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Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative Official publication | www.hwecoop.com

OCTOBER 2017

Recognizing our local

heroes

HWEC organizes second Honor Trip for veterans

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ALSO INSIDE Humbled by hurricanes R. L. Stein’s Goosebumps The Cooperative Difference Ohio’s unique college mascots

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NATIONAL

COOPERATIVE MONTH

Every October, Ohio electric co-ops celebrate you— their member-owners. Your co-ops are local, not-forprofit, and democratically controlled by members like you. That’s the cooperative difference. Thank you for being a part of your co-op!

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ohioec.org

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INSIDE

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

HIGHLIGHT

24 BEYOND BUCKEYES

Ohio boasts a bumper crop of nutty mascots roaming the college sports sidelines.

24

In this issue:

Attica (p. 4) Ashtabula (p. 6) Bexley (p. 8) Newark (p. 10) Bluffton (p. 16) Cincinnati (p. 24) Tiffin (p. 26) Wilmington (p. 25) Delaware (p. 25) Akron (p. 25)

10 FEATURES 4 COOPERATIVE DIFFERENCE Electric co-ops show commitment to their communities through the Be E3 Smart program. 8 GIGGLES AND GOOSEBUMPS Ohio native R.L. Stine balances horror and humor to draw in young readers.

4

10 JAILHOUSE HOME For decades, the Licking County Jail served as a residence for those who oversaw the inmates. 15 OKTOBER-FEAST! From sausage to sauerkraut, schnitzel to streusel, Ohio Cooperative Living readers buried us in Bavarian fare for our latest recipe contest. 30 LUSTRON HOMES For a short time after World War II, a Columbus company played a pivotal role in housing all the returning veterans who needed a place to live. Cover photo of the Old Licking County Historic Jail, in most editions, by JRD Photography.

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OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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UP FRONT

C HUMBLED BY

H URRICANES

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helter, food, clean water, electricity — these are the essentials of life in today’s world. For all the technology and innovation available in our modern society, these essentials can still be stripped away in minutes by the power of nature. Across much of Texas, Florida, and nearby states, recovery efforts are underway as of this writing from hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Hopefully by the time you read this, these essentials will have been restored to everyone impacted by these storms. When lives are turned upside down by events beyond anyone’s control, it’s the kindness of strangers — people willing to help those in need — that starts the process of putting things back together. I’m particularly touched by how quickly and completely our sometimesbitter differences fade away.

Pat O’Loughlin

Back here in Ohio, most of us have not even been inconvenienced by these storms. But here’s what I know: Hundreds of Ohioans have packed up and headed into the hardest-hit areas to help people restore the essentials, to help clean up, or even to help start over — and it’s not because of who needs help, it’s just because they need help.

of the Cooperative

Seventy-two of Ohio’s electric cooperative linemen left the day after Irma crashed through to assist electric co-ops in Georgia in restoring power to the tens of thousands of people who were left without. Behind the scenes, we’ve been preparing for months and years to be able to quickly and safely mobilize help whenever and wherever needed. It’s work, but it’s more than a business trip. It really is another part of the Cooperative Difference. Neighbors helping neighbors, near or far, because for all our differences, there is still much more that binds us together than pushes us apart.

President & CEO Ohio's Electric Cooperatives

It really is another part Difference. Neighbors helping neighbors, near or far, because for all our differences, there is still much more that binds us together than pushes us apart.

God bless and protect all those affected by these storms and the neighbors who have come to their aid!

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OHIO OHIO COOPERATIVE COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER LIVING • SEPTEMBER 20172017

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October 2017 • Volume 60, No. 2

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Samantha Rhodes Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer

n

ohioec.org

Official publication of your electric cooperative www.ohioec.org

Check out the mobilefriendly website and digital edition of Ohio Cooperative Living, as well as other timely information from Ohio’s electric cooperatives.

OCTOBER 2017

Jail of Terror!

Preserving haunted — and human — history in Newark

n

Official publication of your electric cooperative www.ohioec.org

OCTOBER 2017

ALSO INSIDE Humbled by hurricanes R. L. Stein’s Goosebumps The Cooperative Difference Ohio’s unique college mascots

Jail of Terror!

Preserving haunted — and human — history in Newark

FOLLOW US ON :

facebook.com/ohioec @OHElectricCoops

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ALSO INSIDE Humbled by hurricanes R. L. Stein’s Goosebumps The Cooperative Difference Ohio’s unique college mascots

Contributors: Brian Albright, Paul Batterson, Colleen Romick Clark, Maura Gallagher, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Magen Howard, Pat Keegan, Isaac Miller, Catherine Murray, Kelsey Rollins, Craig Springer, Damaine Vonada, and Margie Wuebker. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. With a paid circulation of 294,359, it is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

What’s the wackiest holiday traditi on you’ve ever heard of? We’ve all seen “that” family who goes above and beyond for the holidays — or maybe your family is that family! Either way, we’re looking for interesting, obscure, or downright one-of-a-kind holiday traditions. Who do you know that partakes in an unusual holiday pastime? Take to our Facebook or Twitter pages to share your responses with our staff. Find us by searching for Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives or your local electric co-op.

The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215, or call 1-800-282-0515. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member

DID YOU KNOW? Ohio native R.L. Stine’s Goosebumps books have sold around 400 million copies worldwide in 32 different languages. But it wasn’t always an easy road for the children’s horror author; between 1990 and 1999, his books were some of the most controversial, even reaching number 15 on the Top 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books list. The books’ common theme that children always triumph over evil won out, and the series is now the second best-selling children’s book series next to Harry Potter. To learn more about Goosebumps’ Ohio roots, see Page 8.

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer. OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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POWER LINES

BY MAGEN HOWARD

ENERGY, EFFICIENCY, EDUCATION Be E3 Smart program helps connect co-ops with classrooms The Be E3 Smart program provides teachers with resources — such as the energy bike and Snap Circuits (opposite page) — to help them reach their students in new and different ways. Students can even get an up-close look at the Cardinal Station generating facility in Brilliant, Ohio.

T

ake a dash of youthful curiosity, combine it with inspired teachers, and add a free curriculum, and that’s a winning formula for the Be E3 Smart program. The E’s stand for energy, efficiency, and education, and the program’s goal is to help middle school teachers help their students understand the power of energy. It comes with the teacher’s curriculum from the Ohio Energy Project, a nonprofit based in Worthington, as well as energy efficiency items for students to use at home thanks to sponsorship support from 23 electric cooperatives serving Ohio. “I can’t say enough about the program and how much it’s helped us to teach, and with materials that are provided — it just makes it so much easier,” says Ellen Lynch, who teaches seventhgrade science and eighth-grade health at Seneca East Local Schools. “What is so wonderful is they provide so many hands-on materials. With each lesson, there’s at least one experiment.”

Hands-on learning Lynch, whose Be E3 Smart materials are sponsored by North Central Electric Cooperative in Attica, has 4

put a grand experiment at the center of her energy curriculum: Students are charged with creating Rube Goldberg machines, named after the man whose thousands of cartoons depicted purposefully difficult and elaborate ways of completing simple tasks. “They have to create devices or a machine, following the scientific method, and it has to have at least five energy transformations,” Lynch says — think getting a marble into a basket, or powering up a computer to play a video. “Using anything from air in a balloon to dominoes falling, they’ve been very, very creative. They’re not allowed to buy anything. They’ve really done a great job with the machines, and they’re really fun to watch.” So fun that Lynch started recording the students’ machines in action. The videos go on Seneca East’s website each year for everyone to get in on the fun.

Students become the teachers About 20 minutes farther south in North Central’s service area is Buckeye Central Middle School in New Washington, where Marianne Williamson teaches seventh- and eighth-grade science. A few years ago, six of her Be E3 Smart students became the teachers

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at the Ohio eTech conference in Columbus. “We had a booth where students showed the teachers how to teach lessons from the curriculum,” says Williamson, whose Be E3 Smart classroom is also sponsored by North Central Electric. “Our students interacted with professionals, explaining how the Be E3 Smart curriculum worked and demonstrating different experiments.” And that’s where Be E3 Smart is unique. It shows students the real-world effects of energy production and encourages them and their families to be more conscious of those effects in everyday life. “There’s the big idea, something we talk about — reducing the amount of energy we use — but we like our conveniences, computers, lights, phones,” Lynch says. “So how can we make very small changes to conserve energy and still live the way we want?”

“I can’t say enough about the program and how much it’s helped us to teach, and with materials that are provided — it just makes it so much easier.” — Ellen Lynch Teacher, Seneca East Local Schools

with critical-thinking opportunities for our future generations by way of energy education and efficiency,” Williamson says. “Students have become engaged in energy efficiency and conservation by installing useful materials in their own homes — gifts from the cooperatives who genuinely care about their members and the world in which we live.” For North Central Electric, caring is embedded in its business model — locally owned, locally operated, with a commitment to serving its communities.

Williamson says it also gives her students the opportunity to gain social and professional skills.

“One of the cooperative’s key strategies is to look for opportunities to connect the children of our members to education and other programs that will benefit them,” says Terry Mazzone, North Central’s director of member and community relations. “The Be E3 Smart program does that for us. These dynamic and innovative teachers have even invited our energy services advisors into their classroom to talk about how they can help their families use energy wisely.”

“The Ohio Energy Project and our rural electric cooperatives are providing local school districts

To learn more about the Be E3 Smart program and the Ohio Energy Project, visit www.ohioenergy.org.

Learning more than just science

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OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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13 10 ⁄8 103⁄4 10 ⁄16 7

101⁄2

OHIO ICON

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

BRANT’S

APPLE ORCHARD Ashtabula Location: Northern Ashtabula County between Lake Erie and Interstate 90. Provenance: Roy and Debbie Brant established the orchard in the early 1980s, and built a barn that houses an on-site bakery and farm market. In 2014, they sold the 79-acre property to current owners Brian and Jenn Diehl, who operate Brant’s Apple Orchard with help from their two teenage sons as well as orchard manager Brian Morris and farm market/bakery manager Shelly Damon. Significance: With a picturesque pond surrounded by trees displaying a kaleidoscope of colors, and pot-bellied stoves that make the barn feel warm and cheery, Brant’s Apple Orchard is one of northeast Ohio’s favorite fall destinations. Going there for just-picked apples, jugs of sweet cider, or Brant’s ever-popular cider donuts is a local tradition, and on the day before Thanksgiving, the barn bustles with people buying homemade pumpkin and apple pies. Because Ashtabula County is famous for its covered bridges, autumn visitors also like to make Brant’s part of their itinerary.

