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n Pioneer Electric Cooperative Official publication of your electric cooperative Official publication | www.pioneerec.com www.ohioec.org

SEPTEMBER 2017

Agriculture for All

Away from light pollution, a stargazer’s sanctuary in Geauga County

From high-tech research to food and fun, the Farm Science Review appeals to old and young alike ALSO INSIDE Fun and funny fall festivals Making historical markers The ‘pawpaw king’

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ohioec.org

Brin the our

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STAY

AWAY. STAY

SAFE. OEC-OCL_SEPT ISSUE_COVER.indd 2 SafetyFallAd.indd 17_FULL 1

S BE AWARE OF POWER LINES

Whether you’re on the farm, at home, or on the road, remember to LOOK UP for power lines. Keep yourself and vehicle or farm machinery at least 10 feet from electric lines at all times.

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FSR ad.ind


6

10

INSIDE

In this issue:

HIGHLIGHT

4

32

FUTURE FARMING

High-tech equipment, agricultural advances take center stage at the Farm Science Review.

FEATURES

6

OUR POWER

Member-owned Cardinal Station is the workhorse of the Ohio cooperative power generation system.

10 KEEPING IT SIMPLE

A couple of unlikely goat farmers have found a niche making and selling a line of soaps and natural skin-care products.

15 DELICIOUS AND VERSATILE

For all those times you rack your brains deciding what to make for dinner, chicken nearly always comes through.

24 MARKING HISTORY

Ever wonder where those ubiquitous roadside historical markers come from? The world’s leading producer hails from none other than Marietta, Ohio.

London (p. 4) Brilliant (p. 6) Mesopotamia (p. 8) Frazeysburg (p. 10) Marietta (p. 24) Cleveland (p. 31) Old Washington (p. 32) Coshocton (p. 32) Geneva (p. 34)

32 FUN AND FUNNY FESTIVALS

From arcade games to apple butter, Ohio towns have events to celebrate just about anything.

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SEPTEMBER 2017 •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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Sept

UP FRONT

OH

CO

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR

POWER?

Pat Sa

Con Gros Mur Wue

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OHIO ISSN Elec­t 294, elec­­­­t mem in an Rura

ho among us, when we flip a light switch or turn on a fan, gives a second thought (or even a first thought) to where the electricity comes from to light the bulb or cool the room? Part of our job at Ohio’s electric cooperatives is to make it easy for you to take this miracle of science and engineering for granted. In this month’s issue, Ohio Cooperative Living pulls back the curtain and gives you a peek at how we make sure that power is literally at your fingertips anytime you want it. The very fact that we don’t really have to consider the source every time we flip a switch is testament to the workhorse nature of our power generation system — for Ohio electric cooperatives, that’s been anchored by the Cardinal Station plant on the Ohio River near Brilliant. Cardinal has been reliably delivering electricity to Ohio’s cooperatives since 1968. Cardinal was the first-ever alliance of an investor-owned electric utility, American Electric Power (AEP), and a member-owned electric cooperative, Buckeye Power, to jointly own and operate a plant to serve the consumers of both organizations. For nearly 50 years, this historic relationship has benefited consumers across Ohio. But because the role of Ohio’s investor-owned electric utilities has changed in recent years, we are exploring changes to the ownership and operation of the entire threeunit plant. Ohio’s investor-owned utilities, such as AEP, no longer produce electricity for their consumers, instead requiring that electric generation be purchased from third parties. Conversely, Ohio’s electric cooperatives own all the generating assets required to meet the needs of the 400,000 electric cooperative members in rural Ohio. Your power comes from several sources — including natural gas, wind, solar, hydropower, methane gas, and yes, coal. This all-of-the-above energy supply strategy allows Buckeye Power to fulfill its mission of delivering competitive, stably priced and reliable electric service to your cooperative.

2

Pat O’Loughlin

President & CEO Ohio's Electric Cooperatives

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and engineering for granted.

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September 2017 • Volume 59, No. 12

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org

Patrick O’Loughlin President & CEO Patrick Higgins Director of Communications Jeff McCallister Managing Editor Samantha Rhodes Associate Editor Anita Cook Graphic Designer

ohioec.org

SEPTEMBER 2017

n North Electric Cooperative OfficialWestern publication of your electric cooperative Official publication | www.nwec.com www.ohioec.org

Check out the mobilefriendly website and digital edition of Ohio Cooperative Living, as well as other timely information from Ohio’s electric cooperatives.

Agriculture for All From high-tech research to food and fun, the Farm Science Review appeals to old and young alike

FOLLOW US ON :

facebook.com/ohioec

youtube.com

@OHElectricCoops

linkedin.com

ALSO INSIDE Fun and funny fall festivals Making historical markers The ‘pawpaw king’

n North Electric Cooperative OfficialWestern publication of your electric cooperative Official publication | www.nwec.com www.ohioec.org

SEPTEMBER 2017

Agriculture for All From high-tech research to food and fun, the Farm Science Review appeals to old and young alike ALSO INSIDE Fun and funny fall festivals Making historical markers The ‘pawpaw king’

Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Marilyn Jones, Patrick Keegan, Catherine Murray, Jamie Rhein, Damaine Vonada, Margie Wuebker, and Diane Yoakam. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Elec­tric Co­op­eratives, Inc. With a paid circulation of 294,359, it is the official com­mun­ication link be­tween the elec­­­­tric co­operatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their mem­bers. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an en­dorse­ment. If you find an advertisement mis­leading or a product unsatisfactory, please not­ify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Of­fi ce, Consumer Protection Sec­tion, 30 E. Broad St., Col­um­bus, OH 43215, or call 1-800-282-0515.

What would you do with a drone? These high-tech flying gadgets are being used for more than just joy flights these days. As they become more affordable, a growing number of people are purchasing them.

Do you have a drone? If so, what do you use it for? If not, what would you like to do with it? Take to our Facebook or Twitter pages to share your ideas with our staff. Find us by searching for Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives or your local cooperative.

Periodicals postage paid at Colum­bus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member

DID YOU KNOW?

Ohio’s official state native fruit, the pawpaw, is a rich source of vitamin C, magnesium, iron, and manganese, and also contains a moderate amount of vitamin A. As nutritious as it is for humans, however, it’s a crucial part of the diet of the swallowtail butterfly. Pawpaw leaves contain an organic pesticide that swallowtails are immune to, but which makes the caterpillar and adult swallowtails a nasty snack for birds and other predators. Learn more about pawpaws on Page 30.

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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POWER LINES

SOMETHING FOR

EVERYONE

More than 150,000 come to the Farm Science Review for high-tech equipment, agricultural advances, and plain old fun

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he Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Education Center at the 2016 Farm Science Review introduced several popular new attractions. So what’s the best way to follow that up? “It seemed like everything there was such a hit, we’re going to do them again,” says Janet Rehberg, OEC’s director of marketing. “People loved the Kids’ Zone, so we’ll have more of that, and the ‘Be a Lineman’ area was crowded the whole time, so we’ll keep that, too. We also have a few new displays in our area that I think people will really enjoy and get a lot out of.” Sponsored by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences,

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the Farm Science Review is one of the premier agricultural trade and education shows in the nation. It offers landowners, farmers, and conservationists the opportunity to learn about the latest agricultural innovations in research from nearly 650 exhibitors. The 2017 showcase will be September 19–21 at the Molly Caren Agricultural Center in London, Ohio. Tickets are available for $7 online at fsr.osu.edu and at county extension offices and participating local agribusinesses (kids ages 5 and under get in free). Tickets also can be purchased at the gate for $10. Ohio electric cooperative members can enter to win a $100 bill credit by completing the entry form on the inside

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New for this year’s 55th Farm Science Review, visitors will be able to “Map Your Show” on a new mobile app in preparation for the three-day event. The app, available in app stores, allows visitors to browse the interactive map and search for specific exhibitors or product categories. Of course, it’s not all new. A long-running highlight of OEC’s building is the microwave cooking demonstration. Patty Miller and Sherry Bickel appear for their 28th year, performing up to four microwave cooking demonstrations per day and sharing the scrumptious results. This year’s recipes include English muffin bread, warm Havarti-spinach dip, tuna casserole, and sunshine cake. Also, the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives hot air balloon will once again soar high above Farm Science Review twice a day (weather permitting).

back cover of this issue of Ohio Cooperative Living and bringing it to the OEC Education Center. “Lots of people come to the review and want to see the latest and greatest equipment, but the take-home for the majority of visitors is to become more efficient — both economically and through their farming operations,” says Nick Zachrich, Farm Science Review manager. “One of the efficiencies they’re looking for is energy efficiency, and since agriculture as an industry is a relatively high consumer of electricity, the co-ops’ message of efficiency, conservation, and savings is a great benefit to the farmers who come to the review.”

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t

BY JEFF McCALLISTER

ENERGYLINES POWER

OUR

POWER

Member-owned Cardinal Station: Generating electricity the co-op way

D

riving on Ohio Route 7 south of Steubenville near Brilliant, the first thing most people notice about the Cardinal Station power-generating facility is the snow-white plume emanating from the tall, thin dual stacks on the northern end of the station and from the shorter, stubbier tower to the south. The color of those plumes is significant. Long gone are the days when the stacks would send black smoke into the atmosphere. Thanks to more than $1 billion in investments in environmental equipment, that cloud is nearly all water vapor. Cardinal’s emission controls actually do a better job than federal law requires. It is one of the cleanest coal-burning generating plants in the world.

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First impressions

“I was immediately struck at just how clean it is all over the plant,” says Pam Engbert, a member of lancaster-based South Central Power Company who toured Cardinal in July with fellow teachers from around the state. “You don’t expect to walk into a plant like this and for it to be this clean. Only one time I saw any coal outside the stockpiles, and that was near the pulverizer, where I would have expected to see a lot more than there was.” The next thing people notice as they get closer is the sheer size of the place. Even the view from the entrance gate doesn’t give the complete perspective; it’s not until you get up near the Unit 3 cooling tower/stack that the magnitude really hits. “It’s bigger than what I thought it would be, overall just a more massive place than you see in pictures or even just driving past,” says Marianne Williamson, another teacher and a member of Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative, which is based in Wellington.

