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Valley Guide I

OJAI BUCKAROOS

THROUGH THE LENS OF OJAI PHOTOGRAPHER MARC ALT

BY

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PUBLISHED FOR

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Ojai

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THOMAS ONE YEAR LATER OJAI BY THE GLASS A PLACE FOR POTTERS

VENTURA + SANTA BARBARA + LOS ANGELES + SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTIES


With a perfect blend of relaxed refinement, this sophisticated Mediterranean single story enjoys one of Saddle Mtns most aesthetic settings. $1,595,000

Downtown 3 bed, 2 bath home full of character & updated with amenities such as an updated kitchen, wood floors, central AC, & a light-filled breakfast nook. $1,195,000

Haven’t found THE ONE?

Large and private 12,500 sq ft corner parcel and over sized family room with vaulted ceilings compliments this 3 bed and 2 bath East End Ranch style home. $649,000

Build your own dream home and enjoy quiet country living, just a few minutes from downtown Ojai on a beautiful, flat parcel on North Fork Springs Road! $299,000

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Call us at 805.637.4467 to learn more about our upcoming listings.

Build your dream home on this flag lot that’s over 1/3 acre and is flat and fully fenced. Sale can include complete zoning-compliant plans for a Main House, a Guest House and a Garage. $309,000


o j a ih o me s 4 sale .com Cal BRE #01906376

MEMORABLE MOMENTS from

THE MICHAELS + McCLUNG TEAM’S 2018 CLIENT APPRECIATION PARTY At Topa Mountain Winery

An outpouring of gratitude to all of our dedicated fans and supporters!

Sharon:805.637.4467 Char: 805.620.2438 Jerry: 805.620.2437

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GABRIELA CESEÑA REALTOR | Luxury Specialist Berkshire Hathaway

Unwavering commitment to my clients’ satisfaction | Driven by passion for the work I do

505 Grand Avenue Updated Downtown Ojai | 2 homes for 1 plus 600 sq. ft. Art Studio Vaulted Ceilings | Flower & Vegetable Gardens | Fruit Trees | Romantic Patios | Ojai Sanctuary Asking $1,349,000

209 S. Montgomery Street Downtown Ojai | Los Arboles Gorgeous Tuscany Townhome Whitman Design | Gourmet Kitchen Two En-suite Master Bedrooms Asking $820,000

4488 Thacher Road 12175 Mountain Lion Rd. Upper Ojai Valley | Equestrian Retreat 1906 Ojai Craftsman | East End Acreage Sophistication & Tranquility 5 Bed, 5 Bath Exquisite Design Stunning Mountain Views Thoughtfully Renovated Chef’s Kitchen | Library Barn, Corrals & Workshop Call for price For Rent $7,500 / month

CA DRE #01983530

805.236.3814 | gabrielacesena@bhhscal.com | Gabrielacesena.bhhscalifornia.com

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FINE JEWELRY + ARTISAN GOODS + LIFESTYLE GALLERY 453 E Ojai Ave., Ojai, CA 93023 • (805) 646-1997 • susancummings.com •

@susancummingsdesign

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277+ Acre Ranch with 5 Houses, Horse Facilities, Stunning Views & More. www.29443hwy33.com $6,250,000

5 Bedroom Horse Property with Guest House, Pool, Horse Facilities and Views www.1577KenewaStreet.com $2,895,000

IN W! C ES RO

Three-bedroom home with many recent upgrades and mountain views walking distance from The Arcade, parks, golf course, farmers market and more. $589,000

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Remodeled 3BR, 2BA home with mountain views, three-car garage, outdoor living areas, plantation shutters, laundry room, and so much more. $789,500


36-Acre Upper Ojai Ranch with Caretaker’s House, Guest Quarters, Saloon, Rec. Building, and Amazing Views www.OjaiParadiseRanch.com $3,399,000

4 BR + 3BA Ranch-Style Home on Five Acres with 2 BR Guest House. www.1175CamilleDrive.com $1,639,000

3 BR, 3 BA Ventura home with fireplace, formal dining room, Italian tile floors, and double ovens within walking to shops, restaurants, salons. $779,900

Rare opportunity to buy Gateway Plaza! Oak View shopping center with long-term occupants, large parking lot and great location. $1,679,000

Kellye Lynn 805-798-0322 CalBRE# 01962469

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• • • • • • • •

Spa Memberships Radiant Facials Therapeutic Massage Body Treatments Foot & Hand Services Pre-wedding Day Escapes Far-infared Sauna Spa Day Packages

“Relaxation At It’s Finest” “I live over an hour away from Ojai, but I’ve heard rave reviews from many people regarding this spa. My experience was nothing short of amazing, blissful, relaxing and peaceful. The prices are competitive and they do offer specials.” Malibu, California

“Amazing-The Best Spa I Have Ever Gone To!” “I have been to many Top End Spas in this country and abroad, this was the best facial and massage I have ever gotten.” Long Beach, California

805.640.1100 • 209 Montgomery Street • thedayspa.com 8

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January 3 – March 10 2019

paintings

Josef Albers Max Bill John McLaughlin

canvas and paper

311 N. Montgomery Street

Thursday – Sunday noon – 5pm

canvasandpaper.org

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YOUR GUIDE TRANSFORMED

A

fter 36 years in print we have reimagined every fiber of our Ojai Valley Guide. Greetings from the new publisher and editor-in-chief. Yes, the word “Visitor” is gone...a superfluous title, I believe, when considered in its deeper context. Our mission: to reconnect locals, share a glimpse of Ojai life and shed light on the unique qualities that make Ojai special, while serving as your Guide to the Ojai Valley and its neighbors. Our town reflects on our anniversary one year after the historic Thomas Fire and as a community, we are more connected than ever before; a family who experienced something together. Sadly, most of California now shares in this understanding. Everybody has a story. Care and empathy ran deep from the grocery store to the crosswalk; time stood still, we held our breath, forgot about our differences and remembered our common love for this valley. Our town looks back as we move forward in recovery. Our own Perry Van Houten discovers again that hope and kindness can overcome fear and loss. Returning to the earth, the recent clay wave is sparking a renaissance for Ojai pottery. Locally it began with Beatrice Wood, was shaped by Frank Massarella and Otto Heino, and now remolded by Wyatt Amend and others. Arts writer Anca Colbert explores Ojai’s reinvigorated art form. Ojai is part place and part myth. Our collective romantic dream of cowboys in the Wild West lives on, grown out of the history and traditions of the Californios. Before we became a state in 1850, these Spanish-speaking buckaroos developed a style of riding and ranching that is still practiced by some in the Vaquero way. Through his lens, photographer Marc Alt captures cowboys in our hills, following longtime traditions. As a wine destination, Ojai is finally making an impact on both local and out of town wine connoisseurs. Richard Camp takes us on a tour of wineries and tasting rooms in the Ojai Valley that showcase the best of the local varietals. For me, competitive swimming is a metaphor for life. Inspirational coach Jermaine Britton instills in his students the values of hard work, consistency and mental strength — tools for success that Ojai Valley News reporter Austin Widger brings to the surface. Was it a mystical, spiritual vortex that saved the heart of town from the fire, the belt of fruit trees that surround us or simply a shift in wind that spared most of us? We have lessons to remember — both concrete and esoteric. We will thrive by approaching change with creative thinking and a love for our neighbors, to positively adapt to life’s new story. My heartfelt thanks to all the columnists, artists, advertisers and staff at the Ojai Valley News for your contribution and commitment to innovation as we rebuild this regional standby, the Ojai Valley Guide. I look forward to a dynamic exploration of all things Ojai — the next 36 years. 10

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Ojai

Valley Guide

PUBLISHED SINCE 1982 BY THE OJAI VALLEY NEWS

EDITOR & PUBLISHER Laura Rearwin Ward

CONTRIBUTORS

Perry Van Houten • Austin Widger Marc Alt • Amelia Fleetwood Anca Colbert • Cindy Pitou Burton Randy Graham • Shivani Jane Kathleen Kaiser • Holly Roberts Drew Mashburn • Fred Drennen

ART DIRECTOR Paul Stanton

ASSISTANT EDITORS

Marianne Ratcliff • Linda Griffin Georgia Schreiner

ADVERTISING

Linda Snider • Lynn Goodman

PRODUCTION Billy MacNeil

CIRCULATION Ally Mills

BUSINESS MANAGER Jodie Miller

CONTACT US

Phone: 805.646-1476 Fax: 805.646-4281 info@ojaivalleynews.com 101 Vallerio Avenue Ojai, California 93023

This Edition: Ojai Buckaroos: Through the Lens of Mark Alt

OJAIVALLEYNEWS.COM L AURA REARWIN WARD publisher@ojaivalleynews.com

© 2018 Downhome Publishing


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ANNOUNCING The Grand Opening of our Super Food Kitchen and Dispensary! Come visit BōKU and bring this flyer for * Free superfood gift! * Free E-bike test ride! * 30% savings store wide! Sharing the most delicious, health forming superfoods on earth. Since 2007. Available ONLY online at www.bokusuperfood.com and at BōKU HQ here in Ojai! BōKU International Inc. 987 W Ojai Avenue, Ojai CA 93023

(805) 650-2658

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BōKU OPEN

Monday - Saturday 9am - 5pm


ibrance health better health at every age.

NOW AVAILABLE to you in Ojai at BōKU 1st & 3rd Saturday of Every Month:

• • • •

Customized Vitamin Infusions SHAPE Weight Loss Program Stem Cell Therapy Natural Hormone Balancing

• Detoxification • Human Growth Hormone • Non-Invasive Heart Testing

Dr. Darren F. X. Clair Medical Director, Vibrance Health

Call to Make an Appointment:(805) 379-0254 Vibrance Health (at BōKU) 987 W Ojai Avenue, Ojai, CA 93023 Vibrance Health (Main Office) 32123 Lindero Canyon Road, Suite 205 Westlake Village, CA. 91361

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OUTDOORS Outback Ojai - page 17

SHOPPING

The Gift Guide - page 23 Stopping points - page 51

INSIDE

WINTER 2018

FOOD & WINE

Cooking in the Aftermath - page 56 Lavender Inn the Kitchen - page 60 Ojai by the Glass - page 68

ART & CULTURE A Place for Potters - page 36 Artists and Galleries - page 50

LIVING

Thomas One Year Later - page 78 Ojai Buckaroos. Through the lens of Marc Alt - page 99 A Hike In the Snow - page 90

EVENTS

Ojai Art Center Turns 80 - page 118 Calendar of Events - page 122

NEARBY OJAI page 126

HEALTH & MINDFULNESS Returning to Tea Time - page 111 Healing Directory - page 117

EDUCATION

Swimming’s Secret Sauce - page 132

BUSINESS

Meet your Chamber CEO - page 140 Rotary Living Treasures - page 147

COLUMNS

Look Back in Ojai - page 154 Worried In Ojai - page 159

REAL ESTATE page 144

AD INDEX page 161 14

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L ov i n g l y h a n d c ra f te d i n O j a i , C A Jes MaHarry Store ~ 316 East Ojai Avenue, Ojai California 93023

www.jesmaharry.com ~ 877.728.5537 ~ jesmaharryjewelry

Photo by: Rylann Smith VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018 15


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Perry Van Houten, Ojai Valley Visitors Guide Ojai Snow Scenes While snowfall on the valley floor is rare, the mountains surrounding Ojai can become a winter wonderland whenever the snow level drops to 5,000 feet or so. The sparkle atop Nordhoff Ridge, Chief Peak, the Topatopa Mountains and, farther north, Pine Mountain, beckons the genuinely adventurous, with a sure-fire cure for cabin fever. The problem can be getting there. Backcountry roads will be closed, so snowbound adventurers must make the trip on foot. Take the Sisar, Horn and Howard canyon trails; or Chorro Grande Trail, to reach 7,000-foot Pine Mountain, if you’re hankering for a hike to the snow. You’ll likely see crystals clinging to the stratified, crumbling cliffs of Topatopa, the sun playing hideand-seek behind dark gray clouds moving like great ships, and the tracks of wild animals in fresh powder. Or you may experience “graupel,” a German word for soft hail or snow pellets, created when a snow crystal comes in contact with a super-cooled droplet of water. As rare as it is, snow did blanket the valley in 1916, 1932 and 1957. According to “The Ojai Valley: An Illustrated History,” the heaviest snowstorm ever to occur in the valley happened in 1949. It brought three to four inches of snow to the valley floor. “By noon, every store in the valley had sold out of film,” the book states. The problem can be getting there. Backcountry roads will be closed, so snowbound adventurers must make the trip on foot. Take the Sisar, Horn and Howard canyon trails, or Chorro Grande Trail, to reach 7,000-foot Pine Mountain, if you’re hankering for a hike to the snow.

Outback

W

hile snowfall on the valley floor is rare, the mountains surrounding Ojai can become a winter wonderland whenever the snow level drops to 5,000 feet or so. The sparkle atop Nordhoff Ridge, Chief Peak, the Topatopa Mountains and, farther north, Pine Mountain, beckons the genuinely adventurous, with asure-fire cure for cabin fever.

by Perry Van Houten

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You’ll likely see crystals clinging to the stratified, crumbling cliffs of Topatopa, the sun playing hide-and-seek behind dark gray clouds moving like great ships and the tracks of wild animals in fresh powder.

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Or you may experience “graupel,” a German word for soft hail or snow pellets, created when a snow crystal comes in contact with a super-cooled droplet of water.


As rare as it is, snow did blanket the valley in 1916, 1932 and 1957. According to “The Ojai Valley: An Illustrated History,” the heaviest snowstorm ever to occur in the valley happened in 1949. It brought 3 to 4 inches of snow to the valley floor. “By noon, every store in the valley had sold out of film,” the book states.

OVG

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r a e Y w e N y p p a H Ojai Valley Athletic Club is thankful for another fantastic year! We are blessed to have a great members and to be a part of the strong Ojai Community. Stay healthy this holiday season. There’s a winter workout for everyone at OVAC! Call Ojai Valley Athletic Club Today (805) 646-7213

409 S. FOX ST. (805) 646-7213 OVAC.CACLUBS.COM

OWNED & OPERATED BY CALIFORNIA ATHLETIC CLUBS • CACLUBS.COM

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Established in 1993 • License # 764241

805.658.0440 1500 Callens Road, Ventura, Ca 93003 kitchenplacesventura.com


An Ojai tradition for over 50 years 302 W. Matilija Street (805)646-3755 9:30 - Sunset daily

www.bartsbooksojai.com 22

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Local Gift Guide

GIFT OJAI

Presented by Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce

WWW.OJAIGIFTS.COM

Photos by Mariana Schulze

Caravan Outpost Adventure Hotel, Shop, & Event Space. 317 Bryant Street | Specialized Turbo Cuomo 3.0 e-Bike in UV Lilac. $3250 or available for day rental. The Mob Shop 110 West Ojai Avenue | Hightail Handmade Jacket. $180 Sunstream Goods 205 N Signal Street, behind NoSo Vita | Tuareg Ebony Amulet with Antique Silver. $395 Nomad Gallery 307 E Ojai Avenue No. 103 | Hand-Distressed Vintage Levi’s. blanchesylvia 212a E Ojai Avenue | Jess Conti Leather Backpack. $225 OVA Arts 238 E Ojai Avenue | Flower CSA. $80/mo Sunstream Goods collab with Native Local Flower Design. Friday pickup @ 205 N Signal Street, behind NoSo Vita | The Serpent Hat. $350 SamRobertsLA 900 E Ojai Avenue | Baguette. Kate’s Bread. Order ahead for Sunday pickup @ noon | katesbread.com VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Local Gift Guide

SERVE OJAI Sugar Bush IPA & White Pixie Ale. 22 oz $11.50 Ojai Valley Brewery located at Azu Restaurant 457 E Ojai Avenue

Beato Chocolates 72% Dark Chocolate & Sea Salt. $10 Beato Lounge at Porch Gallery 310 E Matilija Avenue

Glasses by Local Artists Heather Stobo & Katie Van Horne. $15 Porch Gallery 310 E Matilija Avenue

Wyn Matthews Serving Platter. $70 Firestick Pottery Showroom & Clay Studio 1804 E Ojai Avenue Murcotts (winter citrus). Friends Ranch Mail order or pickup Tues & Fri mornings 7am-noon, 15150 Maricopa Hwy

Organic Bay Garlic Chili Oil. 100mL $20. Pineapple Balsamic. 60mL $10 Chocolate Reserve Balsamic. 60mL $12 Carolïna Gramm Tasting Room 326 E Ojai Avenue

Sandra Torres Porcelain Sake Set. $155 Human Arts Gallery 246 E Ojai Avenue

Ojai Sage Honey. 2lb $20 Ojai Lavender Honey. 12oz $14 Local Orange Blossom Comb Honey. 9oz $14 Honey Dipper. $2.50 Heavenly Honey Tasting Room 206 E Ojai Avenue

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Baguette. Kate’s Bread Order ahead for Sunday pickup at Noon


Local Gift Guide

WEAR OJAI Eros Collective Silver & Brass Ring. $65 Sunstream Goods 205 N Signal Street, behind NoSo Vita

Sterling Silver & Black Onyx Necklace featuring antique sterling medallion. $550 Barbara Bowman 125 E Ojai Avenue

Hsu Studio Earrings. $105 Human Arts Gallery 246 E Ojai Avenue

Tuareg Crossbody Bag. $125 Nomad Gallery 307 E Ojai Avenue Suite No. 103

Gayle Minjarez Sphere Cuff Fused Gold & Silver. $200 OVA Arts 238 E Ojai Avenue

Tuareg Tassel Keychain. $18 Nomad Gallery 307 E Ojai Avenue Suite No. 103 OO AH Alchemy Hydrosols. $18 Rainbow Bridge Market 211 E Matilija Street

WWW.OJAIGIFTS.COM VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Local Gift Guide

LIVE OJAI Seed of Life Crystal Grid. $19 Choose your personal intent or with our crystal intent shown: “ Wisdom of the Heart” - Rose Quartz, Fire & Ice, Kyanite & Malachite set for $156. Price varies. Dharma & Dog 215 E Matilija Street

Wild Oak Pottery Ceramic Cannister. $60 OVA Arts 238 E Ojai Avenue

Ojai Dirt Candy Soap. $10.49. Himalayan Salt Heart by Love’s Blessings. $8.99 Aloha Bay Candle. $2.79 Monarch Meadows Farm Plant-Based Scrubbers. $9-14 Rainbow Bridge Market 211 E Matilija Street

Sansevieria. $15 in Fanny Penny x Nico 77 Pot $45 Found 203 Studio 203 N Ventura Street Leslie Clark “Silver Century” Native Plant Giclee. $75 Nomad Gallery 307 E Ojai Avenue Suite No. 103

Coyuchi Cloud Brushed Flannel Sheet Set. King Size $298 Terramor Organic Home 147 W El Roblar Drive

Succulent $4 in Fanny Penny x Nico 77 Pot. $35 Found 203 Studio 203 N Ventura Street

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Get your rocks on!

