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FALL 2009

The Ampul A MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI & FRIENDS OF THE RUDOLPH H. RAABE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

IN THIS ISSUE Service to Country, Profession and Humankind Pharmacy and Tennis: A Perfect Match 125th Celebration Continuing Education Insert


THE AMPUL The Ampul is a publication of The Rudolph H. Raabe College of Pharmacy Editors: Josh Alkire Lynn Bedford Laurie Wurth-Pressel Design: Jeni Bible Photography: Dr. Kim Broedel-Zaugg, BSPh ’81 Lynn Bedford Ken Colwell Contributors: Dr. Kim Broedel-Zaugg, BSPh ’81 Scott Wills, BSBA ’87

FALL 2009

Ampul Contents Message from the Dean Feature

p. 4-9

Service to Country Service to Profession Service to Humankind

Feature

p. 10-11

Heartburn Awareness

Moments in History

p. 11-12

125th Celebration

Feature

p. 16-17

A Perfect Match

Pharmacy News and Activities

p. 18-19

Student Focus

p. 20

Where Are They Now?

p. 22

The Ampul is published by Ohio Northern University, 525 S. Main St. Ada, OH 45810, 419-772-2000.

Lewis “LK” Smith, R.Ph., Ph.D.

The R. H. Raabe College of Pharmacy at Ohio Northern University has long been recognized as one of the premier colleges of pharmacy in the nation, continually meeting the high standards of pharmaceutical education. Throughout its prominent history, the college has graduated pharmacists who now have successful pharmacy practices and who are active in local, state and national health-related organizations. More than one-fourth of all pharmacists in Ohio are Ohio Northern alumni.

Mary Ann (Gardner) Turner

In Memoriam

Advisory Board

p. 23

FALL 2009

The Ampul A MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI & FRIENDS OF THE RUDOLPH H. RAABE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

www.onu.edu/pharmacy IN THIS ISSUE Service to Country, Profession and Humankind Pharmacy and Tennis A Perfect Match 125th Celebration Continuing Education Insert

2

p. 22

On The Cover: The Raabe College of Pharmacy celebrates its 125th anniversary by remembering the past and envisioning the future.


From the Dean

Dr. Jon Sprague Professor of Pharmacology and Dean Ohio Northern University Raabe College of Pharmacy

Serving Community and Societal Needs I recently attended the 45th Annual Licensure Ceremony for all pharmacy graduates in the state of Ohio. This venue gives us, as faculty, one final chance to mingle with our recent graduates. At this ceremony, all newly licensed pharmacists and those of us that have been licensed for some time are invited to stand and recite the Pharmacy Code of Ethics. At some point, all pharmacists have recited this code; it’s last line states, “A pharmacist serves community and societal needs.” We often talk to our students about the importance of service to the profession of pharmacy. We can see this in our students when they display leadership in numerous state and national pharmacy organizations. This trend then continues as our graduates enter the profession of pharmacy. For example, 23 Raabe College of Pharmacy graduates have held the office of president of the Ohio Pharmacists Association (OPA), and 12 have held the office of president of the Ohio Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists (OSHP). In Dr. Jon this issue of The Ampul, weSprague highlight three alumni who serve their country, Professor of pharmacology and dean profession and humankind. Ohio Northern University College of Pharmacy For the last 125 years, the students, alumni and faculty of the Raabe College of Pharmacy have served community and societal needs in so many inspiring ways. We thank all of you for all you do for the profession of pharmacy!

3


Feature

Col. Mark Butler, BSPh ’79, is dedicated to keeping the men and women in the U.S. Air Force healthy. Service is core to Col. Mark Butler’s personality. “My parents raised my brothers and me to believe in service,” he says. “Serving others is the ultimate thing you can do. There is no greater way to give.” As commander of the 59th Clinical Support Group at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, Butler has plenty of opportunities to serve the men and women who protect our country. He oversees approximately 800 health care staff members in the 59th Medical Wing at Wilford Hall Medical Center, the Air Force’s largest medical center. His unit produces 1 million meals, 3.8 million lab tests, 3.4 million prescriptions and 500 research protocols each year. Butler also is responsible for the Department of Defense’s largest and most productive blood donor center. When Butler graduated from Ohio Northern in 1979, he never imagined he would end up in the military. He started his career as a retail pharmacist in Lima, Ohio, but seven years into it, he began to feel restless. “I wanted something more,” he says. When he decided to join the Air Force at age 32, his wife, Mary, was “phenomenally supportive,” even though she knew it meant a lifetime of sacrifices.

4


These sacrifices included frequent re-assignments and relocations – an inevitable part of a military career, explains Butler. Throughout his productive 21-year career, during which he rose through the ranks to his present command, he has held a variety of posts and served in many places, including Florida, Alabama, Illinois, Ohio (Wright-Patterson AFB), Haiti, Washington, D.C., and Portugal. “You make many new friends, but then either you move on or they move on,” he says. “It can be hard to say goodbye. But I now have friends all over the country … no, all over the world!” Butler has also embarked on special assignments, including humanitarian mission trips to Haiti and El Salvador and Operation Enduring Freedom, during which he traveled to war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan to inspect pharmacy management and offer process-improvement recommendations. “We called it the ‘sleep deprivation tour’ because we moved around a lot at night for security reasons,” he says. “But I appreciated the chance to take care of those wonderful young Americans who are doing great work to keep us safe and free.”

