 for Buildings & Grounds - Kenneth Caldwell Sr. Director 2 for Finance - Rick Feldmann Sr. Director 3 for Services & Activities - Karen Schirack LCS Education Director - Mary Alice Sargent Business Office Administrator - Terry Vidal THE LCS NEWSLETTER IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY. DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS THE 15TH OF THE MONTH PRECEDING PUBLICATION. NEWS ITEMS OR CORRECTIONS MAY BE LEFT AT THE LCS OFFICE OR E-MAILED TO BINKCALDWELL @YAHOO.COM NOTE: THE EDITORIAL STAFF RESERVES THE RIGHT TO COMPLETE EDITING PRIVILEGES. ARTICLES AND/OR CALENDAR EVENTS WILL BE INCLUDED ACCORDING TO TIME, SPACE AVAILABILITY AND EDITORIAL DECISION ON THE APPROPRIATENESS OF THE INFORMATION FOR INCLUSION.

THE FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR LCS CAN BE FOUND ON THE WEBSITE WWW.LAKECHAPALASOCIETY.ORG

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Service

EMERGENCY NUMBERS

www.tel.chapala.com

DIRECTORY * BEAUTY

ADVERTISING

- ANGEL ESTRADA Tel: 766-4666 - EMU OIL Tel: 765-2233

- EL OJO DEL LAGO Tel: 765-3676

* AIR LINES - AMERICAN AIRLINES

Pag: 37

* ANIMAL CLINICS/PET SHOP - ACUARIO REPUBLICA Cell: (045) 333 441 3563 Pag: 34 - ANIMAL CARE Tel: 766-3062 Pag: 57 - DEE’S PET CARE Tel: 762-1646 Pag: 65 - LAKESIDE SPAY & NEUTER CENTER, A.C. Tel: 766-0821 - PET SHOP Pag: 57 - SALUD ANIMAL Tel: 766-1009 Pag: 67

* ART GALLERIES/HANDCRAFTS - ARATI Tel. 766-0130 Pag: 30 - CATHY CHALVIGNAC Tel: 766-1153 Pag: 55 - DIANE PEARL COLECCIONES Tel: 766-5683 Pag: 54 - EL PALOMAR Tel: 01 (33) 3635-5247 Pag: 54 - GALERIA DOS LUNAS Pag: 27 - OJO DE LIEBRE Tel: 766-6006 Pag: 67 - THE AJIJIC ART HOUSE Tel: 765-5097 Pag: 06, 12, 22, 48

* AUTOMATIC DOORS

- CAR CITY Tel: 765-2550 - GRUPO OLMESA Tel: 766-3780 - LINEA PROFESIONAL Tel. 766-2555, Fax. 766-0066 - MAZDA Tel: 765-4800, 01 (33) 3344-4499 - RON YOUNG-MECHANIC Tel: 765-6387

* BEER & LIQUOR STORES - BETO’S LIQUOR Tel: 766-5420, Cell (045) 333-507-3024 - MODELORAMA Tel: 766-2678, 765-2055 - TEQUILA EL VIEJITO Tel: 33-3812-9092

Pag: 62 Pag: 23

* BLINDS AND CURTAINS - CABO DO MUNDO - INTERIOR DESIGN Tel: 766-0026 Pag: 21

* BOOKS - VERONICA’S BOOKS Tel: (376) 766-5435

Pag: 63

* BOUTIQUE / CLOTHING STORES - CUGINIS OPUS BOUTIQUE Tel/Fax: 766-1790 - FIAGA BOUTIQUE Tel: 766-1816 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - LEATHER GALLERY Tel: 766-2845

Pag: 28, 67

Pag: 54

Pag: 44 Pag: 47

Pag: 06

* CHURCHES - LAKE CHAPALA BAPTIST CHURCH Tel: 765-2925 Pag: 60, 67

Pag: 09

* CLEANING SERVICE Pag: 45 Pag: 73

- MAXYCLEAN Tel: 766-4677

Pag: 21

- FUMIGA Tel: 762-0078, (045) 33-1155-7059 - FUMI-TECH Tel: 766-1946, Cell. (045) 333-369-3737 - RW SERVICIOS INTEGRADOS Tel: (33) 3124 6151, Cell: 33 1237 2951

Pag: 68 Pag: 66 Pag: 50

* FURNITURE - AJIJIC ART & DESIGN Tel: 765-5882 - ARDEN MEXICO Tel: 765-3540 - ARTE AMANECER Tel: 765-2090 - RICARDO FERNANDEZ Tel: 766-5149 - TEMPUR Tel: (52) 333-629-5919, 333-629-5961