Gem Quest Jewelers Jewelry Design 8 Jewelry Repair Tuesday-Saturday 10am - 5:30pm • Sundays by appt.

324 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai CA 93023

805-633-4666

www.GemQuestJewelry.com barnettcath@gmail.com VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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INTUITIVE READERS DAILY Tarot Readers Spiritual Counselors Astrologers

Buddhas to Birthday Cards

OJAI HOUSE m

a

and a Huge Selection of Crystals

est. 2000 ...

um

Bumperstickers to Beeswax

ys tical empori

Chair Massage & Energy Healing

OPEN DAILY 11-6

304 N. Montgomery Street, Ojai, CA

2 blocks north of Ojai Avenue & A World Apart!

805.640.1656 • OjaiHouse.com •

nutmegs_ojai_

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Ask us about ou r Honey C lub!

Visit our Honey Tasting Room: 206 East Ojai Avenue, in the Arcade, downtown Ojai www.heavenlyhoneycompany.com | 805-633-9103

Sustainable Style

for Personal Well-being and a Healthy Planet

Organic and natural mattresses, organic cotton sheets, duvet covers, blankets, baby clothes, women’s clothing, wool pillows, comforters and toppers.

147 W. El Roblar Dr., Ojai • 805.640.3699 Open Tues-Sat 10-5

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terramororganic.com

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Have questions about the drought? As the CMWD Board considers a Stage 4 Drought Declaration, the District will be providing information to customers on what Stage 4 will mean. We’ve set up a webpage that we will update with details on conservation efforts, water usage restrictions, and other important facts.

Learn more: www.CasitasStage4.org Bringing peace (of mind) to pets and their people one visit at a time. Ojai Valley’s Pet Care Specialists We take your pet’s care seriously.

ThePeacefulPup.com 805.646.PUPS (7877) Services we offer are: • Dog Walks • Potty Breaks • Pet Sitting • Overnights (in your home) Licensed. Bonded. Insured. • Serving the Ojai Valley Since 2010

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A Place for Story by Anca Colbert

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Potters

A rekindled interest in pottery activity around the Ojai Valley

In Ojai’s history and reputation of attracting artists and creatives of all kinds we know that potters and ceramic artists have long been drawn to live and work here, in this place, this small town nestled in a heavenly mountain valley.

next to the Happy Valley School. That home and studio, now transformed into The Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts, welcome visitors on pilgrimage seeking a glimpse into the famed artist’s inner and outer landscapes.

Naturally, Beatrice Wood’s storied life and career first comes to mind. “Beato” lived here from 1947 (when she built her house and studio in the East End) until her death in 1998, at the ripe age of 105. For many, she put Ojai on the map. She did so for this then-young art lover, freshly arrived from Paris to Los Angeles, who first came to Ojai in 1973 was invited to lunch by Beatrice, who at the time was just settling into her new home in the Upper Valley,

From illustrious potters and ceramic artists to modest craftspeople, from devoted amateurs to occasional or accidental hobbyists, Ojai’s story as a home to those who want to work with clay endures. In recent times, that long-established tradition is rejuvenated and invigorated by the arrival of new potters to the area.

Beatrice Wood carving figures on a sculptural bowl (1995).

Photo ©1995 Cindy Pitou Burton VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Photo ©1995 Cindy Pitou Burton

Simply defined, pottery is “one of the oldest and most widespread of the decorative arts, consisting of objects made of clay and hardened with heat. The objects made are commonly useful ones, such as vessels for holding liquids , or plates or bowls from which food can be served.” (George Savage, Britannica ) Pottery is both an object of utility and an object of beauty. Originally developed for utilitarian purposes, making simple objects for cooking and use in every day life, over time pottery became a craft, then a decorative craft , and later on an art. As to the distinction 38

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between crafts and art ... that’s another (long) story. The main types of pottery (earthenware, stoneware and porcelain) look distinctly different. Due to the huge combination of choices available to a potter – e.g., the types of clay and their quality, the mixing of various materials and the vast range of techniques used (hand-building or wheel, kiln types, firing temperatures, etc.) – the works produced result in astonishingly different shapes and textures. Some of it by design, some of it by chance. From its simplest utilitarian

manifestations thousands of years ago to the complexity of modern and contemporary sculptural works, pottery is a cultural artifact that traces the evolution and reflects the richness of human history and civilizations around the globe. At the Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts, now a mecca for ceramics lovers, one can view Beatrice Wood’s legendary luster glazes and provocative figurative sculptures, and learn about her extraordinary life. The Center’s director, Kevin Wallace, tends to her legacy and opens the doors to visitors by organizing art events, art shows and work-

shops. The latter are more like retreats, opportunities to learn, surrounded by nature. Valerie Freeman, a painter and sculptor, took one workshop and then started creating her own lustrous glazes. In addition to ceramics, the workshops offer also basketry, fiber and woodwork; these experiences attract artists and students, private family and corporate retreats. Beato’s spirit is still present in her studio at the foot of the Topas. Vivika and Otto Heino’s lives played a key role in developing the identity of Ojai as a place for potters. Married for 50


Otto Heino working at his wheel (2009). much-coveted) “yellow” glaze, regaled visitors with colorful stories about his life, tended the kiln, and worked with students and apprentices till his death in 2009 at the golden age of 94. How could we include every gifted potter and ceramicist who came to live and work in Ojai? Impossible in this space. For now, let’s briefly acknowledge only a few whose presence and influence made and continue to make a difference. Larry Carnes’ studio near Ojai Lumber was for many years a must-stop for pottery lovers. Larry was versed in clay chemistry and its scientific analysis, and had collaborated with Otto Heino. He welcomed students of all levels. After he moved away, his place sold in 2017 and its activities were rekindled as the Firestick Pottery Studio and Gallery.

Potter and sculptor Myra Toth started teaching ceramics at Ventura College in 1976. The influential teacher, now retired and with more time to work on her own art, holds yearly workshops in her Pyramid Studio in Ojai and attracts students from all over the world. Out of the 68 or so current members of OSA (Ojai Studio Artists), six are artists or sculptors who are creating and innovating primarily with clay: Richard Flores, Richard Franklin, Valerie Freeman, Bruce Tomkinson, Sandra Torres, and Wyatt Amend. Frank Massarella, the popular potter and teacher, opened his “Firehouse” studio and school in 1982 on Montgomery Street, where the Ojai Vineyard is now; Frank recently reopened his studio in Oak View. His influence endures in Ojai. Following up on Beatrice Wood’s legacy, a few independent potters in the valley work with luster glazes, e.g.,

Sooz Glazebrook and Nanci Martinez. To make pottery you need a studio. Not every artist can afford to maintain one, so having access to properly equipped studio space with good light is essential. Potters often need to have access to, or rent space in other potters’ studios. A professional studio usually offers space and use of equipment that includes kilns, potters’ wheels, slab rollers, and more. Walls are usually lined with shelves for works in progress at various stages of completion, and dozens of pots and jars filled with chemicals. A spirit of camaraderie develops among potters as they talk shop and collaborate while sharing work spaces, resources, tools and techniques. And the occasional drink.

Robin Nahin, owner of Firestick Pottery Studio, working at the wheel with new student Robin Flowers.

years, the couple produced a significant body of work in their artistic partnership, mostly traditional vessels decorated with delicate glazes of their own.

photo ©2018 Anca Colbert

In 1973, they moved to Ojai after purchasing the McAndrew Road studio of their friend and former student, Beatrice Wood, and established their own studio: The Pottery. Former students, collectors and devotees flocked to their studio year after year. After Vivika’s passing in 1995, Otto continued to work, with help from younger potters and assistants. He developed his world-famous (secret and VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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photo ©2016 Simone Noble

Pottery is the kind of craft that is best learned from teacher to student, from “master” to apprentice. You learn a lot by seeing how others do it. Same goes for glass artists. And cooks! But to become a “chef,” you must spend years chopping the parsley just right, or cooking the rice to the perfect temperature and consistency for sushi. Attention to detail. Focus. Practice. Patience. All skills and traits potters must have in order to become good at their craft. A sense of humor is also much needed on the road to “perfection,” as one must deal with the inevitable failures that are part of the learning experience. Firestick Pottery Studio on Ojai Avenue offers classes, studio spaces and a gallery. In June 2017 Robin Nahin bought Larry Carnes’ house and studio. Robin has been throwing pots at Long Beach City College since 1970. She has been coming to Ojai for 37 years and is now bringing renewed energy into the spacious studio and outdoor areas. Local potters Wyn Matthews and Sean Ponder have taken turns there teaching and tending the five kilns (three electric, two gas) on the premises. The studio has attracted beginners and serious potters, and a couple of established local artists who have expanded their work to include luster glazes (painter and sculptor Valerie Freeman) or paint on ceramic vases (plein air artist Jeff Sojka). A gallery space indoors displays works made on the premises. Another resource for studio space and learning opportunities is The Ojai Pottery and Clay School on Fox Street, established years ago as “a professional studio for adult

students at all levels dedicated to teaching and supporting the creation and promotion of ceramic arts.” A few artists contribute to the recently revived activity in pottery around town. In 2006 Sandra Torres moved with her family from Santa Barbara to Ojai. Having recently joined the Ojai Studio Artists, her studio was open to visitors during the October Studio Tour. What a treat to discover her and her masterful artistry! “The character of my current work resides in the exploration of small but significant variations of shape, size and pattern.” An architect, with an MBA to boot, Sandra first turned to ceramics in 1999 and acquired an international education through apprenticeships and classes in Santa Barbara, Mexico, China, Hungary and Belgium — influences visible in her artistic pursuit. The simplicity of her shapes and exquisite quality of her porcelain works stand out by their technical achievement and delicacy. Eight years ago, Scott Chatenever moved his home and studio from Santa Barbara to Ojai. A dedicated ceramic artist, he came to pottery from a scientific background as an engineer; he is driven to research the materials and the process of working with clay.

Top left: Sandra Torres in her studio, December 2016. Top right: Sandra Torres Sake Set, Slip Cast Porcelain. BottomLeft: Scott Chatenever “Pod” stamped and tooled porcelain. Bottom right: Scott Chatenever demonstrating how he creates lifelike textures in clay. photo © Scott Chatenever

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photo ©2018 Anca Colbert

photo ©Sandra Torres


Scott makes his own tools and marks to use on his pottery and ceramics. With an extensive experience of studying and teaching pottery techniques, he generously shares his deep knowledge and passion for the medium and its history. His work is organic, reflecting a keen attentiveness to the natural world with its range of textures and dimensions, from the roughest (tiny, muddy mushrooms carefully carved out) to the smoothest (huge fish tiles and murals illuminated in lustrous glazes). This consummate craftsman plays masterfully with forms and techniques: “I work obsessively to create new life forms.” Scott Chatenever demonstrates and embodies the obvious fact that pottery is both an art and a science. Wyatt Amend grew up in Ojai surrounded by a world of opportunities to pursue a creative path. The young artist found his own distinct direction. He combines superb technical skills with sculptural innovation. Treating clay like wood, he is “using the ceramic wheel in a reductive way to carve out his pieces.” For him, the glazing process is particularly important. “Although my glaze is all in the details, sometimes the patterns get lost in the molten half of ceramics. A pristine gridded out application of glaze mixed with the high temperature of my firings can lead to a whole new mandala of colors. The exact patterns are as important as the variation of firing, and are not possible without one another.”

golden age of Venetian glass, Wyatt Amend explores his artistic medium in an innovative, adventurous manner.

From bold, modernist sculptural forms to meticulously crafted vessels inspired by the

Marc Millovich has been hand-building pottery exclusively out of micaceous

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clay for 18 years. A California native, he traveled the world. A year ago, he and his family moved from La Madera, New Mexico, to Carpinteria. Two months ago, he rented studio space at Firestick Studio on

Ojai Avenue to do his work and, maybe, teach classes. Making pottery with micaceous clay is a method dating back at least 800 years. The clay contains mica (hence the sparkle), the fire pit must be


photo ©2018 Cindy Pitou Burton

outdoors, and the vessels are good for cooking. They look ancient, simple and spectacular. I believe Marc Millovich is the only potter to practice this technique in this area. Felipe Ortega was his mentor in this craft. “Playing in the mud is a timeless human pastime. I only make cookware, as this is clay I have to dig for myself. For me to use it for anything else would be a shame as it adds richness to all flavors married in it.” Marc’s interest in sustainable living and holistic cooking will no doubt enrich Ojai’s like-minded community. “I am as passionate about my pottery and process as I am about cooking in them.”

would also talk about her excitement of getting up early in the morning to open the kiln and see what came out of the overnight firing. Yes, more cooking. A ritual relationship develops between potters and their kiln. It is one of the utmost importance. What comes out of using your hands to mix clay with water, to shape something out of nothing, to turn the wheel, and to see the result transformed through fire is nothing short of magical. It’s sheer alchemy.

Beatrice Wood often compared her pottery making to cooking. When asked about the recipes for her famed luster glazes, she would reply: “Oh! Well, just a pinch of this and a pinch of that.”

Pottery making is slow, three-dimensional, and tactile. In counterpoint to a fast-moving world and a contemporary culture hooked on two-dimensional, image-based technology and virtual reality, “making” with one’s hands is a form of meditation, a grounding therapy, a creative exercise in slow motion, and a sensual experience. Remember the erotic pottery-making scene in the movie “Ghost”?

Like Otto Heino, Beatrice

The pleasure of touching the

clay is powerful. The pleasure of feeling the texture of the various artifacts, of experiencing the way light is absorbed or reflected on their surfaces is seductive. It’s a form of play for all our senses. Standing in line for tacos at the OSA opening-night party mid-October, the woman next to me introduced herself as having just moved to Ojai from San Diego. That’s how I met Lynn Render and her husband. It turns out she is (you guessed!) a potter who would like to set up a studio here and work again, now that her husband retired. “I’ve known Frank Massarella for many years as my husband, Ron, and I would come to Ojai for me to attend workshops with Vivika and Otto Heino, stopping to visit with Beatrice Wood. We would always stop by and chat with Frank and Dusti at their Firehouse Pottery. Full circle to our story ... Lynn is fascinated with the variety of expression that comes out of people’s hands. “Those of us with more years in the business might have more technique, but what comes from the heart is amazing!” Consider the kind of direct, palpable choice that making pottery brings to a person’s life. A child can quickly learn how to do it. A ceramic artist spends a lifetime refining their skills. In both cases, it’s profoundly satisfying to mold clay to be able to enjoy and to share with others the creation resulting from that experience: a physical, sensual, playful, simple and complex experience.

Above: Wyatt Amend in his studio. Right: Evening pottery firing by Marc Millovich.

Anca Colbert is an art adviser, curator, writer and longtime resident of Ojai. She gratefully acknowledges the courtesy of the various artists and photographers giving her permission to select and use their photographs to illustrate this article. OVG

photo ©2013 Marc Millovich

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FIRESTICK POTTERY & GALLERY Creative Workspace Open to Public Gallery, Workshops, Free Tours Open 10-6 daily• Closed Tuesday 1804 E. Ojai Ave• 805-272-8760

for details: www.firestickpottery.com • Robin Nahin • Owner/Potter 562-688-6600

There’s always someThing new aT The

Museum of Ventura County

Explore the history, present and future of Ventura County and discover what makes us unique. Check out our events and exhibits at venturamuseum.org Museum of Ventura County • 100 East Main St. Ventura, CA 93001 • 805.653.0323 Agriculture Museum • 926 Railroad Ave. Santa Paula, CA 93060 • 805.525.3100

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John Aaron

Architectural Illustration 2-D & 3-D Editorial Art Inquiries: modernarf@gmail.com modernarf.smugmug.com 805.861.8546 Coming in 2019: Painting Boulder: A Coloring Book of the City’s Iconic Architecture


Photo by William Gray Harris

B EATRICE W OOD C ENTER FOR THE ARTS

Exhibitions • Workshops • Performances Open to the Public Friday – Sunday, 11 am – 5 pm 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Road in Upper Ojai

805-646-3381 • www.BeatriceWood.com VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Frameworks of Ojai custom picture framing

AU G U S T

L AU R E L

GALLERY

Hours: Monday ~ Friday 10 - 5 Saturday 11 - 3, or by appointment. (805) 640-3601 236 w. ojai ave, #203, ojai, ca 93023 info@frameworksofojai.com VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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The Rainmaker Shower Custom Design & Installation

We

California Largest Collection of Pottery, Tile, Art, Furniture & Jewelry in Southern California.

OjaiRockstacker.com

805 279-7605

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Early California Antiques 1331 State Street, Santa Barbara CA 93103 (805) 837-8735 www.earlycal.com


Open Enrollment Starting March 2019

noahsarkpreschoolojai.com | 805 646 8745 LICENSE #561702446 & 561709918.

