Issuu on Google+

12 & N ei l th

Spring 2014

PROUD PARENTS:

RAISING A FAMILY AS A DENTAL STUDENT

m agaz i n e

*

foodie:

TABOULEH SALAD

ADVOCACY: + Why Dental Students Are Effective Lobbyists

WHAT DID YOU DO OVER SPRING BREAK?


Sp’14

OSUASDA

Contents 2

6

9

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

ADVOCACY & LEGISLATION:

FOOD & LEISURE:

Don’t Innovate; Don’t Survive

Why Dental Students Are Effective Lobbyists

Foodie: Tabouleh Salad Spotlight Columbus: 16-Bit Bar+Arcade

5

7

11

PERSONAL STORY:

PROUD PARENTS:

JUST FOR FUN:

A First-Year’s Perspective

Page 1

How Students Balance Having A Family & Going To School

Spring Break Plans Spring Photo Recap


m a g a z i n e

................................... a publication of The Ohio State University American Student Dental Association

................................... MAGAZINE CONTRIBUTORS Editor-In-Chief Will Burnard (D3) Contributing Editors Stacey Stevens (D3) Laura Awadalla (D2) Contributing Writers Stacey Stevens (D3) Gretta Seif (D2) Spencer Tepe (D1) Aklilu Ameha (D2) Nathan Prueter (D4) Morgan Kelley (D2) Contributing Photographers Morgan Kelley (D2) Stacey Stevens (D3) William Alexander (D3) Lydia Lancaster (D2) Aklilu Ameha (D2) Dr. Robert Rashid Layout & Design Will Burnard (D3)

................................... EXECUTIVE COUNCIL President Mike Border (D3) President-Elect Morgan Kelley (D2) Vice President Eric Murnan (D3) Treasurer Jeff Gannon (D4) Associate Treasurer Warren Gall (D2) Secretary Shanthi Cariappa (D4) Associate Seretary Clare McGorry (D2)

................................... Email inquiries & submissions to: burnard.6@osu.edu www.asda.org.ohio-state.edu

...................................

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

12 & Neil

LET TER FROM THE EDITOR

th

Don’t Innovate; Don’t Survive CHANGE IS A FACT OF LIFE. As the season shifts from winter to summer, spring is a natural highlight of this fact. But spring is also a time of change for many dental students. D4s will soon embark on the wonderful “real world” of dentistry; D2s have a big transition from pre-clinic typodonts to living, breathing patients; and D1s and D3s will move up from the lowest on the dental school totem pole to the highest, respectively. It’s an exciting time with a steep learning curve for many, so where do you begin to navigate the brave new world you’re about to enter? Simply put: Strive to always be improving. This past February OSUCoD representatives were presented with an national ASDA Gold Crown award for “Most Improved Newsletter.” When ASDA won the award (an honor that had been a personal goal of mine), there was a bittersweet feeling associated. It felt great to reach the goal we had set out to achieve, but the journey to get there had come to an end. That’s the thing with most goals: They’re often finite. Improvements, appropriately enough, can be endless. The goal for all of us as we move to the next stage, should be “most improved,” not being the “best.” This may sound like a contradiction to the normal achiever mantra of dental students everywhere, but consider this: Once you’ve achieved “best” status, it’s only a matter of time until someone better comes along. A key to success is to be improving, not to be static. Being completely satisfied now, means being behind in the future—a principle that holds true throughout multiple arenas of life. I look around today and see giants of various industries falling—industry leaders not being able to adapt, because they’re happy being the “best” today, instead of “most improved” for tomorrow. Consider for a moment the movie rental industry. Blockbuster video fell to

Netflix and Redbox, because they either refused to see a change or decided that what seemed like a market trend was actually just a fad. Companies like Lyft and Uber—taxi service platforms capitalizing on GPS and phone-based payments—are revolutionizing cab use, and yet the giants, which should have capital to spare, are not responding with phone applications or GPS of their own. These scenarios have more complicated business implications than discussed, but the underlying principle is this: Don’t innovate; don’t survive. Although it may seem otherwise, we are part of an industry that plays by the same business rules as everyone else. And now, possibly more than ever, many industries are being turned upside down. For us and for our future, this means that we must never stop improving; we must be aware of our surroundings; and we must adopt good ideas as they come along. We as a profession have an obligation to encourage change and have a guiding hand in it. For if we don’t, someone else will. If we rely only on others to develop and improve our own industry, the outcome is completely out of our hands (for better or, more importantly, for worse). As you all embark on the change that this season brings, I urge you to help change dentistry for the better and improve yourself beyond the “best.” The best is temporary and now; improvements and innovations are lasting and the future.