Currently: Brant’s grows three kinds of Asian pears, six types of table grapes, and 23 varieties of apples, including its best-selling Honeycrisp (for eating) and Cortland (for baking). After acquiring the orchard, the Diehls significantly enlarged the barn, yielding a bigger bakery, a farm market, and an eating area, where customers enjoy soups and sandwiches made on oven-fresh breads. “Our chicken salad is made from scratch with our own apples and grapes,” Jenn Diehl says, “and it’s served on our cranberry bread.” Besides local maple syrup and honey, the farm market features Brant’s apple butter, bourbon apple butter barbecue sauce, and refreshing cider slushies. Brant’s cider is made on an 1895 cider press from a blend of several varieties of ripened apples. “We usually press cider on Tuesdays and Fridays,” notes Diehl, “and customers can watch.” It’s a little-known fact that: The orchard’s grounds boast 2,700 apple trees, wooded walking trails, and a play area with slides topped by a miniature covered bridge. Brant’s also shows movies on Saturday nights; offers weekend hayrides; gives educational orchard tours; and hosts a Fall Festival and Halloween Costume Party every October.

© 0

Brant’s Apple Orchard, 4749 Dibble Rd., Ashtabula, OH 44004. Open mid-August until the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. Tours by appointment. For information, call 440-224-0639 or visit www. brantsappleorchard.com. 6

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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PROFILES BY BRIAN ALBRIGHT

AND Ohio native R.L. Stine balances horror and humor for young readers

S

caring children may seem like an odd way to make a living, but Goosebumps author R.L. Stine has a knack for it. “You just sort of feel it,” says Stine, an Ohio native who grew up in Bexley. “In the beginning of writing a book, you have to decide how scary to go. If it’s not scary enough, the book is boring. If it’s too scary, it gets silly or ludicrous. It’s a fine line when you’re dealing with 7- to 11-year-olds.”

Stine is something of an expert at walking that line. Long before the children’s and young adult book markets were overrun by wizards and vampires, Stine launched a horror series for teens (Fear Street) in 1989, followed by Goosebumps in 1992 — and soon came to a realization that helped him strike that balance. “They like to be scared,” he says of his young audience. “I didn’t understand that when I first started doing these things. But people just like to have a scary adventure when they know they are really okay, and kids do know that. That’s the thing about Goosebumps — they know what to expect. There will be twists and turns, and it will all end up okay.”

Powerhouse franchise Stine’s spooky empire has since grown to massive proportions. An insanely prolific writer, he has published more than 300 books and sold somewhere in the ballpark of 400 million copies — making him one of the all-time best-selling authors of children’s books, right up there with

8

GIGGLES

Dr. Seuss and J.K. Rowling. The Goosebumps series has spawned comic books, audiobooks, a TV series, numerous spin-off series, a musical, a theme park, board games, video games, and a 2015 full-length feature film.

There are also three films based on his Fear Street series (set in Shadyside, Ohio) in the works, and he’s published two picture books, The Little Shop of Monsters (2015) and Mary McScary (2017), illustrated by Arthur creator Marc Brown. Stine also scripted a new Man-Thing series for Marvel Comics.

Hometown influence Although he’s known for being scary, Stine has always been just as interested in making people laugh, which is evident in some of his more absurd Goosebumps titles like The Abominable Snowman of Pasadena and Planet of the Lawn Gnomes. His writing is also heavily informed by his upbringing in Ohio, and the majority of his books take place in suburban Midwestern neighborhoods. “I often think back to Bexley when I create those neighborhoods, and I use the places of my childhood to set the stories in,” Stine says. Stine and his brother went to Saturday matinees at the Esquire theater on Broad Street and the Drexel on Main, where they laughed at the low-budget horror movies that later would greatly influence Stine’s books. He also spent much of his free time as a kid writing and drawing his own comic books.

Jovial Bob from Bexley While Bexley is known as one of the wealthier communities in Columbus, Stine describes his upbringing as poor. “We lived in a brick house on

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  • OCTOBER 2017

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the edge of Bexley, and on the next block were these huge mansions. The governor’s mansion was two blocks from us. As a child I always felt like an outsider because we didn’t have money. That sort of turned me into an observer. That’s one of the reasons I’m a writer.” He launched his writing career editing the humor magazine (The Sundial) at Ohio State before moving to New York in the late 1960s. He landed a job at Scholastic, where he wrote joke books for children under the name “Jovial Bob” Stine and eventually launched Bananas, a humor magazine for kids that was published in the 1970s and 1980s. He also occasionally contributed to Dynamite magazine, another Scholastic publication that was edited by his wife, Jane (who also co-founded Parachute Press, the company that originally launched both the Fear Street and Goosebumps series).

And he’s still able to snack on his favorite pizza from Rubino’s (something of a Bexley institution), which he has frozen and shipped to his Manhattan apartment. “That’s the one thing I miss about Ohio,” Stine says. “I’ve been a New Yorker for a long time now, but Columbus has the best pizza. Even my wife, who is a real New Yorker, admits that Columbus has better pizza.” Brian Albright is a freelance writer from Cleveland Heights.

Giving back, getting back Although he doesn’t get back to Ohio often, Stine does maintain ties to Columbus. He provided an endowment for the Bexley Education Foundation’s R.L. Stine Creative Writing Workshops. Earlier this year, he made a personal appearance at the Drexel Theater, and afterward spent part of his evening palling around with old friend Fred “Fritz the Nite Owl” Peerenboom, whom he has known since his college days.

OCTOBER 2017 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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CO-OP PEOPLE

BY MAURA GALLAGHER

JAILHOUSE HOME

The Energy Cooperative’s Nelson Smith grew up in the ‘Jail of Terror’

I

magine being 13 years old and going home every day for the next six years — to jail.

Nelson Smith, chairman of the board of The Energy Cooperative in Newark, called the Licking County Jail home for nearly the entire span of his teenage years, but not because he had committed any crimes. Smith moved into the Licking County Jail when his mother was hired in the early 1960s to be the head cook and jail matron, the person in charge of the female prisoners.

“One of my favorite things about being a part of the LCGPS is having the opportunity to give some amazing tours and relay the history of the jail and a few of my many stories from living here,” Smith says. The jail has quite a history, in fact — one that’s left it with a reputation for being haunted.

Haunting origins When it was built in the late 1880s, the Licking County Jail was considered 10

BACKGROUND PHOTO BY JRD PHOTOGRAPHY

Now Smith has found his way back to the jail, as a trustee for the Licking County Governmental Preservation Society (LCGPS), where he chairs the activities committee. Smith coordinates fundraisers and tours of the jail — which has since been renamed The Old Licking County Historic Jail — to help with its preservation, restoration, and use.

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A copy of a special edition of the Newark Advocate from 1910, documenting one of several notorious events in the old jail’s history, hangs from the jailhouse wall.

to be the finest jail in Ohio, according to LCGPS’s biography of the institution. Designed by architect Joseph Warren “J.W.” Yost, the original budget was $68,685, though the final cost was nearly double that by the time it opened. PHOTOS BY MIKE ELTRINGHAM

The jail was set up in a way that is unheard of today. The three floors in the front were residential. There were offices, a foyer, a living room, a dining room, and a family kitchen on the first floor and bedrooms for the sheriff’s family on the second floor; the third floor was designated for the matron, so that was where Smith lived with his family. But four sheriffs, including three consecutive, had fatal heart attacks in the same bedroom, ending the building’s days as a residence in 1971. All the residence rooms were converted into staff offices.

Then, of course, there was Carl Etherington.

The back four floors of the jail housed inmates. One floor held women, and the other three floors were for men, with a “drunk tank” in the basement. The jail had 34 cells, with two bunks per cell, allowing for 68 inmates. The walls of these cells saw some dangerous and famous prisoners — some of whom contribute to the ghostly tales told during jail tours to this day.

Etherington, a detective with the Anti-Saloon League of Ohio, came to Newark to raid saloons for serving illegal alcohol in 1910. Etherington shot a local saloon owner, in self-defense, and was taken to the Licking County Jail. A mob stormed the jail, forcibly removed Etherington, and hanged him from a telephone pole in the Newark town square.

The Lewingdon brothers, better known as the “.22-caliber killers,” murdered 10 people across three counties in central Ohio and were inmates before being sent to state prison.

The future of the historic jail The Licking County Jail operated for 99 years, until it became overcrowded and closed its doors in 1987, and a new jail was built a couple of blocks away. Continued on Page 12 Nelson Smith (opposite page) and the Licking County Governmental Preservation Society are working to restore the residence portion of the Old Licking County Historic Jail to its once-splendorous state.

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10½

Continued from Page 11

The Old Licking County Historic Jail has also been featured on the Travel Channel’s Ghost Adventures, and it frequently has paranormal investigators performing ghost hunts to track down the spirits that are said to haunt the jail to this day.

Four sheriffs, including three consecutive, had fatal heart attacks in the same bedroom, ending the building’s days as a residence in 1971.

LCGPS hosts fundraisers throughout the year, including flashlight tours, ghost hunts, and the “Jail of Terror,” a haunted house during the Halloween season (see sidebar). LCGPS also raises money through a 5K road race, the Oktoberfest-style Jailhouse Rock Beer Fest, and an annual Carl Etherington memorial fundraiser. To learn more, visit www.lcjail.org.

Ghosts have long been said to roam the halls of the former Licking County Jail in downtown Newark. Now, thanks to the Licking County Governmental Preservation Society (LCGPS), those spirits are brought back to life every Friday and Saturday from the last Friday of September through the end of October as the old building transforms into the “Jail of Terror.” The LCGPS, which has overseen the old jail building since it closed its doors in 1987 and is tasked with its restoration and historical promotion, came up with the idea in 2015 to convert the jail into a haunted house during the Halloween season.

Working with haunted house entertainment company Factory of Terror, out of Canton, the society spends two months setting up to create one of the scariest settings around. Actors portraying prisoners, gh ouls, and ghosts from the jail’s creepy past create a gory experience that people of all ages can enjoy (though parental discretion is advised for younger folks).

The haunt begins in the sheriff’s living quarters, continues down to the cellblock levels — which are full of rioting inmates — then finishes with one last scare in the jail yard.

PHOTOS BY MIKE ELTRINGHAM

Doors open at 7 p.m., and tours last through midnight. Regular tickets cost $17, though fast pass tickets that allow patrons to jump to the head of the line are available for $25. The walk through the jail lasts about 20 minutes, and lines form that can create about a twohour wait, so patrons are advised to arrive early. Proceeds from the haunt are set aside to restore areas such as the foyer and the sheriff’s office to their original state. For more details, visit www.jailofterror.com. The Old Licking County Historic Jail (above) as it stands today, and the marker that only scratches the surface of the building’s history.