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FEATURED

Artists & Galleries

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WINTER collection

Anca Colbert Art Advisory Services Art adviser, curator, appraiser, writer, and accidental photographer. www.ColorOfLight.com www.ArtsAboutTown.com By appointment anca.colbert@mac.com

Canvas and Paper An exhibition space showing paintings and drawings from the 20th century and earlier periods in thematic and single artist exhibits. canvasandpaper.org 805-798-9301

Human Arts Gallery Folk art, jewelry, glass, art wearables, furniture, sculpture and more. 246 East Ojai Avenue humanartsgallery.com 805-646-1525

Lattitudes Fine Art Gallery Transform you space with fine art photography 401 E. Main St, Ventura, CA 93001 lattitudesfineart.com 805-642-5257

Karen K. Lewis Painter & printmaker; etchings, monoprints, figure drawings, plein air landscapes, still lifes and large scale oil paintings. ojaistudioartists.org 805-646-8877

Dan Schultz Fine Art Gallery & Studio Plein air landscapes, figures and portraits in oil by nationally- acclaimed artist Dan Schultz. 106 N. Signal St., Ojai, CAÂ DanSchultzFineArt.com 805-317-9634

Martha Moran The Ojai Rockstacker Rock stacks, fountains & more for garden or desktop. Studio visits by appointment. martha@ojairockstacker.com 805-279-7605

OVA Arts Your Go-To Place For Gifts 238 E. Ojai Ave. Open daily 10-6 ojaivalleyartists.com 805-646-5682

WU2 Creations Acrylics and watercolors by William & Karen Wu 852 Oak Grove Ct. (by appointment) WU2Creations.com 805-649-531

August Laurel Gallery 307 East Ojai Ave. 805-646-0967 augustlaurel.com

Whitney Hartmann Photography Weddings + Babies + Families www.whitneyhartmann.com (805) 798-2254

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1

Backcountry Tour. Ojai is a wonderful base camp for a variety of adventures into some of California’s most magnificent backcountry. Curious visitors might be surprised by the wealth of natural & cultural features to be found in this vast & mystical region. The self-guided backcountry tour starts in Ojai, rambles north on Highway 33, over Pine Mountain Pass, through Ozena Valley & Cuyama Valley to Cerro Noroeste Road, through the Mount Piños area, & returns on Lockwood Valley Road to Highway 33. Scenic stops, recreation opportunities, side trips & services along this loop are plentiful. The whole trip, with Ojai as base camp, is about 180 miles.

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Bart’s Books. A world-famous outdoor bookstore where you can browse more than 100,000 hardcover & paperback books, with new stock daily. Serving Ojai Valley since 1964. Special search service available. Located at 302 W. Matilija St. (805) 646-3755.

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Twice Sold Tales. Second-handbookstore next to the Ojai Library, 121 E. Ojai Ave., reselling books to benefit Friends of the Ojai Library. Most hardbacks are $2 & paperbacks are 50¢. The selection of books includes author-signed first-editions, new age, mystery, art, music and more. Open every day from noon to 4:45 p.m. (805) 646-4064.

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Camp Comfort. The park is nestled in a valley astride the San Antonio Creek. RV & tent camping are available plus a country hall accommodating up to 340 people & a group barbecue area. 11969 N. Creek Rd., Ojai. (805) 654-3951.

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Circle Drive. Highway 150 to Santa Paula; Highway 126 to Ventura; Highway 101 to Ojai turnoff; Highway 33 back to Ojai. Mountain, valley & ocean views.

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Rotary Community Park – Permanent art installation in the park called “Voices of Ojai,” quotations from historical figures of Ojai’s past etched in stone. Other features include Ted Gall’s “Freedom Chase” horse sculpture, a tile park bench by RTK Studios, and a horse trough dedicated to former Ventura County Supervisor, Tom Clark.

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Cluff Vista Park – A stop at this small park comprised almost entirely of California native plants is a must. Paul Lindhard’s stone monolith sculptures stand sentry, the park also has two beautiful water features.

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Krishnamurti Library and Retreat. The Krishnamurti Library & Krishnamurti Retreat in Ojai are housed where Krishnamurti lived. The library is at 1070 McAndrew Road, (805) 646-4948. The retreat is at 1130 McAndrew Road, (805) 646-4773.

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Krotona Library. A library serving both the public & research scholars. It houses an extensive collection of books on theosophy, comparative religion, philosophy, health & healing & other subjects. The library is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., & Saturdays & Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. Closed Mondays & holidays. The Krotona Library is at 2 Krotona Hill, (805) 646-2653.

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Krotona Quest Bookshop. A unique selection of books on theosophy, metaphysics, psychology, health & healing. The bookstore also offers a large selection on spiritual philosophy, modern science & religions of the world. Special orders are available. Open Wednesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. & Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. Closed Mondays, Tuesdays & holidays. 47 Krotona Hill. Call (805) 646-0873.

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The Ojai Retreat. 160 Besant Road, Meiners Oaks. A 5-acre educational retreat center with 360-degree views, seven minutes from the center of Ojai. The public is welcome to visit the grounds and the three libraries from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, after checking in with the office. 12 guest rooms, most with views. (805) 646-2536.

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Libbey Park. Features Ojai Music Festival, Ojai Tennis Tournament, Mexican Fiesta & other cultural events. Famed for the Libbey Bowl amphitheater. In downtown Ojai next to the post office.

Stopping Points 13

Los Padres National Forest. The nearly 2 million acres of coastal mountain terrain in the Los Padres National Forest is home to thousands of plant & animal species. It offers maps, guide books, campfire permits, wilderness permits & National Forest Adventure Passes. Ojai Ranger Station is located about one-half mile east of downtown at 1190 E. Ojai Ave. Call (805) 6464348 for information.

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Meditation Mount. A public meditation center whose mission is to promote meditation as an act of service to the world. There are daily meditations and monthly Full Moon Community Meditations, The grounds are at the end of Reeves Road. The grounds are temporarily closed since the Thomas Fire. Please contact them for the date of the 2019 reopening. 805-646-5508, www.meditationmount.org

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M.E.S.A. Naturalists will guide you along eight miles of trails through 200-plus acres of oak woodlands, streams, chaparral & meadows. Available to school & community groups by reservation. Call (805) 646-8712.

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The Ojai Foundation. 9739 Ojai-Santa Paula Road, six miles from the center of Ojai. A 40-acre educational retreat center at the foot of the majestic Los Padres mountains. The public is welcome to visit the lovely gardens or simply walk the land from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Weekend programs & educational retreats take place in the fall & spring. Call (805) 646-8343.

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Ojai Valley Museum and Visitors Center. 130 W. Ojai Ave. The only museum in Ojai, preserves & exhibits the art, history & culture of the Ojai Valley with a permanent history gallery & a changing gallery with rotating exhibits Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; & Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. Tours by appointment. (805) 640-1390.

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Ojai Valley Museum and Visitors Center. 130 W. Ojai Ave. The only museum in Ojai, preserves & exhibits the art, history & culture of the Ojai Valley with a permanent history gallery & a changing gallery with rotating exhibits Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; & Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. Tours by appointment. (805) 640-1390. Visitor’s Center can be reached at (805) 640-1390 Ext. 202

Places to go and things to see in the Ojai Valley. Turn the page and locate each place on the map.

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Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce. At 206 N. Signal St. M - F, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (805) 646-8126.

Sarzotti Park. Left on Park Road from Ojai Avenue when heading east. Playground, ball field, recreation center, barbecue pits & horseshoe pits.

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Tennis. Libbey Park, downtown Ojai. Other locations include Matilija Junior High, 703 El Paseo Road in Ojai; Nordhoff High, 1/2 mile north of the “Y” intersection of Highway 150 & Highway 33; Ojai Valley Inn, call 646-5511; Soule Park, off Boardman Road; Ojai Valley Athletic Club (private club), end of Fox Street, call 646-7213.

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Lake Casitas. Created by Casitas Dam, with 100 miles of shoreline with boating, camping, picnicking & fishing. For information about the lake, water park and campgrounds, call (805) 649-2233. VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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& Park Office

Special Events Area

Olympic Site

R d.

Boat & Trailer Storage

Santa Ana Boat Ramp Bate & Tackle

nta Sulphu r M ou

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OVLC Rio Vista Preserve

Map compliments of the Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce & e.D Brooks MAP © 2012

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Old Creek Ranch Winery

Owl Court Group Camping Area Blue Heron Water Adventure Park

MAIN ENTRANCE

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OVLC Ojai Meadows Preserve

Ojai Valley Land Trailhead Conservancy Ventura River Preserve

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OVLC Ventura River Steelhead Preserve

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Ojai Valley News

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Stopping Points

Fun things to do and see in the Ojai Valley. See the previous page for descriptions.

Favorite Hiking Trailheads

A Sulphur Mountain Rd. B Old Baldwin Trail C Riverview Trail D Oso Trail E Cozy Dell Trail F Matilija Canyon, left at Matilija Canyon Rd., to end G Rose Valley Falls H Foothill Trail I Pratt Trail, off N. Signal St. J Shelf Road - N. Signal St. K Shelf Road - Gridley Rd. L Horn Canyon, Thacher School, north end of McAndrew Rd. VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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________

____________

____________

______

4444444444444444444 Coming soon!

4444444444444444444

global fare, locally prepared

_________ 211/215 E Matilija St Ojai, CA 93023

www.rainbowbridgeOJAI.com

Market - 805.646.4017 Deli - 805.646.6623

Dharma & Dog - 805.646.9200 Sage - 805.646.9204

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Cooking in the Aftermath Randy Graham

If you are like me, you eat too much at holiday feasts. So in the days that follow, why not treat your lingering family and guests to savory delights on the lighter side of the caloric spectrum? My breakfast croissant recipe is super tasty and can carry you through to dinner. The French onion soup, which can be made in advance and gently reheated, is light and will put a smile on your face.

Breakfast croissant Easy to make and will bring kudos from family and guests, and might make them forget all about the turkey or brisket they enjoyed the night before. For a complete breakfast, I serve this with a side of country-style fried potatoes and fresh orange juice. Ingredients: 8 tablespoons prepared pesto (divided) 2 medium tomatoes (sliced) Salt and fresh cracked black pepper to taste 2 avocados (peeled, pit removed, sliced thin) 4 ounces fresh baby spinach 6 large eggs 4 large croissants Directions: Carefully cut each croissant in half horizontally. Set the tops aside. Spread one tablespoon pesto on the cut side of each bottom. Layer two slices of tomato on top of the pesto. Sprinkle tomato slices with 56

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salt and pepper to taste. Place one-quarter of the avocado slices on top of the tomatoes. Place one-quarter of the spinach on top of the avocados. Using a large skillet, scramble eggs lightly over medium heat. Layer one-quarter of the eggs on top of the spinach. Repeat until all four sandwiches are ready. Spread one tablespoon of pesto on the cut side of each croissant top. Place on the spinach and press down lightly to make sure the ingredients settle properly (you don’t want them to slide off!).

French onion soup

This is a very satisfying soup. Serve it with or without the French bread and the Gruyère cheese top. The potato peel broth is a separate recipe in itself and is good to make ahead of time for those cold afternoons when you want a tasty homemade soup but don't have the time to do it all at once.

Ingredients: 1 quart clear potato peel broth (see ingredients below) 5 ounces butter 4 large white or yellow onions (sliced thin) 1 teaspoon sugar 2 cups water 1 tablespoon Better than Bouillon Vegetable Base 1 small bay leaf ¼ teaspoon thyme (dried) 2 teaspoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons brandy Salt and pepper to taste 6 slices French bread (¾ inch thick) 8 ounces Gruyère cheese (grated) Directions: Potato Peel Broth: Wash six to seven large brown potatoes and peel them. Peel off strips at least ¼-inch thick. Peel and quarter one large yellow onion. Wash two carrots and one small stalk celery and cut into 2-inch pieces. Put the potato peels, onion, carrots and celery into 1½ quarts water. Add a sprig of parsley and, if you wish, a peeled clove of

garlic. Bring to a boil, cover, and reduce heat. Simmer for at least 1½ hours, or until all of the vegetables are soft. Drain off and retain the liquid broth. You should have approximately five cups of broth. Onion Soup: Melt butter in a large pot over medium-low heat. Add onion slices. Sprinkle with sugar. Cook onion slices for about 15 to 20 minutes or until tender and golden brown. Pour the potato peel broth and the two cups water over the onions. Add the bouillon, bay leaf, thyme, lemon juice and brandy. Season with salt and pepper and simmer uncovered for another 35 to 40 minutes. The liquid will reduce slightly. Just before serving, pour the hot soup into oven-proof soup bowls. Top with slices of French bread and sprinkle with an ample amount of grated cheese. Place bowls under broiler for about two minutes or until the cheese melts. Carefully remove the soup from the oven and serve immediately.


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SEA FRESH SEAFOOD Seafood - Steak - Sushi

Serving Breakfast Daily • Open 8am - 10pm Voted “BEST SEAFOOD” 9 Years in a Row!

533 E. Ojai Ave

• 805-646-7747

nt S

. Shady Ln

E. Ojai Ave.

Soule Park Golf

Brya

E. Ojai Ave.

t.

Park Rd.

HAKANE SUSHI

Course

967 E. OJAI AVE OJAI CA 93023 (ON THE RIGHT BEFORE SOULE PARK GOLF COURSE)

805-640-3070

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Patio Dining • Pet Friendly Patio • Wine & Beer • Variety of Cold Sake • Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials • Vegetarian Menu • Seasonal Hot Soups Available

OPEN 7 DAYS MON.-FRI. LUNCH: 11:30AM-2:30PM DINNER: 5:00PM-9:30PM SATURDAY • SUNDAY 11:30AM-9:30PM


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Randy’s interactive Gluten Free Pizza Class is ready for people to come and create!

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Lavender Inn The Kitchen BY RANDY GRAHAM

What do a 144-year-old red brick schoolhouse and a renowned culinary school have in common? The answer lies in these three words: Ojai’s Lavender Inn. The Lavender Inn touts itself as “more than a historic bed-and-breakfast,” and this is no understatement. She’s often found working behind the scenes, owner Kathy Hartley is a selfless woman of many talents. In addition to overseeing the Lavender Inn, Hartley has been a board member of Interface Children & Family Services for 10 years, although she has worked closely with them for much longer than that. Her passion is Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Prevention — one of the agency’s six core programs. This support provides comprehensive family violence services that aim to prevent, interrupt and end the cycle of violence within family systems. Hartley says this work is important to her and to the county because “Ventura is the No. 1 The old Nordhoff schoolhouse circa 1874 and today, Ojai’s celebrated Lavender Inn.

county in the state for the total number of reported family violence cases.” Hartley and husband, Mark, purchased the Moon’s Nest Inn in 2003 and changed the name to Lavender Inn. Under Hartley’s expert guidance, the Inn has prospered. Over the next five years, Hartley made many improvements, including a complete makeover of the 1,000-squarefoot innkeeper’s quarters off the kitchen, which is now called Provence Cottage. It comfortably accommodates a family of four and is furnished with a kitchenette. French doors in both the living room and the bedroom open to a private backyard. In August 2008, the city of Ojai recognized the original schoolhouse and the Lavender Inn with a plaque designating the Lavender Inn as Ojai Historical Landmark Number 14. Guests rave about the comfortable accommodations, the wine

and cheese hour in the early evening, and the full breakfast each morning; it has become a wedding destination. The Lavender Inn is also home to the Ojai Culinary School, which uses the large, comfortable kitchen to provide cooking classes taught by some of the Ojai Valley’s best private chefs and caterers. The Ojai Culinary School offers a variety of hands-on and demonstration cooking classes from local chefs many of them focusing on fresh food and seasonal dishes. The chefs provide the expertise, the students provide the enthusiasm and everyone gets to eat what they make. Here is a sampling of the public classes taught by Ojai Culinary School chefs: Robin Goldstein is a private chef and local cookbook author. She teaches a variety of classes including “Summer Tomatoes” and “Simple Wine Country Cooking.” In addition to her cookbooks,

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Above: Bianca Rose prepares her gluten-free vegan Superfood Oatmeal Goji.

Robin also markets her own brand of spices. She says, “Variety is the very spice of life, and I love teaching the essence of cooking, and the mixture of spices to arouse the food with subtle flavors.” See her website at privatechefrobin.com for her cookbooks and catered menus. Sandy Smith is a former executive chef who is known for his innovative Mexican cuisine. His Rosarita Beach Cafe was featured on the Food Network and in Bon Appetite and was widely recognized as one of the best restaurants in the re62

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gion. He teaches the class, “Return to Rosarita Beach.” Clarissa Fishman teaches the class “Italy in the Fall.” In her class students enjoy learning about Italian comfort food and are transported to northern Tuscany while doing so. It is no wonder reservations for her classes fill up quickly. April Tucker is a private chef and caterer. Her cooking style is influenced by her Hispanic roots. During the holiday season she teaches the popular “Traditional Tamales Made Easy” class where

students learn to make masa and fillings, and how to fold tamales three different ways using corn husks. Bianca Rose is known locally as the compassionate eating chef. By incorporating more plant-based, organic foods into our diets, she believes we can not only take charge of our own health, but help shape a greener future for generations to come. She teaches “Gluten Free Vegan Baking” and “Vegan Cheese” classes. See her website at: compassionateating. com. Hartley says she thought about


Right: Clarissa Fishman toasts “Saluti” to the participants in her “Speak Cook Eat Italian” class. Clarissa’s Team Building Cooking Class is another one of Ojai Culinary School’s most popular private classes.

upgrading the kitchen while making improvements to the Inn, but decided to keep the charm of the original kitchen. “People feel good cooking there,” she said. “They feel at home. They feel comfortable.” Hartley’s infusion of energy, warmth and compassion toward others just may be the secret ingredients to her successful culinary school, inn and nonprofit endeavors. OVG

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2 Unique Boutique Inns

Ojai

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1103 Maricopa Hwy, Ojai we now offer breakfast for dinner Thursday thru Saturday 5 pm-9 pm. Also that we offer private events venue and catering for all occasions. We offer freshly squeezed orange juice. Serving local, fresh and best

Breakfast & Lunch • 7:00am - 2:30pm Dinner Served Thurs-Sat • (805) 646-5346


Serving Breakfast

MON 3-10 • TUES - Closed • WED -THURS 11:30 -10 FRI 11:30 - 12am • SAT 11:30 -12am • SUN 10-10