Pag: 51 Pag: 39 Pag: 30 Pag: 42 Pag: 48

* GARDENING - GARDEN CENTER Tel: 765-5973

Pag: 66

* HARDWARE STORES

* HEALTH

Pag: 13 Pag: 17

- HYPNOSIS AUDA HAMMETT

Pag: 16, 18, 62, 64, 66

Pag: 15

* HEARING AIDS Pag: 10 - GUADALAJARA AUDIOLOGICAL SERVICES Cell. (045) 33-1511-4088 Pag: 69 Pag: 07

* HOME APPLIANCES Pag: 24 Pag: 20 Pag: 08

- USA APPLIANCES Tel: 01.800.821.6202 MEX 1.866.558.4071 USA - TECNICOS UNIDOS Tel: 765-4266

Pag: 51 Pag: 46

* HOTELS / SUITES Pag: 61

Pag: 50

Pag: 68

Pag: 18

- FERRETERIA Y TLAPALERIA GALVEZ Tel: 766-0880, Fax: 766-2440 Pag: 05

* FINANCIAL SERVICES

Pag: 43

El Ojo del Lago August 2009

* DENTISTS

- DEL MAR Tel: 766-4278

* COMPUTING SERVICES - AJIJIC COMPUTING Tel: 765-4156

Pag: 49

Pag: 42

Pag: 62

- CHANGE OF PACE Tel: 766-5800

* FUMIGATION

* DRY CLEANING/LAUNDRY

* COMMUNICATIONS - HANDY MAIL Tel: 766-3813 - MAILBOXES, ETC. Tel: 766-0647, Fax: 766-0775 761-0363, Fax: 761-0364

Pag: 34

- ARQZA Nextel: 01 (33) 3700 8329 Pag: 06 - CABO DO MUNDO- INTERIOR DESIGN Tel: 766-0026 Pag: 21 - CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING Tel: 766-3626 Pag: 11 - CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING MICHEL Tel: 01 (33) 3635-9203 Pag: 34 - INTERCERAMIC Pag: 29 - INSTALA Cell: (045) 33 1440 6905 Pag: 61 - HOMESERVICES Tel: 766-1569 Pag: 46 - PIETRA FINA Tel/Fax: 01(33) 3628-4919, 01 (33) 3677-1713 Pag: 55 - PISAFIRM Tel: 766-5008 Pag: 48 - WARWICK CONSTRUCTION Tel: 765-2224 Cell. (045) 331-135-0763 Pag: 59

- AJIJIC DENTAL Tel: 766-3682 - C.D. MARÍA LUISA LUIS VILLA Tel/Fax: 766-2428 - C.D. SANDRA ANAYA MORA Tel: 765-3502, 765-5444 - DRA. ANGELICA ALDANA LEMA DDS Tel. 766-5374 - DRA. DOLORES RUSSELL D.D.S. Tel: 766-2881, 766-0075 Cell: (045) 333-108-7727 - DR. ALBERTO DON OLIVERA Tels: 765-4838, 765-4805 - DR. FRANCISCO CONTRERAS Tel: 765-5757 - DR. HECTOR HARO, DDS. Tel: 765-3193, 765-6974

766-1760 765-4444 766-5555

* FITNESS CENTER

* CONSTRUCTION

Pag: 21

* CEILING FANS

Pag: 53

* BAKERY

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Pag: 68

- VENTILADORES DEL OCCIDENTE Tel/Fax: (33) 3631-6619, 3634-9982

Pag: 47

- BRENDA’S BAKERY BOUTIQUE Tel: 765-2987

Pag: 31

066 765-2308, 765-2553 766-3615

Pag: 11

* CONSIGNMENT SHOP - SUZY’S CONSIGNMENT SHOP Tel: 766-5458

- CASA DEL SOL Tel: 766-0050

* BANK INVESTMENT -O&A - MULTIVA Tel: 766-2499

Pag: 63

* BED & BREAKFAST

- AUTOMATIC GARAGE DOOR OPENERS Tel: 766 - 4973, Cell: (045) 33-3157- 6536 Pag: 22

* AUTOMOTIVE

Pag: 49

- CAFE INTERNET AJIJIC Tel: 766-3626 - NEW WORLD TECHNOLOGY Tel: 766-4343

EMERGENCY HOTLINE AMBULANCE - CRUZ ROJA FIRE DEPARTMENT POLICE Ajijic Chapala La Floresta

- INTERCAM Tel: 766-5978 Pag: 31 - LAKESIDE FINANCIAL ADVISOR DAVID LESNICK CFP CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER Fax: 001(623) 327-1277 Pag: 12 - LAKESIDE MORTGAGE CONSULTANTS Tel: 766-2914 Pag: 44 - MONEX Tel: 766-4202 Pag: 75

- CASA BLANCA Tel: 766-1500 - LA NUEVA POSADA Tel: 766-1444, Fax: 766-2049 - MIS AMORES Tels: 766-4640, 4641, 4642 - QUINTA DON JOSE Tel: 01-800-700-2223 - VILLA DEL SEÑOR Cell phone 312 13 22 687 - VILLAS DEL SOL Tel: 766 1152