12

Annual haunting SPINE/BIND EDGE/GUTTER

Though the historic jail may be dark and scary — and possibly haunted — its future is bright. The restoration and preservation of the jail is on the upswing, as LCGPS works to restore the building to the condition Smith experienced during his time there.

— Isaac Miller

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017 10½ 10¾

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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GOOD EATS

STORIES BY MARGIE WUEBKER

Oktober-feast! This month means Oktoberfest in communities across Ohio, and when we asked you, our readers, to roll out your recipes for all foods German, you did not disappoint! After we sampled delicacies ranging from sausages to sauerkraut, strudel to schnitzel, these three emerged as our favorites.

PHOTO BY CATHERINE MURRAY

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GOOD EATS

With no old family recipes to rely upon, our contest winner re-creates restaurant and festival fare. Pam Hoffman knew her Pork Schnitzel was a winner long before she entered the recipe in Ohio Cooperative Living’s Oktoberfest recipe contest. “My stepfather was born in Romania and lived in Germany for several years,” she says. “He says the schnitzel is the best he’s ever eaten.”

KELSEY ROLLINS PHOTOGRAPHY

Judges awarded Hoffman, a member of Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative and first-time contest entrant, a KitchenAid mixer as top prize in the contest. Logan County Electric Cooperative member Tracy McPherson, who entered her recipe for Oktoberfest Beer Cheese Soup, and North Central Electric Cooperative member Ruth Pifher, who entered her recipe for Hot German Potato Salad, each took runner-up honors. (Continued, top of next page)

WINNING RECIPE Pork Schnitzel 4 boneless pork cutlets (1 lb. total), ½ inch thick ¼ cup all-purpose flour 1 tsp. seasoned salt ¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper 1 egg, beaten 2 Tbsp. milk 1 cup panko bread crumbs 1 tsp. paprika 3 to 4 Tbsp. olive oil Sauce: ¾ cup chicken broth, divided 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour ½ cup sour cream ½ tsp. fresh dill ½ tsp. salt Lemon slices (optional)

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Use a meat hammer to pound the pork cutlets to ¼ to 1⁄8 inch thickness. Cut small slits around the edges of each cutlet to prevent curling. Set out three shallow bowls — one with a mixture of flour, seasoned salt, and pepper; the second with the egg and milk whisked together; and the third with a mixture of bread crumbs and paprika. Heat olive oil in a large skillet on medium-high heat. Dredge cutlets in seasoned flour, then in the egg mixture, and finally in the bread crumb mixture. Let stand 5 minutes. Working in batches, sauté cutlets for 3 to 4 minutes on each side. Remove cutlets from the skillet, and place on a cooling rack over a sheet pan to keep warm in a 200-degree oven. For sauce: Stir ¼ cup broth into skillet, scraping up browned bits. In a bowl, combine flour and remaining broth, whisking until smooth. Stir into skillet and bring to a boil, cooking and stirring for 1 to 2 minutes or until thickened. Reduce heat and stir in sour cream, dill, and salt. Heat through, but do not let mixture boil. Serve cutlets with sauce and lemon slices, if desired. Serves 4.

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Although many schnitzel recipes call for veal, Hoffman substitutes pork loin, which is cheaper and more readily available near her Bluffton-area home. She especially likes using panko bread crumbs for the extra crispiness they impart. The dillinfused sauce serves as the crowning touch. She frequently takes advantage of pork loin sales to prep schnitzels and place the uncooked treats in the freezer for later use.

“I have ancestors who came from Germany in the 1800s, but their native recipes did not get passed down through the generations,” she said. “My husband (Mike) and I enjoy going to German restaurants and festivals, so I research recipes and tweak them until they suit our tastes. I am compiling my own German cookbook to preserve my food heritage to enjoy now and to pass on to future generations.”

CATHERINE MURRAY

RUNNERS-UP

Tracy McPherson, also a first-time contest entrant,

created the Oktoberfest soup years ago while operating a small family restaurant in Bellefontaine — one that employed special needs adults and those on public assistance to teach job skills. “Guinness was a featured beer in our pub, so we incorporated it into a cheese soup during our Oktoberfest celebrations,” she says. “Dark beer brings out the cheese flavor and imparts a smoky touch.” McPherson, who is currently studying clinical mental health counseling, has shared the recipe many times. Her son even took along a copy when he moved to California some years ago.

Oktoberfest Beer Cheese Soup ½ cup butter 1½ medium carrots, finely chopped (3/4 cup) 1 medium stalk celery, finely chopped (1/2 cup) 1 small onion, finely chopped (1/4 cup) 3 cups chicken broth ½ pound butter and 2 cups flour for roux

1/8 tsp. pepper 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper 1 cup milk 4 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese ½ cup beer (dark preferred) Sour cream or sprig of thyme for garnish

In a 4-quart Dutch oven, melt ½ cup butter over medium heat. Add carrots, celery, and onion; cook 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until crisp-tender. In a large bowl, mix broth, roux ingredients, pepper, and cayenne pepper until smooth. Gradually stir into vegetable mixture. Heat to boiling over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Boil and stir 1 minute. Stir in milk and cheese. Heat until cheese is melted. Stir in beer. Serve immediately with a dollop of sour cream or a sprig of thyme. Serves 4 to 5. Note: Soup may be reheated on low until heated through.

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Ruth Pifher had no problem deciding which recipe to

enter in the magazine contest. She pegged all her hopes on her mother’s tried-and-true Hot German Potato Salad. “My mother (Lillian Schock) made this often because it is a family favorite,” she says. “For the last 20 years she has made it as a side dish at the church Oktoberfest celebration in Attica.” The experimentation began when the church cookbook committee requested the recipe for an upcoming publication. They wanted a smaller version of the popular treat. Pifher always cuts the potatoes into small cubes instead of thin slices to absorb the tangy sauce. She also recommends using the cheapest bacon available to make sure there are plenty of drippings for the sauce. Celery seed adds extra flavor. “It is a good fall food that our family enjoys all year long and not just at Oktoberfest time,” she says.

Hot German Potato Salad 5 to 6 medium potatoes 1 lb. bacon 2 Tbsp. flour ¼ cup sugar 11/2 tsp. salt

½ tsp. celery seed 1/8 tsp. black pepper 1 cup water ½ cup vinegar

Wash unpeeled potatoes and boil until soft. Cool slightly, peel, and cut into small chunks (about 4 cups). Cut bacon into small pieces and fry until crisp. Remove bacon with a slotted spoon and set aside. Stir flour, sugar, salt, celery seed, and pepper into bacon grease until smooth. Cook until bubbly, stirring as needed. Add water and vinegar to flour mixture. Cook until it boils and thickens. Remove from heat and add potatoes and bacon. Stir gently so potatoes hold their shape. Serves 4 to 6. Note: Salad can be transferred to a slow cooker to keep warm until ready to serve.

OCTOBER OCTOBER2017 • OHIO 2017 •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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BY PAT KEEGAN

THE ENERGY EXPERT

DUCTLESS

HEAT PUMPS PHOTO CREDIT (COMPRESSOR) SCOTT GIBSON.

PHOTO CREDIT (BLOWER): NW ENERGY EFFICIENCY ALLIANCE.

Heat and cool your home without blowing your budget

I

f baseboard heaters and window AC units are driving up household electric bills, mini-split ductless heat pumps might be a good answer. The pumps can heat efficiently even when winter temperatures drop below freezing, and they are an economical and energy-efficient way to beat the summer heat. Ductless heat pumps are often installed as the primary heating source, paired with a backup system that kicks in when outside temperatures are extremely cold. In regions and in the proper type of home, those who switch to this kind of system should see considerable reductions in heating costs. Peter Niagu, an energy services advisor with Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative in Paulding, Ohio, says members there have found that ductless systems with a backup heating system can work effectively even when the temperature is below zero. Ductless heat pump systems could be an ideal solution in homes that don’t have a duct system, or when replacing or repairing existing ductwork would be prohibitive. Niagu also says the system is much more suited for homes with a few larger, open spaces than for those with many rooms to heat and cool. A ductless heat pump has two main components: the outdoor compressor and the indoor air handler. Coolant and electrical lines run through a conduit from the compressor outside the home through the wall to the inside air handler(s). The pumps can be configured in different ways. A common approach is to provide heating and cooling to one large zone in the home by using a single compressor and a single air handler, but one compressor could power as many as five inside air handlers in different rooms, each with its own thermostat. A home could even have more than one outside compressor, though as more are added, obviously the price increases, and homeowners would need to evaluate the cost compared to other systems.

Pat Keegan writes for Collaborative Efficiency, an energy communications company.

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With ductless heat pumps, an exterior compressor can be either set on a foundation on the ground, or mounted to a wall (right). A blower, sized appropriately for the room, is then installed inside the house (left).

Questions to consider

Ductless heat pumps are often a great solution, but it’s wise to consider these questions: • What are the other investments you could make to reduce your energy costs or improve comfort? Is the ductless heat pump the best option? A thorough energy audit of your home will help answer these questions. • Are rebates offered by your electric co-op? • What is the best size and efficiency level for a ductless heat pump in your situation? • Are there contractors in your area with experience installing ductless heat pumps? Contact your local electric co-op for a list of recommended contractors, and visit www. energystar.gov for tips on hiring contractors.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES STORY BY W. H. “CHIP” GROSS

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

HOLMES-WAYNE

HONOR 2017 TRIP T

he streets of Shreve were filled with patriotic signs to welcome home the local heroes of Holmes and Wayne County. It was a parade that was long overdue for many veterans. For the second consecutive year, local veterans of World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War were recognized for their service with an Honor Trip to memorials in Washington, D.C. The trip was free for veterans and coordinated by the Shreve American Legion Forest Post 67 and Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative. The trip was entirely funded by private donations from individuals and organizations. Participating this year were 23 area veterans, each accompanied by a guardian/caretaker. During the three-day bus tour (Aug. 25-27), veterans visited the World War II Memorial, Vietnam Memorial, Lincoln Memorial, Korean Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, Pentagon Memorial, and Air Force Memorial. “It’s a yearlong coordination that is very humbling to participate in,” shared Shay Lynch, Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative Administrative Coordinator. “The purpose behind this trip is to express appreciation to local veterans and hopefully provide steps of healing. It’s a small token we can provide for the unbelievable sacrifice our veterans have made. I’m so thankful to work for an organization that supports our veterans and community. This event would not be possible without the wonderful support of our community.”

Craig Rowland (left) and Ray Beck at the WWII Memorial.