Will

— Will Burnard

Editor-In-Chief Class of 2015

The Ohio State University

2


OSUASDA

Sat 2.22

WED-sat 2.26-3.1

Predent day Eighty-two predental students joined OSU

ASDa Annual session ASDA leaders trav-

CoD ASDA members for the annual Predent Day. Dr. Casamassimo and Dr. Kalmar spoke to the group about the dental profession. Also, predents got their hands on some actual dental-related fun, such as taking and pouring impressions, assembling and using a handpiece, and teeth wax ups. Predents were given a tour of the school and able to have one-on-one time with current students for any questions.

eled to Anaheim, California for this year’s national meeting. Our chapter was honored with two national ASDA Gold Crown Awards (“Most Improved Newsletter” and third place in “Predental Membership Incentive”). The representatives participated in discussions, voted in the House of Delegates, and networked with various chapters from across the country.

TUES 1.21

MON 2.3

Fri-SAT 3.28-29

Advocacy Academy

GIVE KIDS A SMILE

ODA LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

@ODA Headquarters (Columbus, OH) Congratulations to the 29 graduates of our most recent academy (the most ever!). This 90-minute course was provided for students interested in learning about dental advocacy.

Page 3

@Praire Norton Elementary ASDA members visited elementary students to provide screenings and flouride varnish treatmets for our second annual GKAS Day.

@Polaris Hilton Conference for students to join dentists in breakout sessions to discuss issues, such as insurance, entering practice, changing healthcare, etc.


Sun

mon

tues

wed

thur

fri

sat

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

1

fri

sat

February

Mon-tues 4.7-4.8 national student lobby day OSU ASDA paid a visit to Washington, D.C., to inform and educate our country’s policy makers. Twelve OSU CoD students went to a total of fifteen meetings with thirteen representatives, and two senators. Students had the opportunity to personally meet and talk with Rep. Steve Stivers. ASDA’s lobbying efforts were focused on two main issues: Student loan reform and increasing pro bono dental care efforts.

Sun

mon

tues

wed

thur

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

25

26

27

28

1

23

24

march Sun

mon

tues

wed

thur

fri

sat

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

april WED 4.9

Thurs 4.10

STATE lobby day

ASDA Community Outreach

@Ohio Statehouse 52 students teamed up with practicing dentists throughout the state to lobby for two current state bills related to dentistry.

@Kipp Wellness Fair ASDA students paid a visit to the annual community wellness fair to encourage good oral health care, provide oral health instruction, and answer questions.

Sun

mon

tues

wed

thur

fri

sat

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

4

EVENTS CALENDAR

January


OSUASDA

PERSONAL

STORY A FIRST-YEAR’S PERSPECTIVE z S P E N C E R TE P E C LAS S O F 2 01 7 We were all there once, but depending on where you are in your dental educa tion, it’s s ometimes hard to remembe r (or take the time to remember) what D 1 year wa s like. For one student, it’s been a s equence of s elf-di s cove r y, trade-of fs , and quality f r iend ships . Here’s what D1, Spencer Tepe, ha s to s ay about hi s exper ience a s a f irst-year :

A

s I near the end of my first year as a professional student, it’s clear that my education thus far has proven to be enlightening, challenging, frustrating, and rewarding all at once. In these eight months, my classmates and I have had the opportunity to learn a lot about ourselves and how we best operate—discoveries, which are critical to success. I’ve learned to not ignore the things that make me most happy and to set aside time for activities and organizations for which I have a passion. I now know that if, and when, I fail to make time for these “happy” aspects of my life, a strange thing happens: I become an inefficient simpleton whose mind retains little and whose logic resolves nothing. Only when an internal balance is established can page 5

