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Washington Electric Cooperative Official publication | www.weci.org

JANUARY APRIL 2018

Appreciating our linemen

Also inside 5-ingredient desserts

A ‘new’ way to troll for walleye

Regional issue


April is

National Lineman Appreciation Month #ThankALineman Lineworkers serve on the front lines of our nation’s energy needs, and we honor the men and women who work in challenging and often dangerous conditions to keep the lights on. We are proud to recognize all electric lineworkers for the services they perform around the clock in difficult conditions to keep power flowing and to protect the public’s safety. Bringing power to the people. Wherever they may be.

ohioec.org

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INSIDE

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

SPECIAL ISSUE:

REGIONAL TRAVEL Anyone who lives in Ohio knows the almost limitless variety of places to go, things to see, and events to experience within the Buckeye State’s borders. Sometimes, however, it can be fun to cross the state line and get a little taste of what our closest neighbors have to offer. 26

EQUINE DISNEYLAND

Kentucky Horse Park celebrates 40 years as a favorite Bluegrass State attraction.

28

SHIPSHEWANA

The Midwest’s largest flea market and plenty of great Amish food make this northern Indiana spot well worth the trip.

32

GHOST TOWN

Only hikers and history buffs know much about this Civil War-era West Virginia boomtown, nearly 140 years after it burned to the ground.

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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UP FRONT

C

LEARNING OUR LESSONS

A

s spring blooms across Ohio, we also prepare for the inevitable thunderstorms that accompany the season. This past winter, we’ve done more than ever to prepare for the storms, car accidents, and other events that cause lights to go out. The Central Ohio Lineworker Training (COLT) program has been busier than ever, taking advantage of the new indoor facility that we built last year to train both apprentice and journeyman lineworkers about safe and effective methods to repair, and enhance, our electric network. The building and its training stations represent a significant shared investment among the state’s electric cooperative network. It provides a year-round, controlled environment for our lineworkers to learn and master their trade. Not only do the COLT program and training facility help to make our service more reliable, they simultaneously help to keep our lineworkers safe. We had high expectations for the facility’s operational impact — yet the benefits have more than surpassed our hopes. In addition to the basic instruction that we provide to apprentices who are learning their trade, we’ve added advanced classes for journeymen that increase their technical knowledge, demonstrate state-of-the-art equipment, and incorporate advanced work methods in a controlled environment. Apprentice and journeyman class enrollments have been at maximum levels, allowing us to employ our second classroom to meet demand. Our instructors are able to re-create real-life situations to answer questions with hands-on demonstrations, rather than simply explaining theory. The indoor training environment provides a better way for instructors to teach and explain correct procedures to a student who’s handling a live wire at the top of one of the facility’s 40-foot poles. We celebrate Lineworker Appreciation Day on April 9, so please take a moment to thank our linemen for the work they do to keep our lights on. It’s a difficult and potentially dangerous job under the best of conditions, but as you can imagine, their work is most crucial when conditions are at their worst. I’m thankful that we can now provide them the best possible training to prepare them to provide a vital service.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

Pat O’Loughlin

President & CEO Ohio's Electric Cooperatives

We had high expectations for the facility’s operational impact — yet the benefits have more than surpassed our hopes.


APRIL 2018 • Volume 60, No. 7

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES

APPRECIATING OUR LINEWORKERS: They put their lives on the

line every day to keep the power flowing. Here are their stories.

Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communicati ons Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Samantha Kuhn Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer

10 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Pat Keegan, Becky Linhardt, Catherine Murray, Jamie Rhein, and Damaine Vonada.

12 OHIO ICON

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec tric Co op erati ves, Inc. With a paid circulati on of 294,359, it is the offi cial com mun icati on link be tween the elec tric co operati ves in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem bers. Nothing in this publicati on may be reproduced in any manner without writt en permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperati ves, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

‘THE TUG IS THE DRUG’: W.H. “Chip” Gross fulfills a longtime wish, learning to hand-line for walleyes on the Detroit River.

PIONEER SPIRIT: Marietta’s Campus Martius Museum pays homage to the first permanent settlers in Ohio.

15 GOOD EATS SWEET AND SIMPLE: Who says decadent desserts have to be

complicated? Try these five-ingredient delights.

19 LOCAL PAGES News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO CONCERN FOR COMMUNITY: Ohio electric cooperatives make

a difference through a series of donations for schools, health care, and economic development.

The fact that a product is adverti sed in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en dorse ment. If you fi nd an adverti sement mis leading or a product unsati sfactory, please noti fy us or the Ohio Att orney General’s Offi ce, Consumer Protecti on Sec ti on, 30 E. Broad St., Col um bus, OH 43215, or call 1-800-282-0515. Periodicals postage paid at Colum bus, OH, and at additi onal mailing offi ces. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and adverti sing offi ces at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member

38 CALENDAR WHAT’S HAPPENING: April events and other things to do.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE THE FIRST TIME: There’s a first time for everything, and readers

share memories of some of their favorite debuts.

IN THIS ISSUE

New Concord (p.4) St. Marys (p.4) Millersburg (p.4) New London (p.4) Mariett a (p.12) Ridgeway (p.23) Greenville (p.23) Rio Grande (p.23) North Balti more (p.23) Kelleys Island (p.34)

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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POWER LINES

L

BY SAMANTHA KUHN

A LINEMAN’S

Being a lineman is more than a profession; it’s a description of self, according to these men who have more than just their jobs in common — they share a wealth of stories, a knack for troubleshooting, and an often unspoken but consistently unshakeable dedication.

4

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018


B Barry Wisniewski

arry Wisniewski, 66, is the senior-most lineman at Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative in New Concord. Wisniewski was initially hired in 1978 as that co-op’s first meter reader, but two weeks after his hiring, the blizzard of ’78 hit, causing widespread chaos and power outages, and titles didn’t matter anymore; all hands were on deck, and most didn’t even go home at night.

“I remember fighting our way out when most of the roads weren’t open,” Wisniewski says. “To get around, we’d repeatedly send the 4-wheel drive pickup to punch into snowdrifts, then the winch truck would pull it out. Then we’d try the bucket truck and pull it out when it got stuck. Finally, when it got through, the path was wide enough to get the winch truck through.”

For Jesse Tuente, 34, climbing school was the worst of his training days. He recalls raw, bloody shins, the pounding of his heart, and a good deal of heckling. Tuente, like most linemen, was attracted to the physical, outdoor aspect of the trade — but he was scared of heights. “Climbing school was the hump for me; I remember thinking, ‘I don’t know if I can do this,’” says the St. Marys-based Midwest Electric lineman, who’s been at the co-op for 10 years. But he did it, and he still relishes both the challenge and rewards that come with the job. Jesse Tuente

After witnessing the linemen’s scrappy and creative get-it-done mentality, Wisniewski decided to go into the trade himself — which itself is no easy task, then or now. Today, Ohio’s electric cooperative network sends apprentice linemen to its own Central Ohio Lineworker Training (COLT) facility, a $1 million state-of-the-art center in Mt. Gilead. Since COLT’s inception in 2004, about 370 lineworkers have passed through the four-year program’s strenuous combination of hands-on classroom and field work.

The COLT curriculum includes a heavy focus on safety training, including pole-top rescues.

The daily process A common day’s timeline for most linemen: 6 a.m. wake-up call; meet with the crew around 7 a.m. to receive work orders, prepare equipment, and load trucks; drive as much as 150 miles a day executing assignments ranging from installing new service to setting new poles; stock trucks for potential overnight emergencies; finish up around 4 p.m. Depending on the season and weekly rotation, they might remain on call 24 hours, then start all over the next day.

Barry Wisniewski gives a safety demonstration to a young attendee at Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative’s annual meeting of members.

It’s dangerous, difficult work on the best days, but it’s when inclement weather strikes that things really get tough. Tuente recalls one winter morning around 2 a.m., when he was called from his warm bed because a cold wire had tightened so much that it snapped the pole, and he had to venture out into a -40-degree wind chill. It was so cold, the cabs of

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

5


the bucket trucks couldn’t even produce heat, and it took every bit of his concentration just to keep his hands steady. Summer is no better. If you’re not careful, those hours under the blistering sun in heavy, insulated gear can lead to dehydration, nausea, and stenches that can’t easily be aired out of the truck overnight. “Rainstorms are Rick Bowers no fun, either, especially when you’re working near 7,200-volt primary power lines,” says Rick Bowers, 45, a 10-year lineman for Firelands Electric Cooperative in New London. “You can actually feel the tingles sometimes when you get too wet and the electricity tracks on your gloves.”

