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JANUARY JUNE 2018

Washington Electric Cooperative Official publication | www.weci.org

SPECIAL ISSUE:

Exploring Ohio

Endless opportunities for summer adventure

Also inside Internships give a head start to co-op careers

Kids’ recipe contest winner celebrates ‘Gotcha Day’

Bicentennial Barns artist is still on the job


MAKING THE SWITCH Switch to LEDs and save LED lightbulbs use 80% less energy than traditional lightbulbs. In fact, most of the electricity a traditional bulb uses ends up as heat, not light! LEDs last much longer, too. Switch to LEDs and save.

LED Lifetime Characteristics

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018

INSIDE SPECIAL ISSUE:

EXPLORING OHIO 25 FACTORY TOURS Manufacturers throughout the state open their doors to the public, offering tours to demonstrate how they produce their wares.

30 DOGGIE DESTINATIONS More than a third of Ohio households include a canine resident, so when summer travel beckons, it’s nice to know where your tail-wagging pal can come along for the ride.

32 FUN FESTIVALS From duct tape to chivalrous knights, Ohioans find many a reason for celebration.

Cover image on most issues: Enjoying a sample after a tour of the Velvet Ice Cream factory at Ye Olde Mill in Utica (photo courtesy of Velvet Ice Cream Company).

JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 1


UP FRONT

BROADBAND AND PROSPERITY T

he internet has changed the way people live and work around the globe. Access to the internet is the emerging essential utility service. In larger cities across the U.S., there’s no concern that high-speed access is available via cable providers, cellular networks, Wi-Fi, and other broadband channels. However, throughout much of rural Ohio and rural America, high-speed internet access, commonly known as “broadband,” isn’t available. More than 1 million Ohioans lack access to fast, reliable broadband service. Nationally, the figure is a staggering 23 million. Rural broadband deployment should be inherent to the state’s infrastructure plans and development. Broadband is essential for education, health care, and business, including access to global markets. Rural America already faces stiff economic challenges. Fewer than 15 percent of American businesses are located in rural areas and small towns. Inadequate high-speed internet access is making the problem worse and contributing to the exodus of talented young people from the rural landscape. The convergence of new technology and partnerships has made rural broadband deployment more achievable than ever, but high costs remain the biggest obstacle to distribution in less populated areas. That’s why Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives strongly supports Ohio House Bill 378, which establishes the Ohio Broadband Grant Program. It’s a good start. However, if we’re going to solve this national problem, we’ll clearly need additional federal investment. Rural Ohio’s need for broadband connectivity is about better access to telehealth services, as well as educational opportunities and increased access to home learning, which, in turn, provides a more skilled rural workforce and an advanced talent pool. Further, rural broadband service means an enhanced online presence for rural retail outlets, and thus a healthier rural trade economy. For many rural communities, high-speed internet in today’s universal environment means access to prosperity. Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is committed to strong and healthy local communities. A vibrant 21st-century rural economy depends on expanded highspeed internet access and electric grid modernization efforts. That’s why we’re working to be a part of the solution to Ohio’s underserved areas.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

A vibrant 21stcentury rural economy depends on expanded highspeed internet access and electric grid modernization.


JUNE 2018 • Volume 60, No. 9

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Mary Beasecker, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Catherine Murray, Jamie Rhein, Adam Specht, Damaine Vonada, and Diane Yoakam. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. It is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.40 to $6.72 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES COOPERATIVE INTERNS: Every career has to start somewhere, and an internship at an electric co-op is a powerful beginning.

8 CO-OP PEOPLE BARN ARTIST: Scott Hagan, the man responsible for painting

Ohio’s Bicentennial Barns, is still at it two decades later.

10 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE THE OLD JOHNSTON FARM: The life of a pioneer diplomat is re-created at his original farm near Piqua.

14 OHIO ICON MADSEN DONUTS: The Geneva-on-the-Lake mainstay still uses

the original 1938 recipes left by the original owners.

16 GOOD EATS KIDS’ RECIPE CONTEST: Our winner took first prize with the recipe she makes each year to celebrate her “Gotcha Day.”

19 LOCAL PAGES News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO LIGHTING UP THE SCHOOLS: One Ohio co-op helps a local school district improve lighting in the district’s buildings.

The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

38 CALENDAR WHAT’S HAPPENING: June events and other things to do.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE FUNNY WEDDINGS: Lighthearted moments from that special day.

IN THIS ISSUE

Columbus (p.4, 5, 26) Mount Gilead (p.5) Carrollton (p.6) Millersburg (p.6) St. Marys (p.6) Jerusalem (p.8) Piqua (p.10) Geneva-on-the-Lake (p.14)

West Mansfield (p.16) Plain City (p.25) Greenville (p26, 34) Cambridge (p.27) Cincinnati (p.27) Marysville (p.28) Utica (p.28) Logan (p.33) Avon (p.34)

JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 3


apprenticeship

Below are stories from former cooperative interns, in their own words, and how their internships took them to full-time co-op jobs.

company

E

veryone has to start somewhere, career-wise. Many times, that means internships for those who are trying to sort out possible paths. For decades, explorers who have come into an internship at an electric cooperative have found a “home away from home” — a family feeling with smaller staffs that allow for both learning opportunities and advancement. Electric co-ops are companies that care about their employees; they offer good pay, stellar benefits, and a friendly environment.

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POWER LINES

Samantha Kuhn – Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, Columbus I knew I wanted to be a part of a publication that emphasized downhome topics and “real” people, like my own neighbors and friends, while still operating under the cooperative spirit I had grown up in. With my journalism background, love for editing and writing, and a fondness for the co-op model, I had an inkling that being a communications intern for Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives would be a natural fit. I dove into each day’s nitty-gritty operations and asked a thousand questions, and my internship turned out to be the best hands-on learning experience I could have hoped for — not to mention, it paid surprisingly well! My supervisor matched my interests with relevant tasks, then provided a level of honest, real-world feedback that I would have never received in the classroom. The experience allowed me to not just dip my toes into the waters of the co-op world, but to wade in as deeply as I wanted. I was able to cut the rope that bound me to my comfort zone, and in stepping out, I realized just how much more there could be to professional life than merely “work.” So, naturally, I came back to Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives when a position opened.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018


Ryan Strom – Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, Columbus After high school, I decided to study electrical engineering, which had always been an interest of mine, at Ohio University. Midway through my sophomore year, I started looking for positions through the university’s Engineering “CoOp” Program — not electric cooperatives (as I learned about later), but instead a cooperative educational program. The program was set up so engineering students could gain on-the-job experience by working full time for half of the school year and going to school full time for the remainder. I chose a position with Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives because I was excited to learn about the electric utility industry, and I was interested in the co-op business model. While interning there, I developed systems to support the statewide electricload-forecasting program, transmission interconnections, and rate analyses. The position offered exposure into regulation, distribution, transmission, and generation — all of which taught me a lot about the industry. My experience was so phenomenal that when I finished college, I accepted a full-time position with Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives as a power delivery engineer. Now I mentor all of the incoming “co-op” students from schools across Ohio.

Cooperative Dan Bunyard – Consolidated Cooperative, Mt. Gilead/Delaware

Growing up near the village of Galena, just north of Columbus, I was home-schooled from kindergarten through high school. I’ve had a knack for computers since I was young, and I decided to pursue a degree in computer engineering at Ohio Northern University. At the same time, I sought an engineering internship with a local business and got an offer from Consolidated. I worked three months that summer, sorting through old work orders and making small map corrections. In the fall, I started college and discovered very quickly that I didn’t want to be an engineer. After leaving college the following year, I returned to Consolidated, again as an engineering intern, but struggled to figure out what I wanted to be when I grew up. I shifted from engineering to IT intern for about a year before becoming a part-time technician, and that’s when I discovered that IT was my calling. I later became full-time staff and, in 2015, was promoted to systems administrator, overseeing all servers and systems. It’s an understatement to say that all the staff here at Consolidated, including some who are no longer here, are the reason I am where I am today.

Eli Callis – Consolidated Cooperative, Mt. Gilead/Delaware

My story begins at a computer networking course during my senior year of high school. About two months before graduation, my professor told the class that Consolidated had internships available. I interviewed for an IT position and am forever that happy I did, because it concluded with a “When can you start?” I knew little about electric cooperatives, but I quickly learned that Consolidated was a great place to be. I started working two hours per day until graduation and amped that up to three full-time days per week when I started college. The flexible work schedule allowed me to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in network communications management, and I was offered a full-time IT position shortly after. In 2012, Consolidated began to ramp up its plan to build a fiber communications network, and I became network supervisor to oversee and facilitate the needs of the new services. Fast-forward to the present, and our commercial fiber network is well established. I’ve had the opportunity to train and mentor other interns, and now, in preparing for even more growth, I have been asked to move into the chief technology officer role. I have never been more honored.

JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   5


Shiloh Neice – Carroll Electric Cooperative, Carrollton Growing up 15 minutes from Carroll Electric, and having lived on co-op lines for 27 years, I had some exposure to the co-op world. I decided to apply for the summer helper position because it was convenient — close to home and extra cash for college. I was hired and put right to work doing anything and everything that was asked. I helped the mechanic perform service and maintenance on the bucket, digger, and pickup trucks. I also helped in the warehouse by unloading trucks, counting inventory, and doing basic cleaning. I moved from summer helper to working on the Carroll line crew part time while finishing up my degree. In 2013, I was hired full time on the line crew and was given the opportunity to pursue an apprenticeship through the Central Ohio Lineworker Training (COLT) program. Fast-forward three years, and I was promoted to line supervisor. If I had not applied for and received the summer helper position, I would have graduated college as a construction manager. Instead, I pursued an electrical career and have loved it since.

John Porter – Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, Millersburg My internship with Holmes-Wayne began in fall 1988, while I was attending Ohio Northern University pursuing electrical engineering. I was interested in an internship program to help with financial demands and to gain experience, and I began looking into the electric utility industry at the prompting of a professor and family who were co-op members. I was offered an internship at Holmes-Wayne, and I worked on several projects while in college — from implementing an outage management system to converting a Mylar-based mapping system to an electronic AutoCAD system. My internship gave me a lot of experience, and when I graduated, I had an edge on my peers. HolmesWayne offered me a full-time job, and I accepted the position, knowing it came with close friends and family, competitive benefits, and a range of work challenges in the years to come. Looking back from the time I started at Holmes-Wayne as the company’s first in-house engineer to today, as vice president of operations and engineering, I have seen many changes throughout the years. The internship was a great place for me to test out not only a career in the electric utility industry, but a career with my potential future employer.

Matt Donaldson – Midwest Electric, St. Marys When I was in college, I was interested in an internship, but apprehensive about it. I saw an ad from Midwest for a full-time position, which I knew I couldn’t do because of school, but my dad encouraged me to apply anyway. I didn’t get the job, but it worked out because I made great connections, which became useful when I had onthe-job requirements for one of my courses. After striking out at many places and feeling hopeless, I contacted Midwest. They offered me a position working two days per week while taking classes the other three days. It was an incredible experience in the geographic information system (GIS) field, taking paper maps and updating computer models. I worked with maps until I graduated, and Midwest offered me a full-time position as GIS technician a week later. Once I was full time, I took all of the paper maps and converted them to electronic. It’s important to take chances and to not get down on yourself if you fail. If it wasn’t for my father encouraging me to put myself out there, and having my back when I did again, I would not have the job that I have today.

6   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JUNE 2018


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JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   7


CO-OP PEOPLE

artist BARN

Scott Hagan’s familiar work can be seen on structures across the state STORY AND HAGAN PHOTO BY DAMAINE VONADA

W

hen Scott Hagan remodeled his home, he and his wife, Amanda, picked reclaimed barn wood for the staircase and fireplace mantle. It was an obvious choice, given Hagan’s history.

Hagan, a South Central Power Company member from Jerusalem, Ohio, is the artist who painted the Bicentennial Barns for Ohio’s 200th birthday celebration of 2003. As far as he knows, he’s still the only professional barn artist around — and his portfolio has grown to include not only the 88 Bicentennial Barns, but more than 800 additional barns, silos, and other structures across the country (check out www. barnartist.com to see most of them). Hagan resides with his wife and their two daughters on the family cattle farm in Belmont County in a house that once belonged to his great-grandmother, just down 8

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018


Opposite: Scott Hagan has painted more than 800 barns, silos, and other structures since he first painted his dad’s barn in 1997. His latest, right across the road from South Central Power Company’s Barnesville office, was scheduled to be dedicated at the end of May. Above: An iconic Ohio Bicentennial Barn in Dorset Township, Ashtabula County, photographed by Jason Miklacic.

the road from his parents, Rick and Linda Hagan. While Hagan says he inherited his artistic talent from his mother, he grew up doing farm chores with his father. “During winter,” says Hagan, “Dad still calls me in the middle of the night to help him pull a calf.” Hagan’s career as a barn artist began on a whim in 1997, when he painted Ohio State’s Block O logo and Brutus Buckeye mascot on his father’s barn. “I was 19,” recalls Hagan, “and just wanted something big to paint.” A newspaper in Barnesville featured Hagan’s supersized art in a front-page story that caught the eye of the Ohio Bicentennial Commission. At the time, the commission was looking to build excitement for the state’s bicentennial, and after meeting with Hagan, then-Director Stephen George hired him to paint the “1803–2003” logo on barns in each of Ohio’s 88 counties. “The Bicentennial Barns were like giving everybody their own slice of birthday cake,” says George, now senior adviser to Ohio History Connection’s CEO. According to George, Hagan’s “salt of the earth” personality and farming background made him ideal for the project. “For a 19-year-old, Scott had a real understanding of the job’s significance,” George says, “and he had no trouble walking through a pasture to get to a barn. He was very confident in a rural environment.” According to the Ohio Bicentennial Commission’s final report, he traveled in the neighborhood of 65,000 miles and used 650 gallons of pain in the effort.

To Hagan’s surprise, the Bicentennial Barns brought him a certain celebrity. People showed up with picnic baskets to watch him work, asked for autographs, and even applauded when he finished painting a barn. “Scott is such a nice guy that people grew to love him,” George says. “He became like a folk hero.”

“I never intended to make barn art a career when I started, but 21 years later, I’m still doing it and I still like it.” After Hagan completed Ohio’s Bicentennial Barns, he got dozens — hundreds — of requests to decorate more farm structures. While his barn art depicts everything from corn to quilt squares, he especially enjoys doing American flags, and in fact, when Hagan repainted his dad’s barn, he changed his original Ohio State symbols to Old Glory and an eagle. In 2015, Hagan began painting Ohio History Barns, commissioned by the Ohio History Connection and local historical societies, to present Ohio’s rich heritage of significant people, places, and achievements, and to whet the public’s appetite to learn more. “I never intended to make barn art a career when I started,” Hagan says, “but 21 years later, I’m still doing it and I still like it.”

JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 9


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

The old

JOHNSTON

FA R M Historic site depicts the life and times of a frontier diplomat STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

D

uring the early 1800s, Ohio was the western edge of America’s frontier. A few Native American tribes still remained in the state, but the Indian Removal Act numbered their days. Passed by the U.S. Congress in 1830, the Act required all Indians living on reservations to move west of the Mississippi. The last to leave the Buckeye State were the Wyandot, and the man tasked with making that happen was John Johnston (1774–1861). “Johnston was a good choice for the job because he was highly respected by both the Indians and whites,” says Andy Hite, site manager of the historic Johnston Farm and Indian Agency, located near Piqua, Ohio. “It took a great amount of skill and diplomacy to do what he did.”

Frontier introduction Born in Ireland, Johnston emigrated to America at the age of 12 and settled in Pennsylvania, eventually finding work hauling supplies by wagon to Anthony Wayne’s army supply post at Fort Piqua. Right around 1800, at age 26, Johnston became involved with a young woman named Rachel Robinson, who was 16 at the time. The problem with the budding romance was that Rachel was Quaker by religion and John was Episcopal; to say the least, Rachel’s parents didn’t approve. The two young lovers solved the problem by eloping to Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Their honeymoon was an 850-mile horseback trip through the wilderness from Pennsylvania to Indian Territory (now Indiana) where Johnston had accepted a job as an Indian Factor, running the government trading post at Fort Wayne. The position was Johnston’s introduction to Native American culture. He became adept at dealing with the tribesmen of the region and was eventually promoted to Federal Indian Agent.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018


The Old Johnston Farm and Indian Agency in Piqua takes visitors back to explore what life was like in 1800s frontier Ohio during John Johnston’s time as Federal Indian Agent. The historic site includes Johnston’s preserved farmhouse mansion, mule-towed canal boats, and more.

Called back to service He remained in that position until 1811, when he and Rachel moved to their farm near Piqua, onto land Johnston had first seen years before and subsequently purchased in 1804. Their marriage and lives there were prolific; they had 15 children (five boys and 10 girls), and all but one lived into adulthood. It was during this time in his life as a “gentleman farmer,” as he liked to refer to himself, that Johnston was called out of retirement by the federal government to act as the Indian Agent for western Ohio when the War of 1812 broke out. His farm became the site of the new Indian agency from which he oversaw the Shawnees beginning in 1812, adding the Seneca and Wyandot tribes in 1816. Johnston was ousted from his position in 1829 when a new presidential administration (Andrew Jackson) took over in Washington. Yet, he was still willing to help his friends the Wyandot relocate when they left in 1843.

See for yourself If you’d like to experience what life was like on the Ohio frontier, the Johnston Farm and Indian Agency (www. johnstonfarmohio.com) is open Thursday through Sunday from June through August; and by special appointment in April, May, September, and October. Start your visit at the museum to get a sense of the Native American influence surrounding the area, then take a tour of the red-brick farmhouse — considered a mansion during its time — the rooms furnished with period furniture. “We like to keep the house looking as if the original occupants have just stepped out of the room,” Hite says. “So you might see Rachel’s needlework left on a sofa, kids’ toys scattered in a corner, or important papers lying on John’s writing desk.” No visit to the farm is complete without a canal-boat ride on the section of the Miami and Erie Canal that passes through the property. Pulled by a mule or two, the canal boat moves just a few miles per hour. “Canal-boat operators were fined if they exceeded the speed limit of 4 miles per hour,” Hite says, “as the wake from boats eroded the canal banks.” W.H. “CHIP” GROSS is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor.

JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


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OHIO ICON

MADSEN DONUTS Geneva-on-the-Lake BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: On the famous “Strip” (a.k.a. State Route 531) of attractions, eateries, and entertainment venues clustered near Geneva-on-the-Lake’s lengthy Lake Erie shoreline. Provenance: In 1938, Carl Madsen and his wife, Isobel, opened a small donut shop in the summer resort community of Geneva-on-the-Lake. Thanks to Madsen’s delicious “secret” recipes and emphasis on quality, Madsen Donuts developed a loyal following and soon became a favorite stop for vacationers. Their childhood memories of making trips to Madsen Donuts prompted Harry and Bev Biery to buy the shop from Carl Madsen in 1974, and with help from their children, they devoted their summers to operating Madsen Donuts. Keith Biery, who was 5 years old when his parents purchased the shop, grew up making donuts and took over Madsen Donuts in 2005. Biery met his wife, Billie, at the donut shop, and along with their son and daughter, they continue to operate Madsen Donuts as a family business. Significance: Celebrating its 80th anniversary in 2018, Madsen Donuts is an iconic Geneva-on-the-Lake destination, beloved by generations of families who have

14

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018

patronized the shop, as well as the many people who have worked there as teenagers. “Customers always tell us to never change the shop,” says Biery. “They want it to stay just the way it was when they were kids.” Currently: Madsen Donuts offers five kinds of raised donuts and seven different cake donuts. As caretakers of Carl Madsen’s inimitable culinary legacy, the Bierys still use his original recipes, and to ensure freshness, the donuts are handmade throughout the day. From mixing and rolling to filling and glazing, customers love to watch the process. “You can see everything that happens in the kitchen, and that’s an attraction all by itself,” says Biery. It’s a littleknown fact that: Although Madsen Donuts is known for its special glazed cinnamon stick donut, the shop’s best-seller is its creamfilled stick donut. Madsen Donuts, 5436 Lake Rd. E., Geneva-on-the-Lake, OH 44041. For additional information and hours, call 440-466-5884 or visit www.madsendonuts.com.


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reductions, limitations, and exclusions to include a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership. Policy Form ICC11L057P or state equivalent (in FL: 7722L-0505; in NY: 827Y-0505). Not available in all states. In NY, during the first two years, 110% of premiums will be paid. Website unavailable for NY residents. EASY WAY Whole Life Insurance is underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Omaha, NE 68175, which is licensed nationwide except NY. Life insurance policies issued in NY are underwritten by Companion Life Insurance Company, Hauppauge, NY 11788. Each company is responsible for its own financial and contractual obligations. *Age eligibility and benefits may vary by state. **In FL policy is renewable until age 121. AFN44167_0113 JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 15


CONTEST WINNER’S DISH CELEBRATES HER

‘Gotcha Day’ E

very year, the Sloneker family, Logan County Electric Cooperative members from West Mansfield, celebrates a little differently than many others do on Valentine’s Day.

“We call it Gotcha Day, and it’s almost like a second birthday celebration,” says 11-year-old Sasha Sloneker. That was the day that Kara and Mark Sloneker formally adopted Sasha from an orphanage in the Russian province of Siberia. “We have a special dinner and dessert every year, plus I usually get to open presents,” Sasha says. Sasha says that as she has gotten older, she’s enjoyed helping to plan the special day, and she created Sasha’s Pastries for the occasion. “I make it every year on my Gotcha Day.” The recipe is the grand prize winner in Ohio Cooperative Living’s 2018 Cooking With Kids reader recipe contest. Judges not only were inspired by Sasha’s story, but also were impressed by the recipe’s simplicity and its adaptability for other occasions. The pastries earned Sasha and her family the contest’s top prize, an Ohio-made KitchenAid stand mixer. Sasha was inspired by a recipe in her Princess Cookbook, which she improved by adding different flavorings to the icing. She can change it further to celebrate any holiday by using different-shaped cookie cutters or flavorings in the icing.

SASHA’S PASTRIES Prep: 15 minutes; Cook: 10 to 13 minutes; Servings: 24 (depending on the cookie cutter size) 

Strawberry Flavored 15-oz. refrigerated pie crust, at room temperature 1/2 cup (8 oz.) softened cream cheese

Orange Flavored 15-oz. refrigerated pie crust, at room temperature 1/2 cup (8 oz.) softened cream cheese 8 Tbsp. orange marmalade

16

4 Tbsp. powdered strawberry milk mix 16 oz. fresh strawberries, sliced top to bottom, stems removed Orange food coloring (optional) 15 oz. mandarin orange slices

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018

Set oven to 350°F. Unroll the pie crust. Using a cookie cutter, make shapes and put them on a cookie sheet. Gather scraps, roll again and cut more shapes. Bake for 10 to 13 minutes or until light brown. Cool on a rack. While the pastries are cooling, make the frosting. Blend the softened cream cheese and strawberry milk mix or marmalade and food coloring, then blend together with a hand mixer until thoroughly mixed. If too thick to spread, microwave for 10 seconds and stir. When the pastries have cooled, spread some filling on each one. Put a slice of fresh strawberry or orange slice on top and enjoy. Refrigerate leftovers.


Runners-up earn kids’ cookbooks for their entries Erica Simcic, 10, cooks with her grandmother, Judy Tomasovich, a South Central Power Company member from Woodsfield. She earned one of the runner-up awards with her favorite weeknight meal, which she likes so much, she also asks to make it for her birthday dinner each year.

LITTLE MEAT PESTO PIZZA PATTIES Prep: 10 minutes; Cook: 20 minutes; Servings: 4 4 Tbsp. shredded Parmesan cheese 4 frozen breaded chicken patties a sprinkle of Italian seasoning 4 tsp. jarred pesto a sprinkle of garlic salt 1/2 cup spaghetti sauce cooked pasta sidekick 8 slices pepperoni (optional) 1 large tomato Preheat oven to 400°F (ask adult for help).  Place frozen chicken patties on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Next, cover each patty with 1 tsp. of pesto. Then place 2 pieces of pepperoni on each patty. Slice your tomato and place a piece on each patty. Top it off with some shredded Parmesan cheese. Lastly, sprinkle a little Italian seasoning and garlic salt on each patty. Who doesn’t like a sprinkle? LOL.  Place tray of patties in oven for 20 minutes. When oven timer goes off, plate your patties by putting two tablespoons of spaghetti sauce on plate and then place patty on top. We also like to serve a side of our favorite kind of pasta with it. The options are endless on what toppings you could place on your meat pizzas and also what pastas you could have as a sidekick with that patty. Enjoy!! Ulrick Bivens, 6, was inspired by the well-used recipe card for the Pioneer Woman Chocolate Mug Cake that hangs on the refrigerator at the Willard home of his great-grandmother, Barb Annon, a Firelands Electric Cooperative member. Ulrick improved the recipe by adding a not-so-secret ingredient to make his dish.

PEANUT BUTTER SURPRISE Prep: 5 minutes; Cook: 1.5 minutes; Servings: 1 to 3 In a small bowl or mug, mix together: 3 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 3 Tbsp. sugar 2 Tbsp. cocoa powder 1/4 tsp. baking powder 2 Tbsp. peanut butter chips

tiny pinch of salt Mix with fork and add: 3 Tbsp. milk 3 Tbsp. vegetable oil tiny bit of vanilla

Mix all that with a fork. Then drop in the surprise: 1 tsp. peanut butter 1 tsp. powdered sugar Roll the peanut butter in the powdered sugar, and push the ball down into the middle of the cup. Microwave for 90 seconds. When done, sprinkle more peanut butter chips on top and let melt for frosting, or sprinkle with powdered sugar, and eat it up.

JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


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hio electric cooperative leaders joined more than 2,000 of their counterparts from around the country in April to discuss legislative and regulatory concerns with members of Congress at the 2018 NRECA Legislative Conference in Washington, D.C. The conference, held annually, allows co-op leaders to build relationships with policymakers that improve their members’ lives every day. “These relationships are good for the cooperatives and each of their members, and they’re good for our elected representatives,” says Pat O’Loughlin, CEO of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide association that provides services to 25 member cooperatives around the state. “There are issues that affect all of us, and our representatives are giving of their time and efforts to make sure they hear what we have to say.” At one point, Rep. Jim Jordan, from Ohio’s 4th District, who is chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Health Care, Benefits, and Administrative Rules, literally turned over the gavel to a colleague during that subcommittee’s session so he could join a large Ohio contingent in his Rayburn House office. It’s that type of engagement that has helped secure $600 million for rural broadband loans and grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the omnibus spending bill that was passed by Congress in March. That bill also included $5.5 billion for the federal electric loan program, funding for continued cybersecurity research, and provisions streamlining vegetation management on federal lands — all of which are issues cited as among the most important to electric cooperatives by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. At the April session, the farm bill, which was expected to come before Congress in mid-May, was front and center in meetings with legislators, according to Marc Armstrong, director of government affairs at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. “The rural broadband funding in the omnibus was a good down-payment, but there’s a lot more that needs to be done,” Armstrong says. “The farm bill isn’t just about agriculture — it’s also a rural development bill, and must include support for programs that improve the quality of life for rural Americans.”