Open daily, lunch till late. 646-1700 ojaibevco.com VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Ojai by the E

ver since Homer wrote about the “wine dark sea,” poets and madmen, authors and lovers, politicians and pundits have written about the delicious qualities of the luscious grape. For what is wine, but an exquisite creation that nurtures each of the five senses: the delectable taste, the silky touch of the liquid on the tongue, the fragrant aroma of a deeply aged bouquet, the vision of a glistening liquid jewel and the sound of the glasses chiming as we toast a memorable moment with friends or family. Ojai is now flush with tasting rooms where you can nurture those five senses in small, intimate places, or in wide-open spaces that cater to the wine-loving crowds that visit our enchanting little corner of the Ojai Valley. OLD CREEK RANCH The first you’ll encounter if you’re driving in from Highway 101 is the Old Creek Ranch Winery. Turn right off Highway 33 at Old Creek Road and you’ll arrive at the expansive grounds of the old winery that’s been around since the 1800s, but with a modern makeover from Andrew Holguin, his wife Jane and family. They have literally shaken the foundations of the previous winery, removed or remodeled old structures, built a new tasting room, added an outdoor barbecue and catering area, and battled back against the ravages of nature. “After 20 years and the devastating effect of Pierce’s

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glass

A WINE TOUR OF THE VALLEY by Richard Camp

disease, the ranch finally has vineyards once again,” says Jane. “Two acres of vines are in the ground and over the next year, another eight acres will be planted. Eventually we will have 40 acres of vines at the ranch. Since reopening in April, we continue to improve and expand our outdoor guest areas with two large, shaded grass areas with picnic tables and lawn games, as well as many intimate seat groupings with lounge furniture made with repurposed wood from an old barn on the property.” Several times each month food trucks and live music help foster the lively atmosphere. Old Creek’s new, 1,800-square-foot tasting room is still not ready for prime time, but the old tasting room is back in service to last through the winter season. Wine tastings without appointments can be enjoyed every Friday, Saturday and Sunday beginning at 11 a.m. oldcreekranch.com TOPA MOUNTAIN Keep heading east into town to discover the Topa Mountain Winery, another wide-ranging space big enough to accommodate the out-of-town crowds that flock here and mix with the locals. Owner Larry Guerra has installed a 2,300-square-foot tasting room with two spacious tasting bars. Sip there, or meander out to the two-acre “back yard” where you’ll find picnic areas, a band shell, a bocce court and kids playing tag, while their parents sip their latest taste sensations. This selection could be a 2014 Reserve syrah that captured a 93 point rating from The Wine Enthusiast, a 92 point Reserve chardonnay or a 91 point Reserve pinot noir. These are all made with grapes from Bien Nacido, a cool-climate vineyard on the Central Coast of California, and probably the most recognized vineyard in Santa Barbara County. New plans for the winery include an expansion of

the tasting room and grounds, and an adults-only vineyard patio, which will serve as a private event space for special wine dinners. General manager Jackie Franklin says their new releases “will be focusing on locally sourced fruit including a single varietal grenache from Rich Vineyard; an esoteric varietal called Picpoul, also from Rich Vineyard; as well as many estate wines, including a Tempranillo which we’re especially excited for.” The winery will continue to have live music and food trucks every weekend and is gearing up for some concerts with big name acts. The tasting room is open Thursday through Sunday, 12-7 p.m. topamountainwinery.com MAJESTIC OAK Continuing into town, you’ll reach the two tasting rooms of Majestic Oak and Casa Barranca, which are the polar opposites of the large playing fields at


Old Creek Ranch and Topa Mountain. Majestic Oak is nestled down a flight of stairs off Ojai Avenue between Libbey Park and Ojai Pizza, where wine tasters descend into a small outdoor patio to sip and chat in cozy comfort. Even cozier is the intimate tasting room itself, where you’ll find a variety of wines that are very easy to like. On weekends there is live music on the small outdoor area. It is open Monday to Thursday, 12-7 p.m.; Friday to Saturday, 12-8 p.m.; and Sunday, 12-6 p.m. majesticoakvineyard.com CASA BARRANCA WINERY The Casa Barranca Winery is the first certified organic wine in the Central Coast of California. A welcoming, craftsman-like tasting room with fresh flowers invites you to relax and enjoy the wines, which are farmed with grapes made completely pesticide- and herbicide-free. This winter, they are making room for the 2017 vintages, and selling their coveted 2011 Vino Noche at 50% off -- making the

price just $24 per bottle through the end of 2018. You can purchase the Vino Noche in the tasting room or order online (no club discounts available). What is this wine? Casa Barranca President Victoria Adam filled us in, “The Vino Noche - Metodo Portugues signifies that in the crafting of this wine we followed the traditional methods employed in making a port-style wine. The grapes selected for this wine are also traditional varieties grown for this purpose. Smooth and dark, sweet and silky - sip this wine and savor the flavor.” 70

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The tasting room is open Sunday to Thursday, 1-6 p.m.; and Friday to Saturday, 1-7 p.m. casabarranca.com END OF THE ROAD Ojai’s hidden little secret is the End of the Road Winery. Nestled on a small piece of land off Fairview Road, it was started by Bob Levin and his wife, Lisa Solinas. The two of them take pride in growing all their grapes and bottling their wines by hand on the premises, but the summer heat wave hurt their crops tremendously. “We only have one barrel in the works for this year,” says Levin. “We could have bought grapes from elsewhere but our philosophy is to make Ojai wine from Ojai grapes only. We want our wines to tell the

story of Ojai each and every year. This year it will be a short story but I’d like to think it will turn out to be a rich story.” Try their viognier, grenache or syrah and you won’t be disappointed. Tours are by appointment only. endoftheroadwinery.com OJAI VINEYARD Ojai’s flagship winery of more than 35 years, offering 30 different wines, is the Ojai Vineyard. The tasting room, built in 2015 and recently expanded, is a cheerful, inviting space where bottles of wine are displayed in a wine library. General manager Fabien Castel reports that they are “about two-thirds of the way through harvest. It is a very good year after the


fear and damage of the heat spike experienced in early July.” Glowing reviews from Antonio Galloni of Vinous, and William Keller of the Wine Advocate, continue to offer distinctive touches to this wellrespected winery. According to Keller, “The Ojai Vineyard has a wide range of terrific, site-specific wines at prices that are exceedingly fair … the pinots and syrahs are the highlights.” Galloni says, “Readers will find a large number of terrific choices in this lineup of new releases. The entry-level whites are especially fine, as are the 2016 chardonnays. I find the 2016 pinots a bit more variable than the chardonnays, while the 2015 syrahs are consistently brilliant.” The tasting room is open daily from 12-6 p.m.

Thomas Fire, but more than half of their vines survived. “While our harvest will be less this year, we will be able to produce a vintage,” says Chernof. The Alisal winery’s tasting room is located in the Azu Restaurant on Ojai Avenue. All of its wines are available there by the bottle or glass, as well as in tasting flights. Stop in and try the syrah, grenache, malbec, Happy Valley red, Pink Moment rosé, viognier or grenache blanc. The tasting room is open Friday to Sunday, 12-5 p.m. ojaialisal.com BOCCALI VINEYARDS & WINERY Just before you head up the grade into Upper Ojai you will find Boccali Vineyards and Winery’s tasting location at Boccali’s Restaurant. This family-owned and operated vineyards and winery offers a wide selection of award-winning 100% estate wines, including their Valley Oak Viognier, Shangri-La Grenache Blanc, Rustic Red (a zinfandel, cabernet and syrah blend),

ojaivineyard.com OJAI ALISAL Bruce Chernof and Dan Garcia oversee a beautiful spot in Upper Ojai where they grow their own grapes to make their fine wines. Their 2015 grenache won a gold medal at the Lyon International Competition, which is one of the largest blind tasting competitions in France. They’ve also won numerous medals from the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition. Chernoff says that Alisal’s 2016 reds are the best they’ve ever made, with the addition of Mourvedre for the first time as part of their blends. Their property was completely swept by last year’s

2014 Topa Topa Syrah (winner of a double-gold medal at the San Francisco Wine Competition) and an Old Winery Zinfandel. All their wines are grown, produced and bottled on their property in the upper Ojai Valley; a distinction which allowed them to recently receive their Certified Producer’s Certificate from the State Department of Agriculture. Tastings are on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. in their casual outdoor setting. boccalivineyards.com VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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POINT DE CHENE Another real find for wine lovers is the Point de Chene (Place of the Oaks) wine shop at 108 N. Signal St., Ste. B in Ojai. Bob Huey’s place is open, breezy and filled with bottles chosen to tempt you with out-of-the-ordinary choices. “There are a lot of producers out there,” Huey said. “And I like to taste

and experiment, and bring new offerings to Ojai.” He estimates that his assemblage is about 40 percent French, 20 percent Californian and 15 percent Italian, with Spanish and Oregonian selections rounding out the final 25 percent. The shop’s large desk is made from a cedar tree that fell in the Arbolada four years ago, and adds to the unique ambience of the room, which is rustic-cummodern. The most exciting news is, at the time of publication, Point de Chene’s new tasting room will be open to sample its many choices from around the world. pointdechene.com The wineries and tasting rooms throughout the valley continue to make Ojai a wine haven for locals and visitors alike, where both casual and refined palates can pamper their five senses with dynamic wines that stand proudly among some of the finest in California. OVG 72

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Thomas In his 32 years fighting wildfires, Capt. Steve Swindle of the Ventura County Fire Department had never seen a fire like the Thomas Fire. The night of Dec. 4, 2017, he was one of the first firefighters to face the wind-driven inferno, which broke out near Thomas Aquinas College, between Ojai and Santa Paula, and became the second-largest wildfire in recorded California history.

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ONE YEAR LATER

Words and pictures by Perry Van Houten

“The wind was howling down-canyon, coming out of the north. It was blowing fire everywhere. It literally was a firestorm. I’ve been on some big fires here, but not like that,” recalled Swindle, a 29-year department veteran. The fire was burning an acre a second. “In a matter of about six hours, that fire moved what it would normally take six or seven days to move,” he said. Minutes after the fire was reported, a second wind-whipped blaze ignited

“Twice in my career I’ve thought, ‘I might not make it out of here tonight.’” near Koenigstein Road and incinerated a large swath of the Upper Ojai Valley. An estimated 50,500 acres burned on the first night. “You can’t fight a fire like that. It’s fruitless. It’s like trying to stand in front of a runaway train and stopping it with your hands,” said Swindle, tasked with evacuating residents and protecting structures in the hills and canyons above Santa Paula. “Twice in my career I’ve thought, ‘I might not make it out of here tonight’. That was one of those times,’” Swindle said.

The son of a VCFD captain, he was working overtime out of Fire Station 20 in Upper Ojai, so he could make extra spending money for the holidays. Preparing for the worst, VCFD and Cal Fire had been beefing up staff due to the expected weather and extreme fire conditions. A whopping 30 VCFD engines were involved in the first response. They were joined by dozens more from Cal Fire, the cities of Ventura and Santa Paula and others, but it wasn’t nearly enough. Hundreds of structures in Ventura went up in flames as the fire raced for the coast. “It was sheer pandemonium,” Swindle said. “The first night, the emphasis was on saving lives.” In Ojai, the power went out around 10 p.m., plunging the valley into ominous darkness. Less than six hours after the fire started, it began moving toward Casitas Springs and Oak View. By 2:30 a.m. Dec. 5, the fire had reached Creek Road. The Ojai Unified School District canceled classes for the day, and at 8:15 a.m., the city of Ojai activated its emergency operations center. At 10 a.m., mandatory evacuation orders were issued for Casitas Springs. At Nordhoff High School, at an evacuation shelter operated by the Red Cross, nearly 600 people stayed overnight in the gym

Fire engines from all over the western U.S. line Maricopa Highway, December 7. VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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or in their vehicles the first two nights of the fire. Among them were Phil and Dana Phillips, whose property on Tree Ranch Road in Upper Ojai was overrun by flames the morning of Dec. 5. Phil is a veteran of several Ojai Valley wildfires, including the Creek Fire in 1979, in which the house he built survived. The couple’s Upper Ojai property contained two modular homes, including their main residence, a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house. When Phil and Dana saw the reddish-or-

The girls’ dormitory on the upper campus of Ojai Valley School was lost in the fire.

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ange glow of the Thomas Fire looming larger in the east, they packed some things and left, parking their vehicle on the shoulder of Highway 150 near Sulphur Mountain Road. The couple slept for about an hour and went back to the house around 5 a.m. Dec. 5 to check their home. “And it was still there, miraculously, so we were going, ‘Wow!’ ” said Phil. But their luck did not hold due to a sudden change in the wind. Although their home was destroyed, the couple’s three pet llamas, fed and watered by a neighbor, survived. So did the barn.

A few miles away, on Ojai’s East End, the flames advanced to the upper campus of Ojai Valley School. The school lost its science-technology and girls’ dormitory buildings in the fire, along with a ceramic studio and maintenance yard. The structures burned around noon Dec. 5, roughly 15 hours after the campus was evacuated — staff, students, horses and all — amid swirling 80-to-90-mph winds blowing baseball-sized embers, according to firefighters.


“I’m surprised anything stood,” one fire captain told OVS head of school Craig Floyd, “so what you have here is a miracle.” The Thomas Fire was a perfect storm of weather, extremely dry fuel and topography. “Everything came together in the wrong way,” Swindle said. Three weeks of east winds, when the norm is three to four days, added to the misery. “The first couple of nights, it was so hot and so smoky and the winds were blowing. We could barely breathe,” he recalled. At approximately 7 p.m. Dec. 6, the fire

burned across the north slope of the valley, forcing mandatory evacuations for the East End north of Grand Avenue. The Thomas Fire had nearly encircled the city. Swindle got his first break about five days into the fire. “I wound up being off after that fire for four or five months, because it just messed my lungs up,” he said. Smoke and ash from the fire caused hazardous air quality for several days and prompted people to don breathing masks wherever they went. The city of Ojai temporarily prohibited the use of leaf blowers to reduce the amount of airborne ash.

Shortly after the fire erupted, animals started showing up at the Humane Society of Ventura County on Bryant Street in Ojai. “It was pretty chaotic,” said Greg Cooper, HSVC director of community outreach. “People were coming and going, dropping off their animals, asking if they could help or leaving donations. We never turned people away.” During the fire and subsequent mudslides, the facility sheltered 312 rescued or lost animals. “Every space, nook and cranny inside the building was full of animals,” Cooper said. Along with dogs and cats,

A few of the more than 300 animals sheltered at the Humane Society of Ventura County in Ojai.

Smoke billows from the Sulphur Mountain area the second day of the Thomas Fire. VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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the shelter also took in snakes and birds.

Outside, in the corrals, were more than 80 head of livestock, including pigs, goats, alpacas, mules, horses and mini-horses. “It was quite a menagerie,” Cooper recalled, “and with it right around Christmastime, somebody suggested that if we had a camel we could actually have a Nativity scene.”

Luckily, the shelter held a volunteer event in October to organize dozens of temporary crates and kennels. “They came in handy. We went through all of them,” said Cooper. Much of the staff stayed on-site 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for two or three weeks, Cooper said, “and that doesn’t even include the volunteers. We had people coming out of nowhere, in the middle of the night. It was a very magical time for us. We gelled in a way I’ve never seen before.” A stray horse brought in from Santa Paula provided one of the most emotional

Water-dropping helicopters battle flames on Ojai’s East End, December 9.

stories to come from the disaster, Cooper said. The 25-year-old animal was severely emaciated and caked with mud and ash. His owners never came forward to claim him.

Named for the fire, “Tommy” was brought back to health over the course of four months and adopted by Anne Scioscia, wife of former Los Angeles Dodgers catcher and Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia. By 4 a.m. Dec. 7, the fire had begun moving away from the city, into the National Forest and then into Santa Barbara County, and the immediate threat to Ojai was over. The city shut down the EOC that night.

On Dec. 9, the Red Cross shelter at the high school started transitioning residents to alternate locations. OUSD schools reopened Jan. 3, 2018. Twenty-seven students lost their homes in the fire. No structures within the city of Ojai burned, but Upper Ojai lost about a quarter of its homes. Fire officials declared the Thomas Fire out on Jan. 12, after scorching approximately 281,893 acres.

Upper Ojai residents Phil and Dana Phillips wait out the fire at the Red Cross shelter at Nordhoff High School, December 6.

Miraculously, only two deaths were reported — a Santa Paula woman trying to flee the fire, and a Cal Fire engineer battling the blaze outside of Fillmore. “It could have been so much worse,” said Swindle.

At the height of the fire, there were more than 8,000 firefighters from all over the western United States battling the blaze. During breaks, some of them caught a few relaxing moments at the beach and posted photos for folks back home. “I saw quite a few guys who went into surf shops, rented surfboards and wet suits, and went surfing,” Swindle said. It was there, at the beach, that a woman who had lost her home in the fire approached Swindle, grabbed him and started sobbing. “I held her and thought, this is why I’ve been doing this job for so long. We are appreciated, and we always know that,” he said.

Swindle said the outpouring from the community was overwhelming. “It’ll stick with me for the rest of my life. I got to


see the true essence of our community.”

Ojai’s chief of police said he was thrilled to the see the community’s resilience. “When a disaster strikes, I think it really brings out the best in everybody. The Ojai Valley really came together,” said Capt. James Fryoff.

In Upper Ojai, Phil and Dana Phillips are in the process of rebuilding. “Things are coming together nicely,” Phil said. “Life’s not so bad.” That, despite the gargantuan task of dealing with the water, septic, seismic and construction issues that needed to be resolved in order to get a building permit, he said. Neighbors have been fighting through their third and fourth rounds of plan-check. Phil said it’s fortunate he retired 10 years ago. “This is a full-time job now, since the fire. I’m here on the property doing

something, or down in Ventura, working with the county.” The Phillips are hoping to move in by June 2019.

Their recovery was aided, Phil said, by a relief effort for fire victims, started by Upper Ojai resident Trevor Quirk. “Trevor made this a community,” he said. Quirk and neighbor Justin Homze fought the fire together and held a pancake breakfast for the community, which turned into a relief effort for fire victims, Upper Ojai Relief. They and many others spent weeks assisting community members in need — from sharing in-kind donations of food and supplies to cutting fire line to assisting neighbors in need of shelter. Quirk, a lawyer by trade, said there was no master plan. “This thing was just developing, like a snowball, and we very quickly realized that we weren’t going to be able to stop it. We were just trying to contain it, kind of like the fire,” he said.