As a top commander in the Air Force, Butler leads by example, modeling discipline, compassion and integrity. He tells his staff to treat each patient “like you would treat your mother.” While he is a self-described “rules kind of guy,” he also possesses an understanding attitude and a good sense of humor. More than two decades after he entered the military, Butler couldn’t imagine a more fulfilling path. “I would describe my military career as a delicious raspberry torte dessert because there are so many layers of satisfaction,” he says. “I get to help others as a pharmacist and health care professional, I get to mentor young people as a leader, I get to grow as a person and professional, and I get to serve my country.”

5


About the Board The Ohio State Board of Pharmacy is a governorappointed group of nine people charged with regulating the profession of pharmacy in Ohio. These nine members appoint an executive director, who, in turn, employs a staff of individuals to accomplish the functions of the board. One of the sections of the board is compliance, which ensures that the state’s pharmacists, pharmacy interns and licensed sites (anywhere that dangerous drugs are manufactured, possessed or sold) comply with state and federal laws.

Ann Abele, BSPh ’77, works to save lives on both sides of the pharmacy counter. What happens when life ambitions are met at such a young age? For some, when you’ve achieved everything you set out to achieve, you search for something more, something that will make a difference. “My ambition was to become a hospital pharmacist and maybe one day a director of pharmacy,” says Ann Abele, BSPh ’77. “Well, my second year out of school, I was a director of pharmacy. So two years after college, I met my goals. But I had to ask myself, ‘What am I going to do for the next 30 years?’ And I just wouldn’t have dreamed that this is where I’d be.” Right now, Abele is in Cincinnati, Ohio, working as a compliance specialist for the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy, serving the profession that has taken her so far. 6

Compliance field staff is divided into agents and specialists. Eight specialists work throughout Ohio, each assigned to a certain territory. Abele works in Adams, Brown, Clermont, Fayette and Highland counties as well as the eastern half of Hamilton County. Each specialist works with compliance agents who bring law enforcement experience to the position. Abele works with two such agents. “Compliance agents are former sheriffs, deputies or policemen that handle retail pharmacy, wholesalers, EMS squads, etc.,” explains Abele. “The compliance specialists are pharmacists that handle more complex sites, like hospitals, nursing homes or compounding pharmacies.” In addition to Abele, four other compliance specialists happen to be ONU pharmacy graduates: L. “Bob” Mandi, BSPh ’76, Jim Amend, BSPh ’74, Rob Amiet, BSPh ’73,and Betty (Nill) Jones, BSPh ’93. “Because Northern is small, you get to know people and you get involved with things that maybe in a larger program you don’t get to,” she explains.


This was what happened with Abele, who was exposed to the idea of pharmacy service while still at ONU. One of her externships was with Charlie Brading, BSPh ’57, an independent retail pharmacist in Wapakoneta, Ohio, who also served on the Board of Pharmacy at the time. “You learn about the Board of Pharmacy going through school, but Charlie made serving on the board a reality to me. That was when I was introduced to the idea of serving in this way,” Abele remembers. The service begins In 1998, Abele was working as director of pharmacy at a hospital in Ashland, Ohio, when Governor George Voinovich appointed her to the Ohio Board of Pharmacy. Shortly after this appointment, she was named the hospital’s chief operating officer. From July 2001 to June 2002, Abele served as president of the Board of Pharmacy, a period of time that included the tragic events of Sept. 11. This prompted a period of introspection and reassessment for Abele. “I decided that I did not want to stay in hospital administration. It just wasn’t what I wanted to do,” she says. “I also decided that I did not want to seek reappointment to the board.” The board itself only meets three days a month, but what happens between these meetings caught Abele’s attention. “As a board member, I was fascinated with what the staff did and how the cases came to us. I wasn’t so excited about being the judge and jury.

While the “best of the best” strive for best practices, the “worst of the worst” simply aim to meet minimum standards. “When I re-focus and visit places where it’s minimum standards, I’m out there protecting the public. We’re very committed to making sure that these places meet at least the minimum standards – and encouraging them to do more.” Investigating theft gives Abele the opportunity to impact the lives of individuals on both sides of the pharmacy counter. “In terms of the drug theft, people are either stealing to make money selling and trafficking, or they’re stealing because they’re addicted. Most of the pharmacists that are stealing are addicted. A lot of our investigations, then, center on pharmacists or interns that are impaired. They’re a danger to the public in terms of their professional behavior,” Abele says. “You really are saving a life, because addiction will kill,” she continues. “If you can help turn someone’s life around, whether they ever decide to practice pharmacy again or not, you’re saving a life.” Geared for service Abele explains that she was drawn to the Board of Pharmacy for the same reasons she was drawn to the profession to begin with. “People who choose the profession of pharmacy are somehow meant to serve other people in some capacity. And whether they’re doing it through standing behind a counter in a retail store, serving in a hospital or serving through their church, they’re just geared for service.”