Pag: 49 Pag: 03 Pag: 28 Pag: 16 Pag: 26 Pag: 22


- EDGAR CEDEÑO Cell: (045) 33-3106-6982 - LLOYD Tel: 766-0152, 766-3508

Pag: 22 Pag: 28

LEGAL SERVICES - MAGO’S OFFICE Tel: 765-3640

Pag: 08

* LIGHTING & DECORATION - LIGHTING & DESIGN CENTER Tel. 766-3506

Pag: 44

* MEAT/POULTRY/CHEESE - NATURAL CHEESE Tel: 765-5933 - TONY’S Tel: 766-1614, 766-4069

Pag: 29 Pag: 09

- DERMATOLOGIST Tel: 766-1198, 765-2400 Pag: 63 - DERMIKA Dermatologic Center Dra. Monica Ramos Tel: 766-2500 Pag: 43 - INTERNAL MEDICINE SPECIALIST & GERIATRICS Dr. J. Manuel Cordova Tel: 766-2777, 766-5611 Pag: 42 - DRA. MARTHA R. BALLESTEROS FRANCO Cell: (045) 333-408-0951 Pag: 61 - GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Dr. Héctor Manuel Alvarado Soria Cell: (045) 33-3626-7957 Pag: 68 - HOSPITAL ANGELES DEL CARMEN Tel: 3813-0042 Pag: 16 - HOSPITAL BERNARDETTE Tel: 01 (33) 3825-4365 Pag: 25 - OCCIMEDGROUP Tel: (01) 33-3825-0000 Pag: 49 - OPHTHALMOLOGIST Dra. María de Jesús Quintero Bernal Tels: 765-2400, 7654805 Pag: 12 - PINTO OPTICAS Tel: 765-7793 Pag: 29 - RED CROSS Tels:765-2308 Pag: 26

* MOVERS Pag: 19 Pag: 14 Pag: 12 Pag: 17 Pag: 58

* MUSIC/THEATER - BALLET FOLCLORICO UdeG

- FARMACIAS AHUACATLAN Tel: 765-6771 - FARMACIA CRISTINA Tel: 766-1501 - FARMACIA EXPRESS II Tel: 766-0656 - FARMACIA MASKARAS Tel/Fax: 765-5827 - FARMACIA MORELOS

Pag: 28 Pag: 65 Pag: 12 Pag: 61 Pag: 63

- MICHAEL’S PHOTO STUDIO & GALLERY Tel: (0133) 3122 3976, Cell: (045) 331 229 8972

- MC INGENIERIA Tel: (33) 3330 9207 - SERVICIO BELTRÁN Tel: 766-4586, 765-3949 - WATCH & CLOCKS Tel: 765 5190, Cell: (045) 33-1331-9226

Pag: 28 Pag: 68

Pag: 68

Pag: 23

- 1ST CHOICE HOMES LAKESIDE Tel: 765-2484 Pag: 27 - AJIJIC HOME INSPECTIONS Tel: 766-2836 Pag: 14 - AJIJIC REAL ESTATE Tel: 766-2077, Fax: 766-2331 Pag: 03 - ALL IN ONE REAL ESTATE SERVICE Tel: 766-1161, 766-2007 Pag: 05 - ALTERNATIVE REALTY Tel: 766-5575 Pag: 57 - COLDWELL BANKER CHAPALA REALTY Tel: 766-1152, 766-3369 Fax: 766-2124, Tels: 765-2877 Fax: 765-3528 Pag: 76 - CHULA VISTA NORTE Tel: 766-2177 Cell: (045) 33-3841-8867 Pag: 46 - EL DORADO Tel: 766-0040 Pag: 02 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 01 (33) 3640-3108 Pag: 58 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 766-2227 Pag: 26 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Cell: (045) 33-3463-5181 Pag: 63 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 765-5943 Pag: 58 - FOUR SEASONS Tel: 766-6065 Pag: 61 - GEORGETTE RICHMOND Tel: 766-2129, 766-2077 Pag: 13 - IMPULSA REAL ESTATE Tel: (+52) 669 913 2745 Pag: 74 - LLOYD REAL ESTATE AJIJIC Tel: 766-0040 Pag: 02 - MICHEL BUREAU Cell. (045) 333-129-3322, Home: (376) 765-2973 Pag: 55 - MIGUEL RUEDA ROMAN Tel: (376) 765-2484 Pag: 43 - RAÚL GONZÁLEZ M. Cell: (045) 331-437-0925 Pag: 23 - RIVIERA ALTA Tel: 766-1169 Pag: 32 - TOM AND DIANNE BRITTON Tel. 766-5249 (home) Cell. (045) 33-1 298-5722 Pag: 03 - VILLA OLIVIA Tel: 766-1069 Pag: 65