I proceed to memorize every nerve, vessel, and muscle of the thorax. For the sake of personal equilibrium, academics often take the back seat to a dinner date, yoga session, club meeting, or basketball game. Collectively, my involvement in these activities permits my first conclusion about dental school: With mindful planning and execution, dental school can be manageable and fun! This is certainly not how I envisioned my grad school experience, but I have deemed having more fun than not to be imperative to success in dental school. Dental school, I’ve noticed, has a very unique environment compared to some of the other professional programs. It’s this unique graduate school environment that promotes camaraderie among us and, I must say, I’ve been impressed with the length to which my classmates go to help one another. Think about it: Never in our lives have we been part of such a select group of individuals. We are inherently competitive to have gained admission into dental school. As undergraduates, we strived to be the best. But now, my classmates, on a daily basis, forego their innate sense of competition, in order to draft communal online study guides and flash cards. This social experience has been impressive to observe, and I feel very lucky to be part of such a supportive academic community. In addition to all this, the class of 2017 has bonded. We have grown to become good friends. We’ve taken pride in our unity and are ever striving to build upon it. This brings me to my second conclusion about dental school: Struggling through a series of examinations is way better with friends. Through the years before dental school, the majority of us have mastered the art of independence. We pride ourselves on our ability to operate free of external guidance, and yet I, personally, have learned to sacrifice some of my own independence and embrace the advice and support of my peers. This, I’ve found, is the easiest way to excel. Yes, OSU CoD students, our building may be a bit old. But I’m convinced we have great people here, and it’s the people that matter most. I am genuinely excited for the curriculum that lies ahead and friendships that will be forged. Cheers to a year in the books, Fellow Nerds! — Spencer Tepe Class of 2016


ADVOCACY & LEGISLATION

Why Dental Students Are Effective Lobbyists

PROTECT YOUR PROFESSION WHICH STATEMENT ABOUT midlevel providers is more convincing? “It is dangerous to allow a midlevel provider with only 18 months of post high school training to perform irreversible dental procedures.” or “As a second year dental student, I’ve completed four years of undergraduate courses and two intense years of dental school training, and I still haven’t drilled or extracted a real tooth. Knowing all that I’ve been through, there is no way I would feel comfortable doing irreversible procedures two years removed from high school.” To a politician the first statement might come off as simply a dentist trying to protect his or her business. The second statement, though, emphasizes the point that it is not safe to allow an inadequately trained midlevel provider to perform irreversible procedures. As dental students we have a unique perspective on dentistry and we need to share that with legislators. Politicians are eager to learn all about the trials and tribulations of becoming a dentist, how student debt will affect our job choices, and our future goals. The term lobbying has a very negative connotation; however, it needs to be thought of as our chance to share the intentions of dentistry with politicians. From past experience, I can assure you that lobbying with state legislators is nothing more than a casual conversation about topics that are affecting dentistry and the patients that we treat. The reason that it is so important to meet with legislators is that the legislation they pass has a huge effect on how dentistry is practiced and subsequently on the quality of care provided to patients. The ODA Day at the Statehouse is a great opportunity to meet and express your willingness to make yourself available to answer any future questions that legislators might have about dentistry. Generally speaking, most legislators know very little about dental school, dentistry, access to care, etc. The hope is that if a legislator needs any information about a dentistry issue, the first person they will call will be a DENTIST.

The benefit for dental students to attend the Day at the Statehouse: 1. Learn about the current issues and legislation affecting dentistry 2. Experience firsthand how legislation at the state level is conducted 3. Network with dentists from all over the state

Why dental students are so important at the Day at the Statehouse: 1. Explain to legislators the process of becoming a dentist (undergrad/dental school/residency) 2. Talk to legislators about your dental experiences thus far and plans for after graduation 3. Demonstrate to practicing dentists that the future of dentistry is in good hands The 2014 Ohio Dental Association’s Annual Day at the Statehouse was held Wednesday, April 9th. Students attended one of two legislative briefings where ODA representatives reviewed the issues that were discussed with legislators. After each briefing, dental students were matched up with a mentor dentist that took them to their prearranged meetings with state legislators. Dental students attended the morning legislative briefing and then attended morning meetings or attended the afternoon briefing and meetings. Students also spent the entire day downtown and met with legislators throughout the day. D3s and D4s received ½ day clinic accountability. D1s and D2s who got permission from the course director were permitted to miss a class or lab. — Nathan Prueter Class of 2014