“One day, I found out that they had split the Cincinnati territory, and they were adding a compliance specialist. So I applied and got the job, and that’s what I have been doing for the last six years.” Inspections and investigations Compliance specialists split their time between making routine inspections (looking into how the pharmacy is being run, how the drugs are secured, how records are kept, how the drugs are accounted for) and conducting investigations (primarily of drug theft). “What I love about this job is I get to see different things,” she says. “I love being out among the ‘best of the best’ pharmacists, learning from them, encouraging them and educating them. Because they’re always looking for ways to be better.”

7


Feature

For many of the world’s poor, basic vitamins and minerals can mean the difference between life or death, say Bob Eredics, BSPh ’63, and his wife, Candy. As founders of the nonprofit organization Vitamins for the World, they have overseen the distribution of 9.5 million tablets to malnourished children, pregnant women and adults in 37 countries since 2004. “We are called to do good works,” Bob says, simply. “These are good works.” The Eredics believe all people are created equal in the eyes of God; therefore, each individual deserves the chance to live their life to the fullest. But many people in developing countries have inadequate diets and unsanitary drinking water, says Bob. These conditions not only make it impossible for them to realize their physical and intellectual potential, they also lead to many untimely deaths. Witnessing one such tragic death kindled Bob’s deep devotion to serve others. During a mission trip to the Dominican Republic in 2003, he watched helplessly as a 2-year-old boy died in his arms from dehydration caused by dysentery. The child’s illness could have been

8

Bob and Charlene “Candy” Eredics are making a difference in the lives of others, one vitamin tablet at a time.


prevented if he’d had access to clean drinking water. “He had been limp and unresponsive for several days by the time he was brought to me,” says Bob. “It was like holding a wet ragdoll.” He recalls feeling an overwhelming sense of futility and sorrow as the life of this tiny toddler slipped away. After that horrible experience, he had a renewed commitment to bring about change. “Every time I see a child drinking water out of a roadside ditch, I’m reminded of the need for clean water and proper nutrition,” he says. Vitamins for the World, which is part of Be His Witness Inc., primarily focuses on the production and distribution of vitamin and mineral tablets to supplement diet. The pills are specially formulated and manufactured in the U.S. for citizens in developing countries, many who live in extreme conditions. “We don’t accept donated products because these are often castoffs with a short shelf life,” explains Bob. “We believe the people we serve deserve the best product we can provide.” The tablets are labeled in the appropriate language and packaged into convenient “suitcase-ready” boxes by volunteers from several churches in the Bradenton, Fla., area where the Eredics live. Candy oversees the scheduling of the volunteers. After packaging, the tablets hitch a ride in the luggage of American missionaries and find their way into medical clinics, schools and orphanages in impoverished villages across the globe. According to Bob, the mission teams frequently report back on the excitement of the villagers when they receive the fresh supply of vitamins.

On occasion, Vitamins for the World ships large pallets of vitamins to those in need via special envoys. For example, in February 2008, the organization teamed up with Extreme Response International and the U.S. Air Force and Coast Guard for an air transport of 1 million vitamins and a generator to schools and an orphanage in Ecuador. In addition to vitamins, the Eredics also oversee the development of clean water sources, such as water wells or treatment facilities, in the villages they serve. In the sugar cane villages of the Dominican Republic, as many as 25 percent of children die before age 5 because of water contamination, says Bob. Vitamins for the World is currently raising $60,000 for a water-purification facility that will serve approximately 40,000 people in a centrally located village in the sugar cane fields in southwestern Dominican Republic. The facility should be in full operation by March or April 2010. Bob and Candy are grateful to many ONU pharmacy alumni and faculty who have provided financial support to Vitamins for the World. Bob’s frequent mission trips to the Dominican Republic and the couple’s joint trips to Ecuador will continue as long as God allows, Bob says. This past May, he suffered a heart attack, but just one month later, he was back in the Dominican Republic working on the water-purification facility. “What a blessing to be alive and able to serve others,” he says. “I thank God every day for the opportunity.”

9


Feature Bringing heartburn awareness to Ohio and Kenya Students receive national award for efforts

Thanks

to the outreach efforts of a team of Ohio Northern pharmacy students, thousands of people in Ohio and across the globe in Masara, Kenya, have found relief from the discomfort of heartburn. Students in ONU’s American Pharmacists Association Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) chapter coordinated an extensive campaign to screen and counsel patients about heartburn. “The students were amazing. They did everything from scheduling the events to planning the events to handling public relations,” says Dr. Kristen Finley, assistant professor of pharmacy practice and heartburn chapter advisor. Students traveled to small communities throughout west-central Ohio to host events at a wide range of venues, including assisted-living homes, community pharmacies and community centers. One of the most