- BAILA ARTE ESCUELA DE DANZA Cell: 33 152 06 891 - CLC Tel: 765-5498 - COLEGIO DE AXIXIC Cell: (045) 33-1467-7995 - IMAC Tel: 52 (33) 3613-1080

Pag: 65 Pag: 18 Pag: 61 Pag: 31

* RESTAURANTS/CAFES/CLUBS - AJIJIC TANGO Tel: 766-2458 Pag: 24 - CAFÉ ADELITA Tel: 766-0097 Pag: 34 - CASA BLANCA Tel: 766-1500 Pag: 49 - CASA WAFFLE Tel: 766-1946 Pag: 03 - CHAC-LAN Tel: (387) 761-0111, 761-0326 Pag: 33 - COCINA SAN ANDRES Tel: 766-5614 Pag: 46 - DAVID’S CAFE Tel: 766-2341 Pag: 61 - DELI CORNER Cell: (044) 33 1520 7707 Pag: 50 - EL BAR-CO Tel: 766-0452 Pag: 26 - FABULOUS FOOD Tel: (376) 766 1349 Pag: 19 - GERARD’S Tel: 766 5956 Pag: 43 - JOHANNA’S Tel: 766-0437 Pag: 11 - LA BODEGA Tel: 766-1002 Pag: 12 - LA NUEVA POSADA Tel: 766-1444, 766-2049 Pag: 03 - LA TASCA Tel: 766-5269 Pag: 27 - “ LA TAVERNA” DEI QUATTRO MORI Tel: 766 2848 Pag: 22 - LAS CABALLERIZAS COXALA Tel: 766-0744 Pag: 33 - LOS TELARES Tel: 766-0428 Pag: 51 - MOM´S DELI & RESTAURANT Tel: 765-5719 Pag: 19, 64 - NUMBER FOUR Tel: 766-1360 Pag: 23 - PATIO PLUS Pag: 07 - PEDROS GOURMET Tel: 766-4747 Pag: 44 - PEPITO’S Tel: 766-2060 Pag: 30 - RECOLETA Tel: 766-2656 Pag: 53 - TALENTO Tel: (33)3915 3565 Pag: 47 - THE GARDEN Tel: 766-1381 Pag: 43 - TONY’S Tel: 766-1614, 766-4069 Pag: 09 - YVES’ Tel: 766-1851 Pag: 54

* RETIREMENT/REST/NURSING HOMES

Pag: 35

* RENTALS/PROPERTY MANAGEMENT * PERSONAL ASSISTANCE - JUSTUS HAUSER Tel: 763-5333, Fax: 763-5335 Emergencies: 01 (33) 3441-8223 Pag: 05 - NEWCOMERS ILSE HOFFMANN Cell: 33-3157-2541, Ilse40@megared.net.mx www.mexicoadventure.com/chapala/guadalajara.htm Tel: 01 (33) 3647-3912

* SCHOOLS

* SECURITY SYSTEMS / WIRE FENCES

* PHOTOGRAPHY

* REAL ESTATE

* MEDICAL SERVICES

- BALDERAS Tel: 01 (33) 3810-4859 - LAKE CHAPALA MOVING Tel: 766-5008 - SEYMI Tel: 01 (33) 3603-0000, 3603-0256 - STROM- WHITE MOVING Tel: 766-4049 - THE MOVERS LAKESIDE Tel/Fax: 376-766-3571

* REPAIRS/ MAINTENANCE

* PHARMACIES

* INSURANCE

- COLDWELLBANKER CHAPALA REALTY Tel: 766-1152, movile: (045) 33-1175-9632 Pag: 60 - FOR RENT Tel: 766-4425 Pag: 66 - FOR RENT Tel: (33) 3616-2726,(33) 3615-9433 Pag: 69 - RENTAL LOCATERS Tel: 766-5202 Pag: 14, 59 - ROMA Tel: 766-3163 Pag: 20 - VILLAS DEL SOL Tel: 766 1152 Pag: 22

- LA CASA NOSTRA Tel: 765-4187, Fax: 765-5815 - LA SAGRADA FAMILIA Tel: 762-1425

Pag: 06 Pag: 63

- S.O.S.E Tel: 765-4921

Pag: 62

* SELF STORAGE - SELF STORAGE-BODEGAS CHAPALA Tel: 766-0661, Tel/Fax: 766-1045 Pag: 59

* SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS - ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Tel: 766-5961 Pag: 62 - EL BAZAR DE LOS NIÑOS Tel: 765-3147 Pag: 69 - LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY Tel: 766-1140 Pag: 70-73 - LAKESIDE SPAY & NEUTER CENTER, A.C. Tel: 766-0821

* SPA / MASSAGE - AFRODITA Tel: 766-6187 - BODY SENSE CLINIC Tel: 766-6080 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - MONTE COXALA Tel: (387) 761-0111, 761-0326 - RESPIRO SPA Tel: (045) 33-3157-7790 - SILUET CORPOFACIAL Tel: 766-5867 - TOTAL BODY CARE Tel: 766 3379