Plenty of power

Of course, that size is important as well. Though Buckeye Power, the generation and transmission cooperative that provides electricity to all members of Ohio electric cooperatives, has added hydroelectric and renewables to its mix of power sources in recent years, Cardinal Station is still the workhorse of the fleet, capable of producing 1,880 megawatts of power at any given time — more than enough electricity for Ohio electric cooperative members on all but the most brutal summer day or the most bitter winter night. Perhaps the most important bit about the plant, however, is neither its size nor its high-tech environmental controls. Cardinal is a baseload plant, meaning that it is designed to operate all the time. However, like your car or any mechanical device, Cardinal must shut down occasionally for needed maintenance work. “Repairs are always part of the operating plans,” says Tom Alban, vice president of power generation at Buckeye Power. “So even though we would like Cardinal to run 24-7-365, we are able to target the

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Marianne Williamson (left) and Pam Engbert (third from left) joined a group of fellow teachers at Cardinal Station last July as they prepare to educate their students about energy.

best times to be able to take it down and use our other generation sources to make up for it.”

We all own Cardinal

“Every co-op member has a stake in that plant,” Alban says. “In addition to getting their electricity from it most of the time, our members built it and added the improvements.” It’s also important to note that Cardinal is the most economical of the generation resources owned by Buckeye Power — and of course, holding down costs means lower electric bills for cooperative members. The operations staff constantly monitors and evaluates new technology, finding ways to optimize the generation process to keep it safe, clean, affordable, and reliable. The people who work there also care deeply about the environment. “You can tell when you listen to the staff that it’s different from working for one of the big utility companies,” Engbert says. “They not only are extremely knowledgeable in what they do, but they also care that they’re doing things the right way. They hold costs down because they know that affects other members. The emissions are clean and the plant is safe because being good neighbors is also the right thing to do.”

SEPTEMBER 2017 •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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OHIO ICON

END OF THE

STORY AND PHOTO BY DAMAINE VONADA

COMMONS GENERAL STORE

MESOPOTAMIA Location: Intersection of State Routes 534 and 87 near the west end of Mesopotamia’s village green (a.k.a. the “Commons”).

Provenance: Like most of the structures surrounding Mesopotamia’s Commons, End of the Commons General Store pre-dates the Civil War and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The white frame building, with its double front porch, was built in 1840 to house a general store that not only supplied necessities such as food and household goods, but also was a gathering place where folks could get their mail and the latest gossip. In 1982, Ken and Margaret Schaden purchased the store and its contents, which included more than a century’s worth of furniture, fixtures, and artifacts. Running it with help from their 11 children, the Schadens introduced bulk foods for the area’s Amish community and repurposed the store’s stockpile of antiquated items, turning them into décor. Their son, Peter Schaden, now owns the family business. “I’ve worked here since age 9,” he says. “I started out sweeping floors and mowing the lawn.” Significance: End of the Commons is Ohio’s oldest continuously operated general store and one of the oldest in the nation.

Currently: With merchandise ranging from lye soap to locally crafted Amish corn brooms, End of the Commons is a nostalgic destination that attracts Amish and “Yankee” customers, as well as motorcyclists and tour buses. “Everybody

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loves going down memory lane, and we believe in making the store a different experience from going to Walmart or Giant Eagle,” notes Schaden. The End of the Commons experience starts outside, with a huge hitching post for horse-pulled Amish buggies, and it continues inside with a working authentic player piano; an old-fashioned barber chair complete with an animatronic “proprietor” who talks and moves; and eye-catching displays of vintage tools, signs, license plates, and memorabilia. Also delighting shoppers are more than 1,000 kinds of bulk foods; some 200 types of soda pop in glass bottles; and 28 different penny candies. “We actually sell the candies for one cent each,” says Schaden. “That’s great for parents because they don’t go broke and their kids are happy.”

After refurbishing a nearby 1940s gas station that’s still in business, Schaden constructed a brick building to connect it with his 1840 general store. The new building contains a café where customers enjoy burgers and hand-dipped ice cream as well as a bakery that makes the superpopular fry pies.

Th w d cr U 1 a m h co a

It’s a little-known fact that: The store’s best-selling fry pies are apple and red raspberry cheesecake.

End of the Commons General Store, 8719 St. Rte. 534, Mesopotamia, OH 44439. For information about the store, its hours, merchandise, and online ordering, call 440-693-4295 or visit www.endofthecommons.com.

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SEPTEMBER 2017 •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

7x10 Magazine Master, 1 Page, Installment, Vertical updated 11/2013

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY MARILYN JONES

CO-OP PEOPLE

KEEPING IT

SIMPLE

Unlikely farmers find success producing goat’s-milk skin care products

Chad Snelling (left) and Jeff Wince have a successful farm and skin-care product business in rural Licking County.

G

reeted by four rescue dogs as I walk toward the 19th-century farmhouse in rural Licking County, I know their barks are more of an announcement than a warning. Once in the yard, the welcoming committee swells to include several turkeys, ducks, chickens, geese, and guineas before farm owners Jeff Wince and Chad Snelling open the door of their 1823 home and invite me in. Wince, born and raised in rural Licking County, and Snelling, city-born and -raised, bought the house and seven acres in 2010 after years of debate. “I had never

10

been on a farm,” Snelling says with a smile, “and never, ever did I think I would become a farmer.” It was the historic house that convinced Snelling to give it a try, and Tilton Hollow Farm was born. Ironically, Wince still works a fulltime job in Columbus, while Snelling is the fulltime farmer. “The farm was established by the Tilton family,” says Wince. “When I was looking at an 1875 almanac, I discovered the farm next door was owned by my fourth and fifth great-grandfathers. I came right back to my roots and brought Chad with me.”

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S

The farm boasts several exotic free-range chickens and roosters.

Members of The Energy Cooperative in Newark, the two started a business in 2013 making and selling soap and natural skin-care products from goat’s milk. “We sell between 300 and 600 bars of soap a month, depending on the season,” Wince says. “You met a lot of our animals already,” says Snelling. “We also have 27 very spoiled dairy goats, plus 15 sheep and a sheepdog, and one very opinionated alpaca.”

Tilton Hollow Farm sells allnatural soap and has a large repeat business.

From the house I am invited to explore the property. Past a pond and along a well-worn pathway, I find a paddock with an assortment of goats, all clamoring for my attention. It’s clear that they are loved and taken good care of.

Most of the farm’s 27 goats were born there.

“We give our animals a wonderful life in return for the wonderful products they help us create,” Snelling says. ”We also hold workshops throughout the year,” Wince adds. “Now we’re looking into some new areas, such as getting certified for dairy production, including cheese and butter.” Tilton Hollow sells its products online. Workshops, including “Planting a Fall Garden,” “Fermenting — Kimchi & Krauts,” “Cheese Making,” and “Hollowday Greenery Decorations,” can also be booked online. “I never imagined working on a farm, let alone making soap or owning goats,” says Snelling. “Now I never want to leave here.” Tilton Hollow Farm, Fallsbury Twp. (near Frazeysburg). For orders and other information, visit www.tiltonhollow.com.

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The farm has several heritage turkeys, and each one has a name.

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T

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Farm Science Review See our display – Talk with us! Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives building September 19-21 • London, OH

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expensive shaft-way. Its small “footprint” and self-contained lift mechanism adds convenience and value to your home and quality to your life. It’s called the Easy Climber® Elevator. Call us now and we can tell you just how simple it is to own. For many people, particularly seniors, climbing stairs can be a struggle and a health threat. Some have installed motorized stair lifts, but they block access to the stairs and are hardly an

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enhancement to your home’s décor. By contrast, the Easy Climber® Elevator can be installed almost anywhere in your home. That way you can move easily and safely from floor to floor without struggling or worse yet… falling. Why spend another day without this remarkable convenience. Knowledgeable product experts are standing by to answer any questions you may have. Call Now!

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AARON HEILERS, LEGACY LANE FARM, SHELBY COUNTY Project Manager, Blanchard River Demonstration Farm Network OHIO FARM BUREAU SOLUTIONS: IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

“ALL FARMERS ARE CONCERNED WITH WATER QUALITY, BUT WANT TO MANAGE RISK. WE SHOW THEM FIRSTHAND HOW NEW DATA IS GETTING BEST PRACTICES ON THE GROUND AND MAKING A DIFFERENCE.”

WATER IS LIFE.

“WE NEED TO HAVE CLEAN WATER WITHOUT LIMITING OUR CAPACITY TO GROW FOOD.” – AARON HEILERS, PROJECT MANAGER, BLANCHARD RIVER DEMONSTRATION FARMS NETWORK

AARON HEILERS, LEGACY LANE FARM, SHELBY COUNTY Project Manager, Blanchard River Demonstration Farm Network

“ALL FARMERS ARE CONCERNED WITH WATER QUALITY, BUT WANT TO MANAGE RISK. WE SHOW THEM FIRSTHAND HOW a farmer, Heilers BEST knows the concerns many farmers about NEWAsDATA ISAaron GETTING PRACTICES ON THEhave GROUND managing risk while improving water quality. And as project manager for MAKING A Farms DIFFERENCE.” the BlanchardAND River Demonstration Network, he also knows how new data is getting best practices on the ground and making a difference to farmers – and to all Ohioans. The Demonstration Farms Network is part of Ohio Farm Bureau’s multi-million dollar investment, putting members’ dues to good use by helping farmers protect the environment. To read our 2017 Water Quality Status Report, visit farmersforwater.org.

Join us on the journey and be a part of preserving farms and protecting natural resources. Become a member of Ohio Farm Bureau today at ofbf.org/joinonline.

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GOOD EATS

DELICIOUS & VERSATILE

What’s the best thing about chicken for dinner? Everything! Fry it, bake it, stew it, roast it, grill it — the versatile bird is a do-it-all main dish that can be served plain and fast for everyday meals or dressed up for special occasions. Even at its greasy-fried worst, it’s still only about 300 calories per 4-oz. serving.

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OVEN-BARBECUED CHICKEN 1 3-lb. chicken, cut into pieces 2 Tbsp. butter 1 medium onion, chopped 8 oz. tomato juice ½ Tbsp. mustard ½ cup water 1 tsp. salt 1 Tbsp. vinegar 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce Brown chicken pieces in melted butter and remove to roasting pan. Cook onions in remaining butter until golden brown. Add remaining ingredients and simmer 10 minutes before pouring over chicken. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. For extra crispiness, increase heat to 500 degrees the last 3 to 4 minutes. Serves 4.