The pharmacy team from Ohio Northern was indispensable during the fall 2008 SHAREKenya mission trip. The 14 pharmacy students, along with preceptors Dr. Kristen Finley and Dr. Annette Enlow, took blood pressures, temperatures, respiratory and 10

heart rates, and patient histories; pre-packaged and organized medications; and dispensed thousands of medications, counseling each and every patient. Diseases encountered were not typical of what is seen in the United States. The most common diagnoses included malaria, typhoid, schistosomiasis, HIV, TB, intestinal parasites and worms, and malnutrition. “The amount of personal and professional growth that has resulted from the SHARE-Kenya trip is incredible, and the experience has carried us through tough situations back in the United


successful events took place at a Chili Cook-Off in Findlay, Ohio, where the students handed out antacid tablets and education pamphlets to a crowd of around 2,000 people. “It just makes sense to talk about heartburn when people are eating chili,” laughs Finley. The students didn’t limit their awareness campaign to Ohio – they took it overseas to Africa. Fourteen ONU pharmacy students collaborated with Ohio University for a mission trip to Masara, Kenya, in November and December 2008. In addition to their other duties, the students counseled and provided donated medications to more than 400 people with heartburn in Kenya. “The students talked with each and every patient through a translator and answered all their questions,” says Finley. “They passed out educational handouts in the appropriate language and collected patient records to document their impact.” The team’s extraordinary heartburn awareness project didn’t go unnoticed. ONU’s APhA-ASP chapter won the 2008 National Patient Care Award in the Heartburn Awareness

Challenge during the APhA’s national conference in San Antonio, Texas, in April. The chapter captured top honors against 69 other student chapters from across the country competing in a patient care project. “We had more than 60 ONU pharmacy students attend the national conference, so it was thrilling when the award was announced,” said Finley. “The Kenya project was unusual and must have been what captured the judges’ attention. In addition, our team was very successful with its public relations efforts.” According to Finley, the Heartburn Awareness Challenge provided students with an invaluable experience. “Students learned how to properly counsel patients and improve overall communication skills. They interacted with a widerange of personalities and counseled people with different needs,” she explained. “There is no doubt that this challenge positively impacted our student pharmacists, patients in the community and the overall profession of pharmacy.”

Samantha Cunningham, a fifthyear pharmacy student from Adena, Ohio, served as the chairman of the committee. Co-chair members were Krysten Bucholtz, a third-year pharmacy student from Garfield Heights, Ohio; Melissa Negro, a third-year pharmacy student from North Huntingdon, Pa.; Erin Rhodes, a fourth-year pharmacy student from Swanton, Md.; Ryan Naseman, a fourth-year pharmacy student from Anna, Ohio; Monica Weisenberger, a fourth-year pharmacy student from Columbus, Ohio; and Sarah Antloga, a fourth-year student from Ada, Ohio.

States,” says Finley. “Our medical mission team treated more than 3,500 patients in this underserved area, where 70 percent of the population lack access to health care. The need for health care continues to grow in Africa, and we feel blessed to have been able to serve this very receptive and appreciative patient population.”

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Continuing Education For more information, please visit www.onu.edu/pharmacy/pharmacy_ce/

ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF OHIO NORTHERN UNIVERSITY’S RAABE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY A Review and Update of Ohio and Federal Pharmacy Law: ASHP 2009

Monday, Dec. 7, 2009 Maggiano’s Little Italy Fashion Show Mall 3200 Law Vegas Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89109

Presented by: Dr. Donnie Sullivan, Professor Pharmacy Practice

SI

R

N

OR IV THERN UN

E

Ohio Northern University is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This knowledge-based program is acceptable for 0.1 CEUs. UAN 048-00009-019-L03-P. Please allow four to six weeks for Statements of Credit to be issued. There is no fee for this program.

Meet the Dean Series Ohio Pharmacy Law for ONU Alumni Dr. Donnie Sullivan Professor of Pharmacy Practice Raabe College of Pharmacy March 11, 2010, in Cleveland March 17, 2010, in Columbus

Save the date for these upcoming Continuing Education Programs: Continuing Education Programs March 11, 2010, in southeast Ohio (location to be announced) March 24, 2010, in Akron, Ohio

12

IO

To RSVP, call 419-772-2727 or e-mail alumni@onu.edu and indicate “ASHP Reception” in the subject line.

TY

8-9 p.m. Continuing education program with Dr. Donnie Sullivan

Join us for these additional dates:

®

Educational program 8-9 p.m.

OH

OBJECTIVES • Discuss the legal requirements regarding pharmacy technicians • Discuss the legal requirements for pharmacists to give immunizations • Discuss the requirements of computerto-fax prescriptions and electronic prescribing • Discuss issues related to controlledsubstance dispensing in an institutional setting • Discuss recent changes in Ohio and federal pharmacy law and how they impact the practice of institutional pharmacy in Ohio

6:30 - 8 p.m. Reception for alumni and friends Update on the college with Dr. Jon Sprague, dean of the College of Pharmacy

Reception and college update 6:30 - 8:00 p.m.