Pag: 54 Pag: 31 Pag: 44 Pag: 33 Pag: 30 Pag: 17 Pag: 10

* THERAPISTS - PROFESSIONAL REHABILITATION Tel: 766-5563

Pag: 19

* TOURS - CHARTER CLUB TOURS Tel: 766-1777 - GRUPO TURQUESA Tel: (376) 766-5435

Pag: 09 Pag: 65

* TRANSLATION SERVICES - ELI RANGEL Tel: Tel: 01 33 3335 0863

Pag: 67

* TREE SERVICE - CHAPALA TREE SERVICE Tel: 762-0602

Pag: 69

* WATER - TECNO AQUA Tel: 766-3730, 766-3731

Pag: 15

* SATELLITES/ T.V. * WEAVERS - SATELLITE & ELECTRONICS Tel: 766-4768 - SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF AJIJIC Tel/Fax: 766-1117, 766-3371

Pag: 58

- TELARES LOS REYES Tel: 766-5640

Pag: 22

Pag: 15

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AA- Meets daily at 10:00 am. Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday at 4 pm. Marcos Castellanos 51-A. 766-5961. ACÁ- Teaches youths, families sustainable agriculture, Joco and Jaltepec. Meet 14th of month. For more Information 387 763-1568. A COURSE IN MIRACLES- Saturday 2:00 pm 16 Sept #34, Unit 6, 766-4882 No charge. Ongoing. AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA 904 WING- Meeting 2nd Friday of every month in May, June, July & August. From September to April we meet the 2nd and 4th Friday. Contact Don Slimman 765 4141. AJIJIC QUILT GUILD - Meets second Tuesday monthly. Guests & New Members Welcome. ajijicguild@gmail.com AJIJIC SCRABBLE CLUB- Tuesdays and Thursdays noon-3 pm at LCS Ken Gosh Pavilion. Dan Stark 766-0411. AJIJIC WRITERS’ GROUP- Meets 1st and 3rd Fridays at 10 am. New Posada. Coffee. Meeting followed by lunch at the New Posada. AXIXIC MASONIC LODGE #31- Meets 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of each month at 5:00 pm. Contact the secretary at 763-5346 for details. AMERICAN LEGION OF CHAPALA POST- #7 General Membership meets 11 am 2nd Thursday. Tel: 765-2259. AMIGOS INTERNACIONALES- Every Wednesday 6 to 8 pm, Nueva Posada; informal friendly group meet to make new friends. AMIGOS DEL LAGO A.C.- Working to improve the ecology. See www.amigosdelago.org or contact us at info@amigosdelago.org. AMITIES FRANCOPHONES- Meets every 3rd Saturday at 1 pm contact: Roland and Camille at 766-0149. rvanhoudt@prodigy.net.mx. ANIMAL SHELTER- Provide shelter and new homes for dogs and cats. Tel: 765-5514. ANITA’S ANIMALS- Free loving dogs and cats. call (01 387) 761-0500. www.anitasanimals.com. ASA- Ajijic Society of the Arts. Meets every 1st Monday of the month at Nueva Posada, 10 am. BRIDGE AT OLD POSADA- Monday 1:15 check in. Mary Andrews 766-2489. BRITISH SOCIETY- Lunch meeting the 1st Saturday of each month, 1pm at Manix Rest. 765-4786, chapalainn@prodigy.net.mx. CARD & DOMINO CLUB- Wednesday, Friday & Sunday. Call for times. We will teach; make friends! Tel. 766-4253, Cell: (045) 33-1295-6485. CANADIAN CLUB OF LAKE CHAPALA- Meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the month, September through April. Social hour: 3:00 pm, program 4:00 pm. Visit www.canadianclubmx.com. CASA DE ANCIANOS- Provides support for elderly citizens, 765-2497. CENTRO DE DESARROLLO AJIJIC- Provides family planning and reproductive health education. 766-1679. CHILI COOK OFF- Providing a carnival for residents raising charitable funds, 763-5038. DAR- (Guadalajara)- Daughters of the American Revolution, meets monthly Sep. through June. Cell:333-897-0660 or Tel: (376) 766-2284. DAR- (At Lakeside)- THOMAS PAINE CHAPTER meets every 3 Wednesday at 12:30 noon, September thru June. Tel: 766-2981 or 762-0834. EASTERN STAR ESTRELLA DEL LAGO CHAPTER #10- 1st Wed. at 1:00 pm at Hotel Monte Carlo. 766-3785, www.oesestrelladellago.org. E.R.I.C.- Provides support for the construction and renovation of educational buildings. 766-2866. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS- GA Meeting held every Wednesday afternoon at 3:00 PM in the Doctor’s office at the Lake Chapala Society Charlie K. at cell: 331-445-2136. GARDEN GUILD- promoting the interest in the development of local gardens with an accent on the exotic species available in central Mexico. GERMAN MEETING- 2nd Thursday, 1:00 pm. La Nueva Posada. Call Thea 765-2442 or Hannes 765-3094. GOLDEN STRINGS OF LAKE CHAPALA, A.C.