Greg Lemon

“When the phone rings at 3 a.m., you’re the one someone needs,” says 44-year-old Greg Lemon, a 16-year lineman from Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative in Millersburg. “Knowing I have the ability to help people when there’s a car-pole accident or outage is a driving force for me. The day-to-day is practice, but when push comes to shove, it feels like the Super Bowl.”

Nearly all linemen have stories about lives they’ve touched on the job. On one occasion, Wisniewski drove by a shaky man in his 80s attempting to get his lawnmower secured on a trailer. Too frail to be doing such a strenuous job by himself, the man was immensely grateful that Wisniewski stopped mid-job to give him a hand. Wisniewski noticed the man’s U.S. Army cap from Korea, and shook his hand to thank him for his service. “When I drove away, he was standing next to the trailer at attention with his arm raised,” Wisniewski says. “He was the one saluting me when it should have been the other way around.”

Rick Bowers poses with a family in Guatemala whose home he helped electrify during a 2016 service trip.

Safety is of paramount concern, especially for family-focused electric cooperatives. Whether battling the clock trying to restore power after an outage or performing a routine procedure for the hundredth time, safety never takes a backseat to timeliness. Ohio crews are proud to have cut their rate of serious work-related injuries during a time when the industry average has increased.

If anyone deserves to be saluted, though, Lemon says it’s the wives and children of linemen. His family tolerates a home full of unfinished projects he has to abandon on weekends when the phone rings, and understands when he has to leave sporting events and family functions early. “Family is huge,” Lemon says. “My kids always make it a point to give me a hug and say ‘Dad, I love you’ before I leave for work. It means the world to me.” For more linemen stories, including a video of Ohio linemen in action on a typical day, visit www.ohioec.org.

“It’s not like an assembly line. You have to consider so many factors and think ahead about what could happen next — but not too far ahead, or you could get yourself in trouble,” Tuente says. “It makes you a more respectful person to know things can be taken away at any moment.”

More than electricity Ohio’s mean salary for power-line installers and repairers in May 2016 was $65,090, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, but compensation is rarely mentioned when the linemen describe what makes the job worthwhile.

6

Greg Lemon and other lineworkers must be prepared to do their work in less-than-favorable conditions.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

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13 10 ⁄8 103⁄4 10 ⁄16 7

101⁄2

BY SAMANTHA KUHN PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY ALLISON

Supporting

FALLEN

Chris Landers, top right, and his mother, Mary, bottom center, with his siblings and father last May. Landers, a lineman from Oklahoma, was killed on the job in 2017.

inemen

“I’m just waiting for him to come in the door going, ‘Got ya, mom.’ He was good at playing jokes on us all — but I know he’s not actually coming. It’s like a nightmare.” Mary Allison speaks through teary eyes about her son, Chris Landers. She was on vacation with her daughter last September when she got the call that Chris, a 41-year-old lineman from Cordell, Oklahoma, had been killed on the job — electrocuted after leaning into a power line he thought had been disconnected for repair. He left behind five children, ages 10 to 22. “We’re still taking it one day at a time,” Mary says. “I stay strong for the rest. I listen and do what I can. We’ve been told that we have to sell his house and truck, which is very hard.” It’s situations like this that show the need for the Fallen Linemen Organization (FLO), a nonprofit entity created to memorialize lineworkers killed or injured on the job and to support those family members affected by such loss. Beyond sending flowers, providing meals, and lending a shoulder to cry on, FLO also can help with more practical matters, such as setting up and sharing GoFundMe websites to help families raise money for medical bills.

“What they don’t do is simply write you a check and then go away,” says Dwight Miller, director of safety and loss control at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide service organization for the 24 electric cooperatives serving Ohio. “They have volunteers who will spend time with the families to help them through an extremely difficult period. They understand the nature of the industry and can relate emotionally with these families.”

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The electric line industry employs about 200,000 workers, and electric power-line installers have traditionally ranked among the most dangerous jobs for decades. Fortunately, families of Ohio electric cooperative linemen have not had to call on assistance from FLO, and that’s in part because they prioritize a culture of safety, Miller says. Rates of lost work time and serious injuries among Ohio co-op lineworkers have been below national averages for the last decade. But the organization remains a well-respected entity — here and everywhere that electric lines run.

 L

Re fir

Showing support

There are many ways to support the Fallen Linemen Organization, including by direct donation, but now there’s a specialized license plate in Ohio that can help as well. The “Honoring Fallen Linemen” plate was approved by the Ohio General Assembly in 2016, with strong support from Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. The plate can be purchased at Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles offices or on www.oplates.com. Proceeds go to the Fallen Linemen Organization.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

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WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

‘The tug is t 10

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018


STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

I

admit it: I’m hooked on fishing. Like most addicts, I like to believe I can quit at any time — just walk away. But deep down I know that’s not true. We fishermen even have an expression to explain our illness: “The tug is the drug.” Last April, for instance, I was fishing the Detroit River, which is always cold in early spring. Even though the air temperature was in the low 50s that morning, high winds had 2-foot waves whitecapping the 42-degree water, and it felt like winter. Yet, I was still happy to be there. I’d been wanting to learn a specific fishing technique — hand-lining — for years, and I finally had my chance. To make it more of a treat, I had one of the best pro anglers in the business, veteran Mark Martin of Twin Lake, Michigan, and two of his pro staffers, Mike Schneider and Les Dennis, to show me the ropes. They were pre-fishing the river in preparation for an upcoming walleye tournament and had graciously invited me along. “Hand-lining is an old-school method of trolling for river walleyes that’s been around for a century or more,” Martin says. “It’s so productive because it keeps the lures on or near the bottom, and that’s where the walleyes are.” Hand-lining, he adds, works especially well in murky water conditions, which is what anglers usually face during spring on the Detroit. In hand-lining, a heavy, slender lead weight (12 to 24 ounces) is attached to a 4-foot wire leader, known as a “shank,” to take plastic, minnow-imitation lures to the bottom. The shank has a D-ring spaced about every 8 inches, and the lures attach to the D-rings via monofilament leaders. The main line, so as not to break, is stout 60-pound-test wire coated with clear plastic. But the line doesn’t attach to a traditional fishing rod and reel; rather, it stretches to a large, spring-loaded reel mounted near the front of the boat. Once we were in position in about 20 feet of water, Martin stayed at the helm, while Schneider and Dennis dropped the trolling rigs over the side and began fishing from seats on opposite gunnels of the boat. Holding the line between a thumb and forefinger, they constantly felt for the bottom with the weight, then would lift the line just a foot or two as the reels took up any slack. “Just keep repeating that motion — tap and lift, tap and lift — until you feel a fish hit,” Schneider says, letting me try. “When you do, bring the line in hand over hand and we’ll net the fish.” I did as instructed, but never felt a fish of any kind bite, let alone a walleye. In fact, none of us caught anything that day. That’s the dirty little secret most weekend anglers don’t realize: Even pro fishermen get skunked occasionally. So take comfort in that, fellow addicted anglers. I do regularly. (Note: Martin informed me that the walleyes started biting later that week, after I’d left. What a surprise.)

Top: Mark Martin uses weights from 12 to 24 ounces when hand-lining. Above: The line is attached to a spring-loaded reel mounted near the front of the boat. Opposite: Martin with a typical Detroit River walleye.

Go-to guide If you’d like to try hand-lining the Detroit River for walleyes this spring, Mark Martin recommends fishing guide Brad Smyth of Detroit Outdoor Adventures. Smyth can be reached by phone at 586-945-7429, or by e-mail at detroitoutdoors@gmail.com. His website is www.ifishdetroit.com.

s the drug’

Hand-lining for walleyes on the Detroit River

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

11


OHIO ICON

BY DAMAINE VONADA

LOCATION: Second and Washington streets in Marietta, near the confluence of the Muskingum and Ohio rivers.