One of the oldest veterans participating this year was Bob Baker, age 89, who served in the U. S. Army during World War II and Korea, enlisting when he was just 17 years old. “I especially wanted to see the Korean War Memorial, because I was a forward observer for a mortar company during that conflict,” Baker said. “But the real highlight of the trip for me was the friendships I made over the weekend getting to know the other veterans.” Continued on Page 20

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HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

All the veterans stand on the steps of the Memorial Amphitheater in Arlington National Cemetery, after presenting a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

VETERAN

Jim Adkins­­— Marines/Vietnam Robert Baker — Army/WWII/Korean War Ray Beck — Marines/Vietnam Mike Boreman — Army/Vietnam Gary Brenly — Army/Vietnam Lynn Carpenter — Army/Vietnam Carl Cooper — Army/Vietnam Mitch DeWitt — Army/Vietnam Eldred Hess — Marines/Korean War Chuck Kelly — Army/Vietnam Martin Lemon — Army/Vietnam Orrin Morris — Army/Vietnam Ray Morris — Marines/Vietnam Harry Newcombe — Army/Vietnam Randall Reber — Air Force/Vietnam Don Reichert — Army/Vietnam Craig Rowland — Marines/Vietnam Daniel Sheeter — Air Force/Vietnam Lloyd Shellhorn — Army/Vietnam Thomas Snyder — Army/Vietnam Robert Sudimak — Army/Vietnam Dave Wells — Air Force/Vietnam Jim Wolfe — Army/Vietnam

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GUARDIAN

Bob Burgett Steve Asbury Doug Polen Sue Boreman Jim Smith Lisa Lang Dick Smith Judy DeWitt Tim Hess Roberta Carpenter Stacy Shaw Cathy Morris Chassie Crytzer Mary Newcombe Mabel Kirchner DJ Reichert Leonard Jones Janet Shunk Elaine Baker Jeff Burgett Lisa Gress George Shunk Jackie Wolfe

Steve Asbury was Bob Baker’s guardian during the trip. A fellow veteran, serving five years in the U. S. Marine Corps, Steve is now a Class A lineman for Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative. “I wanted to go on the trip to be able to sit down with these local veterans and hear their stories,” Asbury said. “I especially wanted to talk to the World War II and Korea veterans, because there aren’t that many of them left anymore. And when we got back to Shreve on Sunday evening and topped the hill into town and the Rolling Thunder motorcycles pulled out in front of our bus to escort us during the parade, well, I teared up. It was the homecoming some of these guys never got years ago.” Stacy Shaw, guardian and safety directory at Holmes-Wayne Electric shared his experience. “These monuments represent our rich history,” Shaw said. “These veterans bring such knowledge and stories of a captured time in our country’s history that not only must be treasured but also passed on to future generations.”

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Gary Brenly, age 71, served in the U. S. Army during the Vietnam War. “I had some post-war problems, nothing serious, but I wanted to go on the trip mostly for healing — to visit the Vietnam Memorial Wall,” Brenly said. “I wanted to make sure that the men who were killed in our unit had their names on the wall, and that they got what was due them. The names were there.” Brenly’s guardian was Jim Smith, a fellow Vietnam vet and president of Rolling Thunder, Ohio Chapter 2. “Rolling Thunder was originally the idea of a couple of Vietnam War veterans in 1987, to honor America’s prisoners of war,” Smith said. “They organized a motorcycle rally in Washington, D.C., to publicize the fact that America has POWs/MIAs that were never accounted for. The first year, about 2,500 riders showed up on their motorcycles. Memorial Day 2017 was our 30th anniversary, and an estimated 900,000 to a million riders and their motorcycles came and toured the city.” The highlight of the weekend for many of the veterans and their guardians was laying a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery. Four veterans from the group were chosen to present the wreath, one being Bob Baker. At his advanced age, Bob Continued on Page 20B

Above: Martin Lemon on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial with the Washington Monument behind him. Below: Lloyd Shellhorn visits Audie Murphy’s grave in Arlington National Cemetery. Murphy was one of the most decorated American combat soldiers of WWII.

OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES spends most of his time in a wheelchair these days, but he can walk, slowly, with a cane. Yet, he put both cane and wheelchair aside temporarily during the wreath ceremony, preferring instead to “stand up straight and walk like a soldier,” he said. We call our veterans heroes, yet they are quick to deny it, saying instead that they were just doing the job our country called them to do. The real heroes, they insist, are their buddies who were not fortunate enough to make it back home. If you’d like to sponsor a veteran or make a donation toward next year’s Honor Trip, make your check payable to Shreve American Legion Forest Post 67 and write “Honor Trip” on the memo line. Mail checks to P.O. Box 112, Millersburg, OH 44654. Top left: Steve Asbury and Robert Baker at the Korean Memorial. Middle left: Lynn Carpenter rubs a name at the Vietnam Wall. Bottom left: Mike Boreman at the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial. Top right: Jim Smith, Gary Brenly, and Carl Cooper at the Lincoln Memorial. Bottom right: Shreve Parade goers welcome home local veterans returning from Honor Trip. They are applauded and greeted with signs and hugs.

PARADE PHOTOS BY W. H. “CHIP” GROSS

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2017 Holmes-Wayne Honor Trip

COMMUNITY DONATIONS

Above: Eldred Hess, Tim Hess, Martin Lemon, and Robert Baker present a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Solider.

Ajtaji Family Trust Robert A Ajtaji & Brenda Ajtaji Trustees Jerry & Margaret Ungerer Marvin Young Robert & Mae McGirr Monitor Bank Wooster Emblem Club 374 Josh & Cassandra Drouhard Roger & Victoria Meggyesy Elaine Baker Alan & Nancy Perlman Lynn & Cynthia Willett Donald & Harolyn Walker Wanda L. Griffith Trustees of The Griffith Family Trust Vietnam Veterans of America Inc. Chapter 255 Lakeville Methodist Church American Legion Auxiliary Holmes Unit 192 Jeff Burgett Roy and Judy Smetzer Fairview United Methodist Church Brittany Polen Roger & Janet Pennell Fritz Welded Products Rolling Thunder Ohio Chapter 2 Robert Burgett Blachleyville United Methodist Church Hope United Methodist Church Fairview United Methodist Church Loren & Mabel Kirchner St John Lutheran Church Robert Symonds & Michelle Quinn John Ellsworth Veterans of Foreign Wars Chaplain Kieffer Post 1081 Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, Inc. Shreve American Legion Post 67

Note: W. H. “Chip” Gross is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor, and says that he is very appreciative to have been chosen to write and photograph this Honor Trip story. “It wasn’t just another story for me,” Gross said. “My father and uncles — who have all passed away now — served our country during World War II, and writing this story brought back special memories of those special men in my life. Many, many thanks to all our veterans, both past and present, who keep America free.” OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

#WHOPOWERSYOU

Your community. Your inspiration. WhoPowersYou.com/Enter

Nominate someone today for the #WhoPowersYou contest This is your chance to honor someone in your community and celebrate the power of human connections. Visit whopowersyou.com/enter between 10/2/17 and 11/4/17 and submit a photo of your nominee. Then tell us why that person inspires you and how he or she makes a difference in your co-op community — your nominee could win a cash prize!

CONTEST PRIZES

GRAND PRIZE $5,000 SECOND PLACE $2,000 THIRD PLACE $1,500

Together, let’s celebrate the power of human connections

As the national network of more than 740 co-ops, Touchstone Energy® Cooperatives value the people who elevate and energize our communities. That’s why we are launching a contest to honor inspirational community members across the country.

HONORABLE MENTION $500

Winners will be selected by a panel of judges based on the impact they on the community. All entries must be submitted by Nov. 4, 2017. Winners will be announced January 2018. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED. Visit whopowersyou.com for full contest rules.

Sponsored by Touchstone Energy ® Cooperative, Inc., 4301 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22203. ® 2017.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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CASH

I GET FROM MY ELECTRIC COMPANY?!

As a member-owner of your electric cooperative, you receive capital credits. In the past 10 years, Holmes-Wayne Electric has distributed more than

$12.1 MILLION in capital credits to its members.

What are capital credits? Capital credits distributions from member-owned, not-for-profit utilities like Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative are somewhat similar to the dividends paid to shareholders of investor-owned utilities. The difference is that a co-op’s “shareholders” are also the members that it serves, and the “dividends” are capital credits distributed to the cooperative’s member-owners.

What’s the difference between allocated and retired capital credits? Allocated capital credits appear as an entry on the permanent financial records and reflect your equity, or ownership, in HWEC. Every year, the cooperative notifies its member-owners of the amount added to their patronage capital account through a printed notice on their May electric bills. When capital credits are retired, a check is issued to you.

How are capital credits calculated? Each year, net margins of the cooperative are divided among the members based on each member’s electric consumption for the year. Members who use more electric service receive a larger amount of capital credits allocated to their account.

Will I receive a capital credits check every year? The board of trustees must authorize a retirement before you receive a check. When considering a retirement, the cooperative’s board of trustees must consider the financial condition of the cooperative, the need for cash, and the availability of loan funds.

What happens to my capital credits when I leave HWEC’s service area? Your capital credits remain on the books in your name and member number until they are retired. Because payments are made to current and former members alike, you should ensure that HWEC always has your current mailing address.

I have been a cooperative member for several years. When will I receive a capital credits check? Most recently, the HWEC Board of Trustees approved the retirement of capital credits from 1996 and 1997. Members who joined the cooperative since 1996 and 1997 have not yet received a general capital credits retirement. The unretired capital credits, or “equity” of the cooperative, serves a vital function — allowing the cooperative to operate economically and effectively, while investing in the infrastructure necessary to meet the needs of our members. A 20-year capital patronage cycle is the common industry standard.

What are unclaimed capital credits? HWEC wants to ensure that members receive this benefit, but sometimes we are not able to reach members after they have moved from our lines, leaving their capital credits “unclaimed.” In this month’s and November’s issue of Ohio Cooperative Living, we have included a list of members who have not claimed their capital credits. If you recognize any of the names listed, please have the person contact our office toll free at 866-674-1055. HWEC also needs to be notified by a relative or other legal representative when a member passes away so that the account can be closed or transferred to another person’s name.

OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

CAPITAL CREDITS

Unclaimed capital credits In 2013, Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative, Inc., mailed a general retirement of capital credits. Many checks were returned to us as undeliverable and, to date, these refunds remain unclaimed. Per the cooperative’s Code of Regulations, the unclaimed capital credits are reallocated to current cooperative members four years following the original mailing and following two consecutive notices in this publication. This is the first notice. Anyone with information on these members or their heirs, whose name and last known residence is listed, is asked to contact the cooperative office toll-free at 866-674-1055. Contact must be made within 60 days following the last date of the publication of this notice on Jan. 1, 2018. ABRAHAM DRIS MANSFIELD OH

BAHR BARBARA Y WEST SALEM OH

ACKERET WILMA WOOSTER OH

BAILEY JACK D SMITHVILLE OH

ACTION CHEVROLET AKRON OH

BAKER CAROLYN D WOOSTER OH

ADAMS JOHN S HOUSTON TX

BAKER JEFF L WOOSTER OH

ADAMS LEROY WASHINGTON DC

BALES DOROTHY S CUYAHOGA FALLS OH

ADAMS WALTER L DEFIANCE OH

BALLACCHINO JOSEPH LYNCHBURG OH

ADAMSON JANICE K WOOSTER OH

BALLANTYNE KATHLEEN A SEVILLE OH

ADI TERRA DISTRIBUTING HURON OH

BALLEK STEVE J CLEVELAND OH

ADKINS DAVID L WEST SALEM OH

BAM INVESTMENTS MANSFIELD OH

ADKINS RICKIE A WEST SALEM OH

BARAT SCOTT P RITTMAN OH

ADKINS THOMAS LJR HOLMESVILLE OH

BARBARA ANDERSON WOOSTER OH

AGRI-INDUSTRIES CORP WOOSTER OH

BARD S H ASHLAND OH

AKERS FRANKLIN DSR WOOSTER OH

BARKER ROBERT E BONITA SPRINGS FL

AKINS SHARON R MILLERSBURG OH

BARKEY STEVEN R WOOSTER OH

ALEXANDER ANTHONY AKRON OH

BARNES MARILYN A WEST SALEM OH

ALEXANDER MICAH U STRASBURG OH

BARNES RONALD L SIMPSONVILLE SC

ALLEN RONALD E WEST SALEM OH

BARNETT DON WOOSTER OH

ALLER GARY N CANTON OH

BARNETTE EMMA E KILLBUCK OH

ALLESEE RICHARD W WOOSTER OH

BARNETTE JEWEL A APPLE CREEK OH

ALLISON DALE WEST SALEM OH

BARNHART EDITH M FRAZEYSBURG OH

ALLISON EUGENE BIG PRAIRIE OH

BARR CHERYL R ASHLAND OH

ALLOWAY KEVIN P LILLINGTON NC

BARR EDWARD STOW OH

ALLTEL COMMUNICATIONS INC LITTLE ROCK AR

BARRY JOHN C CRESTON OH

AMBILT CORP RITTMAN OH

BATTERSBY CHARLES WOOSTER OH

AMERICAN WEATHERSEAL URBANDALE IA AMPRO AKRON OH AMTEX OIL & GAS INC CANTON OH ANDERSON ROBERT E WOOSTER OH ARBOGAST GERRY W ASHLAND OH ARBOGAST KEITH F MEDINA OH ARCO PIPELINE CCPL 167 INDEPENDENCE KS ARMAN PAUL BIG PRAIRIE OH ARMSTRONG DELLA M MILAN OH ARMSTRONG SCOTT A WEST SALEM OH ARNOLD RANDY K LAKEVILLE OH ARNY CAROL J OSTRANDER OH ARTRIP TOMMY M WOOSTER OH ATWOOD ENERGY INC HOUSTON TX ATWOOD RESOURCES INC PORT WASHINGTON OH AUSTIN RETIREMENT VILL CLEVELAND OH

BASINGER DEAN A SMITHVILLE OH BEACHY MAYNARD E SUGARCREEK OH BEACHY TRUCKING SUGARCREEK OH BEASLEY LARRY E GREENVILLE SC BEATTY DAVID W UHRICHSVILLE OH BEATTY MARTHA GLENMONT OH BECKER JAN F KILLBUCK OH BEERS DANIEL J BURBANK OH BELLMAN LARRY D SHREVE OH BELLVILLE WILLIAM D BIG PRAIRIE OH BENATTY CORP CAMBRIDGE OH BENHAM DEBORAH L WEST SALEM OH BENNETT CHARLES S LODI OH

BERNHART RONNIE E FREDERICKSBURG OH BERRY ROGER H LOUDONVILLE OH BESANCON FRANK A SMITHVILLE OH BEST KENT E WOOSTER OH BICKEL JOHN J MILLERSBURG OH BIENZ ROBERT A NORTON OH BIGLEY WELDON SR WEST SALEM OH BILDERBACK ARTHUR G ZANESVILLE OH BILLINGS BRENDA J BURBANK OH BING DAVID L ST AUGUSTINE FL BIRKES JERRY WOOSTER OH BISHOP GREG G PERRYSVILLE OH BITTICKER STEVEN R LOUDONVILLE OH BLACHLEYVILLE GRANGE WOOSTER OH BLACKLEDGE RODNEY W BEACH CITY OH BLACKWELL DORIS J MANSFIELD OH BLAGG GEORGE G APPLE CREEK OH BLAKELY BARBARA L WEST SALEM OH BLANKENSHIP LELA A WEST SALEM OH BLAYLOCK TONY G MEDINA OH BLU OIL CO DANVILLE OH BODNAR ANDREW P BARBERTON OH BOEHM GEORGE WEST SALEM OH BOGGS MICHAEL K POWELL OH BOOTH JOHN WOOSTER OH BOOTH RUTH H KILLBUCK OH BOREMAN SARAH L WEST SALEM OH BORNSTINE JOHN STERLING OH BOUCH WILLIAM V ASHLAND OH BRAMMER HOMER D ASHLAND OH BRAUN ALBERTA A CLEVELAND OH BRENEMAN BARRY W MEDINA OH BRENNEMAN A L SMITHVILLE OH BRIAN FRED MSR WOOSTER OH BRIGGS JOHN WOOSTER OH BRINSON JOSEPH L ORRVILLE OH

BENNETT RITA L RITTMAN OH

BROADBRIDGE WAYNE MILLERSBURG OH

BENSON MICHAEL P HARRISON TOWNSHIP MI

BROCK KENNY V AUBURN AL BROWN BILL WEST SALEM OH

BENTLEY KATHY A BURBANK OH

BROWN GREGORY L WEST SALEM OH

BERGOON DILLON KILLBUCK OH

BROWN KEVIN D WEST SALEM OH

20F OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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Unclaimed capital credits BROWN LINDA A CLEVELAND OH