The Stagecoach Station General Store’s parking lot, 12679 Ojai-Santa Paula Road, served as headquarters for the relief effort, which raised more than $100,000 for fire victims during those first few weeks. “People still need help,” Quirk said, so Upper Ojai Relief is not going away anytime soon. “It’ll always exist. It’s transformed into a community hub.” Quirk said people kept telling him this was the way Ojai used to be — a tight community with neighbors helping neighbors. “It was kind of the impetus to me thinking, we don’t have to end this, and Ojai can still be like this. We just have to build it. If you keep the positive energy going, it’s contagious.”

But Quirk wonders if the fire has, at least temporarily, changed the character of the Ojai Valley, a character it got from its “nontraditional” people — artists, musicians; not working 8-to-5 jobs and not living in traditional homes. Many who were burned out of their rented guest rooms and granny flats cannot afford to return.

County geologist Jim O’Tousa points out an area of Matilija Canyon where the post-fire debris flows were likely once winter rains arrived.

“The fire has chased these people away,” Quirk said. “Ojai is unique because of the people that occupy it, and when you have a fire that wiped out a certain element of that, it changes things. It changes the feeling and the fabric of it. We’ll see what it becomes.” OVG

“From The Fire,” a new book about the Thomas Fire, draws on the experiences of the Ojai community, with hundreds of photographs, 40 poems and reflections, and nearly 50 interviews. The 200-page, full-color book, published in November, is the work of authors Elizabeth Rose and Deva Temple. “It’s a human story,” Temple said. “It’s a story of love and loss, and I think it touches on something really profound and deeply personal for all of us. I really wanted to showcase what a community can do when people come together.” The book features interviews with fire and law enforcement personnel, local nonprofits, businesses and schools, people who lost their homes, saved their homes, evacuated or stayed behind. “These are intense,” said Rose. “These stories are really quite powerful.” The Ojai Valley Museum, which considers the interviews archival documents, planned its current exhibit, “Trial by Fire,” around the book. The exhibit is about the last four fires in Ojai. The book, available in the museum bookstore and online, is priced $28.95 for softcover and $100 for a limited edition hardcover. All net proceeds from book sales are being donated to the Greater Goods Relief Fund. For more information, visit www.fromthefirebook.com VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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A

break in the storm and the glitter of snow above the Ojai Valley became a call to action one March morning, and, in need of some real adventure, I decided on a hike to the Topatopa Bluffs. Seven to eight hours of walking, roughly 14 miles round trip, much of it along a flowing creek and beneath dripping oaks, seemed like a worthy trek. At 8:30 a.m., I park along Highway 150 near Summit School, lock the car, don backpack (stuffed with four energy bars, a peanut butter sandwich, 100 ounces of water, and

my big raincoat) and walk up paved Sisar Road to the trailhead. I hike in full sun, beneath blue sky, the storm having blown through, or so it appears. The tread underfoot is wet but not muddy. The road crosses the creek twice within the first mile, a moderate climb through a green world which includes fresh stands of poison oak on both sides of the trail, large water droplets on nearly every leaf. Beneath a canopy of oaks and sycamores, I march on. I can see the snow-covered cliffs of Topatopa up ahead.

Two miles up I briefly leave the trail at a sharp left-hand turn, and continue a short distance along the creek. Moments later I’m surprised by a splash of water and a sudden flapping of wings. To my astonishment, two mallard ducks take flight up-creek to a pool beneath a small waterfall. Common on ponds and marshes, the ducks, a male and female, seem out of place on the rocky creek.

Back on the road, which switchbacks out of the trees and up the canyon, the Topatopas to the north come into view once more, now partially

Winter Outdoors

A Hike to the Snow Words and photos by Perry Van Houten

obscured by clouds. The sun, too, is now ducking behind the clouds, and the wind picks up. Just past a locked gate three miles up, the White Ledge-Red Reef Trail branches from the main road, my route to the ridge. Rain begins to fall, as does the temperature, so I stop to put on my raincoat. It’s a wet and glorious climb to White Ledge Camp, out of the trees, and into high, windy country. At 5,000-feet elevation, I’m getting a fine view of the storm coming in, dark gray clouds scudding across the glass-like Santa Barbara Channel.

I encounter patches of snow here and there as the trail meets the ridge road, about four hours from the start. I turn east toward the Topatopas, their 90

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crumbling layers almost completely hidden in the mist. Just up the road a piece is Elder Camp, its single picnic table coated with an inch or two of new snow. At last I arrive at the Topatopa Bluffs Trail.

Less than a mile to go, another 1,000 vertical feet left to climb. Pellets of snow (“graupel,” as I later learned) start to fall as I begin the difficult

switchback trudge up the snowcovered trail. A steady pelting soon becomes a blizzard, and I hear the boom of thunder. A hundred yards from the summit, with visibility near zero and feet fighting for traction, I decide to give up, for safety’s sake. Live to hike another day. Footsore, I start down the mountain, thinking of the drama I’ve been enjoying — from sun to storm in less than six hours. But there’s one more act to come. On the return trip, graupel turns to rain just below the ridge and, at home, I’m treated to a spectacular double rainbow, stretching from one side of the Ojai Valley to the other.

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Ojai based portrait photographer and filmmaker Marc Alt shines the spotlight on the old Californio Vaquero way of life and captures the romance of the American West with his latest photographic project. Alt, who grew up in Hawaii on a small ranch with his father, always had horses in his blood.

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Alt shares, “When I moved to Ojai seven years ago from the East Coast I wanted to get back into riding and learn about the old style of Western Horsemanship.”

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Determined to follow the The Early Californio style of riding and roping, in which the horse is trained slowly - giving it a solid foundation, Alt  turned to local Montecito-based horse trainer Bruce Sandifer (Sandifer runs the Californio Bridlehorse Association). Sandifer believes that using methods of balance and timing with minimal input from the rider make a truly great well rounded horse.

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Using his camera to document more closely the things that he was learning Alt explains, “I started shooting training sessions, events and tracking the progress of the traditional way of building a horse from start to finish.” These photographs took on a life of their own and his passion project was ignited. Over time Alt’s photographs have become synonymous with his own dynamic visual style as he traveled across the Western states following the main players who ride and train in the traditional Vaquero way.

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Alt attributes his photographic obsession to his interest in the history and traditions of this “Old Way” of riding. Much of this tradition started in Santa Barbara and the Central Valley area when the missions ran large cattle operations. The Spanish vaqueros brought their horsemanship and stockman-ship to the U.S in the 1800s. Alt expands,

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“A lot of it got lost, and people just raised horses without thinking too much about it, but now more attention is being paid to this tradition.” He continues, “ I love to tell stories about these incredible cow horses and the life and people that surround them. It’s the thing that I love most to shoot.”

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More of Alt’s work is at: www.marcalt.com and on Instagram: @marcaltphoto

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Returning to Tea Time by Shivani Jane

A

s the days grow shorter and the crisp presence of the season is accentuated in the afternoon light, a quiet comfort fills our valley, creating the perfect ambience for tea and good company. Cool winter weather and seasonal gatherings naturally bring us together. The season offers an invitation to slow down and take time to share meaningful conversation over a soothing warm cup of steeped herbs and honey, or exotic imported leaves with spices and milk. For centuries, this very tradition of afternoon tea has created a relational ritual for restoring our rhythms with nature and each other. But, in our fast-paced, forwardmoving society, has anyone noticed how the custom of tea has been pushed aside? The world’s most popular drink is becoming hidden in an obscure process of Kombucha brewing, which is carefully-fed steeped tea and sugar. Tea traditions once prevalent in the chambers of emperors and queens, and routine among common folk, have been ground out by the buzzing coffee consumption of our driven lifestyles. I’m not slamming the character of coffee or any of the talented baristas in our fine city. They create artfully crafted beverages made from the finest fair-trade, organic beans. There is no doubt that the popularity of the coffee and kombucha culture holds power. But maybe it’s time to redeem the status of tea-time, and bring forth the subtle feeling of presence and pleasure that a fine cup of leaves can offer. For thousands of years, medicinal teas and decoctions have been used.

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Fermented leaves sourced from the tea plant Camellia Sinensis have been consumed for many reasons. China is deemed the country and origin of the tea culture, and is the source of some of the finest teas that were once used as a form of currency and trade. The medicinal usage of herbs dates back to the written records of Dioscardies Greek physician and pharmacologist, who discovered 600 medicinal plants, used for preparation of infusions. The beneficial properties of the traditional tea plant and herbal infusions have been recognized in every culture and used in a remarkable and unusual manner. In addition, plant extracts are often used to balance and support the body, and to open the mind and heart for spiritual insights. The traditional art and culture around tea has been esteemed for many centuries, and is still revered through ritual ceremonies in Japan and China. It is also upheld every afternoon through the institution of British tea time. With its irresistible blend of aromatic spices, black tea, steamed milk and sugar; India’s version of chai has managed to sustain a solid presence amidst the coffee craze, and continues to grow in popularity. In the world of tea, the plant Camellia Sinensis provides the leaves for deriving white, green, oolong and black tea. All other infusions made of herbs, spices or other plant matter are commonly referred to as tisanes. The cornucopia of plants used for tea and tisanes are sourced from every corner of the world, from flower to root. This allows for the inclusion of every taste and value imaginable. Consider the experiential elements of tea time: from the beneficial act of slowing down, to the awakening

of a full sensory experience. From the sound of the kettle to the scent of the fragrant steam rising to meet you; the smooth cup radiating warmth is held in your hands and raised to your mouth, releasing nature’s incredible spectrum of flavors. It’s worth mentioning that this habit can offer numerous health benefits that include antioxidant properties and polyphenols, which are abundant in green teas. If caffeinated tea beverages are not your thing, there are a variety of herbal, fruit and root infusions offering a wide range of nutritional qualities and flavors.

Tea time can be a way to share the season’s traditions, meet a friend, create new ritual, revive your senses or simply appreciate life’s essential pleasures. Ojai happens to be the original home of Zhena, the gypsy, who came through and uplifted the modern-day tea scene with her creative fair-trade tea blends. Drink in the delightful tradition of Ojai Valley and celebrate the day with a warm vibrant cup of tea. All you need is freshly boiled water, your favorite blend and a cup filled to the brim. An even better way to enjoy this beverage is with a traditional teapot, two china cups and a friend. Breathe, sip and enjoy. Ahhhh!


“Drink your tea slowly and reverently, as if it is the axis on which the earth revolves— slowly, evenly, without rushing toward the future.” THICH NAHT HANH

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80

Ojai Art Center at By Kathleen Kaiser a mysterious stranger who may or may not be a murderer, a cranky old matriarch and her poetry-loving niece who flirts with danger, and the stranger! It’s a suspenseful ride, and I’m confident that the remainder of the season will be just as thrilling.”

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n 1939, the Ojai Art Center first opened its doors. Eighty years later, the Center is now the longest continuously operating art center in California. When it opened, the small theater inside presented its first season bringing popular productions to Ojai. Celebrating the 80th anniversary, the Ojai Art Center Theater’s artistic director, Richard Camp, reached back in time and will present as the first play for 2019, “Night Must Fall.” “I went to the Ojai Valley Museum and looked through the archives,” said Camp. “I discovered that ‘Night Must Fall’ opened the theater. Reviving the first play ever done at the theater is a great way to connect our history over the years and celebrate its longevity. The play is an Agatha Christie-type murder mystery set in an old manor house, with

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By the season opening February 15, the theater will have received a complete makeover, with new seats, sound and light booth, and additional features to improve the theater-going experience. A celebration is planned in January introducing the refurbished theater to the public, including the many engraved nameplates from those who sponsored a chair. As of press time, 100 seats had been secured. “The fundraising for new chairs exceeded our expectations,” said Herb Hemming, OACT theater board treasurer and theater manager. “The generosity of the Ojai community is outstanding. We are now able to update other elements in the theater so that future productions will have state-of-the-art technical abilities.” Season tickets are a great holiday gift and a wonderful way to see all of the productions while saving money. Every season

The theater celebrates its 80th anniversary with an outstanding 2019 season. ticket purchase is entered into a drawing for either a portrait in oil by renowned Ojai artist Duane Eells, or dinner for two at the Ojai Valley Inn. Season tickets are on sale now at OjaiACT.org. “Our 2018 season was one of the best in the theater’s history,” said Camp. “I invite everyone to share the excitement of the new one!” Here are the scheduled 2019 productions: NIGHT MUST FALL Runs February 15 – March 10 This was the first play ever produced at the OACT in 1939. Eighty years later, it’s being revived to celebrate the theater’s eight decades of drama and musicals. This “Agatha Christie-type” whodunit sports a mysterious intruder, a cranky, meddling matriarch and her niece who dabbles in danger and poetry. This delicious sendup will keep you guessing ‘til the very end! MOLIÈRE’S THE MISER Runs April 5 – April 28 An old pontificating patriarch who


lustfully hordes his money confounds everyone by announcing that he wants to marry his son’s girlfriend. This outrageously funny 17th century classic gets an update that has much to say about today’s world regarding greed, humanity and sexual politics. MAMA MIA! Runs June 14 – July 14 As the title song goes: “My, my, how can I resist ya?” Jam -packed with energy and sheer fun, this singing and dancing tribute brings to life the timeless songs of the worldwide phenomenon known as ABBA! You won’t be able to sit still and may find yourself singing along… strongly encouraged! BLESS YOUR HEART Runs September 6 – September 29 A thoughtful yet hilarious look at a teacher of evolutionary biology who returns to his Carolina home to stop his 17-yearold brother from marrying the preacher’s daughter. When he clashes with his evangelical mom and his 11-times-married aunt with an Elvis fetish, the story will leave you laughing, thinking, and “all shook up!” SEUSSICAL, THE MUSICAL! Runs November 22 – December 15 From the beloved Dr. Seuss, this wonderful holiday musical lovingly brings to life some of his favorite characters including Horton the Elephant, The Cat in the Hat, Gertrude McFuzz, Lazy Mayzie and a little boy with a big imagination, Jojo. Adults and kids alike will be thrilled and filled with laughter and holiday spirit. To learn more or purchase tickets, visit OjaiACT.org. VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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The Ojai Art Center Theater Celebrating 80 years of quality entertainment in the Ojai Valley

TWO OUTSTANDING INCENTIVE GIFTS!

Each season ticket purchased will be entered into a drawing opening night for two incredible and very Ojai-centric gifts—a portrait in oil by renowned artist Duane Eells, or dinner for two at the exquisite Ojai Valley Inn. Each ticket will receive an entry. Consider purchasing season tickets as holiday gifts so you are entered again and again.

Three plays and two musicals in our newly refurbished theater. What better way to see and enjoy live theater than as a season ticket holder. Buy your season tickets and take a chance on one of two outstanding incentive gifts. Be part of this year-long tribute to great theater.

Season tickets now available online at OjaiACT.org January 25

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SERVING OUR COMMUNITY SINCE 1891

OJAI VALLEY NEWS

805-646-1476 CIRCULATION@OJAIVALLEYNEWS.COM


The Happy Valley Cultural Center Presents

Chamber On The Mountain Narek Arutyunian

Zlatomir Fung

Clarinetist

Cellist

Sunday January 27, 2019 3:00 pm

Sunday March 3, 2019 3:00 pm

Photo: Matt Dine

Photo: Christian Steiner

An extraordinary musical experience in a setting of extraordinary beauty

General Admission $25

Purchase advance reservations at www.ChamberOnTheMountain.com Performances take place at Logan House (adjacent to the Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts)

1/2 page Visitors Guide, Winter 2018 Issue

Chamber On The Mountain | 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd. (in Upper Ojai) | Ojai, CA 93023 | (805) 646-9951

Krotona Institute of Theosophy An international center dedicated to understanding, harmony, and peace among all peoples, comparative studies in religion, philosophy and science, altruism and the ideals of a spiritual life. Library & Research Center 2 Krotona St. Ojai CA 93023

Synchronicity: Mysterious Connecting Principle of Life & its Meaning Stephan Hoeller, Jan 18 - 20 Weekend The Voice of the Silence: Way of Self-Discovery, TS Members Intensive Pablo Sender with B. Bland, D. Bruce, R. Ellwood, M. Parisen, N. Samarel, Jan 25 - Feb 1 Week The Mahatma Letters: Questions of Good and Evil, God, & Matters of Life & Death, Nelda Samarel, Feb 5 – 8 Four Mornings Reflections on the Immanence of God Peggy Heubel, Feb 12 – 15 Four Mornings Light & Music from the Inner Planes: Clairvoyance of Geoffrey Hodson Robert and Richard Ellwood, Feb 15 – 17 Weekend Buddha-Dharma: The Path to Liberation John Cianciosi, Feb 19 – 22 Four Mornings

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The Journey of Transformation Ravi Ravindra, Mar 19 – 22, 26 – 29 Weekday Mornings

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From Siddhartha Gautama to Buddha Priscilla Murray, Ravi Ravindra, Mar 29 – 30, Friday Eve & Saturday

info@krotonainstitute.org, www.krotonainstitute.org, 805 646-1139, 805 646-2653

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Calendar DECEMBER 2018 - MARCH 2019

December “Cinderella” Through Dec. 16 Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiact.org Bring the family to this English pantomime full of holiday laughter and song. Agora Foundation Dec. 20, Noon to 1 p.m. Ojai Library, 111 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai (805) 231-5974 www.theagorafoundation.org This free Community Seminar Series on “The Foundations of Our Republic” will cover “The Constitution: The Amendments, Part IV” in this discussion. Ojai Concert Series Dec. 20, 7 p.m. Ojai Valley Woman’s Club, 441 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai (805) 665-8852 www.ojaiconcertseries.com The popular “Irish Christmas in America” show will take the stage for its 14th season in a family-friendly performance of top Irish music, song and dance, rich in history. “The Belle of Amherst” Dec. 21 through Dec. 30 Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiact.org A one-woman show about poet Emily Dickinson, starring Anna Kotula, directed by Steve Grumette. California Naturalist Certification Class Through Dec. 31 Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, 370 W. Baldwin Road, Building A4 (805) 649-6852 www.ovlc.org Registrations will be taken Dec. 1 through Dec. 31 for the California Naturalist Certification class to be held Feb. 1 through March 9 at OVLC.