CAMPUS MARTIUS MUSEUM Marietta

PROVENANCE: After he and other Revolutionary War veterans formed the Ohio Company to purchase and inhabit land in frontier Ohio, General Rufus Putnam led a group of 48 men from New England on a trip down the Ohio River in 1788. Landing at the mouth of the Muskingum River, they established the first organized U.S. settlement in the Northwest Territory and christened it “Marietta” in honor of Marie Antoinette, the French queen who had encouraged her country to support the American Revolution. For shelter and protection from attacks by Native Americans, Putnam and his pioneers erected Campus Martius, a fortified collection of blockhouses and row houses that got its name from the “Field of Mars” where Rome’s citizen-soldiers trained. SIGNIFICANCE: The Marietta settlement effectively launched the nation’s westward expansion, and Campus Martius served as the Northwest Territory’s initial seat of government. After the 1795 Treaty of Greenville ended Ohio’s Indian wars, Campus Martius was dismantled — except for the home of Rufus Putnam, who resided there until his death in 1824. The State of Ohio built a museum on the site in 1928, and the Rufus Putnam House, which still stands on its original location, was enclosed in the south wing. CURRENTLY: Although the Ohio History Connection owns the Campus Martius Museum, a local nonprofit, the Friends of the Museums, operates it. The museum focuses on Ohio settlement and migration; boasts three floors of exhibits; and offers guided tours that introduce visitors to historic gems that include the Rufus Putnam House, an extensive collection of Native American artifacts, and a china cabinet built by Marietta settler Jonathan Sprague. “It’s believed to be the oldest piece of furniture made in Ohio,” says the museum’s marketing director, Christina Tilton. IT’S A LITTLE-KNOWN FACT THAT: The Ohio Company Land Office, a 1788 log structure that was restored and moved to the museum’s grounds for Ohio’s 1953 sesquicentennial, is the oldest building in the Buckeye State. Campus Martius Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta, OH 45750. For more information, call 740-373-3750 or visit www.mariettamuseums.org.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018


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Eichers Repair Center Archbold, 419-446-2460 Foltz Ag Enterprises Inc. Bremen, 740-569-7351 Braces’ LLC Carrollton, 330-627-8089 Paul’s Outdoor Power Equipment Dayton, 937-835-0000 Jenning’s Mower & Moped Fort Jennings, 419-286-2406

14

Greenwich, 419-895-1135 Holgate Implement Sales Holgate, 419-264-2031 Snyder’s Equipment Loudonville, 419-938-3981 Haas Sales Marietta, 740-374-3245 Brownies Tractors & Impl. Nelsonville, 740-753-9242 K. L. Welch And Sons Newcomerstown, 740-498-6613

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

New Carlisle Country Clipper Mowers New Carlisle, 937-604-0036 Baker Hardware, Okeana 513-756-9700 Hills Agra-Tech Service Orient, 614-877-4244 Smithco Equipment LLC. Pataskala, 740-927-8874 Cliff’s Repair Seaman, 937-927-5363 Boyd’s Mower Repair Somerdale, 330-859-2581

Altizer Farm Supply Thurman, 740-245-5193 Van Wert Carts & More Van Wert, 419-238-2732 Vienna Lawn & Garden Vienna, 330-539-5170 Jojo’s Country Clippers Waynesfield, 567-204-8257 Agnew Farm Equipment Youngstown, 330-758-2114


GOOD EATS

Sweet &simple

RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHERINE MURRAY

Who says decadent desserts have to be complicated? These five-ingredient sweet treats are as simple as they are delicious!

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

15


SALTY PEANUT BUTTER COOKIES Prep: 10 minutes; Cook: 10 minutes; Servings: 12 1 cup peanut butter 1 large egg, lightly beaten 1 t sp. coarse sea salt, for 1 cup sugar sprinkling 1 tsp. vanilla extract Preheat oven to 350°F. With a mixer or by hand, whisk together egg, sugar, and vanilla until light and fluffy. Add peanut butter until well mixed. Place tablespoon-sized scoops of peanut butter mixture 1 inch apart onto ungreased baking sheets. Flatten scoops with the tines of a fork, making a crisscross pattern. Sprinkle coarse salt on top. Bake until golden, about 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool 2 to 3 minutes, then transfer cookies to racks to finish cooling. Per serving: 196 calories; 11 g fat (2.4 g saturated fat); 1.3 g fiber; 21 g total carbs; 6 g protein.

LAVENDER PEACHES AND CREAM Prep: 5 minutes; Servings: 1 1 large peach, sliced 2 Tbsp. heavy whipping cream

1 Tbsp. sugar 1 tsp. lavender buds 1 Tbsp. pistachios

Place peach slices in a dish. Drizzle with heavy cream. Sprinkle sugar, lavender, and pistachios on top. Serve. Per serving: 277 calories; 14 g fat (7 g saturated fat); 2.7 g fiber; 38 g total carbs; 4 g protein.

S’MORES PIE (Page 15) Prep: 15 minutes; Chill: 3 hours; Servings: 8 6-oz. pre-made graham 2 3.5-oz. boxes instant cracker crust chocolate pudding mix 13 oz. marshmallow creme 2 cups whole milk 1 cup chocolate chips In medium bowl, beat pudding mixes and milk until smooth (pudding will be thick). Add chocolate chips. Evenly spread pudding on top of crust. Refrigerate 3 hours or until firm. Using a piping bag or a large spatula, layer marshmallow creme on top of pudding, all the way to the edges of the crust. With a small kitchen torch, carefully toast the marshmallow topping. Serve cold. Per serving: 492 calories; 14 g fat (7 g saturated fat); 2 g fiber; 88 g total carbs; 5.5 g protein.

16

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018


APPLE AND DATE PARFAITS Prep: 5 minutes; Servings: 4 16 oz. plain, low-fat yogurt 1 tsp. cinnamon 1/4 cup honey, plus extra for drizzling

1 medium apple, chopped 6 dates, chopped

Mix cinnamon and 1/4 cup honey into yogurt. Alternate layering yogurt, apples, and dates. Drizzle a little honey on top. Per serving: 281 calories; 2 g fat (1.5 g saturated fat); 3.6 g fiber; 57 g total carbs; 9 g protein.

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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First, clear communication is critical, because a renovation that includes energy efficiency improvements comes with extra challenges. Identifying a single point of contact will help avoid confusion, conflicts, and cost overruns. Before the work starts, have a discussion with your contractor about quality. You want the contractor to know that you’ll be carefully overseeing the work and that there may be others involved in this oversight, such as building inspectors, your electric cooperative, or an independent energy auditor. You can discuss the standards of a professional, high-quality job, and you can agree on the points at which the contractor will pause for you or someone you designate to review the work. At a minimum, an inspection should take place before you make an interim payment, and almost all efficiency measures will require a final inspection. It’s important to maintain good records throughout the process, not only to iron out any miscommunication, but also to provide documentation for inspectors or to qualify for rebates or tax credits. When the renovation is complete, it may be worth the extra step of having a final audit by a licensed energy auditor. My neighbors were saved from a home renovation disaster when an energy audit revealed that the energy efficiency contractor had failed to produce the promised efficiencies. Once you confirm that the work is 100 percent complete, you can write a check for the final payment, sit back, and enjoy your revitalized, more energy-efficient home. PAT KEEGAN writes for Collaborative Efficiency, an energy communications website.

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Be sure to inspect energy improvements, such as replacement windows (left), to make sure they are installed properly before you make a final payment; HVAC technicians or energy auditors can use diagnostic equipment (right) to measure air leakage and air flow.


WASHINGTON ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

MESSAGE FROM THE GENERAL MANAGER

THE

POWER

BEHIND YOUR

POWER

Lineworker Appreciation Day — April 9, 2018

A

s April arrives, it brings showers that produce spring flowers. It also heralds the beginning of a potentially stormy season that can inherently include power outages. While Washington Electric Cooperative strives to provide reliable electricity to our members, there are times when Mother Nature has other plans. Most of us can ride out a storm from the comfort and convenience of our homes. However, there is a group of professionals that spring into action when the weather takes a turn for the worse — co-op lineworkers.

One of the most dangerous jobs

Jack Bragg General Manager

Braving stormy weather and other challenging conditions, lineworkers often must climb 40 or more feet in the air, carrying heavy equipment to restore power. Listed as one of the most dangerous jobs in the U.S., lineworkers must perform detailed tasks next to high-voltage power lines. To help keep them safe, lineworkers wear specialized protective clothing that will selfextinguish, limiting potential injuries from burns and sparks. Insulated and rubber gloves are worn in tandem to protect them from electrical shock. In addition to the highly visible tasks lineworkers perform, their job today goes far beyond climbing to the top of a pole to repair a wire. They are also information experts who can in some cases pinpoint outages from miles away. Line crews use cell phones and tablets to map outages, take pictures of the work they have done, and troubleshoot problems. In our community, our Washington Electric Cooperative lineworkers are responsible for keeping 1,773 miles of line across six counties working to bring power to your home and our local community 24/7, regardless of the weather, holidays, or personal considerations. While some of the tools that lineworkers use have changed over the years, namely the use of technology, the dedication to the job has not. Being a lineworker is not a glamorous profession. At its essence, it is inherently dangerous, requiring them to work near high-voltage lines in the worst of conditions. During hurricanes, wildfires, or storms, crews often work around the clock to restore power. 1111248400.

Express your gratitude While April is known for spring showers, there is also a day set aside to “thank a lineworker.” Lineworker Appreciation Day is April 9. So during the month of April, if you see a lineworker, please pause to say thank you to the power behind your power. Let them know you appreciate the hard work they do to keep the lights on.