Continuing Pharmacy Education Offerings from Ohio Northern University * Law & Mortar is a quarterly newsletter filled with on-the-job training information relating to laws and regulations of the practice of pharmacy. This newsletter keeps you up-to-date on the latest regulatory issues of concern to practicing pharmacists. Additionally, each issues features a Continuing Education pharmacy law article, for which you can earn CE credit by completing the quiz in each article. One year subscription of $40 includes four issues and no additional cost for Continuing Education credit. Send payment to: Raabe College of Pharmacy Department of External Affairs Ohio Northern University 525 S. Main Street Ada, OH 45810

*Also check our Web page for several online continuing education offerings, including law. All online CEs are $10 per program. Visit www.onu.edu/pharmacy

Ohio Northern University is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy. Each program is acceptable for 0.1 CEUs.


P  G

T C  C H E F  P S E Both
Charles
“Chuck,”
BSPh
’63,
and
Carol
(Moore)
 Hudson,
BSPh
’63,
high
school
sweethearts
who
attended
 Ohio
Northern
University’s
Raabe
College
of
Pharmacy,
 faced
challenges
as
they
prepared
to
enter
the
pharmacy
 profession. “I
entered
the
College
of
Pharmacy
at
a
time
when
female
 pharmacists
were
not
always
accepted
in
the
profession,”
 remembers
Carol.
“I
was
able
to
eventually
overcome
this
 for
three
reasons:
First,
I
was
very
determined.
Second,
 the
dedicated
faculty
and
staff
at
ONU
gave
me
an
 excellent
pharmacy
education.
Third,
the
personal
learning
 environment
at
Northern
gave
me
the
social
and
interactive
 skills
I
needed
to
succeed.” Chuck
encountered
difficulties
of
a
different
sort.
“I
had
very
 little
financial
resources
when
I
went
to
ONU,”
he
says.
“I
 made
it
by
hitching
rides
to
Columbus
to
work
weekends,
plus
 I
had
a
lot
of
loans.”

“ONU REALLY MEANS A LOT TO US AND SO MANY OTHERS. WE’RE GLAD WE CAN HELP CURRENT AND FUTURE PHARMACY STUDENTS REPRESENT

ONU IN SERVING THE PROFESSION OF PHARMACY.”

Chuck’s
fortune
changed
due
to
the
generosity
of
others.
 “During
my
junior
year,
I
received
a
small
but
very
significant
 award.
I
thought
my
ship
had
come
in,”
he
says.
“I
really
did
 say
to
myself,
‘Someday,
I’m
paying
this
back.’” And
that’s
just
what
the
Hudsons
are
doing
today.
Wishing
 to
help
Ohio
Northern
pharmacy
students
fulfill
their
own
 educational
endeavors,
the
Hudsons
elected
to
“pay
it
back”
 via
a
gift
to
the
College
of
Pharmacy.
This
gift
has
established
 the
Charles
and
Carol
Hudson
Endowed
Fund
for
Pharmacy
 Skills
Enrichment. This
bequest
reflects
the
Hudsons’
deep
appreciation
for
the
 assistance
they
received
from
faculty
and
staff
during
their
 time
at
Ohio
Northern.
Both
Chuck
and
Carol
lead
by
example,
 and
they
wanted
their
gift
to
honor
the
College
of
Pharmacy’s
 enduring
commitment
to
excellence.
By
supporting
pharmacy
 students
in
such
a
way,
the
Hudsons
have
made
a
lasting
 contribution
to
the
University
and
the
profession.

Gifts to The Campaign for Ohio Northern University’s Tomorrow never stop supporting both current and future Northern pharmacy students, and now the need is greater than ever. For details on endowed funds and other planning options, please contact Scott Wills, BSBA ’87, director of development for the College of Pharmacy, at s-wills@onu.edu or 419-772-2705.


Raabe College of Pharmacy Celebrating 125 Years

1884-2009

14


On

Sept. 12, more than 200 pharmacy alumni, faculty, staff, students and guests attended a celebration in honor of the 125th anniversary of the Raabe College of Pharmacy at Ohio Northern University. Following a reception in the new student lounge, the guests walked to a tent adjacent to the pharmacy building to enjoy dinner under the stars.

’63, faculty and dean emeritus, and Dr. Karen Kier, BSPh ’82, director of the non-traditional doctor of pharmacy program and professor of clinical pharmacy. Gossel spoke on the tradition of the College of Pharmacy, Kier discussed the excellence of the college, and Sprague concluded the presentations by speaking about the pharmacy college of tomorrow.

Dr. Kendall L. Baker, Ohio Northern University president, and Dr. Jon Sprague, dean of the College of Pharmacy, welcomed the audience and introduced speakers Dr. Tom Gossel, BSPh

The guests sang “Happy Birthday” and cheered as Sprague and pharmacy students blew out the candles on the college’s birthday cake. A spectacular fireworks display closed the evening’s festivities. 15


Feature

A Perfect Match Pharmacy and tennis serve up a winning combination for two ONU students 2009 produced record-breaking seasons both in the classroom and on the court for the Ohio Northern University women’s tennis team. Co-captains and sixth-year pharmacy students Bridget Larson and Kaitlyn Macdonald led ONU to the Ohio Athletic Conference (OAC) regular-season championship, the OAC Tournament championship and the University’s first-ever bid to the NCAA championships. In the classroom, the Polar Bears achieved Intercollegiate Association Academic All-American Honors, earning an in-season average grade point average of 3.84, the highest of any sport in school history. Larson and Macdonald have led by example and gathered many accomplishments during their tennis and academic careers. In the classroom, both have earned national and All-OAC accolades for their successes. On the court, they were First-Team All-OAC and undefeated in the OAC in doubles for their senior campaigns. Macdonald was named 2009 OAC Player of the Year, a first for the Polar Bear tennis program.