GRILLED CARIBBEAN CHICKEN 4 (4 oz.) boneless chicken breasts 4 tsp. lime juice 2 tsp. vegetable oil 2 tsp. jerk seasoning Nonstick cooking spray

LIGHTER FARE

Flatten chicken breasts to 1/4-inch thickness using a meat mallet. Combine lime juice and oil. Brush both sides of breasts with oil mixture and rub with jerk seasoning. Coat grill grates with cooking spray and heat grill to mediumhigh. Grill chicken, covered, 5 to 6 minutes on each side or until done. Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 155 calories, 4 g total fat (1 g saturated fat), 0 g fiber, 25 g protein

BALSAMIC CHICKEN 6 (4 oz.) boneless chicken breasts 1/4 tsp. black pepper 1 tsp. garlic salt 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 medium onion, thinly sliced

1 (14.5 oz.) can diced tomatoes 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar 1 tsp. dried basil 1 tsp. dried oregano 1 tsp. dried rosemary 1/2 tsp. dried thyme

LIGHTER FARE

Season chicken with pepper and garlic salt. Heat oil in large skillet; add chicken and onions. Cook until chicken is browned. Pour in tomatoes, vinegar, and herbs. Simmer until chicken is done, about 15 to 20 minutes. Serve over rice or noodles or alongside salad. Serves 6. Per serving: 198 calories, 8 g total fat (2 g saturated fat), 2 g fiber, 27 g protein

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GOOD EATS

PECAN-STUFFED CHICKEN BREASTS 4 Tbsp. butter 1 large stalk celery, chopped 1 small onion, finely chopped ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper 4 slices bread, toasted and cut into cubes

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3 oz. pecans, chopped 2 tsp. parsley flakes ¼ cup water 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts 2 Tbsp. lemon juice 2 Tbsp. melted butter ¾ tsp. salt ½ tsp. pepper

Melt 4 Tbsp. butter in pan and sauté celery, onion, ½ tsp. salt, and ¼ tsp. pepper. Stir in toast cubes, chopped pecans, parsley flakes, and water. Flatten chicken breasts and place each in center of a 12-inch square of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Brush both sides of breasts with lemon juice and 2 Tbsp. melted butter. Sprinkle with 3/4 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper. Spoon stuffing mixture in the center of each breast. Fold foil around chicken and seal tightly. Bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Carefully open packets and bake for an additional 20 minutes. Serves 4.

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THE EFFICIENCY EXPERT

THE BENEFITS OF

AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMPS

BY PAT KEEGAN

F

or most of us, heating and cooling accounts for the largest part of our household energy use. For someone wanting to replace a furnace system that runs on propane or fuel oil, an electric air-source heat pump could be a good alternative. A heat pump is also a cost-effective alternative to electric furnaces, baseboard heaters, and wall units.

How heat pumps work

In the summer, an air-source heat pump acts as an air conditioner (AC) that draws heat from your home’s air and transfers it outside. In the winter, the system’s direction is reversed, so that heat is pulled from the outside air and moved into your home.

The heat pump has two major components: the condenser (also called the compressor) that circulates refrigerant through the system; and an air handler that distributes the conditioned air. Most heat pumps are split systems, with the condenser located outside and the air handler inside. A packaged system contains both components in one unit that is placed outside your home. In the past, heat pumps weren’t efficient enough to work in colder climates. In recent years, however, technology has advanced to make them viable even in climates with long periods of sub-freezing temperature.

If an old furnace has an AC attached, replacing both the

How an air-source heat pump works

In the summer, the heat pump moves heat from inside the home through refrigerant lines to the exterior. Illustration Credit: Collaborative Efficiency. 18

Heat pumps generally are split systems, with the condenser situated outside the home.

heating and cooling system with the all-in-one solution of a heat pump might produce significant cost savings. For someone currently cooling with window units or an older central AC, moving to an air-source heat pump could reduce summer energy bills. Heat pumps not only reduce energy costs, they can also eliminate the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning and problems that can occur with on-site storage of propane or heating oil.

Selecting and installing

How much can a heat pump reduce energy costs? It depends upon the size and efficiency of the home, local energy prices, and local climate. Online calculators can help predict energy savings, but energy auditors can predict energy savings with greater precision, and they can offer advice on choosing a specific brand and size of the unit. More importantly, energy auditors can suggest other ways to improve comfort or reduce energy use, such as duct sealing or insulating the building envelope. PAT KEEGAN writes for Collaborative Efficiency, an energy communications company.

In the winter, the heat pump moves heat from outside through refrigerant lines into the home. Illustration Credit: Collaborative Efficiency.

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PIONEER ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

YO U VOI CE D YO UR C O N C E R N S , AND WE HE AR D YO U Throughout the past few months, Pioneer has experienced several issues involving our phone system, particularly after our normal hours of operation. For this, I would like to take a moment to apologize to our members, especially those who were affected by outages during this time and dealt with the frustrations that come with not being able to reach your cooperative in a time of need. Pioneer is fully focused on its members, and with that comes difficult decisions. Unfortunately, in the selection of our telephone carrier, our decision led to many unanticipated consequences, including dropped calls, lower call volume availability, and an overall decreased level of service. So, when 200 members’ lights go out, and you all call in at the same time, our current provider can’t keep up. And let’s face it — these are the times when you need our phone service to work best.

Ron Salyer PRESIDENT & CEO

You voiced your concerns, and we heard you. In late June, our team, led by our manager of information services, began the process to switch to a tier-1 telephone carrier from our current tier-3 carrier, and our intention is to have our system fully converted by late October. Switching to a tier-1 carrier will increase our network capacity and reliability significantly compared to our current provider, which is a smaller company operating through agreements with tier-1 providers. In the meantime, we have been able to work with our current carrier to make temporary adjustments that will help increase reliability until we are able to fully implement the new service. The new carrier guarantees to provide our members nearly flawless phone coverage with 99.99 percent availability. While every day we strive to make the best decisions on behalf of our members, there are times we will falter unintentionally. We cannot express our thankfulness enough to the membership for voicing your concerns, letting us know there is an issue, and providing us the time and understanding to resolve it to the best of our ability.

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PIONEER’S FOX TO RETIRE AFTE R 30 Y E A R S O F S E R VI C E Doug Fox, Pioneer’s manager of operations and safety, is set to retire on Sept. 1, 2017, after more than 30 years of service at the cooperative.

in other states. Through his years of experience, he is certain that cooperative employees are among the nicest people you will meet.

Doug admits that he was focused on joining Pioneer early on — applying to Pioneer multiple times during the first decade of his career. He wasn’t hired immediately to no fault of his own. Pioneer had an anti-nepotism policy — a policy still in place today — that would not allow multiple family members to work for the company, and his aunt worked for the cooperative.

“I will miss the relationships — some of my best friends and the people I trust the most work here,” says Doug.

Upon her retirement, his persistence finally paid off, and he was hired as a groundman at Pioneer in 1987. Despite being hired as a groundman, Doug had another position in mind. “I had a real desire to be a lineman,” says Doug. “It’s just what I wanted to do, something that not everyone else wanted to, or was able to do.”

He says that when he began considering retirement a couple years ago, one of his main goals was to make sure that Pioneer’s three operations supervisors and assistant safety managers had the training and knowledge that he will take with him upon retirement. “They won’t miss a beat,” says Doug. “I have no concern that this group will continue to operate just as smooth as they have in the past.” During his retirement, Doug, a self-proclaimed sports nut, looks forward to watching a few more Cincinnati Reds games at Great American Ballpark, spending more time with his four grandchildren, and figuring out how to slow down after so many years in a fastpaced profession. Congratulations and best wishes during your retirement, Doug!

He worked his way up the chain to first class lineman in 1991, lineman in charge in 1996, and leader lineman in 1998 before becoming Pioneer’s first manager of safety in 2005. Doug then moved into the Piqua operations supervisor role in 2007, manager of operations in 2014, and landed finally as the manager of operations and safety in 2015. Doug says that at heart, he will always be a lineman, and looking back, he would have been happy to stay in that position. “Being a lineman is hard work, but with that comes a lot of job satisfaction,” says Doug. Doug has had experience working with other line crews and has taken part in storm restoration repairs 20

Pioneer’s Manager of Operations and Safety Doug Fox watches the annual pole top rescue training at the cooperative headquarters in Piqua. Fox is set to retire on Sept. 1.

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TIPS TO AVOID A CYBER SECURITY ATTACK and preventive measures taken by your co-op Pioneer Electric takes cyber security seriously.

of Pioneer employees were deceived by these training e-mails, and 13 percent reported the emails as fake.

Last year alone, Pioneer’s information technology team sent out nearly 1,500 phishing e-mails internally as part of a company-wide, comprehensive cyber security training.

In addition to internal training, Pioneer also monitors internal and external events to prevent ransomware attacks.

Employees are encouraged to report phishing attempts. As of June 30 2017, less than one percent

Practicing these preventive measures regularly helps keep members’ sensitive information safe.

It is going to happen to you

Vary Passwords

Believing that you will not be the target of a cyber security attack makes you particularly vulnerable to hackers. It’s best to always be on guard.

Use a good mix of characters, numbers, and symbols, and avoid using the same password for multiple sites.

Update Software

Use security password management programs such as lastpass instead of writing passwords down.

Be sure to keep all software, especially virus protection software, up-to-date on your devices.

Avoid Phishing Scams Think before you click — be careful when clicking on attachments or links in an e-mail. Does it look suspicious or is it unexpected? When in doubt, throw it out.

Keep your devices close Never leave electronics or storage devices unattended in public places — even if someone doesn’t steal your devices, they may steal sensitive information.

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CEN TURY-O L D BA R N S

find new purpose

True to their roots, engaged couples turn to barns throughout Pioneer service territory for their ideal rustic wedding celebration. Ben Bickert and his wife, Erin, held their reception at The Willow Tree, a rustic wedding venue located just outside of Tipp City, more than 17 years ago. Since then, the property has always held a special place in their hearts. In 2010, the couple made the decision to move back to Miami County from Iowa to be closer to family. By what they consider “fate,” while searching for homes online, Erin stumbled upon the historic property they wed on nearly two decades ago. The Willow Tree property, with a home in disrepair due to previous tenants, was being foreclosed on and had sat empty for a year and a half. After deciding it might be worth considering, Ben drove from Iowa to Tipp City to view the property. Before he could even make it back to Iowa, the realtor of the property had accepted the Bickerts’ offer.

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They purchased the five-acre property primarily as their home, and at the time were not quite certain they would get into the wedding business. However, the decision was, to some degree, made for them. Before they had closed on the property, Ben says they began receiving phone calls from brides to book the barn for weddings. “There was a lot of excitement that The Willow Tree was coming back,” says Ben. It wasn’t long before the couple realized the barn, the property, and the event coordination would consume enough time to require both of them to work at it fulltime. The Willow Tree, which had hosted weddings for more than 30 years came back to life. “It took eight to nine months to get the property and bridal suite in good enough shape to host a wedding,” says Ben.