18   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JUNE 2018


WASHINGTON ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

MESSAGE FROM THE GENERAL MANAGER

R

epresentatives from Ohio’s electric cooperatives traveled to the nation’s capital in April to advocate for the interests of electric co-op members in the halls of government. During office visits with members of Congress, these co-op representatives sought support for legislation that would expand access to high-speed broadband internet, fund rural development programs to boost local economies, and keep members’ electric rates low by loosening burdensome regulations. Legislators were urged to support a farm bill that includes strong financial support for electric cooperatives and rural communities. Washington Electric Cooperative speaks up to represent members like you — and to act in your best interest. Together, with electric co-ops across the nation, we have a loud voice. Thankfully, not all electric co-op members need to fly to D.C. to have their voices heard. Washington

Electric members can visit www.action. coop, where they can educate themselves on energy policy and send messages to their representative and senators on behalf of the cooperative. Washington Electric Cooperative members can also boost our grassroots policy efforts by joining ACRE CoJack Bragg Jr. op Owners for Political GENERAL MANAGER/CEO Action®, which supports political candidates who understand co-op issues and will fight on our behalf. To learn more about Co-op Owners for Political Action and how you can raise your voice on both a state and federal level, call our office at 740-373-2141.

JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  19


WASHINGTON ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Cool Returns: Save energy, get $100

W

e all know what accompanies summertime — humidity and hot temperatures. But there’s another summertime element that affects your wallet: higher electric bills.

Electric power is usually received from baseload power plants, which are the most reliable and cost the least to operate. But when more electricity is needed — like during the hot summer months, usually between 2 and 7 p.m. — your electric cooperative is forced to use power from inefficient peaking plants, which costs more. When demand for electricity is high, the cost can skyrocket for members. 1261828301 The solution? Participating in Cool Returns, an air-conditioning “load management” program from Washington Electric Cooperative that decreases demand on the electric system from air conditioners. Saving energy keeps electricity costs lower for everyone over the entire system.

How it works and why you should participate Washington Electric will install — at no cost to you — a radio-controlled switch on your central

air conditioner or air-source or ground-source heat pump. This does not control your home’s thermostat or harm your cooling system; it simply cycles the unit’s compressor during peak conditions for about 30 minutes of every hour in 15-minute intervals. “Cycling the air-conditioning units, instead of just turning them off for an extended period, allows us to reduce costs on hot summer days while continuing to cool members’ homes,” says Kevin Zemanek, director of system operations at Buckeye Power, Washington Electric’s cooperative wholesale power supplier. These cost reductions are passed on to co-op members as savings on their electric bills. By participating in Cool Returns, you will receive a one-time, $100 rebate once the switch is installed. No maintenance or upkeep is required on your part, and to see if the switch has been activated, simply check for a red indicator light.

Member satisfaction We know what you’re thinking — will I feel a difference in temperature? Because the fan isn’t controlled, cool air still circulates in your home when the switch is activated. Despite factors like how well your home is insulated, most participants report they don’t notice a change in comfort. “Over 99.9 percent of people don’t have a problem with the switch,” said Jennifer Greene, director of marketing and member services at Washington Electric Cooperative. “We encourage people to give it a try. It’s a great way to help keep costs low for yourself and your neighbors, and there’s the added benefit of a $100 rebate.”

Moving forward Before contacting Washington Electric Cooperative, look up the manufacturer of your air conditioner or heat pump, the model number, and unit capacity. Also determine if it has an outdoor disconnect switch. To learn more or to enroll, call Washington Electric Cooperative at (740) 373-2141 or visit the energy-saving section of our website, www.weci.org. 20   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JUNE 2018


YOUTH PROGRAMS

Area students earn co-op scholarships Congratulations to the four local high school seniors named winners in Washington Electric Cooperative’s annual Children of Members Scholarship program. Katey DePuy of Caldwell took first-place honors and earned a $1,500 award. A graduate of Caldwell High School, she is the daughter of Randy and Marissa DePuy and plans to study biomedical science. Second place and a $1,000 award went to Meredith Coil of Marietta. The Marietta High School graduate is the daughter of Robert and Melissa Coil and plans to study biology. Coil also earned ninth place in the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives statewide scholarship competition, winning an additional $1,500 prize.

Katey DePuy

Meredith Coil

Isabella Brown

Devyn Latture

Isabella Brown of Graysville earned a $750 third-place prize. Also a graduate of Marietta High School, she is the daughter of Russell Brown and Melissa Brown and plans to major in visual communication design. The fourth-place $500 award went to Devyn Latture of Marietta. The Warren High School graduate is the daughter of Scott and Sally Latture and plans to study biological sciences. Washington Electric Cooperative is proud to have provided scholarships to high-achieving children of members for more than 50 years. We wish this year’s winners the best of luck with their future endeavors.

“Dads are most ordinary men turned by love into heroes, adventurers, story-tellers, and singers of song.” — Pam Brown

Happy Father’s Day!

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month Laundry Tip: Use rubber or wool dryer balls, which help separate clothing in the cycle, providing better airflow and a shorter drying time. Wool dryer balls can help absorb moisture, which also reduces drying time. Source: energy.gov

JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 21


WASHINGTON ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES NOTES Dual Fuel — rebates of $500 for new heat pumps installed with a fossil fuel furnace system and co-op load management switch.

Capital credits Washington Electric Cooperative, Inc., refunded capital credits totaling $51,536.15 to the estates of 43 members through March 2018. If you know of a deceased member, please have the executor of the estate call our office for information on the member’s capital credits.

Geothermal — rebates of $600 for newly installed geothermal systems. Air conditioners — rebates of $100 for whole-house airconditioning systems with co-op load management switch. Applies to systems younger than 10 years.

Credit for account number If you find your account number in the local (center four) pages of this magazine, call the co-op office; you will receive at least a $10 credit on your electric bill. In April, David Offenberger of Whipple located his account number and received a $20 bill credit. If you find your account number, call the co-op office by the 16th of the month in which it is published.

Co-op Connections® Card Washington Electric Cooperative members saved $322.94 in March on prescription drugs with the Co-op Connections® discount card. Members have saved a total of $91,391.80 since the program launched in June 2011. Be sure to check out www.connections.coop for information on discounts from national retailers and Coupons.com!

Refrigerators and freezers — $100 rebate for members who replace existing refrigerators and stand-alone freezers with a new ENERGY STAR®-labeled appliance. Rebates available on first-come, first-served basis. Call for details.

Co-op services After-hours outage reporting — Call 877-544-0279 to report a power outage outside of business hours. Outage alerts — Use our SmartHub system to sign up for free outage alerts and other co-op information. Online bill payment — Visit www.weci.org to use our secure SmartHub online payment system. Automatic bill payment — Call our office for details on

Co-op rebate programs

having your electric bill drafted from your checking or savings account each month.

Water heater — rebates from $200 to $400 for qualifying

Pay your bill by phone — Call 844-344-4362 to pay your

50-gallon or higher new electric water heaters.

electric bill with a check, credit card, or debit card.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Paul Fleeman, CCD, BL CONTACT 740-373-2141 | 877-594-9324 www.weci.org REPORT OUTAGES AFTER HOURS 877-544-0279 OFFICE 440 Highland Ridge Road P.O. Box 800 Marietta, OH 45750 OFFICE HOURS Mon.–Fri., 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

Chairman 740-934-2306

Larry Ullman, CCD, BL Vice Chairman 740-934-2561

Betty Martin, CCD, BL Secretary-Treasurer 740-473-1539

Gale DePuy, CCD, BL Assistant Secretary-Treasurer 740-473-1245

William Bowersock, CCD, BL

General Manager/CEO jbragg@weci.org

BILL PAY SmartHub www.weci.org HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION? E-mail your ideas to: jgreene@weci.org. Facebook.com/WashingtonElectricCoop

740-373-5861

Shawn Ray 740-638-5270

Brent Smith 740-585-2598 CCD — Certified Cooperative Director BL — Board Leadership

22   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JUNE 2018

Jack Bragg Jr.

Twitter.com/washelectcoop


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

Co-op-aided lighting upgrade brightens district’s schools North Central Electric Cooperative (NCE) Energy Services Advisor Andrew Finton helped New Washington’s Buckeye Central Local School District upgrade its lighting to moreefficient LED technology. Lighting installations have been made in stages over the last three years, allowing Buckeye Central to reduce its lighting wattage and energy costs. Next, Buckeye Central plans to upgrade lighting in the vocational agriculture and industrial arts areas, plus the bus garage. Eventually, the school district aims to reach 100 percent LED use in all buildings. NCE and the school district took advantage of a statewide rebate program available through Buckeye Power, NCE’s wholesale power supplier. Up to $15,000 per facility in rebates is available to commercial and industrial members who upgrade their lighting.

Troy employees receive electrical safety training from Pioneer EC Nearly two dozen City of Troy employees attended a safety demonstration and training at Pioneer Electric Cooperative earlier this year. The training explained the danger of electrical lines that come in contact with anything from equipment and vehicles to clothing and vegetation. Pioneer Operations Supervisor and Assistant Safety Manager Steve McClay shared stories of electrical contacts and the dangers of exiting vehicles that have downed lines on them. The number of broken poles due to vehicle accidents in 2017 was at an all-time high on Pioneer lines.