APRIL 2018  • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

19


WASHINGTON ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

ELECTIONS

Cast your vote in this year’s

DIRECTOR ELECTION Ballots must be postmarked by May 10 simply make your selection on the ballot and return it in the provided postage-paid envelope. Ballots must be postmarked by May 10.

Democratic member control is a guiding principle for cooperatives around the world. Your electric co-op is governed by a seven-member board of directors, and it’s time once again to make your voice heard by participating in the annual election.

Election results will be announced at our Annual Meeting on May 17 at the co-op’s facility near Marietta. Please note that all voting will be conducted by mail. There will be no voting at the Annual Meeting.

This year, there is one open seat. Seeking election to the board are Jedd Butler of Newport, Brian Carter of Sarahsville, incumbent Gale DePuy of Marietta, and Donald Ullmann of Caldwell.

To protect the election’s legitimacy, all mail-in ballots must be routed to the post-office box provided on the return envelope. Ballots may not be included with payments or given to a co-op employee or board

The election is conducted through mail-in ballots, which will arrive in member mailboxes in mid-April. To vote,

Meet the candidates The following Washington Electric Cooperative members are seeking election to the co-op’s board of directors. There is one open seat in this year’s election for a three-year term.

Jedd Butler

Political: New state and federal regulations are always going to be a worry. We must find a way to mitigate the effects to our members.

Why are you interested in becoming a member of the board of directors?

Demand: Every year, our members obtain more and more electronic devices as well as new appliances beyond the basic refrigerator, stove, and water heater. As we acquire more and more, the increased demand is expected.

Retired from B.F. Goodrich/RJF International. Resides near Newport.

My intent to become a Washington Electric board member is to help our co-op continue to meet the power demands of all our customers, new and old. I feel my administration, technical, and economic abilities would be an asset to the co-op board, as well as my record for being a team player. What, in your opinion, are the greatest challenges facing the cooperative in the future? Our board will face many challenges in the coming years. In my mind, they include:

20

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

Transmission to consumers: Clearing our rights-of-way has been such an improvement in the last few years. Constant attention to this area must be maintained and never allowed to fall into disrepair.

Brian Carter

Highway tech/project supervisor for Ohio Dept. of Transportation. Resides in Sarahsville.

Why are you interested in becoming a member of the board of directors?


member. We will not accept ballots dropped off or delivered to our office. No exceptions will be made. All Washington Electric members are encouraged to attend the Annual Meeting to enjoy entertainment, a free KFC dinner, door prizes, displays, and hear election results.

Election FAQs 1. When will I receive my ballot? Ballots will be mailed to all co-op members in mid-April. 2. When is the mail-in deadline? Ballots must be postmarked by May 10. 3. How do I know who is running for a position on the board of trustees? Information on all candidates will be included with your ballot. You can also refer to the information below. 4. Can I vote at the Annual Meeting? No. All voting for the trustee election will be conducted through mail-in ballots.

5. Can I mail my ballot with my payment? No. Do not include your ballot with your payment. Conversely, do not include your payment with your ballot. This is very important. Please only mail your ballot to the post-office box number printed on the postage-paid return envelope. Ballots returned to the cooperative with payments will become void. 6. Can I drop my ballot off at the co-op office? No. Co-op employees and board members are not in any way involved with the receiving or counting of the ballots. All ballots must be mailed to the post-office box number printed on the postage-paid return envelope. 7. Why is my ballot being sent to a post-office box in Minnesota? Washington Electric has hired a professional elections firm to handle all aspects of the election. This represents a cost savings for the co-op and also adds an extra layer of security and accountability. Because no one at the cooperative or in the local area will be involved in counting the ballots, votes remain anonymous.

Photos courtesy of New Creations Studio

Serving the members of the cooperative and serving the communities that we provide service to. The employees at Washington Electric work very hard, and representing them would be an honor. What, in your opinion, are the greatest challenges facing the cooperative in the future? Funding advancements in technology, right-of-way maintenance (which is ongoing), and employee numbers to keep up with new construction.

Gale DePuy, incumbent Self-employed. Resides near Marietta.

Why are you interested in becoming a member of the board of directors? To provide the best possible electric service at the lowest possible cost. What, in your opinion, are the greatest challenges facing the cooperative in the future?

Upgrading our system to accommodate a 138 kVA transmission system and the rising cost of purchased power.

Donald Ullman Retired from Noble Local Schools. Resides in Caldwell.

Why are you interested in becoming a member of the board of directors? Washington Electric Cooperative has provided to myself and my family many services since 1941. I want to try to give back to others whenever I can. What, in your opinion, are the greatest challenges facing the cooperative in the future? To continue to meet all of the reasonable requests and challenges as that arise in future years while maintaining the current excellent services being offered.

APRIL 2018  • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

21


WASHINGTON ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

NOTES Capital credits Washington Electric Cooperative, Inc., refunded capital credits totaling $21,922.27 to the estates of 19 members through February 2018. If you know a deceased member, please have the executor of the estate call our office for information on the member’s capital credits.

Credit for account number If you find the number of your account in the local (center four) pages of this magazine, call the co-op office; you will receive at least $10 credit on your electric bill. In February, Norma O’Linn of Lowell located her account number and received a $40 credit. If you find your account number, call the co-op office by the 16th of the month in which it is published.

Co-op Connections® Card Washington Electric Cooperative members saved $607.86 in January on prescription drugs with the Co-op Connections® discount card. Members have saved a total of $90,508.65 since the program launched in June 2011. Be sure to check out www.connections.coop for information on discounts from national retailers and coupons.com!

Co-op rebate programs Water heater – rebates from $200 to $400 for qualifying 50-gallon or higher new electric water heaters.

Dual Fuel – rebates of $500 for new heat pumps installed with a fossil fuel furnace system and co-op load management switch. Geothermal – rebates of $600 for newly installed geothermal systems. Air conditioners – rebates of $100 for whole-house air conditioning systems with co-op load management switch. Applies to systems younger than 10 years. Refrigerators and freezers -- $100 rebate for members who replace existing refrigerators and stand-alone freezers with a new ENERGY STAR®labeled appliance. Rebates available on first-come, first served basis. Call for details.

Co-op services After Hours Outage Reporting – Call 877-544-0279 to report a power outage outside of business hours. Outage Alerts – Use our SmartHub system to sign up for free outage alerts and other co-op information. Online Bill Payment – Visit www.weci.org to use our secure SmartHub online payment system. Automatic Bill Payment – Call our office for details on having your electric bill drafted from your checking or savings account each month. Pay your bill by phone – Call 844-344-4362 to pay your electric bill with a check, credit card, or debit card.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Paul Fleeman, CCD, BL CONTACT

740-373-2141 | 877-594-9324 www.weci.org

Chairman 740-934-2306

Larry Ullman, CCD, BL Vice Chairman 740-934-2561

REPORT OUTAGES AFTER HOURS

Betty Martin, CCD, BL

OFFICE

Gale DePuy, CCD, BL

877-544-0279

440 Highland Ridge Road P.O. Box 800 Marietta, OH 45750 OFFICE HOURS

Mon. - Fri., 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Secretary-Treasurer 740-473-1539

Assistant Secretary-Treasurer 740-473-1245

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

General Manager/CEO jbragg@weci.org

BILL PAY

SmartHub www.weci.org HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION?

E-mail your ideas to: jgreene@weci.org.

William Bowersock, CCD, BL

Facebook.com/WashingtonElectricCoop

Shawn Ray

Twitter.com/washelectcoop

740-373-5861 740-638-5270

Brent Smith 740-585-2598

CCD — Certified Cooperative Director BL — Board Leadership

22

Jack Bragg Jr.


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

FFA gets hands-on with utility tech A group of students from Ridgemont High School’s FFA recently stopped by Mid-Ohio Energy’s Kenton offices to learn about careers in the electric utility industry and to see how technology is not only influencing the current workplace, but also shaping jobs of the future. A demonstration of the co-op’s grid operations showed how technology has increased operating efficiency and reduced outage times. During the exercise, a student volunteer was able to use the automated system controls to simulate bypassing a particular substation to provide power from an alternate substation. Additional presentations highlighted how the co-op uses a drone to perform line examinations and explained how the nation’s electric grid operates.

Darke REC donates to Cancer Association Employees from Darke Rural Electric Cooperative recently raised and donated $840 to the Cancer Association of Darke County. The Cancer Association specializes in providing education and support to those afflicted with cancer and their friends and families.