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The Bickerts host weddings Friday through Sunday from April through October. Their venue holds up to 200 guests. The couple is excited to try something new this year — offering a bridal show open house on Sept. 26 at their property along OH-571 — giving future brides a true representation of what to expect from the venue. “At the end of this year, we will have hosted more than 400 weddings in five years,” says Ben.

Pretty Prairie Farm

Pretty Prairie Farm, located outside of Urbana, became a wedding venue almost by accident. Jill and Todd Michaels’ daughter got engaged around Thanksgiving of 2013. “She asked if she could have her wedding at the farm, and our initial reaction was ‘Sure, we can set up tents in the back yard,’” says Jill. Lo and behold, tents weren’t what their daughter envisioned; she wanted to use the barn — a 173-yearold structure that held livestock and animals for Future Farmers of America and 4-H projects, and before that, housed equipment, too. After a year and a half of pressure washing, cosmetic repairs, and modifications, including the addition of restrooms and the removal of several walls, the barn became the perfect setting for a country wedding. “After everything was washed, it brightened the wood in such a way that it just came to life,” says Jill.

The couple hosted their daughter’s wedding in 2014. It didn’t take long before the Michaels received numerous inquiries to use their property for other weddings. “We were hesitant at first because we didn’t want to be ‘married’ to it every weekend,” says Todd. They first tested the idea of opening it as a rentable venue with six weddings in 2015, and then they booked every weekend in 2016. It was during 2016 that the couple hired a few employees who act as the wedding coaches when the Michaels are not available — allowing them to maintain some flexibility with their own schedules. The barn at Pretty Prairie Farm holds up to 350 guests with a balcony that overlooks a large stage and dance floor. The Michaels accept reservations from May to October, only allowing one event per weekend, which lets the renter decorate on Friday, celebrate on Saturday, and clean on Sunday. “We’ve seen all sorts of wedding styles from a baseball theme with ballpark food to very upscale with fine china,” says Todd. In addition to the barn, the property also has a large backyard where a ceremony can be held. The bride and bridesmaids are able to use Todd and Jill’s children’s old bedrooms, and the men can relax in the recreational space above the carriage house.

Continued on Page 20D

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Lost Creek Memory Barn

Lost Creek Memory Barn, located just outside of Troy, booked its first wedding in 2012 when, according to Wade Wilhelm, a family friend asked his brother Wayne if she could see the barn as a possible wedding venue. At the time, the barn was filled with soybeans, farm machinery, and horse reining equipment; however, the bride had a vision and asked that the Wilhelms clean out the barn. Wilhelm says that back then, they didn’t see the barn turning into a rentable venue. “It kind of happened on accident,” says Wilhelm. The barn was used one additional time in 2012, and a niece and nephew each used the barn for their weddings in 2013, but it wasn’t until 2014 that the Wilhelms decided to open it up to couples outside of family and friends. “I honestly thought it was just going to be a fad,” says Wilhelm. “But here we are a couple years later, taking reservations for as many events as we will allow.” They held 14 weddings in 2014, 45 in 2015, and 65 in 2016. They have 65 scheduled for 2017, which they have determined to be their maximum number for a given year. The Wilhelms book weddings from the second week of April through the first week of November. Named for the creek that runs under and along the lane

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leading to the farm, the barn and house were built in 1889 and have been in the Wilhelm Family since 1914. The barn is 2,400 square feet and has a maximum occupancy of 215. The historical house can be used by the wedding party to get ready and prepare for the big day. It’s a family endeavor according to Wilhelm, as his wife, Diana; brother, Wayne, and his wife, Diana; sister Laurie; and his children also help with the events. Wade and his brother, Wayne, still use the 160 acres of farmland to raise crops as well. Turning the barn from an old machine shed to a wedding venue required quite a bit of investment, but the family is now beginning to reap the rewards, according to Wilhelm.

The Buckeye Barn

Among the most recent barn venues within Pioneer’s service territory is The Buckeye Barn, located on TroySidney Road outside of Piqua. Josh Landis and his fiancé, Nicole Jefferies, were inspired to purchase and renovate the country property located at 9017 Troy-Sidney Road, Piqua, after they struggled to find available options to meet their own visions for an ideal rustic wedding venue — a wedding now scheduled on the property in October. Josh says they asked themselves a simple question: “If we are finding it this difficult to find a venue, how many others are having the same problem?”

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y

In October 2016, the barn still had cows in it. The couple took possession on Nov. 3, 2016, and on May 6, 2017, they held their first event. Now, they are nearly booked solid through 2018. “Some of our first bookings were made with cow manure barely removed from the barn,” says Josh. The 11,000-square-foot barn was originally built in 1920. It includes a large screen, projector, sound system, and enough chairs and tables to meet the maximum capacity of 300. Josh was able to do a majority of the work on the barn himself. He was also the designer behind marketing efforts such as the logo and website. The couple worked together to create the rustic chandeliers that add to the venue’s rustic feel. However, Josh is quick to credit Nicole for the planning and decorating of the bride’s quarters and dude cave — a perfect complement to the barn that allows both the bride and groom to have their own private space. “We like to leave the barn as an open canvas for whatever vision our brides and grooms have for their wedding,” says Josh. The owners of each venue agree that it is hard work and requires long days on weekends, but they all feel a level of satisfaction in giving new life to these historic barns and providing couples with their ideal wedding ceremony and reception.

R U S T I C BAR N V E N U ES : LOST C RE E K M EMORY BA R N CASSTOWN, OHIO | 937- 875 -1005 WWW.WILHELMFAMILYFARMS.COM BOOKING DATES: APRIL-EARLY NOVEMBER MAXIMUM OCCUPANCY: 215 GUESTS

PRE T T Y PRAI RI E FA R M URBANA , OHIO | 937-605 -1693 WWW.PRET T YPRAIRIEFARM.COM BOOKING DATES: MAY-OCTOBER MAXIMUM OCCUPANCY: 350 GUESTS

THE BUC K E YE BA R N PIQUA , OHIO | 937- 405 -1934 WWW.THEBUCKEYEBARN.COM BOOKING DATES: APRIL-NOVEMBER MAXIMUM OCCUPANCY: 300 GUESTS

“We like to leave the barn as an open canvas for whatever vision our brides and grooms have for their wedding.” — Josh Landis, co-owner of The Buckeye Barn

THE W I LLOW TREE TIPP CIT Y, OHIO | 937-260-3273 WWW.THEWILLOWTREETIPPCIT Y.COM BOOKING DATES: APRIL-OCTOBER MAXIMUM OCCUPANCY: 200 GUESTS

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Board nominations to be made based upon the following provisions: On Oct. 24, 2017, the county boards of Pioneer Electric Cooperative will nominate candidates for the Pioneer Board of Trustees and for four positions on each of the individual county boards. The elections will then be conducted in the spring by mail and online, with the election results announced at Cooperative Spirit Day on March 24, 2018.

serving the best interest of the membership as a whole. In an effort to ensure the diverse membership of Pioneer Electric Cooperative is represented by members of the board of trustees and the individual county boards, the nominating committees will consider a variety of factors that could have a bearing upon an individual’s capacity to serve as a trustee.

All candidates must be 18 years or older, current members of the cooperative, and living in a home served by Pioneer. They should also be in good standing with their financial obligations to the cooperative and should have a genuine interest in

For additional details, including the Code of Regulations provisions, go to www.pioneerec.com or call our office at 800-762-0997 to request to have a printed copy mailed to you.

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P I O N EER O FFI CES W I L L B E C LOS E D ON M ON DAY, S E P T. 4 , I N R E C OG N I T I ON OF L AB OR DAY. PIONEER RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. CONTACT

1-800-762-0997 | 937-773-2523 www.pioneerec.com MAIN OFFICE

344 West U.S. Route 36 Piqua, Ohio 45356 DISTRICT OFFICE

767 Three Mile Road Urbana, Ohio 43078 OFFICE HOURS

8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

22

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Ronald P. Clark Chair

Colleen R. Eidemiller First Vice Chair

Ted R. Black Second Vice Chair

Terrence A. Householder Secretary

Ron L. Bair Treasurer

Mark A. Bailey Orville J. Bensman Roger J. Bertke Duane L. Engel Trustees

Harold T. Covault Donald D. DeWeese Dwain E. Hollingsworth Douglas A. Hurst Edward P. Sanders Paul R. Workman Donald K. Zerkle Trustees Emeritus

Ronald P. Salyer President/CEO

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION?

E-mail your ideas to: member@pioneerec.com

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Nine finish COLT training Ohio has nine new journeyman lineworkers after the members of the class of 2017 finished the Power Lineworker Certification Program at the Central Ohio Lineworker Training (COLT) center July 28.

The nine members of the latest class — with eight employees of Ohio electric cooperatives and one from a municipal provider — are the first to graduate since the opening of COLT’s new indoor training facility in early July. They finished the full complement of 12 classes over the four-year program that includes 600 hours of related technical instruction and 8,000 hours of on-the-job training under COLT Instructor/ Coordinator Kyle Hoffman and the other members of the COLT staff.

“The program was great,” says Matt Weaver, a new journeyman lineman from Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative. “As a lineman, you can do things in the field and not have a really good understanding

PPEC employees transform Humane Society In May, 25 employees from Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative spent the morning volunteering at the Van Wert County Humane Society in Van Wert, Ohio, to transform the exterior of the facility. Sacrificing their Saturday morning, employees painted the shelter’s garage, replaced and moved the flag pole, landscaped around the house, fixed quarantine units, and made a new mailbox. This service project represented one of the co-op’s annual efforts to give back to the local community, a core principle of PPEC.

Beetles threaten service reliability

Numerous electric cooperatives across the state of Ohio are warning members of a potential increase in outages due to falling trees infected with the emerald ash borer, an invasive green beetle from Asia that has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in North America.

Ash trees become infested when adult borers lay their eggs on the bark, and the larva that hatch bore into the tree, disrupting the movement of water and nutrients. Most infested trees are killed within one to three years, and those dead trees can easily fall on primary electric conductors or other equipment. Dead trees are hazardous to remove since they cannot be safely climbed; therefore, quick action

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The 2017 class in the Power Lineworker Certification Program: front row-Training Specialist Gary Simpson, Shiloh Neice from Carroll Electric, James Coots from Consolidated Electric, Zack Azallion from South Central Power, Adam Steer from Guernsey-Muskingum Electric, and Travis DeVolld from Washington Electric; back row-Training Specialist Dave Allen, Taylor Riedy from Westerville Electric Division, Joel Miller from Lorain-Medina Rural Electric, Matt Weaver from Guernsey-Muskingum Electric, Daniel Hill from South Central Power, and COLT Coordinator Kyle Hoffman.

of why. This program answers those questions with more than just, ‘because this is how it’s done.’” must be taken to remove them prior to death. Electric co-ops such as Carroll Electric have developed additional tree pruning and removal rotation plans to ensure these beetle-infested trees miss electrical facilities should they fall.