PPEC awards grant to boost local economy Monroeville recently received a $14,400 grant from Buckeye Power and Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative, whose northwest Ohio territory stretches into portions of northeast Indiana. The money will allow the east Allen County community to develop 42 acres located next to the American Mitsuba plant and obtain an environmental survey to assist in site certification and marketability. Due to the site’s highway access, employees could be drawn from both Indiana and Ohio, an attractive factor to potential buyers.

JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 23


OHIO TRAVEL ISSUE

Exploring Ohio

From exploring natural wonders to satisfying curiosity at historical marvels and fun festivals, the Buckeye State offers almost endless opportunities for adventure.

24

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018


OHIO AT WORK Manufacturers throughout the state open their doors to the public, offering tours to demonstrate how they produce everything from modern vehicles to old-school items and providing prime examples of the Buckeye work ethic. Plan ahead: Since production schedules can affect factory tour availability, always call to confirm dates and times. BY DAMAINE VONADA

Phoenix Bat Company Plain City

7801 Corporate Blvd., Plain City 877-590-6675 www.phoenixbats.com

“W

ho wants to start the lathe?” asks sales specialist Brian Chenetski, as he leads visitors on a tour of the Phoenix Bat Company. “All you have to do is push the green button.” A youngster steps forward, presses the button, and — voila! — everyone watches wide-eyed as the lathe turns a chunky wooden billet into a sleek baseball bat in only two minutes. “This is the most advanced bat-making machine in the world because it automatically cuts and sands wood,” Chenetski tells the group. Located near Plain City, Phoenix Bats is a Union Rural Electric Cooperative member that annually manufactures about 17,000 baseball bats from maple, birch, and ash, sourced primarily from New York and Pennsylvania. “That’s where they grow tall and straight; we need perfect, straight-grained wood for our pro billets,” Chenetski explains. Although it’s one of 38 companies approved to make pro bats, Phoenix Bats hits a grand slam by offering nearly 700 different models sized for everyone from T-ball players to major leaguers. It also produces customized award and trophy bats, as well as reproduction bats dating back to the 1850s. The company itself started in 1996, when a Columbus craftsman who played for the Ohio Village Muffins decided to make authentic bats for the old-time team. Today, Phoenix Bats keeps a firm grip on the vintage market with a lineup that includes Ruth, Mantle, and “Shoeless Joe” replicas. “This company began with the Muffins,” notes Chenetski, “and it’s still the gold standard for vintage bats.”

JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   25


American Whistle Corporation Columbus

6540 Huntley Rd., Columbus 800-876-2918 www.americanwhistle.com

Started in 1956, the only U.S. metal whistle manufacturer produces 1 million whistles every year. “We make the best whistles in the universe,” says Business Development Director Mark Waterstreet. “They’re heavy-gauge brass, don’t rust, and last a lifetime.” After watching the company’s 40-ton press and custom-made soldering machine in action, tour participants get a complimentary whistle.

KitchenAid Stand Mixer Factory Greenville

1701 KitchenAid Way, Greenville 888-886-8318 www.kitchenaid.com/ experience-retail-center

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018

The KitchenAid stand mixer is likely America’s favorite countertop appliance, and every single one originates at the Greenville manufacturing plant. “People love that they’re made in America,” says Tour Guide Marlenea Hood. Since the mixer comes in more than 80 colors, the factory’s robotic paint department wows visitors, and so do the optional post-tour apple dumplings at downtown Greenville’s KitchenAid Experience retail center.


Mosser Glass Cambridge

9279 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge 866-439-1827 www.mosserglass.com

The Mosser family’s expertise is hand-pressed glass, and at their factory’s retail store, pieces like Mosser’s gorgeous cake stands confirm their knack for beauty and craftsmanship. Tours cover the entire manufacturing process, and says Manager Mindy Mosser Hartley, “People can see the handiwork that goes into decorating lights or crimping baskets.”

Rookwood Pottery Company Cincinnati

1920 Race St., Cincinnati 513-381-2510 www.rookwood.com

Founded by pioneering ceramist Maria Longworth in 1880, the revered art pottery company has a tradition of excellence that is evident in timeless architectural tiles, as well as decorative items such as its iconic 1920s Shirayamadani candlesticks. Tours include every phase of pottery production and emphasize the company’s artisans. “The scope of the Rookwood tour,” says guide George Hibben, “is unequaled as a living treasure of American ceramic art.”

JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   27


Honda Heritage Center and Auto Plant Tour Marysville

24025 Honda Parkway, Marysville 937-644-6888 www.hondaheritagecenter.com

At Honda’s visitor facilities in Marysville, you get two different tours in one trip. The self-guided, at-your-own-pace tour of the Honda Heritage Center’s museum features products from Gold Wing motorcycles to a HondaJet, while fast-paced guided assemblyplant tours showcase the Accord. Tip: Plant tours have limited availability, so reserve your spot early.

Velvet Ice Cream Utica

11324 Mt. Vernon Rd., Utica 800-589-5000 www.velveticecream.com

28   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JUNE 2018

An 1800s mill complete with a waterwheel provides a picturesque home for the Dager family’s century-old Velvet Ice Cream Company. After tour guides review the history of the company and Ye Olde Mill, guests get to watch ice cream being made from a viewing gallery. Tip: Try the Licking Legend, Velvet’s famous five-scoop sundae, at Ye Olde Mill’s café.


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JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   29


TRAVEL ISSUE

DOG-FRIENDLY

DESTINATIONS STORY AND PHOTOS BY JAMIE RHEIN

O

hio is generally a dog-friendly state — more than a third (36.6 percent) of the state’s households include a canine resident — and research tells us that nearly two-thirds of dog owners consider their pup to be a member of the family. So when summer travel beckons, it’s nice to know where your tail-wagging pal can come along for the ride.

The great outdoors Ohio’s 56 state parks are a dog-friendly gold mine of miles of trails and pristine waterways, with diverse vistas from the rugged beauty of southeastern Ohio’s mountains to Lake Erie’s shoreline. From woods to wetlands, there’s much to explore with a canine companion.

30

where dogs can settle in. At the lodges at Deer Creek, Punderson, and Salt Fork, dogs are allowed to stay in some guest rooms for a nominal fee. Over the years, Malabar Farm — where the top of Mt. Jeez offers a stunning view of the farm and surrounding hills — has been Columbus poet Charlene Fix’s go-to place for dog-walking adventures. Three generations of dogs have made the trip with her. She also loves the Kokosing Gap Trail on a former Pennsylvania Railroad line between Danville and Mt. Vernon.

Add some structure

When Kathy McQuate of Whitehall headed to Deer Creek with her family for a weeklong getaway, Hoagie, their German shepherd, vacationed right along with them. “Our cabin was right by the water,” she says. “Every morning, he barreled through the trees to the lake.”

For ranger-led events where dogs and dog folks mingle, head to Howl at the Moon, Happy-Tails-n-Trails, and Walk and Wolf through the Columbus Metro Parks system. These evening programs at Highbanks, Glacier Ridge, and Sharon Woods pair hikes with nature know-how. Dogs are welcome on dog-friendly trails throughout the park system.

Deer Creek is one of several parks with a dog beach and dog-friendly cabins, and every park has campsites

In the Dayton area, Five Rivers MetroParks offer the nation’s largest paved trail network of more than 300

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018


If You Go • Keeping dogs on a leash is a requirement at all places mentioned here. • To go to dog-friendly places, your dog must also be dog- and people-friendly. • When canoeing, consider a life jacket for your dog for safety. Also, put a towel or a mat in the canoe bottom to help your dog keep its footing.

miles to explore. The mix of waterfalls, gardens, prairies, and forests are dog-friendly destinations. Last year, Cox Arboretum became dog-friendlier after Zipp, the park’s worker dog, retired. With Zipp no longer around to keep the geese away, visiting dogs (with their owners) do the job instead.

More adventures For dog travel with a river view, hit the Hocking River on a Hocking Hills Adventures canoe trip. “Dogs are family,” says owner Shane Barbini. The 5-mile Crockett’s Run gives dogs plenty of time to get out and swim. At Captains Baseball Stadium in Eastlake, where the Lake County Captains play, enjoy a night of baseball with your best friend. “Bark in the Park nights are our favorite games of the season,” says Brent Pozzi, social media manager. A portion of all dog tickets sold is donated to the Lake County and Geauga County Humane Societies. Dog-friendly activities and promotions go on throughout the game. In Marietta, the Lafayette Hotel, with a history steeped in Ohio’s sternwheeler days, welcomes dogs as favored guests. At checkin, dogs are given a treat from a dog treat jar. The $50 pet fee is returned if there isn’t any damage to the room.

JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 31


TRAVEL ISSUE

Fun festivals!