BREC awards grant for economic development Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative (BREC) recently presented Gallia County Economic Development with a $15,000 grant. The funds will be used for an archaeological review, geotechnical study, threatened and endangered species review, and wetlands studies at the 77-acre Dan Evans Industrial Park Phase II site, located between Rio Grande and Gallipolis. In partnership with Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, BREC and other coops around the state award grants to community organizations to help reduce the cost of unknown factors in their economic development sites.

HWE, CoBank donate $10,000 to schools Wood Lane Schools and Elmwood Local Schools received $5,000 each in donations from North Baltimore-based Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative (HWE) and CoBank — a cooperative bank based in Greenwood Village, Colorado, and a lender to HWE — as part of CoBank’s Sharing Success program, which matches cooperative donations. Elmwood Local Schools plan to use the funds to order “wiggle chairs” and standing desks for students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the elementary school, while Wood Lane Schools will purchase various tools to maximize learning potential, including interactive white boards and additional laptop computers or iPads with adapted keyboards to support eye-gaze technology. In the past four years, HWE and CoBank have donated $50,000 to organizations such as Habitat for Humanity and the Boy Scouts of America’s Camp Berry.

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

23


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REGIONAL TRAVEL ISSUE

Across Anyone who lives in Ohio knows the almost limitless variety of places to go, things to see, and events to experience within the Buckeye State’s borders. Sometimes, however, it can be fun to cross the border and get a little taste of what our closest neighbors have to offer.

STATE LINES

travel APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

25


REGIONAL TRAVEL ISSUE

BY DAMAINE VONADA PHOTOS BY JAMES SHAMBHU, COURTESY OF KENTUCKY HORSE PARK

EQUINE DISNEYLAND Kentucky Horse Park celebrates 40 years as a favorite Bluegrass State attraction

T

he horse is Kentucky’s icon, and no place celebrates all things equine better than Kentucky Horse Park.

Located just outside Lexington, the park is like Disneyland with horses. Pristine grounds and specially designed buildings echo the beauty of the surrounding Bluegrass horse country, while programming and activities harness humanity’s relationship with horse breeds throughout the globe. Although it is owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky, its pedigree began in Virginia in 1777, when Governor Patrick Henry granted thousands of acres in the Kentucky Territory to a Revolutionary War veteran, Col. William Christian. Subsequent owners raised Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds on that land, and John R. Gaines of Lexington’s Gainesway Farm put forth an idea for an equine-themed park and followed through to spur its development as a public-private partnership. Since its opening in 1978, Kentucky Horse Park has grown into a multifaceted facility that combines a working farm with equestrian venues that host prestigious competitions, such as the Kentucky Three-Day Event, a world-class dressage, cross-country, and jumping triathlon. It’s also home to top equine associations, museums, a campground, and, between April and October when operations are in full swing, more than 100 horses. The park turns 40 in 2018, so it’s an ideal time to enjoy its unparalleled brand of horseplay. Here’s a quick guide to its attractions and experiences.

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

Go For Gin, the second-oldest living Kentucky Derby winner, greets visitors daily to his home in Kentucky Horse Park.


Hall of Champions presentations

Retired racing elites like Kentucky Derby winner Funny Cide charm fans and relish attention during appearances at the Hall. “These horses all have presence,” says manager Rob Willis. “Everything in their DNA is firing on the right cylinders. That’s why they’re here.” Point Given, the 2001 American Horse of the Year, debuts this month.

The art of legends

At the park’s entrance, a magnificent bronze of Man o’ War marks the resting place of the legendary racehorse. Additional sculptures throughout the park portray equine immortals such as Secretariat, Supreme Sultan, and Misty, the Chincoteague Pony popularized in children’s literature.

Breeds Barn and Parade of Breeds

The park typically has 30 to 40 different horse breeds in residence, including familiar ones like the Quarter Horse and Morgan Horse, as well as rare Marwari from India and Akhal-Teke from Turkmenistan. Entertaining parade of breeds shows highlight horses and their traditional home turf with colorfully costumed riders — think knights riding English Shires, Vikings on Norwegian Fjords, and Native Americans astride Appaloosas.

International Museum of the Horse

Covering 50 million years of equine history, exhibits range from horses in Chinese art to the newly opened “Black Horsemen of the Kentucky Turf.” A popular exhibit is “Calumet Farm’s Trophies,” a true Bluegrass treasure that includes 560 spectacular trophies that attest to the Lexington farm’s decades of dominance in Thoroughbred breeding and racing.

Visitor Information Center and gift shop

Stop here to get a park map, review the day’s schedule of activities, and plan your visit. “You can’t just spend an hour at the park,” advises Breeds Barn manager Shelli Wright. “You have to spend the day, because everything here teaches you something about horses.” The center offers a fine introductory film, Rein of Nobility, and the gift shop boasts the nation’s largest permanent selection of Breyer model horses. While you’re there, make sure to ask about the narrated horse-drawn trolley tours; riding a trolley pulled by Draft Horses is a fun way to get acquainted with the park’s main attractions.

The Big Barn The barn dates to 1897 and was the site of Kentucky’s first Standardbred sales. Now housing Draft Horses, it hosts meet-and-greets so visitors can appreciate these gentle giants. “When people stand beside a Draft Horse and realize how big they are, it’s like they’re seeing the ocean or Grand Canyon for the first time,” says assistant Equine Operations director Sheila Forbes. For more information about 2018 anniversary events, call 859233-4303 or visit www.kyhorsepark.com.

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

27


SHIPSHEWANA

REGIONAL TRAVEL ISSUE

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA AERIA PHOTO COURTESY SHIPSHEWANA TRADING PLACE & FLEA MARKET

The Midwest’s largest flea market and plenty of great food make this northern Indiana spot well worth the trip

I

t was 25 minutes past noon when I scored the last serving of the Friday lunch special — scalloped potatoes and ham — at the Auction Restaurant in Shipshewana, Indiana. Just seconds after I ordered, a young man sat down and asked for the special too. “It’s all gone,” said the waitress, a pleasant, middle-aged woman wearing an apron, plain blue dress, and white bonnet. “Well, I was wanting it all morning,” he complained, then settled for a prime rib sandwich. One bite of the special, and I understood his disappointment. Served on a divided plate with corn and applesauce, the mound of nottoo-cheesy potatoes liberally laced with ham tasted like something Grandma used to make, and for $7.99, it was quite the wholesome, hearty bargain. So, when the waitress mentioned that the pie was homemade too, who could resist a slice of custardy peanut butter crowned with whipped cream and a dusting of crumbles?

W

Sto

Don’ desig you mon

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Take MyPi your com

The Auction Restaurant sits at the main entrance to the Shipshewana Trading Place Auction & Flea Market, the dual enterprises that turned a tiny Indiana village with deep Amish-Mennonite roots into an enormously popular destination. “It started in 1922 with a small livestock auction,” says Shipshewana Trading Place marketing director Lora Gates. “The flea market organically grew when auction-goers began selling things from the trunks of their cars.” Today the auction sells antiques and livestock year-round, and the flea market is the Midwest’s largest, boasting 900 booths and bringing upwards of 350,000 people to Shipshewana (population 703) between May and September. As a result, the village is hardly isolated or humdrum. Surrounded by the nation’s third-largest Amish community, it’s a family-oriented place where “plain people” seamlessly coexist with their “English” neighbors; where buggies and bicycles are as common as pickup trucks and SUVs; where incredibly eclectic shopping options range from village specialty shops to “shingle shops” on Amish farms, to anything-and-everything at the Flea Market; and where 2018’s events include a Quilt Festival and the world’s largest Clydesdale sale and convention.

Sa Yo

“Lots of things can surprise you here,” says Beth Thornburg of the Shipshewana/LaGrange County visitors’ bureau, “and the food is phenomenal. It’s like Thanksgiving every day.” The following is a mere sample of the many attractions that lend Shipshewana its appealing flavor. Continued on Page 30 MADE

m 28

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

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Continued from Page 28

Menno-Hof

This museum and visitors’ center is ideal for acquainting yourself with the beliefs and culture of Shipshewana’s Amish-Mennonite residents. While its exterior channels a typical local farmstead, rooms filled with realistic vignettes — including a dungeon and a sailing ship — reveal their remarkable journey of faith across centuries and continents. 260-768-4117; www.mennohof.org.

E&S Sales

Shop alongside the Amish at this bulk food bonanza. Buy fresh cinnamon rolls (with caramel or buttercream frosting) at the bakery; grab a sandwich at the café; find seldom-seen items like hog casings and super-sized cheeses; and check out the buggy parking lot on the store’s north side. 260-768-4736.