Kaitlyn Macdonald and Bridget Larson

By amassing more than 280 wins between them, the pair has also become ONU’s all-time winningest women’s tennis players. The new record-holders were excited about their achievements. “It’s cool to leave something behind,” says Macdonald. “I have lots of memories from those doubles wins.” The girls earned most of their doubles wins together. “It gives us a great sense of accomplishment,” adds Larson.

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Both ladies are currently finishing their sixth year of pharmacy through experiential rotations and have appreciated their ONU pharmacy experiences. “The support was absolutely amazing,” says Macdonald. “We had many faculty members show up for several matches, and they would always wish us luck or ask how the season was going. We definitely knew that, no matter what, we had the total support of the college behind us, which is an incredible feeling.” Both girls attribute a big part of their success to head coach Scott Wills, BSBA ’87. “Coach stressed academics and helped me grow into the player I wanted to become,” says Larson. Wills also stressed the mental aspect of tennis. “I learned how to think on the court,” says Macdonald. Wills, who has been head coach for nine years and who played on the men’s tennis team when he was a student, also has a pharmacy connection: He’s the director of development for the college. “It’s been an honor to coach Bridget and Kaitlyn. They epitomize what being a student-athlete is all about and are going to do great things in their service to the profession of pharmacy,” he says. “A family atmosphere where alumni, faculty and staff provide support and encouragement and cheer on the students in their extracurricular endeavors really provides a great overall environment and learning experience for our students.” Macdonald and Larson feel nostalgic as their time on the tennis court and on campus comes to an end. “Northern has a warm and welcoming atmosphere that makes it special. That’s what drew me to the school in the first place, and that’s the biggest impression that I’m left with as I’m getting ready to leave,” says Macdonald. “You’d be hard pressed to find as many genuine, caring, supportive people in a single environment as at Ohio Northern, and I’m going to miss that.”

Over the last eight years, pharmacy majors have composed well over half of the Polar Bears’ roster and have been major contributors in building the Polar Bear tennis program into a perennial power in the OAC. ONU has been champion or runner-up in both the OAC regular season and OAC tournament the last eight years.

I had the privilege of meeting Dr. Albert Sebok, BSPh ’53, before even entering as a P1 at ONU. We are both from Hudson, Ohio, so he hand delivered my academic scholarship. Throughout my time at Northern, I’ve continued my relationship with Dr. Sebok, and even had him as an instructor. He was there cheering on the tennis team as we clinched the OAC title this year. I am fortunate to have formed a great relationship with him. – Bridget Larson

Pictured from left to right are Robert McCurdy, BSPh ’65, assistant dean of the College of Pharmacy, Kaitlyn Macdonald, Dr. Albert Sebok, BSPh ’53, Bridget Larson, Dr. Ervin Pierstorf, ’53, Hon. D. ’78, and Crys Latham, admissions counselor and coordinator of multicultural recruitment. 17


Pharmacy News and Activities

Record Attendance at Golf Outing Dean Jon Sprague poses with Rudy Prinz, BSPh ’53, at the 12th annual Pharmacy Golf Day at Colonial Golf Club. More than 100 golfers participated in this year’s outing, setting all-time records for participation and contribution to support current and future pharmacy students through the Pharmacy Skills Enrichment Fund. Next year’s event will be held Aug. 28, 2010.

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Editor Named

Bright Joins Faculty Dr. David Bright joined the Raabe College of Pharmacy faculty this fall. He received his Bachelor of Science in pharmaceutical sciences and PharmD from the University of Toledo. Bright’s scholarly interests include medication therapy management (MTM) and collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM), often with emphasis in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. MTM is a form of extended patient counseling, usually taking place in a community pharmacy setting and consisting of 15- to 60-minute appointments. In the ambulatory care setting, CDTM is similar to MTM, but CDTM frequently incorporates a greater emphasis on the assessment and plan for improving patient care. In an effort to support the worth of MTM and CDTM in today’s health care system, Bright also is interested in pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research to maintain the financial viability and identify quantitative support of clinical pharmacy services.

Welcome Back, Kappa Psi

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The Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical Fraternity returns to Ohio Northern University. Founded in 1879 to foster high ideals, scholarship and pharmaceutical research, the national Kappa Psi organization

Cameron Van Dyke, BSPh ’96, was recently appointed editor of The Mask of Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical Fraternity. Van Dyke becomes just the 16th editor of The Mask in the 130-year history of Kappa Psi and the first from the Gamma Delta chapter at Ohio Northern. Since graduating from ONU, Van Dyke has stayed involved in Kappa Psi by serving as grand ritualist from 1999-2001, working on numerous committees and holding several supervisor positions. Currently, Van Dyke works with Ohio Northern students as they reactivate ONU’s Gamma Delta chapter of Kappa Psi.