CARTER WENDY K SHREVE OH

COTTLE MARTHA M GLENMONT OH

BROWN NORMA SHREVE OH

CARTER WILLIAM G BIG PRAIRIE OH

COVER TERESA J JEROMESVILLE OH

BROWN RANDALL WEST SALEM OH

CASCADE PETROLEUM CANTON OH

COWEN JACK SCAPPOOSE OR

BROWN RANDI S WEST SALEM OH

CASE LAVINA WOOSTER OH

CRABTREE GEORGE FSR WEST SALEM OH

BROWN ROBERT R WEST SALEM OH

CASEY DANNY K WOOSTER OH

CRAMER HARRY E DUNDEE OH

BRUGGER BRUCE A WOOSTER OH

CASGRAIN PETER B WOOSTER OH

CRANE JOHN H WELLINGTON OH

BRUGGER MICHAEL F WOOSTER OH

CASSELL JOHN L CRESTON OH

CRAWFORD BARBARA M WEST SALEM OH

BRYAN PATRICIA A MOUNT VERNON OH

CAUDILL AMY L ASHLAND OH

CRAWFORD PAMELA A WEST SALEM OH

BUCKLEW BEVERLY MILLERSBURG OH

CAWTHRA DARCI A BIG PRAIRIE OH

CREBS ROBERT WEST SALEM OH

BULLARD TED J NAPLES FL

CERNETISCH EDWIN D LA MESA CA

CREBS TODD POLK OH

BULLOCK WILLIAM J DUNDEE OH

CHAFFIN NEAL C BURBANK OH

CRIDER MARIAN S MEDINA OH

BUNT DANIEL M WOOSTER OH

CHAFIN HELEN WEST SALEM OH

CROSKEY JOHN W WOOSTER OH

BURFORD DOUGLAS J WOOSTER OH

CHALLIS STAIRWAYS INC DRAPER UT

CROSS RAMONA HOMERVILLE OH

BURGAN PATRICIA S WEST SALEM OH

CHAPMAN AMY L HOLMESVILLE OH

CRUMMEL EARL R AKRON OH

BURKEY LORETTA A DUNDEE OH

CHAPMAN KEITH W BIG PRAIRIE OH

CRUSH C M WOOSTER OH

BURKHOLDER JACK E PUYALLUP WA

CHASTAIN JAMES E ELYRIA OH

CURTIS DAVID M FAYETTEVILLE GA

BURNS CONNIE S DECORAH IA

CHIO LYNN K JEROMESVILLE OH

CUSTOM FORKLIFT SERVICE WEST SALEM OH

BURRIS DEBORAH M CRESTON OH

CHRISTIAN RADIO MILLERSBURG OH

CUTLIP M M WOOSTER OH

BURSON WILLIAM L LIBBY MT

CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY BRECKSVILLE OH

D & C OIL CO CANTON OH

CHURCH SUSAN R WEST SALEM OH CLARK ANNA M MOUNT VERNON OH

DANA HAWKINS KAYE SHAMP AND KILLBUCK OH

CLARK CLAY CO MILLERSBURG OH

DANIELS LARRY J SHREVE OH

CLARK F G HOLMESVILLE OH

DARNELL ELWOOD CLEVELAND OH

CLARK RHONDA J WEST SALEM OH

DAVENPORT LARRY ASR MEDINA OH

CLEVENGER RODNEY BURBANK OH

DAVIS ANDREW O MILLERSBURG OH

CLEVER ALFRED B DOVER OH

DAVIS BARBARA E GLENMONT OH

CLICK DANIEL L WEST SALEM OH

DAVIS EDWARD MANSFIELD OH

CLOUSE CHERI E ELYRIA OH

DAVIS KENNETH L WEST SALEM OH

CLUTTER RICHARD ASHLAND OH

DAVIS RICHARD K MEDINA OH

COBLENTZ BEN J MILLERSBURG OH

DAWKINS DELMAR C RITTMAN OH

COBLENTZ JONAS E HOLMESVILLE OH

DAWSON GREGG W LOUDONVILLE OH

COBLENTZ MARK B WALNUT CREEK OH

DEARMENT WARREN L BURBANK OH

COBLENTZ MOSES A HOLMESVILLE OH

DELOR JIM KILLBUCK OH

COCHRAN THOMAS W MEDINA OH

DEVENNEY HELEN K WEST SALEM OH

COFFMAN WILLIAM P WEST SALEM OH

DEVORE ESTHER MOUNT VERNON OH

COFSCO INC WOOSTER OH

DEVORE GEORGE B MOUNT VERNON OH

COLLINS MICHEL G FORT LAUDERDALE FL

DEVORE WALTER L HARRISVILLE WV

COLUMBUS OILFIELD EXPL COLUMBUS OH

DEWEY J R PETERSBURG TN

CONDRY MARK D WOOSTER OH

DICK JAMES E WOOSTER OH

CONKLE GEORGIA J KILLBUCK OH

DICKENS RUBY M WEST SALEM OH

CONLEY CHARLES E CUYAHOGA FALLS OH

DICKERHOFF CLOYD BEACH CITY OH

CONLEY THOMAS S WOOSTER OH

DICKSON WILLIAM DSR LOUDONVILLE OH

CONRAIL CORP CINCINNATI OH

DIEFFENBACH BRUCE D LEBANON NJ

CONROY & GEHRING STRONGSVILLE OH

DILGARD FLORENCE LAKEVILLE OH

CONVERSE MARGARET V WOOSTER OH

DILGARD FLORENCE LAKEVILLE OH

COOK ROBERT A DENVER CO

DILLON MARY K CANTON OH

COOL ROBERT H STERLING OH

DODENHOFF ALFRED F WOOSTER OH

COOMBES ADELINE BARBERTON OH

DOMERS DUANE B WADSWORTH OH

COOPER CLYDE E COSHOCTON OH

DONAHUE JANET L SMITHVILLE OH

COOPER EARNEST M WOOSTER OH

DONALDSON MARY E COSHOCTON OH

CORNELIUS FLOYD BURBANK OH

DONNER HENRY C WEST SALEM OH

CORNET PIETER J BOKEELIA FL

DORIS M. HOUSER POA WOOSTER OH

CORP BILL CLEVELAND OH

DORSEY DAVID A CRESTON OH

COSTELLO JOSEPH P HEATH TX

DOTY GLENN WOOSTER OH

BURT B R MILLERSBURG OH BURWELL FREDERICK D COLUMBUS OH BUTCHER GARY L BRUNSWICK OH BUTLER FRANK WEST SALEM OH BUTLER JOEL L MILLERSBURG OH BYLAND ALLEN K COSHOCTON OH BYLER EVELYN M WEST SALEM OH BYLER JOHN S SULLIVAN OH BYLER URIE A HOLMESVILLE OH BYRD HAROLD WOOSTER OH CADLE DANNY R MILLERSBURG OH CALDWELL TODD A WOOSTER OH CALLANDAR-KIMBERELL INC CERULEAN KY CAMACHO RAFAEL A MILLERSBURG OH CAMPBELL D W WOOSTER OH CAMPBELL GARY PJR SCIO OH CAMPBELL JAMES R NASHVILLE OH CANFIELD MARY WEST SALEM OH CANNELL THOMAS G CANTON OH CAPICCIONI SAMUEL J MEDINA OH CAPITAL OIL & GAS INC AUSTINTOWN OH CARABALLO AUREA E VALLEY CITY OH CAREY JOHN E WOOSTER OH CARLESS RESOURCES INC CAMBRIDGE OH CARMCO INC WOOSTER OH CARNES JACK CRESTON OH CARPENTER DARLENE BIG PRAIRIE OH CARPENTER JAMES JR KILLBUCK OH CARPENTER P M SUMMERFIELD FL CARR DOUGLAS A MAGNOLIA OH CARROLL CHARLES A WOOSTER OH CARTER C R SMITHVILLE OH CARTER JERRY D BURBANK OH CARTER LINDA L WEST SALEM OH CARTER PAULA ORRVILLE OH

Holmes1017.indd 9

DAMON CLAYTON WEST SALEM OH

OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

20G

9/18/17 1:58 PM


HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Unclaimed capital credits DOUBLE R TRUCKING MILLERSBURG OH

FATH CHARLES A SHREVE OH

GENTRY KEVIN D WEST SALEM OH

DOUGHMAN MELODY WILMINGTON OH

FEIN MADELINE G WOOSTER OH

GENTRY MEGAN LAKEVILLE OH

DOYLE TIMOTHY L WOOSTER OH

FENDER CLETUS WALNUT CREEK OH

GEORGE CHARLES D WOOSTER OH

DRAGOVICH JAMES E RITTMAN OH

FERREE DAVID C APPLE CREEK OH

GEORGE MICHAEL K MEDINA OH

DRAKE GILBERT W ORRVILLE OH

FERRELL RUTH A BARBERTON OH

GEORGEN JUNIOR C WOOSTER OH

DRAKE PATTY J JEROMESVILLE OH

FERRIS BOYD WORTHINGTON OH

GERBETZ JAMES P HOLMESVILLE OH

DROUHARD TRACY L ORRVILLE OH

FIEG VIOLA E WEST SALEM OH

GERBINO JOHN G PENSACOLA FL

DROWN PEGGY WOOSTER OH

FIKES CHARLOTTE E KINGSLAND TX

GIANNONE BEVERLY K ALEXANDRIA LA

DUFF CHARLES H MILLERSBURG OH

FIRESTONE NANCY M JACKSONVILLE FL

GIBBON THOMAS E WOOSTER OH

DUFF WAYNE A MILLERSBURG OH

FISCHER EDWARD J WEST SALEM OH

GILBERT CAL E WEST SALEM OH

DUMONT FRED E WEST LIBERTY OH

FISHER ERMA MILLERSBURG OH

GILBERT GILL R LODI OH

DUNCAN DOROTHY MILLERSBURG OH

FLADDA JAMES A WOOSTER OH

GILES CHARLES SPOKANE VALLEY WA

DUNHAM TIM A MANSFIELD OH

FLADDA ROBIN M BOWERSTON OH

GILL EDWARD J WEST SALEM OH

DUNN JOSEPH W ALLIANCE OH

FLEMING DIANE K MANSFIELD OH

GILLESPIE CLARENCE JR WEST SALEM OH

DUNSTONE DERECK K CRESTON OH

FLICKINGER JOHN CHEVY CHASE MD

GILLISPIE ROBERT GATES MILLS OH

DURR FRED MILLERSBURG OH

FLINN DOROTHY J MILLERSBURG OH

GINGERICH DOUGLAS L BLOUNTSTOWN FL

DURST EMERSON L KILLBUCK OH

FLUHARTY FRANCIS L WOOSTER OH

GINGERICH MOSE MILLERSBURG OH

DUSTY DRILLING & PROD NEW LEXINGTON OH

FLURY DOUGLAS G WEST SALEM OH

GINGERY RICHARD W MILLERSBURG OH

DYGERT CLAYTON E WOOSTER OH

FOLCK ROBERT A BUCYRUS OH

GLASSCO THOMAS B WEST SALEM OH

FORCE GARY MILLERSBURG OH

GOETZ THOMAS WINTER HAVEN FL

FORD ROBERT A WEST SALEM OH

GOLOJA MIKE BROOK PARK OH

FOREMAN GEOFFREY H WOOSTER OH

GOSLEE THOMAS W NORTH ROYALTON OH

EARLE CHERYL J CRESTON OH EAST HOLMES WATER CO MILLERSBURG OH EASTERDAY DENISE J LODI OH EASTON MARK F GROVE CITY OH EAVES DEWEY B WEST SALEM OH EBERHARDT DONALD L WADSWORTH OH EBERHARDT KEVIN D WEST SALEM OH EDCO DRILLING & PROD MOUNT GILEAD OH EDWARDS CYNTHIA D WOOSTER OH EGGERS VALENTINE M MILLERSBURG OH EISENBERG MARTIN J CLEVELAND OH ELKO PAMELA J WOOSTER OH ELLIOTT BRUCE D WEST SALEM OH ELLIOTT REX HOWARD OH ELLIOTT RICHARD H WOOSTER OH ELSASSER DAVID S WORTHINGTON OH ELY JOYCE A DOVER OH ENGLIS ROBERT M MILLERSBURG OH ENSIGN KIMBERLY S WEST SALEM OH EPPLEY HILTON COSHOCTON OH ERB WILLIAM A HAYSVILLE KS ESTEPP DOUGLAS W LODI OH ESTES PAULA M HOMERVILLE OH ETZWILER JOSEPH ASR SHREVE OH ETZWILER LES P LOUDONVILLE OH EVANICKY JOYCE J WEST SALEM OH EVANS RICHARD W SEVILLE OH FAIR CLINTON A MEDINA OH FAIR FOREST WEST SALEM OH FAIR LINDA L MILLERSBURG OH FALKENSTEIN ALBERT J WADSWORTH OH FARNER CHRISTINA L WEST SALEM OH FARNHAM GERALDINE HOLMESVILLE OH

FORT DEFIANCE CONST DEFIANCE OH FORTNER WILLIAM WEST SALEM OH FORTUNE ROBERT E BIG PRAIRIE OH FOUTS WILLIAM WOOSTER OH FOX JAMES W WAYNESBURG PA FRANKS ROBERTA M CLEVELAND OH FRANKS ROGER L WOOSTER OH FRANKS RUSSELL R MUSKEGON MI FREDERICK EARL E WOOSTER OH FREDERICK EDWARD E WOOSTER OH FREEMAN DAVID R AKRON OH FRENCH RAY C MILLERSBURG OH FRIEDRICH HENRY R NEW PHILADELPHIA OH FRIETCHEN CHERYL M NASHVILLE OH FUQUA WILLIAM A PARK CITY IL FURON COMPANY AURORA OH GAETHKE-BRAND JANE E EUGENE OR GALBRAITH FRIEDA M WOOSTER OH GALBRAITH RONALD J GLENMONT OH GALION DUMP BODIES GALION OH

GOUSE JOHN ROCHESTER NY GRABER LEE MISSION TX GRAHAM CHARLES T WEST SALEM OH GRAHAM DAWN R WEST SALEM OH GRAHAM GARY G WOOSTER OH GRANT JEFFREY W MC DOWELL VA GRANT THOMAS S LODI OH GRAY STEVE MILLERSBURG OH GREBENIK RICHARD BROOK PARK OH GREEN DAVID I SUN CITY AZ GREEN GILBERT I WOOSTER OH GREEN JAMES A WOOSTER OH GREEN-CUNNINGHAM SANDRA D WALNUT CREEK OH GRESKO TANYA BUCYRUS OH GRIER RICHARD R LOUDONVILLE OH GRIESMER WALTER H CLEVELAND OH GRIFFEY CHARLES CLINTON OH GRIFFEY JOSEPH WEST SALEM OH GRIFFIN R S WOOSTER OH