Since January, Carroll Electric has removed more than 680 off-corridor trees that threatened service reliability.

Camp Palmer receives grants for high ropes

4-H Camp Palmer, located in Fayette, Ohio, recently received a $12,000 grant from Bryan Area Foundation for the new high ropes project, including a $2,500 grant from the North Western Electric Trust and a $500 grant from Midwest Electric’s Community Connection Fund. 4-H Camp Palmer is a camping complex nestled in the woods adjacent to Harrison Lake State Park. Operated since 1947 in conjunction with Ohio State University Extension, the camp features indoor and outdoor living and recreational facilities, offering youth and adults opportunities for environmental education, leadership, and team development.

Hundreds of northwest Ohio electric cooperative youth participate in summer camps and programs at Camp Palmer each year. SEPTEMBER 2017 •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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STORY AND PHOTO BY DAMAINE VONADA

OHIO HISTORY

MARKING

HISTORY

Marietta’s Sewah Studios creates those roadside signs that document significant places

T

he ubiquitous historical markers seen on roadsides around the country have their own unique look, state by state. Those in Pennsylvania and Virginia have built-in mounting posts. New York’s use extra-large letters for better readability, but Florida’s have a smaller font that allows for more words. Alabama’s and Maryland’s markers flaunt their state flags; West Virginia’s exhibits the state seal; Mississippi’s highlights the state flower.

Only one state has its historical markers topped by an outline of the state and the foliage of its state tree. “Those Buckeye leaves on Ohio’s markers are iconic,” says Bradford Smith, president of Sewah Studios in Marietta, the world’s leading historical marker manufacturer. “No other state has historical markers that are as beautiful and ornate.”

Sewah Studios creates between 1,200 and 1,300 markers annually at its plant in Marietta, and has created markers in all 50 states and around the world. The company currently makes the official markers for more than 30 states and also supplies customers in England, France, Mexico, and Jamaica, and a few other countries as well. Made of cast aluminum, the markers are handcrafted by some 20 employees — who do everything from gluing text onto the templates to pouring molten aluminum into molds to painting letters and logos to shipping them in custom-built crates. “We’ve always produced our signs by hand,” Smith says. “That’s why they’re works of art.”

It’s certainly fitting that history-laden Marietta, the first permanent settlement in Ohio, dating to 1788, is the company’s home. Local salesman, cartographer, and history buff E.M. Hawes founded it in an old organ factory in 1927 (“Sewah” is “Hawes” spelled backward). Automobile tourism was gaining popularity, and Hawes saw an opportunity to build a roadside marker business. “Hawes was a visionary,” Smith says. “He saw a niche he could fill, and he did it with aluminum alloys.”

Sewah Studios owner Bradford Smith with his company’s own marker. 24

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In Hawes’s day, commemorative markers and plaques usually were made from wood, which rotted, or iron, which rusted. Hawes not only pioneered the use of more durable cast aluminum, but he also developed a proprietary font and signature layout that continue to impart the “Sewah look” to markers today. “Our lettering style is a modification of the old Caslon font, with serifs that give ‘f’ and ‘g’ a particularly different appearance,” Smith says. “People like its uniqueness.”

Anatomy of an Ohio Historical Marker by Damaine Vonada Unique ornamentation: Outline of Ohio flanked by Buckeye leaves and nuts.

1

2

Color scheme: Brown plate; medium green leaves; shades of nutmeg and tobacco for nuts; gold letters.

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Sewah Studio’s proprietary lettering and distinctive “leatherette” textured background.

After retiring in 1953, Hawes sold Sewah Studios to Smith’s grandfather, Gerald Smith, who constructed its plant in 1959. With separate areas for every aspect of production, the facility is effectively several different businesses — pattern design, typesetting, metal shop, foundry, and painting operation — under one roof. “Each department of Sewah Studios has its own expertise,” Smith says. The Smith family’s acquisition of Sewah Studios coincided with the dawn of interstate highways, which, in turn, awakened demand for markers as tools for touting history and promoting tourism. Soon after Ohio’s

5 4

Construction: Sturdy cast aluminum with a tough powdercoated finish.

6

Sewah numbering code: 9-5 indicates the ninth historical marker in Ohio’s fifth county alphabetically (Athens).

Mounting post: Octagonal extruded aluminum, typically 7 feet long with 3 feet inserted in the ground.

Sesquicentennial Commission began installing blue, Ohioshaped signs displaying tidbits of information at municipal corporation limits in 1953, it also instigated a historical marker project focusing on significant people, places, and events. Today, Local History Services at the Ohio History Connection (OHC) administers both the Corporate Limits Markers and Ohio Historical Markers programs. Sewah Studios made the first Ohio Historical Marker in 1957, titled “PORTAGE PATH.” It was erected in Akron at the site of an important carrying place between the Cuyahoga and Tuscarawas rivers; six decades later, that aluminum marker is still standing.

New markers stand ready in the powder coating booth. 26

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According to Andy Verhoff, a marker funding grant coordinator at Local History Services, OHC records from December 1955 confirm that Sewah Studios also originated the pattern for Ohio’s signs. “The marker committee’s minutes show that Sewah Studios submitted two designs,” says Verhoff, “and the members chose design No. 1, which incorporates the shape of the state supported on each side by clusters of Buckeyes.”

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For the Love of the Game Ohio State Buckeyes Pendant ÂŽ

Hand-crafted and Lavished with 18K Gold Plating Shimmering with Over 30 Genuine Swarovski Crystals

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Ohio currently has more than 1,600 historical markers, and Sewah Studios has made every one since 1957. Its relationship with some states, however, is even longer. Sewah Studios, for example, has made Mississippi’s magnolia-adorned markers since 1949. “It has proven to be a wonderful partnership for us,” says Jim Woodrick of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, “because Sewah Studios does a great job with its products and goes out of its way to help.” In an online age where messaging is instantaneous, the markers are like permanent Post-It notes from the past. They lend the nation’s landscape a sense of place, invite contemplation and conversation, and chronicle often unknown but always authentic stories that both educate and amaze. They also

cover every conceivable subject from actors (such as Steubenville’s Dean Martin marker) to zoos (such as the Toledo Zoo’s marker about its New Deal buildings). “At Sewah Studios,” observes Smith, “we’re America’s storytellers.” Sewah Studios, 190 Millcreek Rd., Marietta, OH 45750. Tours by appointment. 740-373-2087; www.sewahstudios.com.

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8/8/17 12:01 PM 8/18/17 2:34 PM


STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

THE

PAWPAW KING C

hilled, it was President George Washington’s favorite dessert. Today, rural folk throughout the eastern U.S. hunt this delectable wild fruit each fall, keeping their favorite pawpaw patch as secret as they would their best spring morel mushroom woods. Chris Chmiel first became interested in pawpaws while in college at Ohio University. “I like to hike, and I began noticing pawpaws on the ground in the woods, just rotting, going to waste,” he says. Always the entrepreneur, Chmiel saw an opportunity. He wondered if he could gather pawpaws and somehow turn them into a business venture. So 20 years ago, he and his wife, Michelle Gorman, members of Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative, purchased two small parcels of property on the Meigs-Athens County line and began a family farm they named Integration Acres (www.integrationacres.com). “After a lot of trial and error, we are now the world’s largest pawpaw processor,” Chmiel says proudly. “We raise our own pawpaws, as well as buy them from others. We then turn them into everything from pawpaw salad dressings to pawpaw popsicles and more. Of course, we also sell fresh pawpaws seasonally.” Chmiel’s favorite way of eating a pawpaw is the way most people enjoy them — fresh, uncooked, and not having been frozen. “The natural sugars in a pawpaw are very volatile,” Chmiel says, “so when you cook or freeze a pawpaw, the flavor changes.” He describes the taste as creamy and “tropical.” Not surprising, as pawpaws are related to 2,100 tropical fruits. “They should be eaten when the inner fruit, not the skin, is a custard-like consistency, kind of like a soft banana,” he said. As good and nutritious as pawpaws are, Chmiel cautions against picking and eating them directly off the tree. Rather, he suggests waiting for the fruit to drop naturally, then gathering it off the ground. “When a pawpaw is still on the tree, unripe, the flesh of the fruit is white and hard, not yet sweet. Eating it then can make you nauseated,” he says. “Some people can even have an allergic reaction to eating pawpaws, just like with any other fruit. So make sure the pawpaw is soft and fruitysmelling before eating it.”

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Pawpaw trees grow throughout Ohio, but they are more common in the southeastern Appalachian hill country. The trees are not large, reaching only about 35 feet in height. They can live some 40 years or more and begin producing their famous, fabulous fruit, North America's largest native tree fruit, in 7 to 10 years. The green fruits grow to a similar size and shape as a potato. An average pawpaw in Ohio is one-quarter to one-third of a pound, but a large one could weigh a pound and a half. The Buckeye State is blessed with excellent wild pawpaw genetics, resulting in great-tasting wild pawpaws. Some Native American tribes called September the moon of the pawpaws. If you’d like to taste a pawpaw this fall, but aren’t quite sure how to go about finding one in the woods on your own, the next-best place to look is the annual Ohio Pawpaw Festival (www.ohiopawpawfest.com) held each September at Lake Snowden Park near Athens. Chmiel was instrumental in starting the event 19 years ago, and it has grown from a small affair at first into one of the largest in southeast Ohio, attracting nearly 7,000 people from across America over the three-day weekend. For a look at more fun festivals around the state, see Page 32.

Chris Chmiel sells pawpaws from his booth at the 2016 Ohio Pawpaw Festival.

W.H. “CHIP” GROSS, a member of Consolidated Electric Cooperative, is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor. Send e-mail to whchipgross@gmail.com.

t

Visitors enjoy the 2016 Ohio Pawpaw Festival, which included a walking pawpaw tree character.

OEC-OCL_SEPT 17_FULL ISSUE.indd 31

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TRAVEL OHIO

FUNAND FUNNYFESTIVALS

From lumberjacks to Concord grapes, Ohio hosts celebrations for almost any interest

The Official Paul Bunyan Show

J

ust as Paul Bunyan cuts an enormous figure in American folklore, the Paul Bunyan Show has carved out a huge reputation as one of the nation’s oldest and largest logging and sawmill equipment expos. Started in 1957, the Ohio Forestry Association event takes place at the Guernsey County Fairgrounds and boasts some 130 exhibitors who feature everything from lumber products and services to chainsaw sculptures and power tools.