State Board Appointment

appointed by the governor this year to the board. His appointment is for four years.

President-elect of OSHP Rob Mains, BSPh ’79, was recently named president-elect of the Ohio Society of Health-System Pharmacists (OSHP). He will ascend to the presidency in 2010. OSHP is an organization of approximately 900 pharmacists, students and technicians representing the interests of institutional pharmacy practice in Ohio. Mains has previously served several terms on OSHP’s board of directors. As educational affairs director in 2004, Mains was instrumental in creating the first annual All-Ohio Residency Showcase, which has become a highly popular and successful event.

Troy A. Gahm, BSPh ’92, president of Gahm’s Pharmacy in Lucasville, Ohio, and co-owner of Blackburn’s Pharmacy in New Boston, Ohio, was appointed by Governor Ted Strickland to the State Board of Pharmacy effective July 1, 2009. Gahm is a past president of the Ohio Pharmacist Association and Mid Ohio Valley Pharmacy Association. He is one of only two pharmacists in the state

currently has 130 active chapters with 5,000 collegiate and more than 80,000 graduate members, making it the oldest and largest pharmaceutical fraternity in the world. Ohio Northern’s Gamma Delta chapter was started by Dean Rudolph H. Raabe in 1920 and will celebrate its 90th anniversary in March 2010. Like the national fraternity, the revitalized

Gamma Delta chapter welcomes men and women into its membership. The former chapter house is being sold to the Ada War Memorial Park for use as a community building. The park has agreed to name the building “Kappa Psi Building” and will permit the Gamma Delta Alumni Association to use the facility for its annual alumni meeting during ONU’s Homecoming weekends. 19


Student Focus Pharmacy camp

Student demonstration Nicholas Waggamon, a fifth-year student from Delphos, Ohio, prepares to give himself a subcutaneous abdominal injection. All fifth-year students are required to demonstrate injections in preparation to teach proper techniques to new diabetics.

Logan Yoho, a sixth-year student from Little Hocking, Ohio, demonstrates proper label placement during Pharmacy Camp 2009.

Twenty high school juniors attended this year’s weeklong Pharmacy Camp, which took place July 26-31, 2009. The Summer Honors Institute is an ONU summer camp experience for gifted and talented high school students. The Raabe College of Pharmacy has participated for the last three years, providing a camping experience that takes students through drug development, dosage form preparation, drug information research, physical assessment and counseling. “The main purpose is to expose students to a one-week snapshot of what a pharmacy student and pharmacist does and, therefore, interest them in pursuing a pharmacy education,” said Deirdre Myers, pharmacy instructor and laboratory instructor. “The response from all three years has been extremely positive. We also have summer campers who then apply to pharmacy school.”

White coats

During the ninth annual Professional Commitment Ceremony, which took place on Honors Day, May 9, 2009, 162 thirdyear pharmacy students received their white coats. The Professional Commitment Ceremony officially marks an ONU student’s transition from the first three years of pharmacy school to the last three professional years. 20


EMPOWERING

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Joshua Blackwell Bedford Heights, Ohio Pharmacy “ONU has one of the best pharmacy programs in the nation. I am given so many opportunities at ONU that will enrich me and make me a better person. By the end of my educational experience here, I will know what my ‘true north’ is, and I will be an individual who can make an impact on our society.”

TOMORROW Your annual support of the Raabe College of Pharmacy means that deserving students can find their “true north” and enjoy advantages true to ONU traditions – small classes, exceptional and caring professors, and academic rigor, all in an environment that is student-centered, service-oriented and values-based. The impact of loyal, recurring annual gifts cannot be overstated. By making your annual gift, you not only support the Campaign for Ohio Northern University’s Tomorrow but also help celebrate and honor the 125th anniversary of the College of Pharmacy.

Make your annual gift now using the enclosed envelope or give online at www.onugive.com


In Memoriam Where Are They Now? Lewis “LK” Smith, R.Ph., Ph.D. Lewis K. Smith graduated from the University of Texas with a Bachelor of Science in pharmacy followed by the doctor of philosophy in biochemistry. He began his teaching career at the University of Houston. Pursuing his enjoyment of teaching in 1977, he brought his wife, his son and his Texas accent to Ohio Northern’s Raabe College of Pharmacy, where he became an associate professor of biochemistry. In his 29 years of service to ONU, Smith taught biochemistry, nutrition and diagnostic tests and mentored many research students. Over the years, Smith received considerable recognition for his outstanding teaching. These awards included the ONU Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence (allowing him to be the convocation speaker at Honors Day 1992), the Pharmacy Alumni Chair, ZTA Faculty of the Year and the Rho Chi Award, just to name a few. In addition, he served as faculty advisor for Kappa Psi, Rho Chi and Mortar Board. He was also a member of Phi Lambda Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi and several other professional pharmacy groups. In 2006, Smith retired from his teaching duties at ONU. These days, he enjoys traveling with his pharmacist wife, Peggy. They moved to Columbus, Ohio, to be closer to their son, Ken, and his family. Recently, the Smiths accompanied their grandson on a visit to ONU.