January Art Exhibit Through Jan. 3 Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117

Photo by Michael Lamont

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LEFT: Violinist Yue Deng


www.ojaiartcenter.org The holiday group exhibit, “A Feast for the Eyes,” will be on display in the Main Gallery through Jan. 3. Chamber Music Concert Jan. 6, 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 640-8327 www.ojaiartcenter.org Yue Deng, violinist, and Virginia Kron, cellist, will perform in a concert of classical music. “Grizzlies” Jan. 12, 10 a.m. to noon Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, 370 W. Baldwin Road, Building A4 (805) 649-6852 www.ovlc.org “All About Ojai: Grizzlies — Past, Present and Future” will be led by Peter Alagona, Ph.D., of UCSB. Agora Foundation Jan. 26: Seminar I, 10:30 a.m. to noon; Seminar II, 1 to 3 p.m. Agora Foundation, 417 Bryant Circle, Ojai (805) 231-5974 www.theagorafoundation.org “Structural Anthropology, Part One” by Claude Levi-Strauss will be led by Joline Godfrey and Andy Gilman. Breakfast and lunch are available, as are scholarships for teachers and students. Art Exhibit Through Jan. 27 Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org/ “Trial by Fire: Ojai Ablaze 1917-2017” will be on display through Jan. 27, featuring many photographs from community members.

February Art Exhibit Feb. 1 through Feb. 28 Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org Artwork by Valerie Freeman will be on display in the Main Gallery through Feb. 28. A reception will be held Feb. 23 from 2 to 4 p.m. “Night Must Fall” Feb. 15 through March 10 Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St.

(805) 646-0117 www.ojaiact.org Directed by Richard Camp, this is an Agatha Christie-type murder mystery and a re-staging of the first show ever produced at the Ojai Art Center in 1939, to celebrate the Art Center’s 80th anniversary. “Buzz About Bees” Feb. 16, 1 p.m. Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, 370 W. Baldwin Road, Building A4 (805) 649-6852 www.ovlc.org “All About Ojai: The Buzz About Bees” will be led by Ruben Alarcon, Ph.D., of CSU-Channel Islands. Agora Foundation Feb. 23: Seminar I, 10 a.m. to noon; Seminar II, 1 to 3 p.m. Thomas Aquinas College, 10,000 Ojai Road, Santa Paula (805) 231-5974 www.theagorafoundation.org “The Book of Ecclesiastes” will be led by Paul O’Reilly and Larry Shields. Breakfast and lunch are available, as are scholarships for teachers and students. Art Exhibit Feb. 27 through April 28 Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org/ “Origins,” an exhibit of diverse artwork by more than 60 Ojai Studio Artists, will go on display Feb. 27, opening with a “Third Friday” reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

March Ojai Mardi Gras March 15 or 22, 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. Downtown Ojai (Exact date and location to be determined) (805) 646-7843 www.ojaimardigras.com The 20th annual Ojai Mardi Gras Costume Ball is coming to town with the theme of “Zydeco Zodiac.” Hundreds of revelers are again expected. Get your tickets early before they sell out. “Basic Wildlife Tracking” March 17, 10 a.m. Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, 370 W. Baldwin Road, Building A4 (805) 649-6852 www.ovlc.org “All About Ojai: Basic Wildlife Tracking” will be led by Wyatt Harris and the Ventura Tracking Club.

Chamber Music Concert March 31, 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 640-8327 www.ojaiartcenter.org Pianist Natasha Kislenko will perform in a concert of classical music.

Ongoing Certified Farmers’ Market Every Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Matilija Street city parking lot behind the Arcade (805) 698-5555 Open-air market featuring locally grown produce, plants, musicians and handmade items, including soaps, baskets, beeswax candles and olive oil. Ojai Historical Walking Tour Every Saturday, October through June, 10:30 a.m. Depart from Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org Approximately one-hour tours of historical and cultural attractions in downtown Ojai. First Friday Free First Friday of each month, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org Admission to the museum is free the first Friday of each month. Third Friday in Ojai Third Friday of each month, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org Free admission and something extra every month. Old-Time Fiddlers Second and fourth Sunday, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Oak View Community Center, 18 Valley Road, Oak View (805) 797-6563 www.calfiddlers.com Join the California State Old-Time Fiddlers, District 8, for a fun-filled afternoon of listening or dancing to country, western and bluegrass music. Free admission and parking. Healing in America First Tuesday, 7 to 8:15 p.m. Holistic Healing Center, 107 W. Aliso St., Ojai (805) 640-0211 www.healinginamerica.com VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Ventura House of Smokes

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VENTURA

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NearbyOJAI Those looking for a casual sit-down experience should check out Anacapa Brewing Company, Capriccio, The Blue Agave and Rice by Mama.

VENTURA DOWNTOWN

Downtown Ventura offers a unique blend of a beach-town feel, with quality restaurants and nightlife as well.

For a slightly more upscale dining experience try Lure Fish House, Rumfish y Vino, Barrel 33 and Aloha Steakhouse. After sampling some of the local eateries, check out the smattering of bars and breweries located right in the

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downtown area. No two bars and breweries are quite the same, so everyone can find a distinctive spot to enjoy.Ventura Coast Brewing Company is one of the top local craft breweries in the area, and is located in downtown. Their Happy Hour: Sun-Thur 4-7pm Fri-Sat 4-6pm is the most bustling part of the downtown. It is lined with local shops, restaurants, bars, breweries, a movie theater and more. The beauty of the downtown as a whole is it is compacted, so everything is within walking distance of no more than a few blocks.The local eateries offer a wide range of both types of food, and price ranges. Some of the favorite spots for a quick bite include Snapper Jack’s Taco Shack, Pizza Man Dan’s, Beach House Tacos and Spencer Mackenzie’s Fish Company.

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menu has a wide selection of different styles of beer. Food trucks are often parked adjacent to the brewery, particularity on the weekends. Fluid State Beer Garden does not brew its own beer, but brings in many rotating craft beers from all over the West

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VENTURA HARBOR VILLAGE

Located near downtown Ventura, Ventura Harbor Village is the place to be for fun by the sea. The harbor offers ferries to the five islands that comprise Channel Islands National Park. The national park offers hiking, diving and more. Also, many different kinds of vessels can be rented, including paddleboards. Whale watching, sportfishing

Mermaid Gallery Beach Art by Tina O’Brien

Ventura Harbor Village Open Daily 11-6 • (805) 746-2566 www.tinaobrienfineart.com Coast, and has a solid happy hour food selection. The downtown bar scene is highlighted by a small but eclectic mix of places. On Main Street one will find The Saloon, Limón y Sal, VenTiki Lounge and Dargan’s Irish Pub.

and harbor cruises round out the offerings of sea exploration all found at the harbor at Island Packers Cruises. The Harbor Village has a variety of year round events, dining, and arcade, and shopping. The Ventura Harbor Village is a must-visit for any ocean lover. VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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With four beaches around the harbor, there is one for every kind of ocean activity. Hobie Beach offers a spot to launch kayaks, paddleboards and other similar craft. Hollywood Beach is a great recreation spot with fantastic views of the Channel Islands. Silver Strand Beach boasts fantastic surf spots, and Kiddie Beach Park is the only swimming-friendly beach at the harbor. Bringing Greece to Ventura Bringing BringingGreece Greeceto toVentura Ventura

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CHANNEL ISLANDS HARBOR

Situated halfway between Ventura and Port Hueneme, Channel Islands Harbor is a bustling area with beaches, island access, restaurants, hotels and more beachfront fun. The harbor offers rentals of kayaks and Wheel Fun cycles. Channel Islands Harbor is also another access point to the Channel Islands National Park, which offers a National Marine Santuary you can dive down and explore. The Channel Islands Maritime Museum is also located at the harbor, with an ever-evolving selection of exhibits. Every Sunday there is a Farmer’s Market next to the Marine Emporium Landing shopping center. 128

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CAMARILLO

Old Town Camarillo offers a distinctly Camarillan experience only found in one place. Though it is a small area, Old Town Camarillo has a handful of restaurants, and a couple of wine bars. In addition to its collection of eateries, Old Town Camarillo offers spas, salons and centers for the arts.


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Among other events, there is a recurring farmers market in Old Town Camarillo every Saturday from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. rain or shine. The market has been running since March 2, 1991, and donates three-and-a-half percent of its weekly proceeds to nonprofits Camarillo Hospice and the Pleasant Valley Hospital Auxiliary. If you are looking for an old town that also boasts modern comforts Camarillo is it.

Salads - Pastas - Sandwiches Beer & Wine Dine In & To Go!

Carpinteria City Beach is located at the end of one of the main streets, Linden Avenue, and is known as the “World’s Safest Beach.” It is such a great swimming beach because it has small surf, and its gradual incline produces little to no rip currents. It is full of areas for picnicking, volleyball, rentals and barbecues.

CARPINTERIA

Carpinteria is known as one of the last great unspoiled small beach towns on the Pacific Coast, and it certainly lives up to that billing. It is a scenic laid-back town with a mild climate, situated between foothills and the Pacific Ocean.

Carpinteria State Park Beach is also a great beach to explore, with tide pools to view along the miles-long stretch of sand. Seals, dolphins and even the occasional gray whale can be seen from shore.

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Spot is a relaxed burger and milkshake shack which welcomes sandy beachgoers after a day in the sun and surf. Island Brewing Company features distinctive handcrafted beers made from the finest ingredients. Carpinteria is the place to be for a small beach town vibe.

Santa Claus Lane is a spot for swimming, Boogie boarding and beginner surfers. It is popular with the locals, and also offers surf lessons. Rincon Point is one of the premier surf spots in the area, and is recognized as such all over the world. Linden Avenue hosts a farmers market every Thursday. On the first Friday of each month, it has Carpinteria First Fridays. This event offers sidewalk sales, refreshments, live music and fun for the kids too. The Carpinteria Salt Marsh Nature park on the north end of the city is a unique spot. It is home to a variety of rare and endangered plants and birds. They offer free do-

SANTA BARBARA Santa Barbara is trademarked as “The American Riviera,” and it is known as such because of the Mediterranean-style weather, and for its hillsides flowing down into the sparkling Pacific Ocean.

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It is famous for its Old Spanish architecture, which was given to the city in the form of Old Mission Santa Barbara and what is now the County Courthouse. cent-led tours every Saturday at 10 a.m. The Carpinteria Harbor Seal Preserve is home for almost 100 adult seals who give birth to their cubs on the shoreline. Linden Avenue is home to Carp’s best dining spots as well. Corktree Cellars offers a wine bar and bistro, as well as lunch and dinner. Gianfranco’s Trattoria is the primary Italian restaurant on the street, and Sly’s is the go-to for seafood, steaks and cocktails. 130

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Stearns Wharf in the Waterfront District is one of Santa Barbara’s most well-known landmarks. It is California’s oldest working wharf, and has a popular boardwalk. Unique clothing and souvenir shops can be found on the premises, as well as three full-service restaurants. On the other side of the harbor, the Santa Barbara Channel is a great spot for paddleboarding and kayaking. Downtown Santa Barbara has a variety of both namebrand and boutique stores, as well as many local restaurants and cafes. One of California’s oldest outdoor arcades, Paseo de la Guerra, can be found downtown.


SANTA YNEZ

The famed Presidio neighborhood is is the middle of downtown, and where Santa Barbara began. It offers a docent tour through the Presidio where one can gain knowledge of how the city’s founders lived. The Santa Barbara Historical Museum is another spot in the Presidio area where relics and art pieces from Santa Barbara’s history are on rotation every few months.

Santa Ynez describes itself as a sophisticated cowboy town, and it may feel like you’re flashed back in time to the Wild West in this town. The streets are lined with 1800s-style building facades holding shops, saloons and horses hitched to posts. But many restaurants can be found serving more modern fare, from fast food to sit-down to fine dining. Modern shops and galleries line the streets, nestled inside the historic-looking facades.

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Santa Barbara’s fashionable ‘Funk Zone’ is has wealth of small galleries, artist studios, wine bars and restaurants. Stop by and visit the little studios and admire the work of some of Southern California’s cutting edge artists.

The Santa Ynez Valley Historical Society Museum and Parks-Janeway Carriage House explore Old West heritage. The town has a variety of events year round, and also offers biking tours and a bevy of other trails for cyclists.

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Nordhoff water polo head coach and teacher

Jermaine Britton By Austin Widger


N

ordhoff water polo head coach and teacher Jermaine Britton is the epitome of an Ojai native, and the water has called to him for virtually his entire life. But as much as he’s achieved in the aquatics world, he will never utter one boasting word. Britton was born and raised here. He went to Ojai Montessori Preschool, Mira Monte Elementary, Matilija Junior High School and Nordhoff High School. “My mom was a nurse, a delivery nurse here in Ojai,” Britton said. “My grandmother ran the snack bar at Lake Casitas and my grandfather was a (park) ranger out there.” From a young age, Britton had a passion to compete in the water. Part of his drive was inspired by his mother, who also swam for many years. He tells the story of one of his early experiences swimming. “My mom … used to always tell the story of when I got swim lessons at the Ojai Valley Athletic Club,” Britton said. “As the person giving the lessons was instructing, I just went and took a lap. I’ve always … just been a swimmer, and love, love being in the water.” Britton was coached by one of his biggest mentors in life, Rick Goeden, who still coaches at the Athletic Club. After taking lessons as a young boy, Britton swam there as a youth swimmer for a few years. “He was always very quiet as a kid,” Goeden said. “But what I learned later was that he was a fierce competitor. The kids used to call him ‘The Quiet Giant.’” However, Britton had taken a break from swimming for a time before high school. He played football at Nordhoff and also ran track one year. “One of the things I used to tease him about when he got a little bit older, because he was like 6 feet 4 inches when he was in high school...” Goeden said. “We used to have a basketball court right VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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here. Every day before practice he used to go play basketball,” Goeden continued. “And I said, ‘Jermaine, you can’t dunk the basketball. You’re going to have to be a swimmer.’” As a freshman, he had planned to play baseball as his spring sport. The very same day he was cut from the baseball team, he received a call in the evening from one of the Nordhoff coaches at the time, Harry Delatre. Delatre said the team was looking for more swimmers, and wanted Britton to come out for the team. The rest, as they say, is history. “I still say one of the best things to ever happen to me was not making the baseball team,” Britton said. “Not that I wouldn’t have been successful in that, but definitely, my life has been pretty good thanks to aquatics.” “He went on to high school and did really well,” Goeden said. “He had really interesting matches when he was in high school against some people who later turned out to be formidable Olympic swimmers.” He went on to compete at a high level in college and later with United States Masters Swimming, winning a bronze at FINA Worlds one year.

“He’s the person I try to emulate every day, not just as a coach, but probably one of the best human beings I’ve ever met in my entire life,” Britton said. “The impact that my coaches have had on me … I just hope I can do a little bit of the same for my players and swimmers.” Britton says he has formed his own coaching style by taking something, a little part from each of his coaches growing up. To be an effective coach and teacher, Britton tries to be himself, and be real with his players and students alike. He thinks about what he wishes his teachers and coaches at Nordhoff would have told him, and strives to pass his knowledge along to his players. Barrett taught him “it’s much easier to lead by example when the example that you’re leading by is the right one,” Britton said. In return, he wants his players to be dependable. Along with that comes giving one’s best effort every game and practice. “Remember that sports, and what we do, they’re just a game,” Britton said. “Part of that is to have fun, to enjoy what you’re doing. But it’s easier to enjoy what you’re doing when you’ve put the work in.”

“He’s a great coach, he really is,” Goeden said. “When he went on to coach, that’s what I was most proud of him for. He got to see the end result from all his swimming, that he could coach the sport and teach others to do well.”

Along with the athlete aspect of his players, it is crucial to Britton that his players put the student in student-athlete. This comes from his own devotion to being both a student and an athlete. “He got an award for never missing a day of class all four years of high school. He got the personal attendance record,” Goeden said. “But he also got the perfect attendance record for swimming, because he never missed a practice.”

Some of Britton’s other former coaches, Jim Mauch and Rene Nakao-Mauch, now coach the swim team with him, which he says is an enjoyable privilege. Finally, there is Larry Barrett, Britton’s coach at Ventura College.

The mentality that Britton had regarding school is the same one he tries to instill in his own players today. “Academics is paramount for these very much student-athletes, not just athletes but student-athletes, to be

Britton was inspired to become a coach by Goeden, and appreciates the opportunity to give back to the school he graduated from.

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successful,” Britton said. “Because I tell my players, ‘oftentimes you can’t always have the fastest team, you might not always be the strongest team, but one thing you can always strive to be is the smartest team.’” Like many coaches, when Coach Britton one day leaves Nordhoff, his main hope is to leave the water polo program better than it was when he arrived. He was already successful at completely changing the culture of Villanova Preparatory School aquatics during his time coaching there. “The first time I went over and saw a Villanova meet, and I saw the interaction that he had with the kids, that kind of told me that I pegged him right on that (referring to his coaching potential),” Goeden said. “Because he’s really, really good, and the kids all loved him over there.” Former Villanova standout swimmer Eddie Campana recalled a time when one player on the team challenged Britton to a race. “He said, ‘I bet I can swim a 50-yard butterfly faster than you can.’ Coach responded, ‘Well let’s do it right now. Let’s go,’” Campana said. “And he said, ‘What? You want to race? And coach answered, ‘Yeah, I’ll race you with all my clothes on right now.’ And they both jumped in, the kid … had all his stuff on. Coach just jumped in, all his clothes on, and beat him,” Campana continued. When Britton arrived at Villanova, they lost every game for two years, and only had enough players for a co-ed program. But by “2006 we became a part of the Tri-County Athletic Association, and had an actual boys’ (team), and I was there for the very first Villanova girls’ team,” Britton said. “And (I got to) see the point where the boys were a regular playoff team, and the girls were right there on the cusp of doing that.” Though Nordhoff already had a more


established program when he arrived, Coach Britton still sees opportunities to leave the program better than he found it. “I’m hoping to … help usher in kind of a new era,” Britton said. In order to have a truly lasting impact on Nordhoff, Britton plans to play an integral part in getting a new pool for the school. The current pool is one of just two seven-lane shallow pools remaining at Ventura County high schools, along with Santa Paula High School. Because of the shallow depth, the boys’ water polo team was unable to play a home playoff game during the 2017 season, despite reaching the CIF quarterfinals. The pool is acceptable for regular season games, but is not regulation depth for a CIF playoff game. “Jokingly not jokingly I’ve made the deadline to try to get a new pool before my daughter gets here, and she’s 4 years old, so I have, you know, a little less than a decade,” Britton said.