Ohio Renaissance Festival, Harveysburg

Beginning Labor Day weekend, the woods at Renaissance Park become enchanted as the clock turns back to 16thcentury England. Step into the village of Willy Nilly-onthe-Wash, where history blends with fantasy in a joyous mix as strolling minstrels, swashbuckling pirates, fair maidens, kilt-clad gents, and more beckon, “Come play.” The line between audience and performers is often a blurry one; many visitors dress in period garb as they

32

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018

enjoy Queen Elizabeth I’s royal wave in the daily parade; laugh-out-loud shows of silliness and zany feats; and full-armored jousting as it was done 400 years ago. There’s an array of vendors hawking anything from period costumes, elf ears, and fairy wings to flower garlands and knight’s gear, as well as crafts and artisans’ offerings such as pewter and leather mugs, stained glass, jewelry, hair ornaments, and instruments. Food’s also plentiful — giant roasted turkey legs, and stew in a bread bowl are popular — and there are demonstrations everywhere.


It’s a kid-friendly festival, with games of skill and humanpowered Crow’s Nest and Sea Dragon rides. — JAMIE RHEIN

Ohio Renaissance Festival, Saturdays and Sundays, 10:30 a.m.– 6 p.m., Sept. 1–Oct. 28, 2018; order discounted tickets from the website or pay at the gate. www.renfestival.com.

Washboard Music Festival, Logan

What do your great-grandparents, John Lennon, and the Hocking Hills have in common? Washboards, of course. Back in the proverbial good old days, washboards were a household staple. Americans used their corrugated metal surfaces not only for rubbing clothes clean, but also for making music. The style of music created on washboards and other improvised instruments — including spoons, jugs, and cowbells — is called skiffle, which blends elements of American folk, jazz, blues, country, and other sounds. In the 1950s, skiffle was all the rage in England, and none other than future Beatle John Lennon started a skiffle band, complete with a washboard player. Today, the last U.S. washboard manufacturer — the Columbus Washboard Company — is in downtown Logan, where, fittingly enough, the nation’s only festival dedicated to washboard music takes place every Father’s Day weekend. The event’s unique repertoire of toe-tapping entertainment includes such acts as the Steel City Rovers (Celtic), The Wayfarers (Appalachian fiddle songs), Little Roy & Lizzie (traditional bluegrass), and Washboard Hank, a popular Canadian artist who plays country and contemporary tunes on instruments that include a banjo, guitar, kazoo, and his famous “Stradivarius Washboard.” — DAMAINE VONADA

Washboard Music Festival, June 14–16, 2018; 740-277-1806, www.washboardmusicfestival.com

JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   33


Avon Heritage Duck Tape Festival, Avon

Duct tape is the silver-colored adhesive material that has been used for everything from quick household fixes to helping the Apollo 13 astronauts safely return to earth. During World War II, U.S. soldiers likened duct tape’s water-resistant qualities to water rolling off a duck’s back and nicknamed it “duck tape.” The moniker, well, stuck. Today, the Cleveland suburb of Avon is known as the world’s Duck Tape capital because it’s home to ShurTech Brands, which markets the popular tapes. Every June, the Avon Heritage Duck Tape Festival attracts some 60,000 duct tape fans by showcasing the

Gathering at Garst, Greenville The Gathering at Garst may be less than a decade old, but it already has become one of Ohio’s unique treasures. “It’s family-friendly, relaxing, and affordable, and the grounds are beautiful with lots of shade,” Chairperson Jenny Clark says. The Gathering at Garst benefits the Darke County Historical Society’s Garst Museum, and takes place on the last weekend in July at both the museum’s Greenville campus and an adjoining park that hosts the festival’s Living History Encampment. Reenactors wear period clothing and demonstrate historic crafts from 1750 34   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JUNE 2018

ingenuity and creativity that the versatile product inspires. This year’s construction-themed event includes arts and crafts; a Saturday parade; and a fashion show, in which contestants model clothing made from duct tape. The event is free, and in addition to live entertainment, it features favorite local foods. Tip: Go early, because each day, the first 500 festival-goers get free rolls of Duck Tape. — DAMAINE VONADA

Avon Heritage Duck Tape Festival, June 14–16, 2018; 866-818-1116, www.ducktapefestival.com

through 1865, and besides lively — and loud! — cannon firings, this year’s Encampment will include a special candlelight tour. Other attractions include a concert by the Beach Boys tribute band, Sounds of Summer; curated works by regional artists; horse-drawn carriage rides; and exhibits at the Garst Museum that range from the momentous 1795 Treaty of Greene Ville to Darke County-born sharpshooter Annie Oakley. — DAMAINE VONADA

The Gathering at Garst, July 28–29, 2018; Living History Encampment Candlelight Tour, July 27, 2018. Gathering at Garst festival, free; Garst Museum, admission fee. 937-548-5250, www.gatheringatgarst.com, and www.garstmuseum.org.


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JUNE 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37

4/30/18 3:35 PM


JUNE 2018 CALENDAR NORTHWEST

JUN. 1–2 – Dennison Railroad Festival, Historic Center Street District, downtown Dennison. Rides, food, train exhibit, and entertainment for all ages. Car & Motorcycle Show Sat., registration at 10 a.m., judging at 12:30 p.m. Parade 5 p.m. Sat. 740-922-6776 or www. dennisonrailroadfestival.org.

live entertainment, classic car show, and fireworks. Parade Sat. at noon. 419-877-2747 or www.awchamber.com/cherry-fest.html.

for children and students. Gates open at 5 p.m., children’s activities 5:30–7:30 p.m. www.defiancejazzfestival.com.

JUN. 8–9 – Pork Rind Heritage Festival, downtown Harrod, Fri. 6 p.m.–midnight, Sat. noon–midnight. Cruise-in car show, games, entertainment, and, of course, freshly popped pork rinds! www. porkrindfest.com.

JUN. 16–17 – The Fantastic Tiffin Flea Market, Seneca Co. Fgds., 100 Hopewell Ave., Tiffin, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free admission. 300 to 450 dealers per show. 419-447- 9613 or www. tiffinfleamarket.com.

JUN. 9 – Chalk the Walk, 109 S. Ohio Ave. (court square), Sidney, 9 a.m.–noon. Rent a sidewalk square for a donation and create your masterpiece. Chalk provided. A panel of judges will choose a winner, who will receive a prize. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

JUN. 16–17 – Hands-on Glass Blowing, Sauder Village 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold. Class fee $43–$51. 60-minute sessions. Work with internationally acclaimed glass artist Mark Matthews to create your own ornament, pumpkin, flower, or tumbler. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org.

JUN. 9 – Playful Pastimes: Canal Boat Ride, Providence Metropark, 13801 S. River Rd., Grand Rapids, 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. $7, Srs. $6, C. (3–12) $6, under 2 free. Take a canal boat ride on the restored Miami & Erie Canal. www.metroparkstoledo.com. JUN. 9–10 – Power of Yesteryear Club Annual Spring Show, Wood County Historical Museum, 13660 County Home Rd., Bowling Green (off I-75, exit 179, east 1/2 mile). Set-up day is June 8. 419-819-9355 or www.powerofyesteryear.org.

JUN. 3 – Stryker Sportsman Club 3-D Archery Shoot, 02638 Co. JUN. 10 – William Hogeland: Autumn of the Blacksnake, NazRd. 20, Bryan (1/2 mile north of St. Rte. 6 on the right), 9 a.m.–noon. arene Family Ctr., 401 E. Boundary St., Fort Recovery, 3 p.m. Free. A rare opportunity to hear this widely read author and historian. $10, under 18 free. Thirty targets. 419-636-4987 or on Facebook. 419-375-4384, www.fortrecoverymuseum.com, or on Facebook. JUN. 7 – Pinterest Party, Bruno’s (back room), 110 E. Poplar JUN. 16 – Antique Tractor Show, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. St., Sidney, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $35, available online. We bring the supplies, you bring the fun! For age 21 and over. 937-658-6945, www. 2, Archbold, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Historic tractors from the 1920s to the 1960s. Tractor pedal pulls for the kids, hands-on activities. 800-590sidneyalive.org, or https://pinterestparties.bpt.me. 9755, aaron.hughs@saudervillage.org, or www.saudervillage.org. JUN. 7–9 – Whitehouse Cherry Fest, 10802 Waterville St., Whitehouse, Thur. 6–10 p.m., Fri. 1 p.m.–midnight, Sat. 9 a.m.–midnight. JUN. 16 – International Jazz Festival: “Take Me to the Rivers,” Kingsbury Park, 118 Auglaize St., Defiance, 5:30–10:15 p.m. $5; free Free admission and parking. Fresh cherry pie and turnovers, rides,

NORTHEAST

JUN. 2–3 – Ohio Valley Frontier Days, Historic Fort Steuben, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, C. (6–12) $3, under 6 free. Celebrating early American life; crafts, games, pony rides, music, , and dancing. 740-283-1787 or www.oldfortsteuben.com.

JUN. 16–AUG. 11 – Ohio Light Opera, Freedlander Theatre, 329 E. University St., Wooster, 2 and 7:30 p.m. June shows: The Pajama Game, Babes in Arms, and Fifty Million Frenchmen. 330-263-2345 or www.ohiolightopera.org.

JUN. 12–15 – Greek Food Festival, Holy Trinity Greek Church, 300 S. 4th St., Steubenville, 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Experience the tastes and sounds of Greece with traditional foods, music, and dance plus tours of the beautiful church. 740-282-7770 or www.holytrinitygreekfest.com. JUN. 16 – Our Little World Alpacas Spring Open House, 16800 Cowley Rd., Grafton, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. The babies are here! Come see our newest baby alpacas (crias). 440-477-4300 or www. ourlittleworldalpacas.com.