6


OSUASDA to be able to feed her daughter before passing Elsie off to her husband, Steve, for the day. “We like to have her awake when I get home,” says Lia. “At the end of the day, I’m usually exhausted and my husband’s ready to give her away, and I’m like, ‘Yes! Let me take her!’ I just hold her as much as I can. I don’t really have energy to do much else. I get home from school and play with Elsie, eat dinner, and I usually fall asleep soon after she does.” Taryn also tries to reserve time after school for her kids, which she makes possible by using every spare minute productively. “I study at lunch, and I get to school on time. Even if we have class at 8:30 I get there at 7:30. I’m present wherever I’m HOW STUDENTS BALANCE HAVING A at. When I’m studying I really try to focus FAMILY & GOING TO SCHOOL so I’m not wasting precious minutes that I could be spending with my kids.” tal school, our classmates who have children Yet even when parents schedule time to 12th & Neil’s Stacey Stevens sat face a remarkable amount of added respon- study, there are always the unforeseen daidown with several fellow dental stu- sibility, often with surprising optimism, ly delays and distractions. D3 Jonah Staten dents to better understand the life of leaving us non-parents wondering: How can (children depicted below), like many doting a parent studying to become a dentist. they possibly do it? dads, hates telling his daughters Avery, 6, The most obvious challenge of and Reese, 5, that he can’t play with them being a parent while in school is balanc- because he has to study. “The type of studier “Charlotte, please don’t do that!” ing family time with tooth time. Lia Risk I am, I have to get away. I can’t study at home Taryn Gehlert (depicted above) uncovers (depicted top, page 8), a D3 and first-time with the kids trying to get my attention.” the mouthpiece of her phone and apol- mother to six-month-old Elsie, laughs and Jonah also spends a significant amount of ogizes. When I call her for a phone intertime on his commute. “I have got to get up view on her experiences as at 5:30 and get ready and do my a parent in dental school, “I just take each day as it comes. That’s as hair. Then go fight traffic to drive the second-year OSU den- much as I can handle. School forms a routine an hour to school. This morning tal student is on a walk with for you and you get into that routine.” it took me almost two hours to get her four children: Noah, 7; to school. And then I’m fighting Charlotte, 6; William, 2; and traffic to go home. I normally get shakes her head at the idea of time manSam, who is almost one. Although Taryn is agement with an infant. “I just take each home around six or seven, eat dinner with facing a perio exam tomorrow and had as- day as it comes. That’s as much as I can Jennifer and the girls, and then I read them sisted in the clinic until 4:30 that afternoon, handle. School forms a routine for you and their books before they go to bed. We say she sounds not frazzled and rushed as I ex- you get into that routine.” Lia’s isn’t an easy prayers, and that’s it. That’s why the weekpected, but patient and upbeat. (And able to one though. She wakes up at 4:30 AM to get ends are so important to me.” To manage manage her time beyond belief.) ready for school and remains on “standby” the time lost driving before important tests For a dental student who isn’t a or in the event of inclement weather, Jonah parent, even keeping a houseplant alive can stays with his classmates Eddie Nash and seem daunting. Childless students often face Anthony Nguyen. “There were weeks that the challenges of maintaining relationships went by when I never went home; I stayed with significant others, caring for pets, and at Eddie’s,” says Jonah. “I’m scared to death even finding time to cook dinner (or order that I’ll get caught in traffic and miss an carryout for the third time in a week), all exam.” while cramming pharmacology facts that For Lia and Taryn, there was also may or may not be on tomorrow’s test. But the pregnancy during school to contend children add a whole new level of stress with. Lia took part one of her national (and joy) to the dental school experience. boards when she was six months pregnant Whether they arrived at Postle Hall with and recalls being exhausted nearly all the school-age children or added diaper changtime. “I’d spend every ounce of energy I had ing to the list of things to learn during dento stay awake and alert at school and when I