GALLEY ELSIE M MILLERSBURG OH

GRIMWOOD DENNIS LOCKBOURNE OH

GAMERTSFELDER SUSAN D MILLERSBURG OH

GRISCHOW JOHN R AKRON OH GRISSINGER RICK MARENGO OH

GARRETSON LEONA C SHREVE OH

GROSE DAMON R CHARLESTON WV

GARVER MARGARET E WOOSTER OH

GROSS TIMOTHY P DALTON OH

GARVER VANESSA L WOOSTER OH

GROUVER BARBARA S WOOSTER OH

GATLIFF RICKY D WOOSTER OH

GRUBB & PIPES INC IBERIA OH

GEIGER WILLIAM G ARLINGTON OH

GRUESER ROBERT D VINCENT OH

GEISINGER JEROME DSR BOLIVAR OH

GTE TELEPHONE OPERATIONS COLUMBUS OH

GELLA JOHN KILLBUCK OH GEMAYAL ANDREA L PAINESVILLE OH

GUARDIAN MGMT MARION OH GUCKERT B C FOUNTAIN HILLS AZ

20H OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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Unclaimed capital credits GUERIN PHYLLIS CHICAGO IL

HILBERT LARRY WOOSTER OH

IPPCO MILLERSBURG OH

GUIDETTI RONALD P WEST SALEM OH

HILL BONNIE L WEST SALEM OH

IRWIN RAY WEST SALEM OH

GULKO EDWARD WOOSTER OH

HILL HOWARD RJR DUNDEE OH

J & B ENTERPRISE FREDERICKSBURG OH

GUMBER DONNA D CLEARWATER FL

HILL MARK A STERLING OH

J & J OIL & GAS SMITHVILLE OH

GUTSCHMIDT WILLLIAM J MILLERSBURG OH

HILLER BROOKS H BIG PRAIRIE OH

JABIRU RESOURCES SANTA BARBARA CA

GUY PERRY D ISELIN NJ

HILLTOP ALLOTMENT MILLERSBURG OH

JACKSON IRENE C EAST LIVERPOOL OH

HINES MARK E MILLERSBURG OH

JACKSON TAMMIE L WEST SALEM OH

HINTON PHYLLIS E LAKEVILLE OH

JACOBS LABEN C MEDINA OH

HINTZ STEVEN R NAVARRE OH

JAMES GLENN E WOOSTER OH

HIRSCHL GERTRUDE WOOSTER OH

JAMES VERSIL N SHREVE OH

HOCHSTETLER INC HOLMESVILLE OH

JARRELL ROY WJR WEST SALEM OH

HODGE CHARLES B BRUNSWICK OH

JARVIS DENNIS L MEDINA OH

HODGE MARGARET A PENINSULA OH

JAY PALLET ALL MILLERSBURG OH

HOFFMAN CAROLE L STRONGSVILLE OH

JEANDERVIN THERMAN G KILLBUCK OH

HOLCOMB BRUCE E MILLERSBURG OH

JEFFERS MICHAEL L WOOSTER OH

HOLLIDAY JOSEPH E CLEVELAND OH

JENKINS GEORGE K KILLBUCK OH

HOLMDEN KENT L LODI OH

JENKINS MARCHA NEW TRENTON IN

HOLMES JIM F BOLIVAR OH

JENNEY WILLIAM C JOHNSTOWN OH

HONABARGER JOHN J MILLERSBURG OH

JESTER HAROLD R WOOSTER OH

HOOD JANE O MILLERSBURG OH

JILLS COUNTRY ART WOOSTER OH

HOOLEY RICHARD M WOOSTER OH

JOHNSON CHRIS WOOSTER OH

HOOVER ALBERT J SHREVE OH

JOHNSON DAN IONE WA

HOOVER BETTY DANVILLE OH

JOHNSON TONYA R BETHEL OH

HOOVER CHRISTEEN K SHREVE OH

JOHNSON WENDELL C WEST SALEM OH

HOOVER MILDRED R JEROMESVILLE OH

JONES DONNA M APPLE CREEK OH

HOPKINS AMY S KILLBUCK OH

JONES GLENN E MEDINA OH

HORTIN & HUFFMAN WORTHINGTON OH

JONES MYRA J DUNDEE OH

HOSCHAR KEITH E SHERRODSVILLE OH

JONES OPAL M HOMERVILLE OH

HOSTETLER ERVIN N FREDERICKSBURG OH

JONES SPACELINK LTD LODI OH

HOSTETLER ROBERT WOOSTER OH

JONES TIMOTHY C SMITHVILLE OH

HOTT DAVID SMITHVILLE OH

JOSLYN ROBERT O PRINCEVILLE HI

HOWARD RUSSELL ASR WINESBURG OH

JOY IDA MILLERSBURG OH

HOWLAND ROBERT T COSHOCTON OH

JUREATIC CHARLES RSR WEST SALEM OH

HOXWORTH BLANCHE MILLERSBURG OH

JUSTICE FREDDIE H LODI OH

HUEBNER RALPH MILLERSBURG OH

KAHRIG WILFRED D BURBANK OH

HUEGLE RUSSELL WSR DOYLESTOWN OH

KAIN PAUL L WOOSTER OH

HUFF DAVID P ASHLAND OH

KALINOWSKI NANCY DANVILLE OH

HUFFINES CHRISTOPHER D WOOSTER OH

KALMBACH FEEDS UPPER SANDUSKY OH

HUGGINS DENNIE L WILLIAMSTOWN WV

KANDEL BUFORD L ORRVILLE OH

HUGHES JEAN M DELPHI IN

KARVONEN KAREN APPLE CREEK OH

HENNESSY JOHN D DUNDEE OH

HUMRICHOUSER TIMOTHY J JEROMESVILLE OH

KARWAN ELIZABETH W ROCKY HILL NJ

HENRY CURTIS P MANSFIELD OH

HUNT GUILBERT M BRECKSVILLE OH

HENRY WAYNE O NASHVILLE OH

HUNTER JAMES S DANVILLE OH

KAUFFMAN ETHEL BERLIN OH

HERPEL JAMES M SHREVE OH

HURAYT ANTHONY A MILLERSBURG OH

HERSHBERGER CAROL A MILLERSBURG OH

HYDROCARBON INVESTMENTS NILES OH

HERSHBERGER DALE D KILLBUCK OH

ICKES LUELLA M WOOSTER OH

HERSHBERGER DOROTHY PASADENA TX

ICKES R L WOOSTER OH

HERSHBERGER LEVI S MILLERSBURG OH

ILEY JAMES E WEST SALEM OH

HERSHBERGER NORMAN J MILLERSBURG OH

IMARS WAYNE J AKRON OH

H & H PRODUCING BROADVIEW HEIGHTS OH H L M COMPANY DANVILLE OH HABEGGER JEFFREY S TALLAHASSEE FL HAINES EARL L SCOTTSDALE AZ HALEY ROBERT G EAST NORTHPORT NY HALKIAS MARTHA LUGOFF SC HALL JONATHAN N WOOSTER OH HALVERSON JERRY D KILLBUCK OH HAMILTON DONALD HOMERVILLE OH HAMILTON GENEVIEVE RED WING MN HAMILTON ROBERT A WOOSTER OH HAMMERS JUDY L WEST SALEM OH HAMMONS ROLAND D BRINKHAVEN OH HANNA VAN J AKRON OH HARDIN PATRICIA A WOOSTER OH HARDWAY RICHARD A ELYRIA OH HARRIS KATHRYN HOLMESVILLE OH HARRIS ROBERT M LITTLESTOWN PA HARRIS TONI J ASHLAND OH HARRY TIMMY R WOOSTER OH HARTER MARY A AKRON OH HATZIS JAMES G CUYAHOGA FALLS OH HAUGHT BERYL CANTON OH HAYNES JOSEPH H MILLERSBURG OH HECKER JACK E WEST SALEM OH HEDRICK PHIL J MASSILLON OH HEIDTMAN KARL O CLEVELAND OH HEILMAN FREEDA WEST SALEM OH HEINEY ROGER WOOSTER OH HELDRETH EVERETT C LITCHFIELD OH HELLER MALCOLM T BROOKVILLE OH HELM WARREN L MAGNOLIA OH HELMAN KENNETH WEST SALEM OH HENDRIX DAWN S WOOSTER OH

KASER MARJORIE R WAYNESBURG OH

KEAL DRIVEAWAY CO BROADVIEW HEIGHTS OH KEEN RICHARD DJR OAK RIDGE NC KEIFFER VERA ASHLAND OH KELLEY WALTER R WEST SALEM OH

HERSHBERGER REALTY WOOSTER OH HICKMAN RACHEL D WELLINGTON OH

INGRAM BARBARA A RITTMAN OH

HICKS CAROLYN J POLK OH

INLAND CORPORATION HOUSTON TX

HIGGINS JOHN B KILLBUCK OH

IONS SUE C WEST SALEM OH

Holmes1017.indd 11

KAYE STEVEN J JEROMESVILLE OH KEARNEY MARK D WOOSTER OH

IMPACT PETROLEUM INC WORTHINGTON OH

KAUFMAN G E PHOENIXVILLE PA

KENDALL B D PURCELLVILLE VA KENDIG J F FORT MYERS FL KENNEDY JOEL A WOOSTER OH KERR KARL K CANTON OH

OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

20I

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HOLMES-WAYNE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Unclaimed capital credits KHOSLA MANMOHA K LAKEWOOD OH