30

Blue Gate Theatre

Shipshewana’s most entertaining venue specializes in musicals, shows, and concerts by the likes of Ricky Skaggs, Amy Grant, and the Oak Ridge Boys. In a nod to Shipshewana’s favorite dessert, the theatre often gives away pie before performances. 888-447-4725; www.bluegatetheatre.com.

Shipshewana Trading Place

The Auction, Flea Market, and Auction Restaurant are only three components of this multifaceted family business, which also includes an inn, an RV Park, and events such as an Antique Festival and Ship-Chic Craft & Vintage Shows. 260-768-4129; www. shipshewanatradingplace.com.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

Blue Gate Restaurant & Bakery

Its buffets and family-style dinners feature the Amish comfort food trifecta — chicken, noodles, and mashed potatoes — plus an extraordinary assortment of fruit and cream pies. 888-477-4725; www.bluegaterestaurant.com.

Yoder’s Meat & Cheese Company

There’s a reason it’s always busy — a vast variety of choice, carefully sourced meats and cheeses as well as goodies like homemade ham salad, liver sausage, and head cheese (a pork terrine). 260-768-4715; www. yodersmeatandcheese.com.

Davis Mercantile

Locals and tourists converge in Shipshewana’s version of a mall. Enjoy butter-dipped pretzels and flavored mustards at JoJo’s Pretzels; get designed-inShipshewana apparel at Shipshe Casuals; buy locally made Plyley’s Candies at Aunt Millie’s; and take a whirl on a carved horse, cow, chicken, or dog on the carousel. 260-768-7300; www. davismercantile.com.

Yoder’s Department Store and Yoder’s Shipshewana Hardware

Two enterprises under one gigantic roof equals superstorestyle shopping for everything from wood-burning cookstoves and microbrew soda pops to bib overalls and quilting supplies. 877-768-1945, www.yoderdepartmentstore. com; 877-988-9309, www. yodershardware.com.


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REGIONAL TRAVEL ISSUE

STORY AND PHOTOS BY JAMIE RHEIN

ghost town

BlackGold O

n August 4, 1879, before the sun rose over the craggy mountains in western West Virginia, the oil boomtown of Volcano turned into a “lake of fire.” By the time the blaze died, Volcano was almost gone. The post office, opera hall, bowling alley, saloons, and all but a few buildings had been reduced to ash. The fire didn’t end Volcano’s existence right away, as a few remained to continue oil production, but what had been a bustling burg was on an irreversible path to becoming the ghost town that it is today. These days, those who pass through the hills along Volcano Road in and around what is now Mountwood Park in Wood County might not notice the remnants of what once was. Stands of hardwood trees have returned Volcano to nature, where hikers walk on trails named for its landmarks. Evidence of its past is scant, though artifacts do exist. A few hulking wooden oil barrels remain, their rusted bands and weather-darkened wood showing their age. Concrete cisterns and rusted machinery parts stick up from the ground like surrealistic flowers. Fortunately, photos and historic records provide a chronicle of Volcano’s post-Civil War rise to a thriving community of 2,300 people that produced 2.3 million barrels of oil just 20 miles from Parkersburg. Mike Naylor (pictured below left), whose mother visited the town as a child and often bought penny candy at Schaffer’s store there, oversees the Volcano Museum in Mountwood Park. He can point out the spots where the wealthy oil barons lived, or where the traveling circus once pitched its tent on a baseball field 130 years ago. He also can describe the unique system of wheels, belts, and cables that could pump oil from 40 wells with only one engine. At first, he says, the oil was so close to the surface that it was collected with blankets that were laid on oil puddles and wrung out into barrells. The museum includes photos and artifacts, including a model of an oil derrick and a 1972 video showing the last oil producer running his machine. The wooden wheel outside the museum is a final testament to the time when Volcano’s oil fields made a fortune.

Volcano Museum, Mountwood Park, 1014 Volcano Rd., Waverly, WV 26184. Open 12-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays from May 1 to Oct. 31. 304-485-5365.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018


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BY BECKY LINHARDT

CO-OP PEOPLE

Natu ral APPEAL The Kelleys Island Audubon Club attracts visitors to the island by showcasing its beauty and wildlife

K

elleys Island residents welcome the return each spring of their “feathered tourists” — songbirds, waterfowl, and raptors that pass through on their way to Canada. So it was a rather obvious decision for the island’s innkeepers to band together to create an event around it. “Nest with the Birds” began in the 1980s as a way to drum up some earlyseason bookings by offering guided hikes and migration-related programs for birdwatchers. “When friends came for the event, they were amazed by the colorful birds — yellow warblers and blue bunting and others — and insisted that we needed to protect them,” says Pat Hayes, of The Inn on Kelleys Island, which, like the rest of the island’s residents and businesses, is served by Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative. “After investigating a number of organizations, we decided that Audubon was the best fit for our goals.”

34

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018


The Kelleys Island Audubon Club formed in 1992, and with the contacts that had been made through “Nest with the Birds,” KIAC began developing more events. “During an early program I attended, one of the guys presenting was so excited about his topic, and it got me excited,” says June Campbell, a resident of the island. “I became involved as secretary and support the club because I love Kelleys Island, being outside, and learning about conservation.” Among this season’s highlights, along with “Nesting with the Birds” May 17–19, are “Feathers and Foliage” September 21–22, the Butterfly Festival the second weekend of September, and several bird-banding events. Check www. kelleysislandnature.com for a detailed schedule. A new KAIC-related program is night birdbanding. Organized by KIAC member Tom Bartlett, a Cleveland Museum of Natural History Department of Ornithology research associate, the program at the CMNH banding station on Kelleys Island is open to the public. “The station was started in the spring of 1996, and we have now banded 12,891 individual birds of 115 species on Kelleys Island,” Bartlett says. The station’s Northern Saw-whet Owl banding project (begun in 2003) is part of a national project to study migrating owls in North America. The Kelleys Island site has banded more than 600 owls, and has recaptured 50 individual birds from all over eastern North America. Bartlett has also been active in the bird census project, basically a snapshot of the birds of Kelleys Island that now contains 20 years of data. “The island is very important to wintering and migrating waterfowl,” says Bartlett. The project and its data help document and prove that fact. Audubon awarded Kelleys Island its Important Birding Area (IBA) status in 2002, and KIAC now connects with other organizations to protect and promote the natural beauty of the island. “When we received IBA status in 2002, about 25 percent of the island was protected or preserved,” said Hayes. “Now that number is about 33 percent, and we have found that increased preservation brings in increased tourism revenue.” BECKY LINHARDT is a freelance writer from Cincinnati.

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3/7/18 12:08 PM


APRIL 2018 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST

Door prizes, raffles, appraisals, and on-site doll stringing. 734282 0152 or www.toledodollshow.com.

APR. 21 – CMP Monthly Air Rifle and Air Pistol Matches, 1000 Lawrence Dr., Port Clinton. Free admission and parking. Competitions feature a Junior Air Rifle 3 x 20, 60 Shots Air RiAPR. 12–15 – Southern Gospel Expo, Trinity Friends Church, fle Standing, 60 Shots Air Pistol, and a beginner 3 x 10. Rental equipment is available for a small fee. 419-635-2141 ext. 707, 605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert, Free. Over 30 gospel groups from around the country. Food court available each night. 419- lsherman@thecmp.org (Lue Sherman), or www.thecmp.org. 238-2788 or www.trinityvw.com. APR. 21–22 – Ghost Town Spring Crafts and Antiques Festival, 10630 Co. Rd. 40, Findlay, Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. APR. 13–14 – Home Sweet Home: A Vintage-Inspired Mar10 a.m.–4 p.m. A great family event with live music from East ket, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima, Fri. 5–8 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–6 p.m. $10 for two-day admission, $5 for Sat. only; of Cheyenne playing both days, a great selection of crafts and under 12 free. Vintage, shabby chic, antiques, repurposed, and antiques, a 24-ft. climbing wall for the kids, and plenty of food and snacks. www.facebook.com/Ghost-Town-Findlayupcycled items, from clothing and home décor to jewelry and handmade treasures. 419-230-1756 or http://homesweethom- Ohio-152509862778738/. evintagemarket.com. APR. 22 – Glass City Marathon, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo. APR. 6 – “Jacob Riis: How the Other Half Lives,” One of the fastest marathon courses in the Midwest, regularly APR. 14 – Bucyrus Model Railroad Association Train Show Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library and in the top list of Boston Marathon qualifying events. 26.2-mile and Swap Meet, Crawford Co. Fgds., 610 Whetstone St., Museum, Spiegel Grove, Fremont, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Bucyrus, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 12 free. For all gauges. Club marathon, 13.1-mile half marathon, 5K, and five-person relay. Opening day of special exhibition featuring Riis’s www.glasscitymarathon.org. Room open with operating layouts for all to enjoy. 866-562life-size photographs and personal artifacts. A social reformer 0720 or 419-462-5035. and early muckraker in the tradition of Upton Sinclair and Ida APR. 28 – Chocolate and Wine Walk, 5495 Liberty Ave., VermilTarbell, Riis traveled into tenements, factories, and sweatshops ion, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $20. Take a stroll through downtown Vermilto document the day-to-day lives of New York City’s many poor APR. 14 – Lima Symphony Orchestra: “Music Is Life,” #7 ion while sampling chocolate treats and/or wine as you visit the Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $10–$30. 419-222-5701 or immigrants and laborers at the turn of the 20th century. 419quaint shops. 440-967-4477 or http://vermilionchamber.net. www.limasymphony.com. 332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org. APR. 8 – Toledo Doll, Bear, and Toy Show, Stranahan Great Hall, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd., Toledo, 10 a.m.–4 p.m., early admission 8:30 a.m. $6, under 13 free; early bird admission $20. Features dealers from throughout the U.S. selling a wide variety of antique, vintage, artist, and modern dolls and bears, as well as accessories, antique toys, and vintage holiday items.