PROUD PARENTS:

page 7


baby and the two-year-old phases down,” says Taryn, “but if the older kids are struggling in school or have different issues as they grow, that’s something I didn’t really take into consideration.” Not only must these students learn how to parent after a long day in class or clinic, but they also have to stay constantly on their toes academically. Lia says she’s become more of a procrastinator when it comes to studying because she wants to spend as much time as possible with her family. “Usually exams amount to a late night cram session the night before, or the morning of, and I’m lucky to see how things turn out!” she laughs. Taryn agrees: “I was studying for that first path test and there was a bullying incident going on with my son at school and I just didn’t get as much studying done that week as I needed to. I didn’t do well on that exam but I had to compensate by studying harder to get that A on the next one.” With that kind of relentless pressure, Jonah, Lia and Taryn all agree that

having a support system and keeping their eyes on the prize are most crucial to getting through dental school. All three say that their spouses have been instrumental to their success as parents and dental students. “I couldn’t do it without Jennifer,” says Jonah. “She keeps the family afloat and earns all the money. She’s invaluable.” Lia says that in addition to caring for their daughter while she is at school, her husband Steve has learned to cook. Taryn is also grateful for her husband and her nanny, without whom she says she would not have even tried to go to dental school, “because my kids are my first priority and dental school is number two.” That sentiment—family above dental school—rings true among all three. “I feel really guilty sometimes,” admits Lia, “but I’m really fortunate to have a good network of people around me that help reassure me, ‘You’re doing this for her, just keep working hard because what you do helps her in the end.’” Jonah, who used to be a fifth-grade teacher, understands this logic well. “What I made wouldn’t even cover our house bills.” He declares his reason for becoming a dentist is “for Jennifer and the girls to have a better life.” “I don’t view my self as a career person,” stresses Taryn. “I view myself as a mom who is following a passion of wanting to be a dentist too. My biggest advice for others who are thinking about being parents in dental school is that you can do it. You can be a mom and go to dental school. I’m happy—and it is a sacrifice—but I’m happy. I feel like a lot of women feel like they can’t enter that part of their life until after dental school, but if you want to, my advice is you can do it and make it work and be really happy doing it!”

8

FAMILY LIFE

got home I’d crash. My poor husband barely ever saw me during the pregnancy because I was always sleeping!” Taryn found out that she was pregnant with Sam, her fourth child, two weeks before starting dental school. The hardest part of being pregnant D1 year? “Cadaver lab! I got sick a few times, I’m not gonna lie. It’s hard to be in there to begin with, and just imagine being in your first trimester!” Surprisingly, neither Lia nor Taryn felt extremely on-edge about the risks and strains of school during their pregnancies. “It made me a little nervous with the amount of formaldehyde,” says Taryn. “But my OB was fine with it. I appreciated not having to work with Jet and Trim in the sidelab, but I felt fairly comfortable. Lots of pregnant women do a lot worse things than be in dental school in regards to exposure.” Lia also stresses that staying active helped give her the energy to get through the school day. Despite their efforts to stay on top of everyone’s expectations, Jonah, Lia, and Taryn all feel that they’ve made significant sacrifices both at home and at school. “I view it as a sacrifice almost every day that I have to be at school and not with them,” says Tara. Jonah says he knew dental school would be hard, but was surprised with how little time he would actually get to spend with his family. “My wife Jennifer went to law school so she gave me a heads-up of what grad school would be like, but it was just different than we thought it would be. The first two years were absolutely the worst. I assumed I’d be at home studying like crazy late at night. Well it wasn’t like that. It was me in lab, at the clinic, and at Eddie’s.” According to Tara, the demands of dental school aren’t the only rude awakenings parents face. “I pretty much have the


OSUASDA

foodie Tabouleh Salad (Gretta’s Favorite Lebanese Salad) INGREDIENTS: - 3 bunchs fresh parsley, (Italian or curly) - 6 medium size ripe tomatoes (2½ cups) - 1 bunch fresh mint or 3 tbsp dried mint - ½ cup fresh lemon juice - 1 small size onion or 1 bunch fresh onion stems - ½ cup cracked wheat (#1 fine) - ½ cup olive oil - 3 tsp salt - 1 tsp black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS: Pick the parsley and the mint leaves. Wash them well, squeeze all water, and dry them well. If you have a salad spinner, use it to remove excess water.

page 9

Place the wheat in a large bowl. Cut tomatoes into small pieces and place over the wheat. Mince onion, add salt and onion, mix well with a spoon and add over tomatoes. Place a handful of the washed dried parsley and mint in a food processor. Using the pulse button, pulsate each handful 4-5 times until you chop all the parsley, placing them on top of the onion. Now you may cover the bowl and refrigerate until ready to serve. When ready add lemon juice, salt, pepper, and oil. Mix well with a wooden spoon. [Serves 8.] — Gretta Seif Class of 2016


FOOD & LEISURE

SPOTLIGHT COLUMBUS:

16-Bit Bar+Arcade

WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME you visited a retro arcade? More importantly, when was the last time you played retro arcade games for free?! I couldn’t remember the last time I did until I came across this amazing new “barcade” in Columbus—16-Bit Bar+Arcade. If you think the game plan for the night should be going out and playing games, then this is the place for you! 16-Bit Bar+Arcade is the first of its kind to arrive in Ohio. The owner got the idea after seeing a couple barcades in hipster towns like Austin, Seattle, and Portland. 16-Bit is located downtown on 254 South 4th Street next to Dirty Frank’s Hot Dog Palace, which I also highly recommend. Once you step inside, you’ll feel as if you stepped back into your childhood (minus the alcoholic beverages, of course). Lining all the walls are every nostalgic childhood game you can think of—Mortal Kombat, Tekken, The Simpsons, Tron, NBA Jam, Centipede, and even Frogger! If any of these strike a chord, then I suggest you get there immediately! After a long week at Postle, you may find yourself in need of a few beverages and they have you covered. 16-Bit tastefully blends your childhood games with adult drinks. There are multiple craft beers, whether they’re in bottles or cans, as well as a nice selection of cocktails ranging in prices and flavors for your specific palate. But don’t think you have to choose between when you can drink and when you can play, because there are small

drink stands conveniently located next to the screens on most of the games. So now you’re probably thinking that you’re going to be there for a while, and you may get hungry, but that’s already covered! Trust me, random dental student and/or faculty member reading this, I thought the same thing. 16-Bit is located right next to Dirty Frank’s which specializes in the best hot dogs you’ve ever dreamt about for reasonable prices. Even if you don’t like hotdogs, there are multiple food vendors parked right outside. 16-Bit has a great atmosphere for all demographics, so don’t think you’re too young or too old to have a good time. During my first visit, I ran into a young kid named Luke out with his friends. They were out celebrating Rumpsringa. During every young Amish teen’s life, they are given an opportunity to go out into the non-Amish world and experience life outside their community, which is known as “Rumspringa.” 16-Bit was an experience Luke wanted to have, since he may never get this chance again. So what’s your excuse random dental student and/or faculty member? Exactly! I suggest you open up your planner and pencil in an adventure to 16-Bit for the next available weekend (unless you’re a D2, in which case, just put this on your to-do list for next year). — Aklilu Ameha Class of 2016

10


https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=e7ac4c5757&view=att&th=1456b37dd53f49e2&attid=0.1&disp=emb&zw&atsh=1

OSUASDA SPRING SEMESTER is a great time to have fun. It’s a time to get back outside after the harsh winter. With the weather warming up, it’s a time to reignite that passion for outdoor patios, celebrating St. Patrick’s Day regardless of your heritage, and beach vacations. Traveling is a real possibility during that week lovingly referred to as “Spring Break.” We asked a few fellow dental students how they spent their week away from Postle Hall. Here’s what they had to say:

D3, Zeeshan Samandi, asks “Hot dogs or legs?” during his trip to Southern California.

I got my widsom teeth out the first day of spring break, which ended up including a flap and two perforated sinuses. I then flew to Key West two days later to escape the cold and recover.

Tony Besse Class of 2016

During spring break I went on a cruise with my family from Ft. Lauderdale to Haiti and Jamaica. It was tons of fun, eating, drinking, and laying out in the sun. The islands were a perfect escape from Ohio’s cold weather!

Urvi Shukla Class of 2017

page 11

SPRING BREAK!

I went to New York City for my spring break. Although not much warmer than Columbus, I had a great time visiting the Sea, Air, and Space Museum aboard the historic aircraft carrier, the USS Intrepid. Also, it was really nice to reconnect with my family and friends who live in New York.

Clare McGorry Class of 2016

I went to Austin, Texas for South By SouthWest (SXSW) to see a lot of great bands and see the MTV Woodie Awards!

Kelsey Stehli Class of 2017


SPRING PHOTO RECAP

ASDA COMM UNITY OUT KIPP WELLN ESS FAIR REACH: PREDENT DAY

IP ODA LEADERSH

INSTITUTE

PREDE

NT DA Y

PREDEN

T DAY

ADVOCAY ACADEMY

EHOUSE DAY AT THE STAT

12


The Ohio State University


12th & Neil Magazine - Spring 2014