32

—DAMAINE VONADA ­

The Official Paul Bunyan Show, Oct. 6 –8, 2017, Guernsey County Fairgrounds, 335 Old National Rd., Old Washington, OH 43768. For information, call 888-3887337 or visit www.ohioforest.org.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • SEPTEMBER 2017

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Photos courtesy Grape Jamboree

With its gigantic 16-ounce Angus beef patty, the show’s signature Bunyan Burger satisfies hearty appetites, but folks also enjoy Babe Burgers (8 ounces), homemade ice cream, and Amish fry pies. On Saturday and Sunday mornings, early risers treat themselves to Flapjacks for Lumberjacks, a hot-off-the-griddle pancake and sausage breakfast prepared by Ohio tree farmers.

Photos courtesy Charles Blocker

While its attractions include hot saw contests, a bobtail and boom truck cruise-in, and portable demonstrations, the show’s International Lumberjack Competition is always a crowd favorite. Real-life Paul Bunyans from as far away as Sweden and the Netherlands amaze visitors with their skills at axe throwing, underhand log chopping, and wielding crosscut saws. “The lumberjack competition is like something you’d see on ESPN, and nothing in Ohio compares to it,” says Gayla Fleming, who is a Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member and the Ohio Forestry Association’s event manager.


The Geneva Area Grape Jamboree

st

The Jamboree brings upwards of 200,000 people to downtown Geneva every September for family-friendly events such as its Grape Stomp, a juicy competition for barefoot kids and adults, and the Pie Eating Contest, which challenges folks to consume grape pies without using their hands. This year’s Jamboree also features a midway and rides, a car show and craft fair, Saturday and Sunday parades, and entertainment that ranges from the syncopated sounds of the Buffalo Bills Drumline to Green River, a Creedence Clearwater Revival tribute band. Although local wineries offer tastings, the Jamboree is famous for its flavorful Concord grape juice. “The juice is fresh-squeezed at the grape growers’ booth, and you can buy it by the cup, half-gallon, or gallon,” says Johnson. Also available are grape pies, grape ice cream, and the ever-popular Purple Cow, a float made from grape juice and vanilla ice cream. “If you go to the Jamboree,” notes Johnson, “you’ve got to have a Purple Cow.”

Photos courtesy Grape Jamboree

Photos courtesy Charles Blocker

8, 5

Everything’s coming up purple at the 54th Geneva Area Grape Jamboree, an annual harvest celebration in northeast Ohio’s grape belt. “Geneva sits in a narrow band of land along Lake Erie where the climate is suited for growing grapes,” says Jamboree president Dave Johnson. “Concords are our No. 1 grape by acreage, but we produce lots of wine grapes, too.”

­—DAMAINE VONADA

The Geneva Area Grape Jamboree, September 23–24, 2017. For information, call 440-466-5262 or visit www.grapejamboree.com.

OEC-OCL_SEPT 17_FULL ISSUE.indd 33

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-

Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival

The three days of Apple Butter Stirrin’ officially begin October 20. Crafters’ and artisans’ booths line the street. Of course, no stroll through the festival would be complete without sampling the delicious assortment of unique foods, which include homemade soup, apple butter burgers, steak sandwiches, sweet potato fries, cinnamon-roasted nuts, and kettle corn.

As part of their festival admission, guests can go on a living history tour at their leisure to see what life was like in a 19th-century town nestled along the Ohio and Erie Canal. There’s also a kids’ activity area, and the weekend’s events are accented by performances by traditional dulcimer players, bluegrass bands, gospel singers, and country music artists. The nearby Monticello III offers a taste of life on the canal with its horse-drawn boat rides. 48th annual Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival, October 20–22, 600 N. Whitewoman St., Coshocton, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday. For information, visit www.roscoevillage.com or call 740-622-7644, ext. 16 or 800-877-1830.

Photos courtesy Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival

Autumn in Roscoe Village is a special time of year. The beautiful scenery of central Ohio’s rolling hills, the crisp mornings that transform into warm afternoons, and the smoky-sweet aroma of homemade apple butter bubbling over an open fire combine to make the Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival in Historic Roscoe Village a fun fall event.

Cleveland Pinball and Arcade Show

Among the more than 100 pinball and 30 arcade games at the Cleveland Pinball and Arcade Show is a trip to your childhood, plus a modern-day excursion through popular culture. Here, Iron Man, The Simpsons, Ghostbusters, and Game of Thrones are shouldered in rows of dinging, flashing, pinging delight as ricocheting metal balls meet their marks.

Along with open play, where attendees test their skills just for fun, the show’s International Flipper Pinball Association (IFPA) tournament is a friendly competition for players of all levels. Skilled players know every flip matters, and that double flipping (pushing both flippers at the same time) is a way to lose. Also included are seminars by pinball manufacturers and home repair experts, plus a flea market with pinball machines for sale.

­—JAMIE RHEIN

Arcade and Pinball Show, September 7–10, Holiday Inn, 6001 Rockside Rd., Independence. 1-day pass, $20; 4-day pass, $65. Playing games is free with admission. Tournament has a fee. www.clevelandpinballshow.com 34

Don Johnson/Orange Photography

Players of all ages, from novice to pro, pull back springs that shoot balls into play. Watchful eyes anticipate the moment a flipper must strike the ball and send it to a high-point target. For a vintage classic like the Flying Turns, moving race cars around a track is the aim.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • SEPTEMBER 2017

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Don Johnson/Orange Photography

Photos courtesy Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival

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SEPTEMBER 2017 CALENDAR NORTHWEST

SEPT. 1–3 – Perch, Peach, Pierogi, and Polka Festival, downtown Port Clinton, Fri. 5–8:30 p.m., Sat.–Sun. 11 a.m.–9:30 p.m. $3, kids free. Enjoy Lake Erie perch sandwiches or dinner, hot pierogis, Polish sausage, and delicious peach cobbler. www. kofc1750.org. SEPT. 1–8 – Fulton County Fair, Fulton Co. Fgds., 8514 St. Rte. 108, Wauseon. www.fultoncountyfair.com. SEPT. 8–10 – Black Swamp Arts Festival, Bowling Green. This year marks the festival’s 25th anniversary. Enjoy music, art shows, food, and a beer garden. www.blackswampfest.org.

THROUGH SEPT. 4 – Marblehead Lighthouse Tours, Marblehead Lake State Park, 1100 Lighthouse Dr., Marblehead, daily 12–4 p.m. Free tours of Keeper’s House and Lifesaving Station. $3 tour charge to climb the tower; under age 6 free. 419-734-4424, ext. 2, or www. marbleheadlighthouseohio.org. SEPT. 1–4 – West Liberty Labor Day Festival, Lions Club Ball Park, 576 Pickrelltown Rd., West Liberty. Large flea market, Christian concert, games, food. Parade of 150 antique tractors Sat. at noon, antique tractor pull Sun. at 1 p.m. 937-465-4081.

NORTHEAST

SEPT. 9 – Auglaize Harvestfest, Arts/Crafts & Car Show, Auglaize Co. Fgds., Wapakoneta, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $1 admission with donation of canned good, or $2. Tractor rides, pumpkin decorating, pony rides, homemade ice cream, music, and many fun activities. 866-244-6401, 419-394-8252, or e-mail outreach@ auglaizeseniorservices.com. SEPT. 9 – Treasure Island Day, various locations, Kelleys Island, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. An island-wide yard sale. Free map of sale locations available at the Kelleys Island Chamber of Commerce Office, 240 E. Lakeshore Dr., starting at 9 a.m. on day of event. 419-746-2360 or www.kelleysislandchamber.com. SEPT. 15–17 – Tiffin-Seneca Heritage Festival, lower level of Hedges-Boyer Park, Tiffin, 9 a.m.–11 p.m. “Living History SEPT. 9–10 – Civil War Reenactment: Antietam, 198 Main St., Zoar, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. $10, age 12 and under free. Historic Union and Confederate camps, cavalry and artillery demos, narrated Battle of Antietam reenactment, and Zoar museum tours. Civil War Ball on Sat. only. 800-262-6195 or www.historiczoarvillage.com. SEPT. 9–10 – Old Construction and Mining Equipment Show, Harrison Coal and Reclamation Historical Park, 42500 Stumptown Rd., Cadiz (Ohio 519 between U.S. 22 and New Athens), Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $3. Operating and static displays of construction and mining equipment, crawlers, trucks, models, and more. 740-312-5385, 330-618-8032, or www.facebook.com/OCMES/.

AUG. 26–27, SEPT. 2–4 – Great Trail Arts and Crafts Festival, St. Rte. 43, Malvern, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, C. (10–18) $4, under 10 free. A celebration of American folk art, with contemporary and country craftings. Exhibitors from Ohio and surrounding states. 330-794-9100 or www.greattrailfestival.com. SEPT. 1–4 – Firelands Labor Day Festival, New London Recreation Park, 2 Blake St., New London. $7, Srs. $4, under 4 free. Events include truck and tractor pulls, demolition derby, ATV/ motorcross, parade, games, and baking contest. 419-929-4091 or www.newlondonohio.com. SEPT. 2–3 – Toronto Festival of the Arts, 3rd and Market Sts., Toronto, Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. Food, contests, fun, and lots of local art and crafts. www.focusintoronto.com. SEPT. 9–10 – Antiques in the Woods, Shaker Woods Grounds, 44337 County Line Rd., Columbiana, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, under 13 free. Top-quality antiques and collectibles, classic car show on Sun., tractor pulls, entertainment, and a Civil War encampment. 330-550-4190 or www.antiquesinthewoods.com. SEPT. 9 – Willard Train Fest, downtown Willard, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Model trains, planes, and cars. Many layouts and vendors. 419-935-0495 or www.willardtrainfest.com.