NORTHEAST

APR. 1–2, 4–8, 12–15 – I-X Indoor Amusement Park, IX Center, One I-X Dr., Cleveland. $21, under 4 free. Twenty acres of rides, games, food, and fun attractions for the whole family, all under one roof! For dates and times, visit www. ixamusementpark.com. APR. 2–MAY 13 – The Great Steubenville Eggsibition, Visitor Ctr., 120 S. Third St., Steubenville. Huge handpainted “eggs” offer a downtown scavenger hunt! Stop by the Visitor Center to get a map. 740-283-1787.

WEST VIRGINIA

APR. 14 – Spring Crafters’ Showcase, Tam-O-Shanter Sylvania Sports and Exhibition Ctr., 7060 Sylvania Ave., Sylvania (1/2 mile west of McCord Rd.), 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Use the North and West entrances behind the main building. Our crafters can fill your Mother’s Day, graduation, or spring decorating needs. Drawings to win gift certificates! Look for Balloon Bonanza show specials! 419-842-1925 or www.toledocraftsmansguild.org.

APR. 28–29 – Tiffin Flea Market, Seneca Co. Fgds., 100 Hopewell Ave., Tiffin, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. 250 to 400 dealers per show. A browser’s delight featuring a wide variety of merchandise for sale, including antiques, collectibles, furniture, crafts, produce, tools, glass, and more. 419-447-9613 or www.tiffinfleamarket.com.

APR. 7 – Painesville Railroad Museum Fundraiser, Harry Buffalo, 2119 Mentor Ave., Painesville, 2–4 p.m. $20 advance, $25 at door. Enjoy all-you-can-eat hors d’oeuvres and drinks, Chinese raffle, and 50/30-20 raffle. For tickets, call 440-821-3310 (Staci Jacob) or 216-470-5780 (Tom Pescha).

APR. 21–22 – Rocky River Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, 21016 Hilliard Blvd,, Rocky River, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Features artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. 440-227-8794 or www.avantgardeshows.com.

APR. 14–15 – Olde Stark Antique Faire, Stark Co. Fgds., 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.– 4 p.m. Come and explore the wide choice of antiques offered by over 100 select dealers and collectors. 330-794-9100 or find us on Facebook.

APR. 26–29 – Geauga County Maple Festival, Historic Chardon Square, Chardon. A festival celebrating “everything maple”! Features arts and crafts, lumberjack competition, bathtub races, all-you-can-eat Pancakes in the Park, and other fun events and contests. 440-286-3007 or www.maplefestival.com.

APR. 14–15 – Strongsville Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Strongsville Ehrnfelt Recreation Ctr., 18100 Royalton Rd., Strongsville, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Features artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. 440227-8794 or www.avantgardeshows.com. APR. 16–26 – Spring Quilt Show, Historic Fort Steuben Visitor Ctr., 120 S. Third St., Steubenville, 10 a.m.–4 p.m., 740-283-1787 or www.oldfortsteuben.com. APR. 20–22 – Annie Get Your Gun, Geauga Lyric Theater Guild, 101 Water St., Chardon, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $18, Stds./Srs. $15, $10 C. (12 and under). 440-2862255 or www.geaugatheater.org.

APR. 1 – Easter at North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. Visit the Easter Bunny and hunt for Easter eggs. This spring event provides fun and games for all ages. Call for times of egg hunt and other activities. The North Bend Restaurant will offer a Sunday Easter buffet. 304-6432931 or www.northbendsp.com. APR. 7 – Wheeling Jamboree 87th Anniversary Show, Capitol Theatre, 1015 Main St., Wheeling, 7–10 p.m. $20–$65. This annual event celebrates the occasion when Wheeling’s legendary country music program left the radio studio to become the second-oldest country broadcast stage show in history. 304-243-4470 or www.capitoltheatrewheeling.com. APR. 13 – Wheeling Symphony Orchestra: “Appalachian Rhapsody,” Capitol Theatre, 1015 Main St., Wheeling, 7:30 p.m. $16.50–$62. Television/film composer, songwriter, and virtuoso pianist Nate Strasser returns to his roots performing the West Virginia premiere of his signature composition. Joining Nate is violinist and collaborator Matt Combs, a featured performer of the Grand Ole Opry. 304-243-4470 or www.capitoltheatrewheeling.com.

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APR. 28 – North Canton Spring Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, St. George Serbian Ctr., 4667 Applegrove St. NW, North Canton, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Features artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. 440-227-8794 or www.avantgardeshows.com. APR. 28–MAY 12 – Annual Spring Art Show and Sale, Eastern Gateway Community College, 4000 Sunset Blvd., Steubenville. 740-264-2959.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

CENTRAL

America, top equine entertainment and competition, and endless opportunities to experience, buy, and sell horses of all types. 740-845-0085 or www.equineaffaire.com. APR. 14 – Ohioana Book Festival, Sheraton Columbus Hotel at Capital Square, 75 E. State St., Columbus, 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Free admission and parking. This festival celebrating Ohio’s authors will bring more than 100 authors together with readers of all ages for a day of panel discussions, readings, a book fair, children’s activities, prizes, entertainment, and food. 614-466-3831 or www.ohioana. org/programs/ohioana-book-festival.

THROUGH AUG. 26 – “A Very Private Collection of Vintage Glass, 1875–1920,” Ohio Glass Museum’s Gallery, 124 W. Main St., Lancaster, Tues.–Sun. 1–4 p.m. and by appointment. A mixed arrangement of seldom seen and very rare pieces of glass. 740-687-0101 or www.ohioglassmuseum.org.

APR. 17 – A Garden Affair: “Growing Vegetables for the Home Gardener,” Hilliard Community Ctr., 3800 Veterans Memorial Dr., Hilliard, 6:30–9 p.m. Free. Hosted by the Hilliard Area Garden Club. 614-664-3290 or http://destinationhilliard.com/events/a-garden-affair/.

APR. 6–7 – You Have the Right to Remain Dead, Marion Palace Theatre, May Pavilion, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 6:30 p.m. $40 includes dinner and show. Mystery, murder, and lots of surprises and laughs abound in the Palace’s annual Dinner Theatre. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

APR. 21 – Earth Day Celebration, Coshocton County Career Ctr., 23640 Airport Rd., Coshocton, 12–4 p.m. Free. Sponsored by Coshocton Environmental and Community Awareness. Over 50 different exhibits and vendors including local artisans, organic farmers, community groups, and Native American culture. Explore solar power and green enterprises, view live raptor demonstrations, enjoy kids’ activities, entertainment, and good food. 740-502-6546 or www.cecaaware.org.

APR. 12–15 – Equine Affaire, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, 9 a.m.–7 p.m. Experience the nation’s premier equine exposition, featuring an impressive educational program, the largest horse-related trade show in North

APR. 22 – Dave Greer’s Classic Jazz Stompers, Clintonville Woman’s Club, 3951 N. High St., Columbus, 2–5 p.m. Admission fee.  Presented by the Central Ohio Hot Jazz Society. 614-558-2212 or www.cohjs.org. 

SOUTHEAST

APR. 13–14 – The Buck Fifty, Chillicothe, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Have you ever run in an overnight relay race? If not, we’ll help to lay the concept out for you here! Your team of 10 runners will be broken into two groups of 5. Your team will also need two non-running drivers and two vans. www.thebuckfifty.com/ the-race/. APR. 26–29 – Pike County Dogwood Festival, Main St., Piketon. Daily entertainment, great food, royalty contests, tons of rides and other fun kids’ events, craft vendors as well as many other vendors, annual car show, and of course our Grand Parade. This year the festival welcomes back the Pure Prairie League. www.pikecountydogwoodfestival.com.