- Rehearsals at auditorio de la Floresta. Tuesday & Friday, 3-6 pm. HASH HOUSE HARRIERS- Every Saturday at 8:30 am at La Nueva Posada. IRISH SOCIETY OF MEXICO- Meets second Monday 4 pm at La Nueva Posada, Ajijic. Contact Brian Cronin, at 765-5071. JUNIOR LEAGUE DE GUADALAJARA A.C.- Av. San Francisco #3332. ligagdl2@prodigy.net.mx, Guadalajara, Jal. Tel. (33) 3121-0887. LAKE CHAPALA DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB- Meets every Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1:15 p.m.. www.chapalabridge.com. LAKE CHAPALA GARDEN CLUB-Promotes an interest, appreciation and better understanding of botanical subjects. 766-2637. LAKE CHAPALA SHRINE CLUB.- Meets the 3rd Tuesday of every month at 1 pm in the Nueva Posada. Perry King at (376) 763-5126. LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY - LCS- 16 de Sep. # 16-A Ajijic, Open Monday - Saturday, 10 am to 2 pm. www.lakechapalasociety.org. 766-1140. LAKESIDE COMMUNITY AWARDS- We benefit all the community by honoring lakeside’s most talented. 766-3232. LAKESIDE LITTLE THEATRE A.C.- Balanced theatrical entertainment, English-speaking, 765-5942. LAKESIDE SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF- The 4th of each month. Nueva Posada 10:30 am. Call 766-2280, www.lakesideschoolforthedeaf.org. LAKESIDE WILDLIFE RESCUE & REHABILITATION- Rescue & rehabilitation of wild animals. 765-4916. LAKE SPAY AND NEUTER CENTR A.C.- Provides shelter and helps curtail the over-population of animals. 766-3813. LCS EDUCATION CENTER- Provides classes in language and other topics for both Anglo and Mexican community. 766-0499. LCS STUDENT AID FUND- Provides financial support to area students to enroll in university, vocational and high school program. 7660716. LINK- Assisting foreign community. Desk at Lake Chapala Society-Monday, 10 am-noon. LITTLE BLUE SCHOOLHOUSE- Provides financial assistance for students at school for disabled children in Chapala 766-1552. LOS NINOS DE CHAPALA Y AJIJIC, AC Providing educational scholarships to Lakeside children 376-766-1688, www.lakesideninos.org. LOVE IN ACTION- Shelter for abused and abandoned children. For volunteers and donations. Anabel Frutos 765-7409, cell: 331-351 7826. MAS- Music Appreciation Society. Concerts from fall to spring. Classical music and dance concerts. For info call Beverly Denton, 765-6409. MISION SAN PABLO- Helping 60 orphaned children ages 2-14 yrs, 7662551. Beaupaton@yahoo.com. www.misionsanpablo.org NAVY LEAGUE, LAKE CHAPALA COUNCIL- Meets the third Saturday for lunch at 1 pm, Manix Rest. 766 4750 or 766-1848. NEEDLE PUSHERS- Benefitting low-income schoolchildren. Every Tues. 10 am at LCS. Call Lynne at 766-5116. NIÑOS Y JOVENES CARAVAN- Delivers foodstuffs and used clothing to orphanage in San Juan. Call Reuben Varela, 01-387-761-0828. OPEN CIRCLE- Fostering body, mind & spirit, every Sunday at the LCS from 10 am to 12 noon. 765-3402 or frankdburton@yahoo.com. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS- Every Tuesday & Friday 12 am at Marcos Castellanos 51-A, in Upper Ajijic. Tel: 766-2575 or 766-1626. PROGRAMA PRO NIÑOS INCAPACITADOS DEL LAGO AC.- Assisting Lakeside disabled children www.programaninos.org , 763-5010. PASOS MILAGROSOS (MIRACULOUS STEPS.)- Helping Handicapped Children Through the Magic of Horses. Saturdays 8-2. www. pasosmilagrosos.com RED CROSS VOLUNTEERS- Meets 1st Wednesday at 2:00 pm at the Sala LCS. New members welcome. ROTARY CLUB OF AJIJIC- Meets every Tuesday at 2:00 pm at Old Posada. Contact Diane at 766-1215. SCIENCE OF MIND STUDY GROUP- Ajijic Center for Spiritual Living. Tuesday 10 am. Call for info: Ann Brandt 765-2037 or email tim@revdoctim.com. VILLA INFANTIL ORPHANAGE- Provides financial support for children. 765-0093. VIVA LA MUSICA - Bus trips to the symphony, summer concert series, call Rosemay Keeling 766-1801. www.ajijicviva.org. VOLUNTEER HEALTH RESOURCE GROUP- Meeting last Saturday of each month at LCS in sala, 10:30. VOLUNTEERS OF THE CRUZ ROJA- Sponsors fund raising events and provides administrative and support services to the Delegation.