SOUTHWEST

SEPT. 9–10 – Stumptown Steam Threshers Reunion and Show, 42700 Stumptown Rd., New Athens (Ohio 519 between U.S. 22 and New Athens). $5. Includes steam, gas, and diesel tractors; oil field engines; hit & miss engines; antique cars, trucks, garden tractors. 330-265-3659, 740-968-4796, or www. facebook.com/StumptownSteamThreshers/. SEPT. 9–14 – Wayne County Fair, Co. Fgds., 199 Vancouver St., Wooster,10 a.m.–10 p.m. Performances in the grandstands daily. 330-262-8001 or www.waynecountyfairohio.com. SEPT. 11–22 – “Celebrate the Constitution” Exhibit, Historic Fort Steuben, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, Mon.–Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free displays and activities commemorating our nation’s founding document. 740-2831787 or www.oldfortsteuben.com. SEPT. 15–16 – Ohio State African Violet Society Show and Sale, Kingwood Center Gardens, 50 Trimble Rd., Mansfield, Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission, $5 parking fee. A great opportunity to view and purchase hard-to-find and rare varieties of African violets, Streptocarpus, and related growing supplies. 937-654-7014 or www.osavs.org.

SEPT. 1–4 – Green County Fish and Game Labor Day Rendezvous, 1538 Union Rd., Xenia. Rifle/smoothbore woodswalk, pistol match, BB gun match, archery, hawk & knife, pastry toss. 937-245-3878, 937-408-5089, or e-mail hh_contact@yahoo.com. ​ EPT. 2–3 – The Fair at New Boston, George Rogers Clark S Park, Springfield, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. $10, C. (6–11) $3, under 6 free. An 18th-century trades fair demonstrating the history of the Ohio Valley from the period 1790–1810. Storytellers, artisans and merchants, battle re-enactments, music, frontier foods, and Woodlands Indian Village. 937-882-9216, e-mail info@grcha.org, or www.fairatnewboston.org.

SEPT. 1–2 – Matt Baker Memorial Horse Show, hosted by Adams County Horseman’s Association, Adams Co. Fgds., West Union. PAC, SOAR, and OIP approved. 937-695-0550 or e-mail acha.show@gmail.com. SEPT. 1–3 – Giant Scale Radio-Controlled Model Aircraft Air Show, 1100 Spaatz St., Wright-Patterson AFB, Fri./Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. See daring acrobatics performed by model jets, helicopters, warbirds, and other R/C aircraft. 937-255-7207 or www.nationalmuseum.af.mil.

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SEPT. 2–4 – Fort Rowdy Gathering, Community Park, Covington. Entertainment, food, and crafts. Takes place in conjunction with the Fort Rowdy Encampment on the banks of the Stillwater River; includes hawk & knife, spear throw, bow shoot, and many other games and contests. E-mail jar2jam1116@gmail.com or www.fortrowdy.org. SEPT. 6, 13, 20, 27 – Weekly Wednesday Bluegrass Night, Pit to Plate BBQ, 8021 Hamilton Ave., Mt. Healthy, 7–9 p.m. Hosted by Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Bring your instrument and join the band to pick a good bluegrass number. 513-931-9100. SEPT. 15–17 – Ohio Fish and Shrimp Fest, Freshwater Farms of Ohio, 2624 N. U.S. Highway 68, Urbana, Fri. 4–10 p.m.,

Village,” food vendors, crafts, and family entertainment. 419447-6010 or www.tiffinfestival.com. SEPT. 16 – Harrison Rally Day Festival, downtown Perrysburg, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Enjoy a full day of fun including a parade, food, artists, crafters, and more. 419-874-9147 or www.perrysburgchamber.com. SEPT. 16 – Wood County Air Fair, Wood Co. Regional Airport, Bowling Green, 8 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 17 free. Helicopter rides, static airplane displays, hot air balloons, military vehicles, food vendors, and kids’ activities. Free helicopter rides for ages 8-17! www.woodcountyairport.us. SEPT. 19–23 – Apple Week, Sauder Villlage, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, Tues.–Fri. 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Sample apple-themed recipes, watch apple butter being made (Sat.), and visit the 130-year-old cider mill. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org, SEPT. 23 – Fostoria Rail Festival, 1001 Park Ave., Fostoria, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $4, under 10 free. Toy trains, train merchandise and memorabilia, model train displays, photo contest, drones, and R/C airplanes. 419-435-1781 or http://fostoriairontriangle.com. SEPT. 23 – Oktoberfest, downtown Findlay, noon–10 p.m. $5. Authentic German food and libations, live polka music and dancing, competitions, kids’ activities, and more. 419-422-3313 or www.downtownfindlay.com. SEPT. 16 – Fall Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, St. George’s Fellowship Ctr., 3204 Ridgewood Rd., Fairlawn, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Large show features artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. A la carte lunch items from TLC Catering. www.avantgardeshows.com. SEPT. 17 – Harvest of the Arts, 101 Willard Memorial Square, Wellington, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Ninety juried vendors of fine and folk art. 440-647-2120 or www.wellingtonfriends.org. SEPT. 27–30 – Wooster AAUW and Kiwanis Used Book Sale, Wayne Co. Fgds., Wooster, Wed.–Fri. 9 a.m.–8 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–2 p.m. 330-234-3756 or www.woosterkiwanis.org. SEPT. 28 – “Homespun and Calico: Researching the Lives of Our Foremothers,” lecture by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, Ohio Genealogical Society, Richland Co. Chapter, OGS Library, 611 St. Rte. 97 W., Bellville. 419-56-4560, e-mail sunda1960@ yahoo.com, or www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohrichgs/. SEPT. 28 – Art Show and Auction, hosted by Medina Co. Juvenile Detention Ctr., MCJDC Gymnasium, 655 Independence Dr., Medina, 3–6 p.m. Features art pieces created by youth during their detainment. Proceeds will go toward ongoing art therapy projects. 330-722-9301 or e-mail rstollar@medinaco.org.

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SEPT. 29–30 – Woosterfest, downtown Wooster, Fri. noon–11 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Traditional Oktoberfest celebration. 330-262-5735 or www.woosterchamber.com. SEPT. 30 – Oktoberfest, Wolf Creek/Pine Run Grist Mill, St. Rte. 3 S., Loudonville. Adults $5; age 10–20, $1; under 10 free. Enjoy nearly 100 foreign and domestic beers, wine, live music, and great food! www.wolfcreekmill.org/events.html. SEPT. 30 – Independence Train and Toy Show, hosted by KD Trains, Elmwood Park, Elmwood Recreation Ctr., W. Pete Wisnieski Pkwy., Independence, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 12 free. Featuring model trains, all gauges and parts; vintage toys; new and old trains. 216-642-0692 or e-mail kdtrains@att.net.

Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $5, C. (3–12) $2, under 3 free. Mouth-watering seafood, live music, games, and activities for the whole family. 937-652-3701 or www. fwfarms.com/festival/. SEPT. 16–17 – Preble County Pork Festival, Preble Co. Fgds., 722 S. Franklin St., Eaton. Free admission and parking. The best pork chops, pulled pork, ham sandwiches, or breakfast pancakes and sausage in the region. Also includes arts and crafts, petting zoo, camel and pony rides, and racing pigs! 937-456-7273 or www.porkfestival.org. SEPT. 20–23 – Seaman Fall Festival, Lions Park and streets of Seaman. Rides, tractor pulls, garden tractor pulls, floral hall, entertainment, and much more. 937-386-2083. SEPT. 23 – Rhythm and Roots Festival, Troy-Hayner Cultural Ctr., 301 W. Main St., Troy, 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Explore the roots of our American musical heritage. Seven bands on two stages. Enjoy food vendors, a pie party, artisan and music vendors, and a historic vintage vinyl exhibit. 937-339-0457 or www. troyhayner.org. SEPT. 23–24 – Pyramid Hill Art Fair, Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park and Museum, Hamilton, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Artists from around the country showcase their creations. Also live music, food vendors, family activities, a community pavilion, and a straw maze. 513-868-1234 or www.pyramidhill.org/art-fair.

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SEPT. 9 – “A Landscape for the Ages,” Dawes Arboretum, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 10–11:30 a.m. $10; free for members. Registration required. Discover past events that helped Dawes Arboretum evolve into what it is today. Collection history and development, storms, and insect invasions to be covered. 800-443-2937.

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SEPT. 9 – Cog Bog Mud Volleyball Tournament, First Church of God Community Worship Ctr., 25822 St. Rte. 159, Circleville, 10 a.m. Come play in the mud! Teams compete for cash prizes. Adult and junior divisions. Food, flea market, and fun! 740-503-3519 or https//cogbog2016.wixsite.com/mysite.

THROUGH OCT. – Rock Mill Weekends, Rock Mill Park, 1429 Rockmill Place NW, Lancaster, Sat. and Sun., 1–3 p.m. Free. Visit the 1824 grist mill, recently restored to working order, and see demos of grinding methods. Also visit Rock Mill Covered Bridge. www.historicalparks.org/rock-mill-park or www.facebook.com/FairfieldCountyParks AUG. 30–SEPT. 2 – Millersport Sweet Corn Festival, 2645 Chautauqua Blvd., Millersport. Features concerts, rides, games, tractor pulls, 5K run, prizes, and more — plus all the hot buttered sweet corn you can eat! 740-467-2640 or www. sweetcornfest.com. SEPT. 1, 6, 16, 30 – Lorena Sternwheeler Dinner Cruise, Zanesville, 6–8 p.m; 5–7 p.m. on Sept. 30. $35. Includes prime rib dinner. Reservations required at least 48 hours in advance. Children’s menu also available. 800-743-2303 or www.facebook.com/LorenaSternwheeler. SEPT. 7–9 – Marion Popcorn Festival, downtown Marion. Free. Thur. parade at 6 p.m. Free admission. Parade, concerts, rides, games, arts and crafts, 5K run/walk, food, and, of course, popcorn for all! 740-387-FEST or www.popconfestival. com. SEPT. 8–9 – Lithopolis Honeyfest, Columbus St., Lithopolis, Fri. 3–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Honey and products from the hive, arts and crafts, food, photo contest, bake-off, queen and princess contest, demos and bee education, mead wine and beer garden, free kids’ crafts, and much more. 614-8297355 or www.lithopolishoneyfest.com.

SOUTHEAST

SEPT. 10 – North Side Jazz Band, Makoy Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard, 2–5 p.m. Part of the Central Ohio Hot Jazz Society fall concert series, featuring Dixieland jazz. COHJS members $15, non-members $20, dance club members and students $10. 614-558-2212 or www.cohjs.org. SEPT. 15–17 – Country Living Fair, Ohio Village. 800 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Starting at $13. Antiques, vintage items, handcrafted goods, art, home decor, and so much more. https://stellashows.com/event/country-livingfair-ohio/. SEPT. 15–17 – Family Fall Festival, St. Elizabeth Seton Parish, 600 Hill Road N., Pickerington. Family fun, great food, games and rides, entertainment, car show, and big cash raffles. 614-804-2219. SEPT. 15–17 – Thornville Backwoods Fest, 8572 High Point Rd., Thornville, Fri.–Sat. 8 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.–5 p.m. $9; age 10 and under free. More than 325 art and craft vendors. Outdoor kettle-cooked food. 740-246-4749 or www. thebackwoodsfest.com. SEPT. 16 – Fall Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Makoy Event Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $3, under 12 free. Large show features artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. www. avantgardeshows.com. SEPT. 16 – Wings & Wheels Fly In/Drive In, Marion Municipal Airport, 1530 Pole Lane Rd., Marion. Free. Fun for the entire family! Helicopter rides, sail plane rides, vintage aircrafts, and R/C aircrafts that are open to test fly. Also see classic cars, fire engines, tractors, cranes, and more at the Cruise-In for Dialysis. 740-382-1634.