JUN. 7–AUG. 2 – Fort Steuben Thursday Summer Concert Series, Berkman Amphitheater, Fort Steuben Park, 120 S. 3rd St.,

JUN. 16 – Steubenville’s Dean Martin Hometown Celebration, S. 4th St., Steubenville, 9 a.m.–9 p.m. Street festival featuring

JUN. 7–9 – Hot Air Balloon Festival, Coshocton Co. Fgds., 707 Kenilworth Ave., Coshocton, Thur. 4–7 p.m. balloon launch, Fri. 11 a.m.–9:15 p.m. Balloon Night Glow, Sat. 6 a.m.–9:45 p.m. fireworks. 740-622-4877, 800-338-4724, or www.visitcoshocton. com/hot-air-balloon-festival. JUN. 8–10 – Worthington Chorus: “A Crazy Little Thing Called Love,” McConnell Arts Ctr., 777 Evening St., Worthington, Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 2:30 p.m. $10 for ages 12 and up. Songs of the 1980s, with karaoke and best 1980s outfit contest. info@worthingtonchorus.org or www.worthingtonchorus.org.

JUN. 2–JUL. 1 – Rock Mill Weekends, Stebelton Park at Rock Mill, 1429 Rockmill Place NW, Lancaster, every Sat. and Sun., 12–4 p.m. Free. -681-7249 or http://fairfieldcountyparks.org.

38   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  JUNE 2018

JUN. 30 – Lake Seneca Annual Miles of Yard Sales, off N. St. Rte. 576, 1-1/4 miles north of U.S. 20, Montpelier. 419-485-1413, 419485-0393, or www.lakeseneca.org.

JUN. 9 – International Wine at the Mill, Loudonville, noon–11 p.m. Enjoy nearly 100 varieties of international and Ohio wines, domestic beers, live music, and great food. $10 adults over 21, $1 ages 10–20, under 10 free. 419-541-0161 or www.wolfcreekmill.org/ events.html.

JUN. 3 – Kelleys Island 5 & 10K Run/Walk, Memorial Park, 112 Division St., Kelleys Island. Registration begins at 8 a.m., race at 10:45 a.m.. Pre-registration $20 online, ending one week before race day. 419-746-2360 or www.kelleysislandchamber.com.

MAY 30–JUN. 2 – Deercreek Dam Days Festival, Williamsport, Wed./Thur. 4–10 p.m., Fri. 4–11 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Fun for the whole family, with music, food, games, and rides for all ages.​www.deercreekdamdays.com.

JUN. 23–24 – Northwest Ohio’s Picker’s Paradise, Henry Co. Fgds., 821 S. Perry St., Napoleon, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Huge flea market. Antiques, car parts, arts and crafts, food. ksgeil@yahoo.com or 419-235-3264.

music, vendors, food, entertainment, street dance, car show, 5K walk/run, trolley tours, and lots of activities for kids young and old. 740-283-4935 or www.visitsteubenville.com.

JUN. 16 – Beyond the Fences of Zoar: Garden Tour and Luncheon, 198 Main St., Zoar, 9 a.m.– 5 p.m. $15 tours only, $35 for tours and luncheon (reservations required for luncheon). Public and private garden tours, shopping in the Zoar Garden, and symposiums by master gardeners. 800-262-6195 or www. historiczoarvillage.com.

CENTRAL

JUN. 23 – Kids Around the Square, 109 S. Ohio Ave. (court square), Sidney, 9 a.m.–noon. We partner with United Way agencies, nonprofit organizations, businesses, and churches to provide a free morning of FUN for children ages 12 and under. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

Steubenville, 6:30–9 p.m. Bring a blanket and picnic basket and enjoy a free concert overlooking the Ohio River. 740-283-1787 or www.oldfortsteuben.com.

JUN. 9–10 – Quailquest Farm Spring Garden Fair, 2810 Armstrong Rd., Wooster, Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m., rain or shine. Free admission, $2 parking fee per car. Over 70 exhibitors will display their garden art and horticultural products in tents and among the lush gardens. Food wagons on site. 330-345-6722 or www.quailcrest.com.

JUN. 2 – Flea Market on Chardon Square, 111 Water St., Chardon, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission. More than 100 distinctive vendors. Includes vintage and collectible items. http://chardonsquareassociation.org.

JUN. 22–24 – Maria Stein Country Fest, 2291 St. Johns Rd., Maria Stein. Free admission, parking, and entertainment. Handicapped accessible. Live music, games, tractor square dancing, horse and wagon rides, food, and more. 419-586-1146 or www.mscountryfest. com.

JUN. 8–10 – Columbus Arts Festival, downtown riverfront, Columbus, Fri. 11 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. Features nation’s top artists and craftspeople, live music, theater, dance, hands-on art activities, and food. 614224-2606 or http://columbusartsfestival.org. JUN. 9 – Cruise-a-Palooza, downtown Amanda, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. $10 registration for contestants. Classic cars from all eras, baked goods auction, door prize drawings, DJ, and exhibitors. philipmstroup@hotmail.com or http://cruise-a-palooza.com. JUN. 10 – Summer Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Makoy Event Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $3, 12 and under free. www.avantgardeshows.com.

JUN. 22–23 – Ohio Scottish Games, Lorain Co. Fgds., 23000 Fairgrounds Rd., Wellington. $12–$20, under 11 free. Kids’ games, animals, British cars and bikes, Clan Village, Kilted Mile, and more. Newly added is Grass Track Bike Racing. www.ohioscottishgames.com. JUN. 22–24 – Cy Young Days Festival, 102 S. Bridge St., Newcomerstown. Food, entertainment, Old Timers’ game, and more. Former Cy Young Award winner Dwight “Doc” Gooden will be the guest of honor at the luncheon and grand marshal of the parade. 740-227-1544 or www.cyyoungdaysfestival.com. JUN. 22–24 – Lorain International Festival and Bazaar, Black River Landing, Black River Lane, Lorain, Fri. 5–11 p.m., Sat. noon–11 p.m., Sun. noon–6 p.m. $3 daily. Ethnic foods, crafts, and nonstop entertainment. Puerto Rico is the Spotlight Nationality. www.loraininternational.com. JUN. 30 – Fort Laurens: “Let Them Eat Cake,” 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, 1–4 p.m. $10. Dress in your finest for an afternoon of British teas, desserts, and history of the 18th century. Reservations required. 330-874-2059 or www.fortlaurens.org. JUN. 30–JUL. 1 – Mad River Bike Tour, Mad River Harley Davidson, 5316 Milan Rd., Sandusky. Registration Sat. 10 a.m.–2 p.m. $10 per person for the tour, $20 per bike for the round-trip ferry. 419-746-2360 or www.kelleysislandchamber.com.

JUN. 15–17 – Coshocton Dulcimer Days Festival, Roscoe Village, 600 N. Whitewoman St., Coshocton. Free admission and parking, workshops $15; Appalachian and traditional music. 740-545-6265 or www.coshoctondulcimerdays.com. JUN. 15–AUG. 5 – CAPA Summer Movie Series, Ohio Theatre, 55 E. State St., Columbus, Wed.–Sun. 7:30 p.m., Sun. matinee 2 p.m. 614-469-0939 or www.capa.com. JUN. 23 – Dublin Kiwanis Frog Jump, Coffman Park, 5600 Park Rd., Dublin, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Multiple rounds followed by a championship. 800-245-8387 or www.visitdublinohio.com. JUN. 23–24 – Fairfield County Heritage Association Home Tour, 105 E. Wheeling St., Lancaster, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tickets $12 in advance or $15 day of tour. Visit historic homes in the heart of Lancaster. 740-654-9923 or www.fairfieldheritage.com. JUN. 23 – Fayette County’s Toast to Summer and Hot Air Balloon Glow, Fayette County Airport, 2770 St. Rte. 38, Washington Court House, 1–10 p.m. Wine tasting, 50-plus art vendors, food, entertainment, beer garden, biplane rides, and hot air balloons! 740-335-0761 or www.fayettecountyohio.com.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

SOUTHEAST

Deerassic Park, 14250 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Free event is an opportunity to explore various vehicles and meet the people who build, protect, and serve our community. Raffles, play area, and face painting. 740-432-7440. JUN. 2–3 – Southern Ohio Farm Power of the Past: Antique Tractor and Machinery Show, Pike Co. Fgds., Piketon. Vintage tractors and farm equipment. Flea market and craft items, Truck and tractor pulls Sat. 7 p.m., car show Sun. 740-289-4124. JUN. 3, 23 – Music at the Mound with Steve Free, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 1 p.m. on Jun. 3, 2 p.m. on Jun. 23. Free admission, $8 vehicle parking fee. http://arcofappalachia.org/ steve-free.

JUN. 16–17 – Drinking Habits, Markay Theater, 269 E. Main St., Jackson, Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. 740-577-3841 or www.applecityplayers.com. JUN. 22–23 – National Cambridge Glass Collectors Show and Sale, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, Fri. 1–5 p.m., Sat. 10:30 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, good for both days. 740-4324245 or www.cambridgeglass.org. JUN. 22–24 – Muskingum Valley Trade Days, 6602 St. Rte. 78, Reinersville. Large flea market. 740-558-2740. JUN. 22–23 – Kicking Bear One-on-One, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge. Free event, but pre-registration is required. 740-435-3335 or www.deerassic.com.