When asked about the rewards of coaching, Britton emphasized the fact that the relationship he fosters with his players often goes beyond simply that

of a player and coach. “This (past) summer, I got to go to my former player Eddie Campana’s wedding, and I’ve been to a couple players’ weddings,” Coach Britton said. “It kind of proves to me and shows to me that coaching and aquatics … continues beyond high school, and beyond those times in the pool.” OVG

The project is contingent on the financial aspect, and the ability to raise enough money, Britton said. This can be done through grants and fundraising. Britton has been working with Ojai Unified School District Superintendent Andy Cantwell to come up with ideas to raise the funds. “Then (the other important thing is) making sure that when we do it, we do it correctly,” Britton said. In the meantime, Britton will continue to strive to mentor his students and student-athletes. “Teaching health, which is a high school requirement, I pretty much get to teach every student that comes through, which is a lot of fun,” Coach Britton said. “I get to see almost every student as a freshman, go and then develop into who they become as seniors, and then onward.” VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Montessori School of Ojai Voted Runner-up for

BEST CHILD CARE

Friends, Thanks for Loving and Appreciating Our Amazing Staff

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THERE ARE SO MANY

REASONS TO BE

GRATEFUL

for Oak Grove School, but preserving an environment for students to ask the deepest and most formidable questions is at the top of that list; to directly confront fear, loneliness, self awareness and love; to flower from a deep truth within. Oak Grove’s expansive wooded campus and community of adults (parents, teachers, staff) support a safe space for deep inquiry, affectionate communication, and openness in the face of challenge, all while infusing our days with a sense of ease and joyfulness. PRESCHOOL—HIGH SCHOOL DAY AND BOARDING FOUNDED BY J. KRISHNAMURTI

OAK GROVE SCHOOL The Art of Living and Learning

LEARN MORE OAKGROVESCHOOL.ORG VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Meet your Chamber CEO,

Jamie Fleming by Austin Widger

T

he Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce is under new leadership, and wants to get back to business. More specifically, recently hired Chamber CEO Jamie Fleming says he wants to help rejuvenate local merchants.

someone who has come in to visit family … tourists just come to see Ojai, or us locals,” he said. “So the fire really put the town into kind of a fragile situation because it eliminated one of the three (tourists) immediately.”

visitor's information table set up across the street from the Arcade every Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The table will begin each year sometime in the spring, and end in the fall at the conclusion of the Ojai Film Festival.

Fleming comes from a background in the entertainment industry, having worked in a variety of positions in the studio areas of both Disney and Universal. Upon moving to Ojai 15 years ago, he became involved with the various festivals held, and was the director of the Ojai Film Festival for four years. “I found myself almost an ambassador because you want people to come to Ojai for the festivals, so you're constantly talking about why this is such a special place,” he said. When the fire hit, local businesses were hit hard as well, Fleming continued. He said as basic as it sounds, local merchants are reliant on people actually coming into their stores.

This blow to local commerce sparked an idea Fleming has been working toward since he started the job in July 2018, and it launched in Oct. 2018. The project is called “Monday through Thursday,” and it is all about getting locals to shop at Ojai businesses during the week, and realize the stores are not just geared toward weekend tourists.

The newest innovation Fleming is bringing to the valley is Ojai Gifts. This website is launching soon and can be accessed either through wheninojai.com or ojaigifts.com. Fleming said. “Instead of promoting each individual store by name or what have you, we promote the products in this valley, especially gifts.” He envisions the Ojai Gifts site will have the capability to register for weddings, showers and more.

“The potential customer either is 140

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One of the other major changes Fleming worked on is a complete remodel of the Chamber's website, which is wheninojai.com. Along with the site comes an Instagram account and hashtag campaign titled “When in Ojai.” To help make people fully aware of everything Ojai has to offer, the Chamber has begun having a

At the core of all these changes is the revitalizing of local commerce, Fleming said. “I really want the locals to start realizing a dollar spent here helps this town, and there's a lot more here than they probably realize,” Fleming said. “My goal is to get that exposure out there.”


LAWGROUP

One Attorney, Two Areas of Specialty Personal Injury 30 years representing plaintiffs in auto & motorcycle accidents, dog bites, slips/falls, medical malpractice cases, environmental law and tenant rights.

Food Freedom A Farm-to Consumer Legal Defense FundTM attorney defending the rights and broadening the freedoms of family farms, and protecting consumer access to raw milk and nutrient-dense foods.

Julie S. Gerard, Esq. • 603 W. Ojai Ave., Suite F, Ojai • JSGLawGroup.com • 805-798-9165

Derby & Derby, Inc.

“Big Company Capabilities, Small Company Service”

Investment & Insurance Planning and Services Since 1979 State of California Registered Investment Advisor

California insurance licenses #0575624, 0A38521 and 0L48881

Wealth Management Retirement Planning Estate Preservation Legacy Planning Life Insurance & Annuities Long-Term Care

(805) 646-3729

603 West Ojai Ave., Suite C PO Box 189, Ojai, CA 93024 vicki@derbyandderby.com

Donna Lloyd Vice President

Margaret Marapao CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™

Cindy Rodarte Administrative Executive

Victoria Derby Breen Owner/President

Securities offered through Securities America, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services offered through Derby & Derby, Inc., State of California Registered Investment Advisor. Derby & Derby, Inc. and Securities America, Inc. are separate entities.

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FOREIGN & DOMESTIC AUTO REPAIR

Greg Rents - Party Rentals

Voted Best Auto Repair in the Ojai Valley

Putting the Art in the Fine Art of Auto repair

OJAI VALLEY IMPORTS 646-6106

NEW Frozen Drink Machine Tables - Chairs - Patio Heaters

996 EAST OJAI AVENUE ovimports@sbcglobal.net

STAY LOCAL BUY LOCAL

(805) 649-2590 www.gregrents.com

Specializing in Auto Repairs, Tires and Wheels including Alignments, Suspension Work, Brakes & Oil Changes

Ment ion and gour ad et

$20

off a

set o

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FRED

545 N. Ventura Ave. Oak View CA 93022

Dedicated service since 1972

Serving the Ojai Valley, Ventura and Santa Barbara communities

0pen Monday through Friday 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM • Saturday from 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM.

Phone: (805) 649-2830 • Fax: (805) 649-4838

fredstireman@yahoo.com

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Haney Landscape Custom Designs & Inspiring Installations

Randy Haney

805-640-8607 HaneyLandscape.com CA State License #551409

Since 1989

Water-Wise Landscapes Pavers & Concrete Outdoor Rooms & Kitchens Fireplaces Lighting & Irrigation Pools & Spas

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1699 Walter Street Ventura, CA 93003

www.coasttransfer.com

• • • • • • • • •

Office Relocation Local & Long Distance Moving International Moves Short & Long Term Storage Commercial Warehousing Full Packing Services Packing & Moving Supplies New Furniture Installations Final Mile White Glove Service

Call for your FREE Estimate

800-345-7144 • 805-642-7757

USDOT# 125563 • P.U.C. MTR 0191304 144

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Nancy Kogevinas

805.450.6233 Nancy@Kogevinas.com DRE: 01209514

861 Oak Grove Court Offered at $2,495,000

Larry Wilde 805.640.5734

LWilde@west.net

DRE: 00521627

Š2018 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information.

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Riki Strandfeldt CA DRE Lic. # 01262026

(805) www.

Stunning Vistas Luxurious privacy in Upper Ojai

794-6474

Riki4RealEstate.com

riki4realestate@aol.com

~ Coming Soon ~

Ground floor 3rd bedroom

Over 12 acres + well

We List & Sell

Condo

(PUD)

Pool & spa

Ojai Bungalow

Vivienne Moody CA DRE Lic. # 00989700

(805)

798-1099

www.

OjaiViv.com

vmoody10@sbcglobal.net

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Rotary Clubs of Ojai

Lynne Doherty Ojai Valley’s real-life ‘Pied Piper’

Living Treasures 2018

Joyce Avery Robinson Retired OUSD teacher

Karen Evenden ‘Admired and loved by all’

Church deacon and active in multiple Ojai Valley nonprofits.

Accomplished cook, Help of Ojai board member and Ojai Women’s Fund co-chair.

Alan Greenberg

Tobi Greene

Trevor Quirk

‘Always willing to take on the most difficult project’

‘This has been an incredible journey’

Fought the Thomas Fire to save his and neighbors’ homes.

Ojai Duplicate Bridge Club manager, board member of Jewish Community of Ojai.

The Girls Empowerment Workshop is her passion and work experience.

Photos by Holly Roberts

Heart and soul of the Ojai Music Festival BRAVO program’s Music Van for 26 years.

Assisted victims of the Thomas Fire and Montecito Mudslide. VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Where do you want to

LIV?

1159 -1163 Spring Stre et , Oa k View. $1 , 29 5,0 0 0

375 M ar i posa Dr i ve, Ven t u ra. $ 1 , 395,0 00

T h e l ocat ion, t he sty le, t he fe e ling yo u get w hen yo u wa lk t hro ug h t he do o r – every asp e ct of your home should be a reflect io n of w ho yo u a re, wh ere you’ve b e e n, and t he life you a s pire to live. You r b est life b egins w it h a home t ha t ins pires yo u.

554 East Main Street Ventura, California 93001 LIVSothebysRealtyCA.com Cal DRE 01904034 148

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SU B M I T A L L O F F E RS

SU BMI T ALL O FF ERS

NEW L ISTING

SUBMIT A L L O F F E RS

LA COSTA BEACH • MALIBU

MOORPARK

VENTURA

OAK VIEW

Im p e c c a b l e b e a c h h o m e w i th o c e a n v i ew. 4 b e d s , 3 b a th , of f i c e, a n d p r i v a te la n ai.

Sp r aw lin g 3.67 a c re s w i th a 3 b e d , 2 b a th h o m e, d u p l ex w i th 2 b e d , 1 b a th e a c h , a n d a 2 b e d , 1 b a th m o d ula r.

Re m o d e l e d m i d- c e n tu r y m o d e r n h ill si d e m a s te r p i e c e w i th exc e p ti o n a l c o a s t a l a n d i sla n d v i ew s .

L u xu r y e q u e s tr ia n e s t a te w i th m a in h o u s e a n d d et a c h e d 2 b e d , 2 b a th g u e s t h o u s e o n 2. 2 6 a c re s .

2 1701 P a ci f i c C o a s t H w y $2,759,0 0 0 L a r r y K ro g h 8 0 5. 31 2.0 51 2

1076 3 Te r n ez D r i ve $1 ,4 69,0 0 0 Na te Min ke l 8 0 5.7 9 4.9 5 8 8

375 Ma r ip o s a D r i ve $1 , 3 9 5,0 0 0 L a r r y K ro g h 8 0 5. 31 2.0 51 2

1 1 59 -1 16 3 Sp r in g Stre et $1 , 2 9 5,0 0 0 Na te Min ke l 8 0 5.7 9 4.9 5 8 8 L a r r y K ro g h 8 0 5. 31 2.0 51 2

NEW L I ST I N G

I N ESC ROW

SUB MIT A L L OFFERS

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HILLSIDE • VENTURA

VENTURA

C o u n tr y li v in g a t i t s b e s t! Two h o m e s o n a p p rox im a te l y 3/4 of a n a c re in th e b e a u ti f ul Sk y lin e E s t a te s .

C h a r m in g c ot t a ge s t y l e d u p l ex w i th a 2 b e d , 1 b a th a n d a 1 b e d , 1 b a th , ju s t 8 h o u s e s b a c k f ro m th e o c e a n!

Sp a ci o u s 2 b e d , 3 b a th c o n d o l o c a te d n e a r p r im e D ow n tow n Ve n tu r a w i th re m o d e l e d o p e n f l o o r p la n k i tc h e n .

A b ove th e c o ll e ge w i th th re e b e d s , wo o d f l o o r s , la rge f a m il y ro o m a n d a n inv i tin g b a c k y a rd .

7 8 -8 0 Re p o s o D r i ve $1 ,10 0,0 0 0 Na te Min ke l 8 0 5.7 9 4.9 5 8 8

10 91-10 9 3 B a th L a n e $ 8 9 5,0 0 0 L a r r y K ro g h 8 0 5. 31 2.0 51 2

9 0 3 Vall e ci to D r i ve $69 9,0 0 0 L a r r y K ro g h 8 0 5. 31 2.0 51 2 Na te Min ke l 8 0 5.7 9 4.9 5 8 8

2 0 0 Fair f a x Ave n u e $6 8 5,0 0 0 L a r r y K ro g h 8 0 5. 31 2.0 51 2

I N ESC ROW

SU BMI T ALL O FF ERS

SUB MIT A L L OFFERS

R ECENTLY R E DUCE D

CAMARILLO

VENTURA

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VENTURA

Love l y tr a d i ti o n a l h o m e of fe r in g th re e b e d s , t wo b a th s a n ove r size d f a m il y ro o m , a n d a t wo c a r g a r a ge.

Sp e c t a c ula r v i ew s of th e h ill si d e, ci t y a n d i sla n d s f ro m th i s u n i q u e, ove r 1/2 a c re p a rc e l in O n d ula n d o.

Sp a ci o u s a n d o p e n sp li t l eve l p o o l h o m e of fe r in g a u n i q u e d e sig n a n d a p r i v a te m a s te r sui te.

We ll-m a in t ain e d 1 ,4 69 s q . f t. tu r n-key f a m il y h o m e w i th a n o p e n f l o o r p la n . A p e r fe c t inve s tm e n t o p p o r tu n i t y.

10 69 S ey b o l t Ave n u e $6 25,0 0 0 L a r r y K ro g h 8 0 5. 31 2.0 51 2

6 6 0 Sk y v i ew Te r r a c e $ 5 8 9,0 0 0 Na te Min ke l 8 0 5.7 9 4.9 5 8 8

6 8 1 V in e Stre et $ 5 49,0 0 0 Na te Min ke l 8 0 5.7 9 4.9 5 8 8

1019 8 Willa m et te Stre et $ 517, 5 0 0 L a r r y K ro g h 8 0 5. 31 2.0 51 2

L ARRY KROGH & N AT E MI N K EL l arry 805. 31 2 .051 2 n ate 805.794.9588 l k ro g h @ l i vsoth e bys rea ltyca .co m n mi n ke l @ l i vsoth e bys rea ltyca .co m C al DRE 01305510 & 014 83 520 © 2018 LIV Sotheby’s International Realty. All rights reserved. All data, including all measurements and calculations are obtained from various sources and has not and will not be verified by Broker. All information shall be independently reviewed and verified for accuracy. LIV Sotheby’s International Realty is independently owned and operated and supports the principals of the Fair Housing Act.

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Rooney & Stanworth Realtors

Coldwell Banker Property Shoppe ~ Ojai, California

102 W. Matilija Street Award Winning Mixed Use Residence Sophisticated 3 bedroom 3 bath home with separate 600 sq ft commercial studio. Great retail exposure located in the Ojai Village steps to restaurants, shopping, and more! Features include: Open floor plan, private patio, wood finishes and fireplace. The two spacious bedrooms have en-suite baths. The upstairs master suite has a private balcony and a separate exterior entrance. Experience the Ojai lifestyle! www.102Matilija.com $1,249,000

83 Crown Street, Oak View

505 E. Villanova Road

Peaceful setting with mature landscaping, canopies of fruit trees and inviting patio, 3 bedroom 2 bath, upgrades, wood burning stove, central air, two car garage. $649,000

Cozy two bedroom bungalow on just under 1/2 acre (19,284 Sq.Ft. lot) There is a foundation in place for a two story hillside home, with plans and soils report. A Great opportunity. $769,000

Teresa Rooney

805.340.8928 Calif. BRE: 005599443

teresarooney@me.com

Amanda Stanworth 805.218.8117 Calif. BRE: 01262333

amandastanworth77@gmail.com

www.Rooney-Stanworth.com 150

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ROSALIE ZABILLA “Live where you Love”

See more at 11480SulphurMountain.com Super-stylish downtown Ojai home! Beautifully remodeled 3 beds, 3 baths with quality construction evident throughout. Fresh eat-in kitchen with custom cabinets, flowing open floorplan, a wall of French doors for maximum light and spa-like bathrooms. Very private and fenced backyard. Offered at $754,000

Gated and private Spanish-style estate on 110+/- acres with the most beautiful views in Ojai! Main house has Great Room with open-beam, soaring ceilings and never-ending windows as well as a sprawling Gourmet Kitchen. 4 beds and 2 baths Guest House and a sunny Art Studio. Very private, solar-powered with approx. 200 olive trees and 20 fruit trees. Offered at $3,490,000

See more at 526Pleasant.com

ROSALIE ZABILLA

805.455.3183 HomesByRosalie.com Rosalie@HomesByRosalie.com

DRE: 1493361

SANTA BARBARA BROKERAGE | SANTA YNEZ VALLEY BROKERAGE | MONTECITO BROKERAGE Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity. SIR DRE: 899496

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THE WILLIAMSON-VANKEULEN GROUP LET US SHOW YOU WHAT LIVING OJAI IS ALL ABOUT!

EAST END CRAFTSMAN

MARC WHITMAN MASTERPIECE

2477 FORDYCE ROAD

10710 ENCINO DRIVE

SOLD

RANCHO MATILIJA ESTATE

ANNE WILLIAMSON REALTOR OF THE YEAR 2014

805.320.3314 • DRE #01448441

REALTOR, DESIGNER

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805.798.2397 • DRE #01973956

CASSANDRA VANKEULEN LAUREN VANKEULEN

WWW.THEWILLIAMSONVANKEULENGROUP.COM 1.833.BUY.OJAI COLDWELL BANKER PROPERTY SHOPPE • 727 WEST OJAI AVE., OJAI, CA. 93023

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12490 MACDONALD DRIVE


TONYA PERALTA REAL ESTATE TEAM

Impressive style with guest option Darling Hitching Postwing end-unit condo! Arbolada Mid-Century with guest wing & pool!

Oak studded beauty on 1 acre+ w/ studio!