SEPT. 16 – Walk to End Alzheimer’s Fundraiser, Wesleyan Dayspring Church, 2431 Marion-Mount Gilead Rd., Marion, 9:30 a.m. Registration starts 8 a.m., ceremony at 9 a.m. 614-643-2136. SEPT. 16–17 – Harvest and Heritage Celebration, Smeck Historical Farm, 7395 Basil Rd., Baltimore, 12–4 p.m. Free. Fairfield County Antique Tractor Club uses early farm machinery to bring in the harvest. Demos, displays, food, and more. www.historicalparks.org or facebook.com/FairfieldCountyParks. SEPT. 16–17 – Travel Through Time, Sawyer Ludwig Park, White Oaks Rd., Marion, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Meet Native Americans, militia, early settlers, and Civil War soldiers as you travel through 18th- and 19th-century America. Includes a Civil War-era church service on Sunday. 740-387-4255 or www.marionhistory.com. SEPT. 22–23 – Sims Fall Festival, 11300 Chillicothe-Lancaster Rd., Amanda, Fri. 5–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Antique farm equipment, arts, crafts, mums, pumpkins, and fall items. New this year: kids’ activities. Special Civil War encampment. Gen. Sherman’s cannon will be fired on Fri. 7 p.m. and Sat. 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Battle enactment Sat. by the Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 740-969-2225 or e-mail gtosims@hotmail.com. SEPT. 23–24 – Frontier Spirit 1799, Alley Park, 2805 Old Logan Rd., Lancaster, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Living history tent village and trail hike with reenactors representing Ohio’s frontier in 1799. Demos by craftspeople, children’s games, live music with instruments of that time period, and concessions, including bean soup cooked in iron kettles over a fire. www. frontierspirit.org. SEPT. 30 – Bogtoberfest, 5200 Walnut Rd., Buckeye Lake, 5–10 p.m. At St. Rte. 79 near the Buckeye Lake Yacht Club. Food and music galore at the 200-seat outdoor Beer Garden! Specially brewed beers, wine, cranberry treats, ribs, brats, and beer bread. 740-929-1998. SEPT. 30 – Lawrence Orchards Applefest, 2634 Smeltzer Rd., Marion, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Hayrides, petting farm, hay maze, apple bar, and lots of food. $5, under 2 free. 740-389-3019 or www.lawrenceorchards.com.

SEPT. 8–10 – Ohio River Sternwheel Festival, Front and Greene Sts., Marietta. Sternwheeler races, car show, pageant, entertainment, and fireworks. 800-288-2577 or ohioriversternwheelfestival.org.

SEPT. 15–16, 22–23 – Guernsey Gospel Jubilee Spring Gospel Sing, Spring Valley Campground, 9000 Dozer Rd., Cambridge, Fri. 6 p.m., Sat. noon. Free will offering, free parking. 740-7041487 or www.gospeljubilee.org.

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SEPT. 8–10 – Salt Creek Valley Festival, downtown Richmond Dale. Free. Local and national entertainment, craft vendors, and plenty of your favorite foods. 740-884-4474 or www.saltcreekvalleyfestival.com.

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SEPT. 8–10, 16 – AMGS Murder Mystery Dinner, Adena Mansion and Gardens, 847 Adena Rd., Chillicothe. $55, members $50. Hone your skills as a rookie crime solver. Entertaining atmosphere, great food, and a mystery. Reservations required. www.adenamansion.com.

SEPT. 16–17 – Antique Power Show, hosted by Old Iron Power Club, Noble Co. Fgds., Caldwell. $3, under 13 free. Antique tractors, wheat thresher, garden tractor pull, food, and crafts. New this year: petting zoo, kids’ games, and tractor games. Square dance Sat. 6 p.m. 740-934-2258 or 740-213-4713.

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SEPT. 5–10 – Belmont County Fair, Belmont Co. Fgds., 45420 Roscoe Rd., St. Clairsville. Gates open Tues. at 12 p.m. General admission $8. A family tradition since 1849. www.belmontcountyfair.org. SEPT. 7–9 – Southern Ohio Storytelling Festival, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe. This festival showcases the timeless art of spinning tales. Features concert performances by several highly acclaimed and award-winning storytellers. www.majesticchillicothe.net.

WEST VIRGINIA

SEPT. 21–24 – Barnesville Pumpkin Festival, 117 Cherry St., Barnesville. Parade, fun contests and activities, live music, a variety of pumpkin-based food, and the Great Pumpkin WeighOff. 740-425-2593 or www.barnesvillepumpkinfestival.com.

SEPT. 9 – Fall Health and Safety Fair, OU-Chillicothe, Shoemaker Ctr., 101 University Dr., Chillicothe, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Free. Basic health screenings, Red Cross blood drive, safety demos, door prizes, and live entertainment. 740-774-7200 or www.ohio.edu/Chillicothe/.

SEPT. 22 – The Wizard of Oz, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7 p.m. $5. www.majesticchillicothe.net.

SEPT. 11–16 – Guernsey County Fair, Co. Fgds., 335 Old National Rd., Old Washington, 10 a.m.–11 p.m. 740-489-5888 or guernseycountyfairgrounds.org

SEPT. 23 – Lore City Fire Dept. Car Show, Lore City, 1–3 p.m. Registration 10 a.m.–1 p.m. 740-584-0435.

SEPT. 16–17 – Harvest Moon Arts and Crafts Festival, City Park, 1920 Park Ave., Parkersburg. 304-424-7311 or www. woodrecreation.com/harvestmoonfestival/.

SEPT. 16 – Fall Festival on the Avenue / Elizabethtown Festival, along Jefferson Ave., Moundsville, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. A “down-home” day of fun for the entire family. Great food, entertainment, crafts, unique services, and a celebration of the traditions and customs of the past. 304-845-6200, 304280-8974, or www.visitmoundsville.com.

SEPT. 22–23 – Ross County Quilt Guild, Annual Quilt Show, Tabernacle Baptist Church, 221 E. Main St., Chillicothe, Fri. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5. Entries will SEPT. 9 – Gallia County BBQ Festival, Gallipolis City Park, 300 be accepted Sept. 20, 1–5 p.m. 740-773-0222 or e-mail block of Second Ave., Gallipolis, 12–3 p.m. Free. 740-446-6882. cathywalker50@gmail.com.

SEPT. 28–OCT. 1 – Preston County Buckwheat Festival, Kingwood. Buckwheat cakes and sausage dinners, parades, FFA and 4-H project livestock shows, carnival rides, art and crafts, and more. www.buckwheatfest.com or e-mail info@ buckwheatfest.com.

PLEASE NOTE:  Ohio Cooperative Living strives for ac­curacy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.

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Upload your photos at www. ohioec.org/memberinteractive. For January 2018, send your photos of “Staying warm” by Oct. 15; for February, send “Lovebirds of all kinds” by Nov. 15. Make sure to give us your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, and an explanation of the photo, including the names of people shown.

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ENTER TO WIN* A $100 ELECTRIC BILL CREDIT! Bring your completed entry form to the Ohio Cooperative Living booth in our Education Center on Wheat Street at the 2017 Farm Science Review.

Name: Electric co-op name: E-mail address:

*Must be an Ohio electric cooperative member to enter and win.

FARM SCIENCE REVIEW September 19-21, 2017

This major agricultural show sponsored by The Ohio State University draws more than 130,000 people every year. It’s a fun, educational event for farmers and non-farmers alike.

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STOP BY OUR BUILDING

Using energy wisely is important on the farm and at home. You’ll find exhibits and information on ways you can save energy and money in the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Education Center at the Farm Science Review. Visit us at the Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Education Center!

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Courtesy of InfinityDISH with activation, certain conditions apply.

All calls with InfinityDISH are monitored and recorded for quality assurance and training purposes. Offer for new and qualifying former customers only. Important Terms and Conditions: Qualification: Advertised price requires credit qualification and eAutoPay. Upfront activation and/or receiver upgrade fees may apply based on credit qualification. Offer ends 10/18/17. 2-Year Commitment: Early termination fee of $20/mo. remaining applies if you cancel early. Included in 2-year price guarantee at $49.99 advertised price: America’s Top 120 programming package, Local channels HD service fees, and equipment for 1 TV. Included in 2-year price guarantee for additional cost: Programming package upgrades ($59.99 for AT120+, $69.99 for AT200, $79.99 for AT250), monthly fees for additional receivers ($5-$7 per additional TV, receivers with additional functionality may be $10-$15) and monthly DVR fees ($10-$15). NOT included in 2-year price guarantee or advertised price (and subject to change): Taxes & surcharges, add-on programming (including premium channels), DISH Protect, and transactional fees. Premium Channels: HBO: After 12 mos., you will be billed $15/mo. unless you call to cancel. 3 Mos. Free: After 3 mos., you will be billed $40/mo. for Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and DISH Movie Pack unless you call to cancel. Other: All packages, programming, features, and functionality and all prices and fees not included in price lock are subject to change without notice. After 6 mos., you will be billed $8.99/mo. for DISH Protect unless you call to cancel. After 2 years, then-current everyday prices for all services apply. For business customers, additional monthly fees may apply. Free standard professional installation only. All rights reserved. HBO®, Cinemax® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. Internet: Internet speeds, prices, and providers vary by customer address. Call for details. Visa® gift card must be requested through your DISH Representative at time of purchase. $50 Visa® gift card requires activation. You will receive a claim voucher within 3-4 weeks and the voucher must be returned within 60 days. Your Visa® gift card will arrive in approximately 6-8 weeks. InfinityDISH charges a one-time $49.99 non-refundable processing fee which is subject to change at any time without notice. Indiana C.P.D. Reg. No. T.S. R1903.

OEC-OCL_SEPT 17_FULL ISSUE_COVER.indd 4

8/18/17 10:56 AM

Ohio cooperative living sept 2017 pioneer  
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