(NOTE: If there is any change in the above, please advise us so that corrections may be made. Call: 765-2877)

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All Saints Lutheran Church Worship Service 11:00 am 4600 Avenida Tepeyac, Guad. Tel. (01 333) 121-6741. Abundant Life Assembly of God Carr. 140 next to Mail Boxes etc, Tel: 766-5615. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Services in English and Spanish, 10 am, Riberas del Pilar Bishop Wyvell Tel. (376) 765-7067, Bishop’s residence (376) 766-1532. Church of the Holy Spirit Services Sun. 10 am, Albaro Obregon #119, Chapala Tel. (376) 765-4210. Grace Baptist Church 5th Sun. Evening service 6 pm, Pedro Buzeta No. 970, Guad. Tel. (013) 641-1685. Lake Chapala Baptist Church Mid-week service, 9:30 am, worship service, 10:45 am. Santa Margarita #147, Riberas del Pilar, Tel. (376) 765-2925, 766-5234. www.lakechapalabaptist.com. 7th Day Adventist meet at Madeira 12 in Rancho del Oro, 9:15 am to Noon. Potluck follows. 765-2165. Little Chapel by the Lake Sun. services 11 am, Chula Vista,. Jal, Tel. (376) 763-1551. Lake Chapala Jewish Congregation Santa Margarita 113, Riberas del Pilar, Tel: 765-6968. For infor–mation and service times, please call Pres. Elliot Gould. contactus@lakechapalajews.com. Web site: www. lakechapalajews.com. Lakeside Fellowship Sun. worship 11 am, Javier Mina #49 Ajijic, Tel. (376) 766-0795. Saint Andrew´s Anglican Church Calle San. Lucas 19, Riberas del Pilar, Sunday services, 10 am. www. standrewsparish.net. San Andres Catholic Church Services 9:00 am. Ajijic, 766-0922. St. John’s Catholic Church Between Av. Vallarta & Av. Lazaro Cardenas, Guad. Sun. 11am. (013) 121-8131. The Lake Chapala Unitarian Universalist Fellowship meets Sundays at 10:30 a.m. at the Jewish Community Center behind Mateos in Riberas del Pilar (Santa Margarita 113). For additional information call Steve at 766-5507 or email: trudycrippen@ earthlink.net. Check out our website at www.lcuuf.org.


CARS FOR SALE: 94 Ford full pwr, new brakes, tires & battery. Good condition, US plates, hd tow pkg, make offer asking $48mil pesos, must sell. Call: Joe Dean @ Tel: 766 0782 WANTED: small Mexican plated car with automatic transmission, under 50,000 miles, would like AC, make not particular but Toyota, Honda preferable any color. Contact: Paul Skinner FOR SALE: Trailer 5 X 12 back tailgage goes down so you can load a golf cart on it or extend caring. Capacity 5 X 18 Call Charley Craven @ Tel (387) 761 0076 FOR SALE: Golf car classic, new tires and battery. Look like a small car. Call Charley Craven @ Tel: (387)761 0076 FOR SALE: Pointer wagon 2001 dark green. 44000 pesos good condition, standard, Mexican plated. Call Cathy @ 3313417836 WANTED: Want to buy car with Texas plates $5000us, year 2000 or Later. Contact Frank Raimo FOR SALE: Ext cab, long bed, new brakes, new tires. Bed liner and bed cover. Very good condition. All reasonable offers considered. $6000USD. Call: Bill Mc Connaughey Tel: 762-0856 FOR SALE: Platina 2004, 80000 km. Cause departure we sell our car. Mexican Plates, excellent condition, all maintenance done. 3750 USD or best offer. Call: Luc Regnard @ 3337231686

COMPUTERS BEST OFFER FOR: 2.8 ghz Celeron, Windows XP Pro, 512mb Ram memory, Sony DVD Writer, 19” CRT Monitor, 3 Piece Speakers, Keyboard and Mouse. Call Barry Semeniuk @ 376-762-1628 FOR SALE: GARMIN Street Pilot C330. Reconditioned, Warranty until 30 April 2010. Includes latest City Navigator NT Mexico. Cost US$162....Selling price US$150. Call: Paddy Andrews @ 766 6039 FOR SALE: PC Pentium 3Ghz / HD 160Go Desktop computer: $5000pesos or Best offer, 1 DVD burner and 1 CD rom reader Windows XP, Nvidia video card, Speakers, Printer, Call: Luc Regnard @ 3337231686 FOR SALE: HP 2002, 700 Mhz Intel Celeron Processor, 384 MB of RAM, and 30 GB Hard Drive. Microsoft Windows XP Pro, CD Burner. 3,000 Pesos. Call: Belle Arnold @ (376) 765-5773 FOR SALE: Multi Task Print/Scann/ Copy New Hp Multy Task (PRINTER/ SCANNER/COPIER) Includes Color & B/W Cartridges. $1300pesos. For more information call Claudia @ 7662612 (1-5) or 7621363 (After 7 p.m.) or email: graccocyd@hotmail.com FOR SALE: Wireless Equipment. Linksy’s (Division of Cisco) Wireless-N