JUN. 8–10, 15–17 – Narnia, Cambridge Performing Arts Ctr., 642 JUN. 22–24 – The Wonder Workshop, Highlands Nature Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, Fri./Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. $10, Srs./ Sanctuary, 7660 Cave Rd., Bainbridge. Discover the hidden world Stds. $8, under 2 free. 740-261-4304 or www.cambridgeperformof insects with guest leaders Kate Redmond, the “Bug Lady,” and MAY 30–JUN. 3 – National Road Yard Sale, throughout Guern- ingartscenter.org. naturalist John Howard. Register at 937-365-1937 or http://arcofapsey and Belmont counties. Find bargains, antiques, fresh produce, JUN. 9 – Return of the Snakes, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, palachia.org/wonder_workshop. furniture, and more as you shop the sales along Historic U.S. 40. Peebles, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Live reptile displays and presentations on http://nationalroadyardsale.com. JUN. 23 – Summer Solstice Dinner and Celebration, Serpent Ohio’s native snakes. Free admission, $8 vehicle parking fee. 937Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 2–10 p.m. Lecture by Brad Lepper: JUN. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 – Rise and Shine Cambridge Farmers 365-1935 or http://arcofappalachia.org/return-of-the-snakes/. “Effigy Mounds — A World View.” Guided tour. Optional BBQ Market, Tractor Supply on Rte. 209/Southgate Pkwy., Cambridge, JUN. 9–10 – Lucasville Trade Days, Scioto Co. Fgds., 1193 dinner is $15/plate. Pre-register at 937-365-1935 or http://arcofappa8 a.m.–noon. 740-439-2238 or www.downtowncambridge.com. Fairground Rd., Lucasville. $3, under 13 free. Free parking. Features lachia.org/solstice. JUN. 2 – Guided Hike, Highlands Nature Sanctuary, 7660 Cave dogs and other farm animals to sell, buy, or trade, plus flea market JUN. 30 – Forgotten Places and Spaces Walking Tour, through Rd., Bainbridge, 10 a.m. Free guided hike on the beautiful Barrett’s treasures. 937-728-6643 or www.lucasvilletradedays.com. Historic Downtown Cambridge, 3–4:30 p.m. 740-705-1873 or www. Rim trail. Register at 937-365-1935 or http://arcofappalachia.org/ JUN. 16 – National Road Bike Show and Ribfest, Historic ohiomadegetaways.com barretts-rim-guided-hike. Downtown Cambridge, 11 a.m.–8 p.m. Enjoy bikes, ribs, and music JUN. 2 – Hospice of Guernsey’s 4th Annual Touch A Truck, all day! 740-439-2238 or www.downtowncambridge.com.

SOUTHWEST

Tribute. Free. Bring your chair, but no coolers, please. 937-543-5115 or www.tippcityartscouncil.com.

WEST VIRGINIA

JUN. 9 – Old Fashioned Strawberry Festival, 4782 Cincinnati Brookville Rd., downtown Shandon, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission. Fresh produce, strawberry shortcake and ice cream. Local vendors and artists, live music. 513-860-4194 or www.gettothebc.com/events. JUN. 9–10 – Hueston Woods Arts and Crafts Fair, Hueston Woods State Park, Pioneer Farm Museum, 6929 Brown Rd., Oxford, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $4, under 13 free. Outdoor juried art show with over 80 exhibitors. 513-523-8005 or www.gettothebc.com/events. JUN. 16 – Paddle Palooza, Cowan Lake State Park, 1750 Osborn Rd., Wilmington, 1–5 p.m. Free and open to the public. Try out a kayak, canoe, or stand-up paddleboard. 614-306-4913. JUN. 2 – Bradford Railroad Festival and Train Swap: A Salute to the Railroaders, Bradford Ohio Railroad Museum, 200 N. Miami Ave., Bradford, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 13 free with a paying adult. Features train layouts, model train and historical train vendors. 937552-2196 or www.bradfordrrmuseum.org.

JUN. 22 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, McCoy’s Place, 6008 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, 7–9 p.m. Free. Enjoy an evening of lively bluegrass. 513-385-8222 or www.facebook.com/mccoys. place/?rf=192920540735840.

JUN. 23 – Treasure Island River Fest, 409 N. Elm St., Troy, 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Live music, food trucks, brews available after 4:30 p.m. JUN. 2–3 – Troy Strawberry Festival, downtown Troy, Sat. 10 12.1-mile River Race and post-race celebration. www.greatmiami.net. a.m.–8 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.–6 p.m. More than 60 food booths, all showJUN. 23–24 – 26th Annual Historic Home and Garden Tour, casing strawberry dishes and products. Also arts and crafts vendors, 370 E. Main St., St. Paris, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $15. Enjoy a weekend of live music, and more. 937-339-7714 or http://gostrawberries.com. tours, craft demonstrations and sales, food, and live entertainment. JUN. 5–8 – Greenville Farm Power of the Past: 19th Annual Tour is not handicapped accessible and pets are not allowed. 800Reunion, Darke Co. Fgds., 800 Sweitzer St., Greenville. $5. Featuring 791-6010 or www.ccpaurbanaohio.com. tractors and equipment, oil field engines, and Michigan-built JUN. 23–24 – Keeping the Tradition Pow Wow, 2301 W. River engines. 937-547-1845 or www.greenvillefarmpower.org. Rd., Dayton, Sat. 12–8:30 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $8, Srs./C. (6–16) $6, JUN. 8–9 – Banana Split Festival, Denver Williams Park, 1100 free under 5. Weekend passes available. American Indian dances, arts Rombach Rd., Wilmington, Fri. 4–10 p.m., Sat. noon–10 p.m. Free. and crafts, and food. 937-268-8199 or www.sunwatch.org. Food booths, live music, games, 5K run, and, of course, banana splits! JUN. 23–24 – Vectren Dayton Air Show, Dayton International wilmingtonbanana@gmail.com or www.bananasplitfestival.com. Airport, 3800 Wright Dr., Vandalia, 9 a.m.–6 p.m. One of America’s JUN. 8–10 – Versailles Poultry Days, 459 S. Center St., Versailles. leading air shows, featuring the U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels. www. Free admission and parking. Enjoy barbecue chicken dinners and daytonairshow.com. many fun events. 937-526-9773 or www.versaillespoultrydays.com. JUN. 9 – Canal Music Fest, 35 Parkwood Ave., Tipp City, 5:30–10:30 p.m. Featuring Tusk — The Ultimate Fleetwood Mac

BIG SALE!

JUN. 2 – Taste of Parkersburg, corner of 3rd and Market Sts., Parkersburg, 5–11 p.m. $15 advance, $20 at site. Savor food, wine, and beer from local restaurants. 304-865-0522 or www.downtownpkb.com. JUN. 8–10 – Fostoria Glass Society of America Convention and Elegant Glass Show, Moundsville Ctr. Bldg., 901 8th St., Moundsville. This year features cuttings by the Fostoria Glassware Company. 304-843-4128 or www.fostoriaglass.org. JUN. 28–30 – Point Pleasant Sternwheel Regatta, Point Pleasant. Free admission. Parade, pageants, concerts, and more. www. pointpleasantregatta.org.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org.

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JUNE 7, 8, 9 & 10 JULY 12, 13, 14 & 15 AUGUST 9, 10, 11 & 12 SEPTEMBER 6, 7, 8 & 9 Show Hours: Thurs. 10:45am - 6pm, Fri. & Sat. 9am - 6pm, Sun. 10am - 4pm Directions: 3 miles East of Atlanta Airport, I-285 at Exit 55 (3650 & 3850 Jonesboro Rd SE)

JUNE 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 39


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

Funny Wedding Pictures My husband, Robert, and me on our wedding day. His mother, Janet Perkins, gifted us with a honeymoon nightie, so we modeled it while she peeked at us. This is the only framed photo I have of that day. Not sure what she was thinking! Susan Perkins South Central Power Company member

My granddaughter (and flower girl), Alizah, was scared to death of the bearded groom, my nephew, Robbie, when he married Alicia. The ring bearer, Alizah’s brother, Camden, couldn’t even get her to smile. Katie Grubb South Central Power Company member

Jim Wiechart, vice president of the board of Midwest Electric, Inc., and me on our wedding day in 2009. We live in beautiful rural Mercer County, but at the time, I was living in a high-rise condo in a nearby city. Family members thought it would be fun for us to do our own version of Green Acres, so we sang it for all our guests. Kit Wiechart Midwest Electric member

Send us your picture: For September, send “Sweater Weather” by June 14; For October, send “Costume Party” by July 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JUNE 2018


TRUST. ANOTHER PRECIOUS RESOURCE WE’RE COMMITTED TO PRESERVING. Around here, there’s more to trust than making sure your lights come on when you flip the switch. We also have information you can trust, whether it’s about local renewable energy options or ways to lower your bill. To learn more, visit ohioec.org.

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION.

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Ohio Cooperative Living - June 2018 - Washington  
Ohio Cooperative Living - June 2018 - Washington