2.5 acre private Upper Ojai oasis

Arbolada charmer with legal 2nd dwelling! Rachelle Guiliani, Realtor® Keller Williams Realty 805.746.5188 BRE#02047608

Tonya Peralta, Broker Associate Keller Williams Realty 805.794.7458 BRE#01862743

Serena Handley, Realtor® Keller Williams Realty 805.798.1286 BRE#01994892

View our Listings at ILiveinOjai.com


The western arch of the Libbey Park Pergola destroyed in a bomb attack and then demolished in the 1969 beautification drive.

LOOK BACK IN OJAI 1969

Beautifica

In October 1969, the Ojai Chamber of Commerce spearheaded a “Beautification For Better Business Campaign.” 154

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I

n October 1969, the Ojai Chamber of Commerce spearheaded a “Beautification for Better Business Campaign.” I had graduated from Nordhoff High School only a few months before and must tell you, at the time, my business was chasing after beautiful women and cars. I could not have cared less about sprucing up things around the valley, except for a good wash and waxing of my 1961 AustinHealey “Bug Eye” Sprite to, hopefully, impress beautiful young ladies. So, moving on, I was ignorant of this cleanup drive. Mr. Libbey, of Libbey Glass Co. fame, was a proponent of the “City Beautiful Movement” featured at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair. At the original Ojai Day, April 7, 1917, held in Civic Park (now Libbey Park), Libbey said in a speech: “There has been too little attention paid to things aesthetic in our communities and in our homes. The time has come when

town, even inspiring the 1969 beautification campaign and valleywide cleanup drive decades after his speech. On the evening of Oct. 30, City Building Inspector Ken Swift and Hal Mitrany of the Chamber of Commerce chaired a meeting at the Ojai Woman’s Club to organize the cleanup. Thirty-eight groups were invited and about 40 representatives attended. The PTA, American Legion, Chamber of Commerce, Boy and Girl Scouts, Retail Merchants Association, Jaycees, Woman’s Club, Garden Club, Retired Men’s Club, East Ojai Valley Associates and the Committee to Preserve the Ojai were among the groups participating. Harrison’s Rubbish Service volunteered to place collection bins throughout the city and dates were set for free trash and junk removal.

Libbey’s speech includes the word “beautiful” twice. His words and actions emphasized improving Ojai’s aesthetic qualities. As a lifelong resident (67-plus years) of the Ojai Valley, I truly believe that Libbey’s ideals have been ingrained in our

The city also decided to work with business owners to help pay for sidewalk repairs as some sidewalks were not only unsightly, but dangerous. Sidewalk repairs and installation of planters were coordinated with the state repaving Ojai Avenue. In addition, the city repaved 12 residential streets in the western portion of town. Despite the fanfare and ambitious goals, Inspector Swift reported at the end of November that the beautification and cleanup campaigns had fallen short, as participating organizations failed to develop, propose or implement plans. Little had been accomplished beyond some improvement at private homes. He did, however, report two successful beautification projects:

City, county and state agencies were on board. The City Council proclaimed November Cleanup and Beautification Month. The county allowed a main trash-collecting station to be located behind Libbey Park and the state furnished a truck and driver to assist groups that picked up litter along the highways.

tion Month we should encourage in ourselves thoughts of things beautiful, and the higher ideals which art encourages and promotes must awaken in the people fostering of the love of that which is beautiful and inspiring.”

1968. In addition to removing an eyesore, they wanted to open up the view of the park from Ojai Avenue. The Ojai Planning Commission, City Council and Ojai Civic Center Park trustees agreed.

A city beautification conference was held at the Ojai Valley Inn, attended by about 80 planners and planning commissioners from all the cities in Ventura County. Featured speakers were Camarillo officials who touted their community’s beautification successes. In November, the Ojai Architectural Board of Review decided to demolish the Pergola’s two large arches that had been bombed in October 1967 and December

By Drew Mashburn Contributed on behalf of the Ojai Valley Museum.

• The Civic Center Park Board of Directors voted to demolish the bombed arches at the front of the park. • The Chamber of Commerce purchased and planted a permanent Christmas tree at the “Y” intersection. That very same Christmas tree has grown into a mighty fine tree that we all continue to enjoy during the holidays and all year around. VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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WWW.507GRIDLEY.COM

ENJOY AN UPSCALE LIFESTYLE IN THIS COUNTRY-STYLE, TWO-STORY CRAFTSMAN HOME WITH ATTACHED GUEST SUITE IN OJAI, JUST MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN OJAI. NESTLED ON A COUNTRY ROAD, AMONGST BEAUTIFUL MATURE LANDSCAPING, THIS HOME IS SITED FOR PRIVACY.

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Awhai Ranch

12202 Awhai Ranch Road, Ojai

3 bed/3.5 bath on over 20 flat acres with 2,000 sq. ft. barn, pool/spa, views offered at $3,000,000

4 bed/3 bath main house, 2 bed 1 bath guest house, pool/spa over an acre offered at $2,195,000

Bella Vista Estate 4440 Grand Ave., Ojai

Ojai View Estate 627 E. Villanova Rd

4 bed/ 3 bath on 1.8 acres with pool, views and 1 bed 1 bath guest house offered at $2,199,000

Sharon@805Properties.com

805-766-7889 Stacy@805Properties.com

805-217-2676 www.805Properties.com

Each ofďŹ ce is independently owned and operated

MaHarry & Cadenasso, Real2018 Estate VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4Inc. | WINTER 157Team DRE#01761197 DRE#01438966


Coldwell Banker Property Shoppe

Robby Hill “A seamless transition into your next home�

www.RealtorRobby.com

Robby@RealtorRobby.com

805-850-9299

Dale Hanson Ojai Valley Real Estate at

Sales / Property Management / Notary 221 E Matilija St., Ojai | (805) 646-7229 www.ojaivalleyrealestate.com

Three VMU units in the heart of Ojai. Great location, walking distance to town. The back unit has office/den and screened-in porch. Floors are hard-wood and new tile. Fenced back yard. $1,200,000 Great commercial business location with parking. 3 private offices, a bath room and small wet kitchen. Separate attached unit with 3/4 bath and private entrance. $775,000

For all your Real Estate needs call

Marie McTavish 805-231-5075 BRE# 01063382 Mmctavish@troop.com

REALTOR FOR 9YEARS!

She Delivers GREAT SERVICE with Honesty and Integrity

Each office individually owned & operated

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the Ranch Gal!

Historic Arcade building with approximately 1,380 sq ft including front and back entrances. It includes the original vault from when the Bank of Italy and Bank of America were there. $950,000

IN ESCROW!


Fred Drennen is....

Worried in Ojai R

ecently I met a lady at the club who said she was a spiritual psychologist. She said people experience anxiety and lose sleep because their chakras are out of alignment which block the body’s natural energy. She said it would take several sessions (for a small fee) to get them back in balance and bring peace and harmony to my troubled mind. I also worry if my karma is in good standing. Back in 1958 I stuck a Classics Comics book inside another because I didn’t have the extra 10 cents. From then on, anytime I went into Sav-on-Drugs I broke out in a sweat. I don’t know if karma goes back 60 years but you never know. I wouldn’t want to come back as a bug on someone’s windshield.

I also worry about Cooper’s (our dog) mental well-being. As a family member he goes everywhere with us. But when we bring out our swim bags he knows he’s not going. He gets the most pitiful look on his face that neither Tina nor I will look at him. I worry if we are doing permanent damage to his mind. But there’s hope. Yesterday I met the “Pet Psychic” in the Jacuzzi at the club. To get professional help is really simple. Using PayPal, all you have to do is call her on your phone to get a psychic evaluation for your pup. It’s worth trying, karma works in both directions. Seeking relief from all this worrying, I turned to the section in the paper known as Esoteric Astrology.

As you know I’m a worrier. I find myself worrying about stuff when trying to go to sleep.

Liberation might be just around the corner. Here’s what it said for Leo: “Ponder upon how you want to be seen, known and recognized in the world in the context of helping to build the new culture and civilization – your work now”. This is not looking good; this is too heavy of a burden for a 71-yearold. But I read on to find the enlightenment. “You are to nurture the new era at its foundational stages because you are a leader.” I like that, being a leader and all. But still, this might be too much for a retiree. “Begin your garden soon, have a worm bin, create biodynamic soil, save seeds. Then teach everyone your discoveries.” Esoteric astrology did it for me. I found Nirvana. I got my garden in, I got great biodynamic soil, and I got left over-seeds. I’m going out the door to look for some worms and starting building that new civilization.

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Cheryl & Ray Deckert Broker Associates

Maria DePaola Realtor Partner

Sheryl Whipple Realtor Associate

Robert Perron Realtor Associate

Paul Johnsen Realtor Associate

1003 N. Drown Avenue - $849,000

Located in downtown’s highly sought-after Ojai Village, this 4 bedroom property boasts original, refinished hardwood floors, newer quartz counter tops and cabinets in the kitchen, spacious rooms, and partial mountain views. Behind the main home you will find a remodeled 300 sq. ft. structure (approximate) suitable for a studio, guest quarters or whatever your needs may be. All this on just under 1/2 acre!

5 Valley Road - $599,000

This 1,737 sq. ft., 3 bed/2.5 bath home will WOW the most discriminating buyers with its charm and fine detail! Upon entering you’ll notice high beamed ceilings, a warm, inviting fireplace and rich, tasteful flooring. Entertainment or family time is easy with the open floor plan design throughout the first floor, which continues to flow into the kitchen, featuring gleaming updated counter tops. Mountain views and room for RV parking!

402 N. Arnaz Street - $550,000

Tucked away just one-half mile from Meiners Oaks Village you’ll find this 3 bedroom/1.75 bathroom Americana home. Inside you’ll find a comfortable living area with an updated kitchen behind it. The kitchen boasts updated cabinets with wood and glass doors, tile flooring, and all the creature comfort appliances you would expect. Don’t miss this one!

www.BestBuysInOjai.com ~

Phone: 805.272.5221 ~ Email: Team@DeckertDePaola.com

BRE #01761150, 00780642, 01877842, 01962884, 02019595, 02018091, 01859199

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Directory of Advertisers Aaron, John ..................................................... 44 Ace Hardware .................................................. 89 Amanda Stanworth, REALTOR .................. 150 American Mattress .......................................... 85 Andrew Snett, Wells Fargo Advisor .............. 143 Anne Williamson, REALTOR ..................... 152 Antique Mall of Camarillo .............................. 34 Artizen Floors ................................................. 84 August Laurel Gallery ..................................... 47 Australian Native ............................................. 86 AZU Restaurant & Ojai Valley Brewery ......... 65 Bamboo Creek Spa, AA Relaxing Station ..... 111 Bart’s Books ..................................................... 22 Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts ................. 45 Besant Hill School ......................................... 137 Blanche sylvia .................................................. 30 Blue Iguana & Emerald Iguana ....................... 64 Boccali’s Restaurant ......................................... 76 Boku Superfood ............................................... 12 Bonnie Lu’s Restaurant ................................... 74 Book Ends Bookstore ...................................... 32 Buena Tile ....................................................... 11 Byrant Circle Mini Storage ........................... 156 Camouflage ..................................................... 32 Canvas & Paper Gallery ....................................9 Casitas Municipal Water District .................... 35 Cassandra Van Keulen, REALTOR .............. 152 Chamber on the Mountain ........................... 121 Char & Jerry Michaels, REALTORS............. 2,3 Chisum’s Floor Covering ................................. 87 Coast Supply ................................................... 16 Coast Transfer & Storage .............................. 144 Coastal Softub ................................................. 86 Cottage Hospital ........................................... 114 Dale Hanson, REALTOR ............................ 158 Dana Steele Construction ......................... 86, 89 Day Spa of Ojai .................................................8 Derby & Derby ............................................. 141 Domino’s Pizza ................................................ 77 Donna Sallen, REALTOR .................... 162, 163 Early California Antiques ............................... 48 Eveready Termite & Pest Control ................... 93 Fairweather Heating & Air ............................. 93 Firestick Pottery .............................................. 44 For Your Home ............................................... 29 Frameworks of Ojai ......................................... 47 Fred’s Tireman ............................................... 142 Gabriela Cesena, REALTOR ...........................4 Gem Quest ...................................................... 31 Green Goddess Landscaping .......................... 88 Greg Rents .................................................... 142 Hakane Sushi .................................................. 58

Haney Landscape .......................................... 143 Heavenly Honey .............................................. 34 Home Kitchen of Ojai ..................................... 66 Horse Heart Connection ............................... 108 Humane Society of Ventura County ............. 116 Jes MaHarry .................................................... 15 Jim & Rob’s ..................................................... 59 JJ’s Sports Zone ............................................... 67 JSG Law Firm Group ................................... 141 Kathy Hoff, REALTOR ............................... 156 Kerry Miller Designs ....................................... 96 Kitchen Places................................................. 21 Kristen Currier, REALTOR ......................... 156 Krotona Institute ........................................... 121 Larry Krogh, REALTOR ...................... 148, 149 Latitudes Fine Art Gallery .............................. 46 Lauren Van Keulen, REALTOR.................... 152 Lavender Inn................................................... 65 Lisa Phelps Landscaping ................................. 97 Lola Haag Band ............................................ 120 Majestic Oak Vineyard..................................... 74 Marc Alt Photography .................................. 107 Maria DePaola, REALTOR ......................... 160 Marie McTavish, REALTOR ....................... 158 Medicine Shoppe .......................................... 110 Modern Age Dentistry .................................. 115 Monica Ros School ......................................... 36 Montessori School ........................................... 36 Museum of Ventura County ............................ 44 Nancy Kogevinas, REALTOR....................... 145 Nate Minkel, REALTOR ...................... 148,149 Noah’s Ark Preschool ...................................... 49 Nora Davis, REALTOR ................................ 6,7 Nutmeg’s Ojai House ...................................... 33 Oak Grove School ......................................... 137 Ojai Art Center Theater ................................ 120 Ojai Beverage Company .................................. 67 Ojai Business Center ..................................... 143 Ojai Door & Window ..................................... 89 Ojai Olive Oil Company ................................. 27 Ojai Pizza ........................................................ 76 Ojai Pool Store ................................................ 86 Ojai Rock Stacker ........................................... 48 Ojai Valley Athletic Club ................................ 20 Ojai Valley Community Hospital .................. 109 Ojai Valley Imports ....................................... 142 Ojai Valley Museum ........................................ 45 Ojai Valley School ......................................... 138 Ojai Valley Trail Riding Company ................ 107 Ojai Youth Entertainers Studio (OYES) ....... 108 Old Creek Ranch Winery ............................... 73 OVA Arts ........................................................ 47

Papa Lennon’s Restaurant ............................... 67 Patty Waltcher, REALTOR .............. back cover Peppertree Retreat ........................................... 65 Phil’s Custom Painting .................................... 92 Priscilla of Ojai ................................................ 33 Rainbow Bridge Natural Food ........................ 55 Ranch House Restaurant ................................. 57 Ray & Cheryl Deckert, REALTORS ........... 160 Riki Strandfeldt, REALTOR ........................ 146 Robby Hill, REALTOR ................................ 158 Rosalie Zabilla, REALTOR .......................... 151 Sakura Ojai ...................................................... 77 Santa Paula Animal Rescue Center, S.P.A.R.C...84 Santa Paula Art Museum ................................ 45 Sea Fresh Seafood ........................................... 58 Seren Apothecary ............................................ 30 Serendipity Toys .............................................. 33 Shangri-La Care Cooperative ....................... 111 Sharon McClung, REALTOR........................ 2,3 Sharon MaHarry, REALTOR ...................... 157 Stacy Cadenasso, REALTOR ....................... 157 State Farm Insurance, Bob Daddi ................. 139 Sherry Stuckey, REALTOR .......................... 157 Stephen Adelman, REALTOR ..................... 158 Studio Channel Islands ................................... 46 Susan Cummings Jewelry ..................................5 Susan Willis LTD ........................................... 46 Temple Taste ................................................. 108 Teresa Rooney, REALTOR ........................... 150 Terramor .......................................................... 34 The Hut .......................................................... 74 The Nest, Restaurant ....................................... 54 The Peaceful Pup ............................................ 35 Titus Painting .................................................. 88 Tonya Peralta, REALTOR ............................ 153 Top Gun Builders ............................................ 92 Topa Mountain Winery .................................. 73 Trystology ...................................................... 116 VACCO, Ventura Air Conditioning Co. ......... 95 Ventura House of Smokes ............................. 124 Ventura Roofing .............................................. 94 Ventura Swap Meet ....................................... 125 Vibrance Health .............................................. 13 Villanova Preparatory School .......................... 28 Vitality Fitness .............................................. 110 Vivienne Moody, REALTOR ....................... 146 Westridge Markets .......................................... 75 Whitman Architectural Design Inc. .......... 64, 89 Whitney Hartman Photography ..................... 49 VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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1109 Del Prado Court This home has a spacious open floor plan with lovely light filled gourmet kitchen & a stunning master suite!

1234 Mariano Drive Located in the quaint Oaks West neighborhood, you will enjoy this large family home with a pool!

11249 N. Ventura Avenue Beautifully remodeled Classic Bungalow situated on horse property, gated and private!

Build To Suit! Zoned C-1 Wonderful opportunity to build your dream home or business on this beautiful, flat, useable lot!

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4158 Grand Avenue This East End gem is an entertainers dream with a pool & majestic mountain views!

3677 Thacher Road Beautifully remodeled Classic Bungalow situated on horse property, gated and private!

1255 McNell Road Located on the prestigious East End of Ojai, this home is a sanctuary for the body & mind!

804 N. Montgomery Street This 1923 Craftsman Style home is tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac in the heart of downtown Ojai! VOLUME 36 NUMBER 4 | WINTER 2018

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Patty Waltcher 25 ye a r s o f e x p e r i e n ce m a tc h i n g

p e o p l e a n d p ro p e r t y i n t h e O j a i Va l l e y

E a s t E n d M a g n i fi ce n ce This is simply the most beautiful estate in the East End of Ojai. With epic, sweeping views of the valley, multiple architecturally stunning dwellings, orchards, gardens and a fabulous pool, there is nothing else like it in Ojai. Price Available Upon Request

I will help you discover the home that brings peace to your mind and heart (805) 340-3774 164

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