PCI Adapter. Wireless-G Range Expander . Never used. Bought in March for $3,828 and will sell at $2,500. Call: Julie Hensley @ 765-4590

GENERAL MERCHANDISE WANTED: A Computer Desk, A Queen Size like new sofa bed. 376765-6062 please contact us. Ron or April. Oh, and I am looking for an Avon Rep and updated Catalog. FOR SALE: Igloo Water Cooler This is a gently used Water cooler. The spout works perfectly. $350. Call: Julie Hensley @ Tel: 765-4590 FOR SALE: New beautiful sheepskin rugs. Leather decorative edgings, machine washable, decorator image. $700pesos. Call today. Call: Barbara Colbert @ Tel: (376) 763 5038 FOR SALE: Right hand clubs built for 6’ man 3 woods, 7 clubs, putter, stand up bag, weather cover. TV 36” RCA, picture, remote, extra input and output jacks, Call: mike mercer @ Tel: 387-763-1084 FOR SALE: Steel base frame for a mattress. Adjustable from double to king size. On wheels. Call: (387) 761 1054 WANTED: SUV Cargo Rack. Big Country or similar. No plastic boxes! Contact: Susan McGill FOR SALE: I would like to sell my phone line please call at 766-1630. Also, prodigy modem included. FOR SALE: Brand new padded double size mattress cover/protector. Excellent quality. Never opened. $350pesos. Call: Gloria Palazzo @ Tel: 765 4435 FOR SALE: 21 Inch, 4HP, rear bagger lawn mower, runs good, $1250.00 pesos. Call: Jim Draughon @ Tel: 7661767 FOR SALE: Great Lease Available in the Ajijic Plaza Liquor License Included Call Kim 331 313 2006 FOR SALE: one chrome 4 leg swivel black leather seet stool. $400pesos. One chrome 4 leg swivel yellow polyester seet stool. $200pesos. One wooden 4 leg dark stain stool $50p, Bachelor podium bar 3’ x 10” $200p. Call: Heinz Stapff @ 7653587 FOR SALE: sky satelite dish, reciver & remote control. 1,800PESOS. Call: Heinz Stapff @ 7653587 FOR SALE: Rustico Mezquite Wood 6 door dresser 40”H - 59”L- 20”D $9200 pesos. King RanchStyle rocking chair leather seat& backrest 45”H 27”w $8000, perfect for entry way. King Ranch Style round table 26”D 27”H $9000 All Items $20 000 Chair & table $14 000 ALL ITEMS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION !!!! dama.bs@gmail.com. Contact: Damariz Salmeorn FOR SALE: Fisheye lens FC-E8 for Nikon CoolPix digital cameras. Originally developed for scientific or industrial applications, Fisheye lenses are now also widely used in advertis-

ing, commercial and general photography. $100usd. Call David Tingen @ (376)765-3676 WANTED: Need used windows, doors, fencing, barbed wire, chicken wire, chain link, metal railings, window security metals, wheel barrel and ladder, any building materials, tiles, sinks, faucets, toilets, wood, rebar etc. Contact: diane ward FOR SALE: Dining room suite for sale. Table is 7’ long comes with glass top to protect the wood. 8 high back chairs upholstered in red microsuede fabric. $900 US. Call Donna at 7664636 FOR SALE: Sony Home Theatre, barely used. 5 Double Speakers, 1/10” Sub Woofer, 900 Watts Power.

$5,800.00 pesos. For more details call Claudia: 7662612 (9-5) or 7621363 (After 7 P.M.). or e-mail: graccocyd@hotmail.Com FOR SALE: Fire Engine Red 3 wheeler electric SCOOTER, comes complete with electric lift for you VAN, and 2 sets of aluminum ramps. $3000uds, e-mail: ssnnkenn7@aol.com or Call: Suzi Klein @ (376) 766 4456 FOR SALE: Frigidaire 16 Cu Ft Upright Freezer in excellent condition. For further information $200 Call Patsi Dunn @ 376-764-0083 WANTED: used doors and windows, any bldg supplies and gas powered generator, tejas, tiles, plumbing or electrical supplies, economical please!!! Contact: Dusty Ward.

The Ojo Crossword

Saw you in the Ojo

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El Ojo del Lago August 2009


Saw you in the Ojo

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El Ojo del Lago August 2009

El Ojo del Lago - August 2009  

August issue

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