Mary Ann (Gardner) Turner Mary Ann (Gardner) Turner, BSPh ’63, died at age 67 on Aug. 29, 2009, at her residence. She was born Nov. 8, 1941, in Lima, Ohio, to Burke and Margaret Baker Gardner, who preceded her in death. On Aug. 28, 1965, she married James E. Turner, BSPh ’63, ACIT ’00, who survives in Ada. Mary Ann was a pharmacist and co-owner of Gardner’s Drug Store Inc. in Ada. She and James operated the store for 37 years, buying the business from Mary Ann’s father in 1969. Their business philosophy was to always take care of the customer, even if it meant waking up at 3 a.m. to fill an emergency prescription or making home deliveries to the elderly. The Turners provided internship opportunities for many ONU pharmacy students at their store. Mary Ann also was the director of the Ohio Northern University Student Health Pharmacy for 28 years, filling prescriptions and instructing pharmacy students. “We enjoyed working with young people. It kept us young,” she once said about the couple’s connections to ONU pharmacy students. Mary Ann received a Bachelor of Science in pharmacy from ONU and was a member of the Kappa Epsilon fraternity, Zeta Tau Alpha sorority, the Ohio Pharmacist Association and Rho Chi Honorary Pharmacy fraternity. She was a member of Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church in Ada and Mother of Sorrows Catholic Church in Put-in-Bay, Ohio. She also was a member of the Ada Quatre Club, a member of the Put-in-Bay Yacht Club and a past president of its ladies auxiliary. Survivors also include a son, Eric Turner of Springfield, Ohio; two daughters, Deeann Beatty of Avon, Ohio, and Jill Fisher of Olmsted Falls, Ohio; and five grandchildren, Jack Beatty, Margaret Beatty, Katherine Beatty, Rylie Turner, Reese Turner and Holdan Turner. She was preceded in death by a brother, Thad Gardner.

The Raabe College of Pharmacy will honor the memory of Mary Ann (Gardner) Turner, BSPh ’63, by naming the college’s new student organization conference and resource center for her and establishing an endowed fund to support current and future pharmacy students. All alumni and friends wishing to make a memorial gift will be recognized in the new student organization area. Memorial gifts may be sent to the College of Pharmacy using the return envelope in the centerfold or by donating online at www.onugive.com and indicating Turner Memorial for the gift designation. Please contact Scott Wills, BSBA ’87, director of development for the College of Pharmacy, at 419-772-2705 if you have questions. 22


Advisory Board Dominic Bartone BSPh ’77 Owner Hock’s Pharmacy Vandalia, Ohio Dr. Bruce Bouts BSPh ’82 General Internist Blanchard Valley Medical Associates Inc. Findlay, Ohio Col. Mark Butler BSPh ’79 Commander, 59th Clinical Support Group Lackland AFB, Texas Mrs. Adrienne (Wood) Donaldson BSPh ’99 Professional Services Consultant McKesson Foundation Inc. Moon Township, Pa. Dr. Shawn Eaton PharmD ’01 Manager, Professional and College Relations CVS Tallmadge, Ohio George Hill BA ’69, BSPh ’74 Director, Pharmacy Services Catholic Health Initiatives Union, Ky. Kathy Karas BA, BSPh ’75 Pharmacy Manager Buehler’s Pharmacy Canton, Ohio

Richard Keyes BSPh ’92 Executive Vice President of Supply Chain Operations and Mfg. Meijer Inc. Grand Rapids, Mich. Phillip Lettrich BSPh ’85 Director of Professional Relations Emdeon Business Services Twinsburg, Ohio Jay Meyer BSPh ’82 President and COO Remedi Pharmacy Covington, Ohio Theresa “Tip” Parker BSPh ’74 Director of Trade Relations & Pharmacy Operations Abbott PPD Abbott Park, Ill.

FOR RESERVATIONS, PLEASE CALL

866-668-2586 www.onu.edu/inn

Robert “Bob” Parsons BSPh ’71 Executive Vice President Ohio Society of Health-System Pharmacists Marietta, Ohio

Tom Wiechart BSPh ’81 Pharmacist Rite Aid Lima, Ohio

Nichole (Pearson) Penny BSPh ’98 District Pharmacy Supervisor Walgreens-Grand Rapids East District Kentwood, Mich.

Suzanne Eastman Wuest BSPh ’74 Executive Director for Clinical Services Catalina Health Resource Cincinnati, Ohio

Dr. Ervin Pierstorf ’53, Hon. D. ’78 Chairman of the Board and CEO, Retired Fairview Photo Services Rocky River, Ohio, and Pinellas Park, Fla.

Michael C. Yount BSPh ’98, JD ’00 VP, Regulatory Law Rite Aid Corporation Harrisburg, Pa.

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Celebrate 125 years


Ampul Fall 2009