APR. 13–15 – Annual Wildflower Pilgrimage, Highlands Nature Sanctuary, 7660 Cave Rd., Bainbridge. Join us for a weekend of guided hikes, delicious meals, and special talks THROUGH DEC. – Athens Farmers Market, 1000 E. State St., from our guest speakers. Our 2018 theme is “Flowers & Athens, Wed. 9 a.m.–1 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–noon. Buy local and Phibs,” with Pennsylvania photographer and author Doug support your local economy. The market showcases farmers, Wechsler. Hikes will be held at botanical hotspots in our orchardists, specialty food producers, bakers, horticulturalists, region, featuring both Arc preserves and other private and cheese makers, and many other food-based entrepreneurs. state-owned natural areas. Space is limited. 937-365-1935 or 740-593-6763 or www.athensfarmersmarket.org. www.arcofapplachia.org/annual-wildflower-pilgrimage.

APR. 27–29 – Mohican Wildlife Weekend, various locations in Ashland and Richland counties. Free. A celebration of wildlife habitat, heritage, and natural history. Choose from eight program sites that will offer workshops and demonstrations to interest beginners and experienced naturalists alike. It’s sure to be a fun and educational weekend for kids of all ages! 800-642-8282 or www.mohicanwildlifeweekend.com. APR. 27–29 – Vintage Market Days, Franklin Co. Fgds., 4951 Northwest Pkwy., Hilliard, Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p,m. $10 for early buyer, $5 for Sat./Sun. only, under 13 free. An upscale vintage-inspired indoor/ outdoor market featuring original art, antiques, clothing, jewelry, handmade treasures, home decor, outdoor furnishings, seasonal plantings. and more. 417-434-5713 or www. vintagemarketdays.com. APR. 28 – Arbor Day Festival, Dawes Arboretum, 7770 Jacksontown Rd. SE, Newark, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. A fun day filled with family-focused learning opportunities, including tree climbing, activities, and displays. 740-323-2355, 800-443-2937, or www.dawesarb.org. APR. 28 – Taste of Marysville, Marysville High School Field House, 800 Amrine Rd., Marysville, 5–9 p.m. $10 buys 8 tasting tickets. 937-243-5833 or www.tasteofmarysville.com.

APR. 13–15, 20-21 – Annie, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. $10, Srs. and C. $8. Featuring local talent. 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com. APR. 14 – Wing 12 Daffodil Luncheon, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. with vendors, quilt tickets, Chinese auction, and 50/50 raffle available. Lunch will be served at 12:30 with the Style Show to begin shortly afterward. 740-439-8151 or http:// seormc.org. APR. 22 – Southeastern Ohio Symphony Orchestra, Brown Chapel, New Concord, 7 p.m. The final concert of the 44th season. 740-826-8197 or http://seoso.org. APR. 28 – Forgotten Places and Spaces Walking Tour, through Historic Downtown Cambridge, 3–4:30 p.m. 740-7051873 or www.ohiomadegetaways.com APR. 28–29 – Lucasville Trade Days, Scioto Co. Fgds., 1193 Fairground Rd., Lucasville. $3, under 13 free. Parking is free on fairground lots. 937-728-6643 or www.lucasvilletradedays.com.

APR. 7–8 – Southern Ohio Home and Garden Show, Ross Co. APR. 13–15, 20–22 – Mame, Cambridge Performing Arts Ctr., APR. 29 – Zane Grey Day, National Road and Zane Grey Fgds., 344 Fairgrounds Rd., Chillicothe, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. 740642 Wheeling Ave., Cambridge, Fri./Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. Museum, Norwich. Open house will be held 12–4 p.m. 740702-2722 or www.rosscountyfair.com. 740-261-4304 or www.cambridgeperformingartscenter.org. 872-3143 or www.ohiohistory.org.

SOUTHWEST

APR. 1 – Easter Egg Hunt, Young’s Dairy, 6880 Springfield-Xenia Rd., Yellow Springs, 2 p.m. Free. Open to children up to age 10. Each year, Young’s hard-boils and dyes over 7,000 eggs for this fun family event. 937-325-0629 or www.youngsdairy.com/easter-egg-hunt.

APR. 7–16 – Mary Poppins Jr., Taft Theatre, Fifth and Sycamore Sts., Cincinnati. Bring the whole family to enjoy this enchanting mix of story, song, dance, and stagecraft. www. thechildrenstheatre.com/mainstage/details/mary-poppins.

APR. 15 – Annual Farm Toy Show, Champaign Co. Fgds., 384 Park Ave., Urbana, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $2, under 12 free. Look, buy, sell, or trade. Over 120 tables. Door prizes. 937826-4201.

APR. 14 – Spring Fashion Doll Show and Sale, presented by Queen City Beautiful Doll Club, EnterTRAINment Junction Expo Room, 7379 Squire Ct., West Chester, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Fashion dolls, clothes, and accessories from all eras, including Barbie, Tonner, Fashion Royalty, Madame Alexander, and many others. Appraisals and door prizes during the show. 513-207-8409 or find us on Facebook.

APR. 20–21 – Midwest Ceramic Association Show, Butler Co. Exhibition Bldg., Butler Co. Fgds., 1715 Fairgrove Ave., Hamilton, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Ohio’s original ceramic show. www.midwestceramics.org.

APR. 14–15 – African Violet Show and Sale, Eastgate Mall, Batavia (I-275 and St. Rte. 32) , Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 12–6 p.m. View amazing and beautiful plants. Hard-to-find varieties and growing supplies will be available for purchase. One-on-one horticultural consultation and periodic demos will also be offered both days. 513-325-0395 or kcenci@ hotmail.com.

APR. 27–29 – Bellbrook Sugar Maple Festival, downtown Bellbrook, celebrating the festival’s 40th anniversary by honoring past festivals and participants. Entertainment includes live music, a beer garden, a parade, free children’s activities, crafts and food vendors, a 5K run, and a dog show. www. sugarmaplefestival.com. APR. 28 – Fried Chicken Dinner and Silent Auction Benefit, McGonigle Millville United Methodist Church, 2370 Lanes Mill Rd., Hamilton, auction 3–7 p.m., dinner 4–7 p.m. Adults $10; C. 4–10, $5. Proceeds benefit the area needy through the Open Hands Food Pantry. Fried chicken prepared by Charlie’s Grilling Service. Contact Sue Snider at 513-314-4144.

APRIL 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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THE First TIME…

MEMBER INTERACTIVE

1. My son, Emerson Bowen (age 3), during his first snowball fight. Alan Bowen Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative member

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2. The first time Jon and I went to Old Man’s Cave in the winter. We bundled up, packed a thermos of hot soup and drink, and enjoyed the beauty of the snow and ice, the cave, and all the surroundings. Kendra Hess South Central Power Company member

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3. My grandson, Colin, eating his first apple right off the tree. Colin Maag Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative member

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4. Our grandchildren, Jeffrey and Jaime, the first time they rode a roller coaster. This was at Tuscora Park in New Philadelphia. Patty Quaglia South Central Power Company member 5. This is my grandson, Caleb, in his first new car. Janice Thomas South Central Power Company member

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Send us your pictures!

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Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive. For July, send “Sprinkler Fun” by April 14; for August, send “Let’s go to the fair!” by May 14. Make sure to give us your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, and an explanation of the photo, including the names of people shown.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • APRIL 2018

6. My wife, Kendra, and daughter, Evelyn, enjoy their first basketball game together, watching Evelyn’s grandpa coach the St. Henry Redskins. Dan Wolters Midwest Electric member


Fun and easy ways to celebrate Earth Day To celebrate Earth Day on April 22, start by making your home more energy-efficient

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Look around for no-cost measures.

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Call your electric cooperative about energy-saving tips.

• Close the curtains in the summer and open them in the winter. • Turn off your computers overnight. • Turn off video game consoles when they’re not being used.

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• They may be able to offer advice, appliance rebates, or a home energy checkup. You might be surprised to find out what’s really driving up your energy costs.

Look for small steps you can take and DIY. • Caulk around drafty windows. • Check the attic for the correct amount of insulation. • Switch to LED lightbulbs. • Plant a deciduous tree on the sunny side of your house; in a few years, the leaves will cool your home against the sun in summer, then fall off to warm it in the winter. • Use ENERGY STAR-rated appliances.

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6/7/17 3:39 PM


Ohio Cooperative Living - April 2018 - Washington  
Ohio Cooperative Living - April 2018 - Washington