LITTLETON WILLIAM G JEROMESVILLE OH

MAST LEVI A LEFT HAND WV

KIDWELL WOODROW WOOSTER OH

LIVEZEY DENNIS M MANTUA OH

MAST MICHAEL L BERLIN OH

KIGGINS WILBERT E MEDINA OH

LLOYD EMMA J RITTMAN OH

MAST TOBI I LAKEVILLE OH

KILBANE ADVERTISING INC BAINBRIDGE ISLAND WA

LOCKHART DORIS M CANAL FULTON OH

MATHIAS DWIGHT D LEXINGTON KY

KILKENNY MATTHEW G WOOSTER OH

LOCKLEAR TERRY WEST SALEM OH

MAURER NEAL F WOOSTER OH

LOCKNEY EFFIE ARNOLDSBURG WV

MAY RHONDA GREENWICH OH

LOVE ANNA J TORNADO WV

MAYNARD CECIL JJR WADSWORTH OH

LOVE PATRICK WEST SALEM OH

MAZGAJ ROBERT G CALDWELL WV

LOWE DONALD HOLMESVILLE OH

MCCLOSKEY L W WOOSTER OH

LOWE DONALD L WOOSTER OH

MCCLOUD RONALD MILLERSBURG OH

LUCAS WILMA F WOOSTER OH

MCCOMAS RICHARD L WEST SALEM OH

LUCIUS STEVE H BROADVIEW HEIGHTS OH

MCCOMBS CRAIG E KILLBUCK OH

LUKAC CONNIE WOOSTER OH

MCCONAHAY RUSSELL WOOSTER OH

LUNDELL JACK S LODI OH

MCCONNELL TIM WEST SALEM OH

LUPI NATALIE M LOGAN OH

MCCOY BENJAMIN D SHEBOYGAN WI

LUTSCH LEONA WOOSTER OH

MCCOY JOHN UTICA OH

LYONS MARY J SMITHVILLE OH

MCCULLOUGH DRILLING UTICA OH

LYONS ROBERT E MILLERSBURG OH

MCFARLAND JOHN L WOOSTER OH

M B OPERATING INC HARTVILLE OH

MCGLOTHLIN BRODERICK BIG PRAIRIE OH

MACIEL PAUL M WEST SALEM OH

MCGRAW KEITH D LODI OH

MACKEY DEAN WOOSTER OH

MCGREEVY THOMAS J OLMSTED TWP OH

MADDAMMA MARC A MEDINA OH

MCHUGH JAMES M WOOSTER OH

MADER FREDERICK NORTH OLMSTED OH

MCKEE ROBERT L PULASKI VA

MAIRS C J ROLLING HILLS ESTA CA

MCKINNEY DAVID W CHARLESTON WV

MAJEWSKI MICHAEL NORTH ROYALTON OH

MCLAUGHLIN DAVID B WOOSTER OH

MAJKA GERALD E MILLERSBURG OH

MCVICKER C A WOOSTER OH

KIMMELL RICHARD WOOSTER OH KING IVAN D WEST SALEM OH KIRKHAM JOHN S HOPEWELL VA KIRKSEY WALTER MOUNT HOPE OH KLEIN KATHERINE MILLERSBURG OH KLEIN ROBERT M FRESNO CA KLINE GARY E ONA WV KLOSTERMAN EARLE W WOOSTER OH KNAPPENBURGER JOHN P WEST SALEM OH KNODERER THOMAS A KISSIMMEE FL KNOTTS KENNETH J NORTH LAWRENCE OH KRASKA JOSEPH P CRESTON OH KREPINA CINDI WEST SALEM OH KREPINA NORMAN MEDINA OH KRIDLER JANE C MILLERSBURG OH KRIEG DAVID S WOOSTER OH KRUEGER DENNIS A BRUNSWICK OH KRUEGER JAMES E CLEVELAND OH KUNDRACIK GEORGE WOOSTER OH KURTZ ANDREW MILLERSBURG OH KYLE DONALD D DENNISON OH LAFONTAINE PAUL F WEST SALEM OH LANCE CHERYL L WOOSTER OH LANG HELMUT M WEST FARMINGTON OH LANGDON MARY R WARSAW OH LANGKAMP SAM DUNDEE OH LANIER CHARLES C WEST SALEM OH LANTZ PEARL B WEST SALEM OH LARSON ERIC BURBANK OH LATKA DAWN M WEST SALEM OH LAUTENSCHLEGER BEULAH DANVILLE OH LAWRENCE RALPH E MEDINA OH LEAMAN JEFFREY L FREDERICKSBRG OH LEAMAN ROBERT WOOSTER OH LECKRONE DONNA MILLERSBURG OH LEEDA SERVICES INC MASSILLON OH LEGGETT MICHAEL E WOOSTER OH LEHR SUSAN A ORRVILLE OH LESHER C Y WEST SALEM OH LETZELTER DAN M SEVILLE OH LEWIS ELOISE MILLERSBURG OH LICHT HENRY A CLEVELAND OH LILLEY PEGGY WEST SALEM OH LIMBACHER JOHN BALTIC OH LING ROBERT L KILLBUCK OH LINK ROGER BSR OLMSTED TWP OH LINSCOTT JAMES H WOOSTER OH LITTLE JAMES L WILMINGTON DE

MAKSYMIAK JAY A WEST SALEM OH MALCOMSON JOHN D CAMPBELLSVILLE KY MALHKE SYLVIA ELYRIA OH MANACAPILLI PHILIP W SMITHVILLE OH MANATTEE OIL CO FREDERICKSBURG OH MANEESE KEITH A WOOSTER OH MARBURGER TED P ANDERSON SC MARILYN E. SMITH SHELBY OH MARION RICHARD L BREVARD NC MARNER MATTHEW UHRICHSVILLE OH MARQUES DONALD J BOLIVAR OH MARSHALL BENTON WOOSTER OH MARSHALL LYNN A SHREVE OH MARTIN BETTY L KILLBUCK OH MARTIN BRIAN M BIG PRAIRIE OH MARTIN JAMES D WOOSTER OH MARTIN JAMES D WOOSTER OH MARTIN LILLIAN M WOOSTER OH MARTIN LOREE L ASHLAND OH MARTIN MARK WOOSTER OH MARTIN RANDY M BIG PRAIRIE OH MARTIN WALTER F MILLERSBURG OH MASSARO ANTONIO J WOOSTER OH MASSIE BETTY J LIMA OH MAST CINDY L STRASBURG OH MAST IVAN A DUNDEE OH MAST JOSEPH R WILMOT OH

MCNITT JOHN M PORT ANGELES WA MEAS HAYSAN CORPUS CHRISTI TX MEEK WILLARD MADISON OH MEISNER HELEN R POMPANO BEACH FL MELLOTT EUGENE DALTON OH MELLOTT LARRY C RITTMAN OH MENDENHALL DENNIS WOOSTER OH MENUEZ V O MILLERSBURG OH MESSNER REX M BIRMINGHAM OH METHENEY DANA P WEST SALEM OH METZGER BRICE A DANVILLE OH METZGER RUSSELL A WOOSTER OH MICHALEK GEORGE WOOSTER OH MIDDLETON DIANE GLENMONT OH MIDWEST EXPLORATION VILLA PARK IL MIHALKO ANDREW WEST SALEM OH MILANKO DENNIS M WEST SALEM OH MILLER ABRAHAM WOOSTER OH MILLER ANDREW J MILLERSBURG OH MILLER BENJAMIN H COSHOCTON OH MILLER DIANE R MILLERSBURG OH MILLER DON P DOVER OH MILLER ELIZABETH A ROARING SPRING PA MILLER GREGG R DALTON OH MILLER JAMES H AKRON OH MILLER JEFFREY L MINERVA OH MILLER JOHN H DUNDEE OH MILLER K R DAVIE FL

20J OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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Unclaimed capital credits MILLER KATHRYN E DUNDEE OH MILLER LAURA L MILLERSBURG OH MILLER MARVIN M BERLIN OH MILLER MICHAEL D BRINKHAVEN OH MILLER MICHAEL T LOUDONVILLE OH MILLER ORIN F MILLERSBURG OH MILLER ROBERT WALNUT CREEK OH MILLER ROBERT E MILLERSBURG OH MILLER RONALD B WEST SALEM OH MILLER ROY H BIG PRAIRIE OH MILLER RUTH C COSHOCTON OH MILLER SAMUEL E WOOSTER OH MILLER STEVE R WOOSTER OH MILLER WILLIAM R KILLBUCK OH MISSLER CLINTON E WOOSTER OH MITCHELL KEITH A OCALA FL MOATS MEADE E WOOSTER OH MOHICAN RIVER INN AKRON OH MOHLER CHARLES W MILLERSBURG OH MOHLER CHARLES W MILLERSBURG OH MONROE JOHN B GREENWOOD SC MOONEY JOHN D LODI OH MOONEY ROBERT M HOMERVILLE OH MOORE JESSE H WOOSTER OH MOORE MICHAEL LSR BURBANK OH MORELAND LOLA KILLBUCK OH MORGAN CATHY D WOOSTER OH MORGAN JACK B LAKEVILLE OH MORGAN ROBERT D LODI OH MORRIS ANDREW E HILLIARD OH MORRIS DAVID W WOOSTER OH MORRIS ESKER J SHREVE OH

PAVELSCHAK STEPHEN M WOOSTER OH

NEER BRECK A WEST SALEM OH

PENNINGTON DEBRA L WOOSTER OH

PEEK JERRY D MIDLAND TX

NELSON MAE WEST SALEM OH

PENNINGTON JESSE WOOSTER OH

NELSON REX E WOOSTER OH

PENTECOST TOM SUGARCREEK OH

N-ER-G INC MILLERSBURG OH

PEPPLER DAVID N WOOSTER OH

NICEWANDER RUBY DUNDEE OH

PEPPLER WARREN W FREDERICKSBURG OH

NICHOLS ROGER WEST SALEM OH

PERRY CLIFFORD A SIERRA VISTA AZ

NICHOLS SHIRLEY A GAINESVILLE FL NICKLES RANDY L LOUDONVILLE OH NIEBEL DANIEL R LOUDONVILLE OH NIEMOCIENSKI EDWIN A HUDSON OH NOFTZGER LARRY G WEST SALEM OH NORMA CALLAHAN EXECUTRIX COLUMBIANA OH

MORRIS JACK D WEST SALEM OH MORRIS MICHAEL S MOUNT VERNON OH MORRISON LORI L STERLING OH MOSIER DARYL SHREVE OH MOSIER MARY E MILLERSBURG OH MOSS MARGARET M DOVER OH MOUSER CHARLES A WEST SALEM OH MOWERY PATRICIA A WEST LAFAYETTE OH MULDREW WILLIAM WOOSTER OH MULLIGAN DANIEL J LODI OH MULTI PRODUCTS KILLBUCK OH MUNYAN DAVID J LITCHFIELD OH MUTCHLER KURT T ORRVILLE OH MYERS EMMA J WOOSTER OH MYERS GLENN C WOOSTER OH MYERS GLORIA B CLERMONT FL MYERS JAMES E WOOSTER OH MYERS JOHN E WOOSTER OH MYERS LOWELL A WOOSTER OH NAGEL CARL J BURBANK OH

NORMAN DONALD L GRANTSVILLE WV NORMAN JEANETT WEST SALEM OH NORMAN PETER J MILLERSBURG OH NORRIS EDWARD E WALHONDING OH NORTH STEVE R MC DERMOTT OH NORTHWESTERN ALL-SPORTS WEST SALEM OH NORTON CLAYTON H WEST SALEM OH NOVAK KALMAN CLEVELAND OH

PERTEE RENEE M MEDINA OH PETERSON WARREN L MILES CITY MT PETRY RUTH J WOOSTER OH PEVEC JOHN C WOOSTER OH PFISTER DAN DUNDEE OH PFOUTS VERDA C WOOSTER OH PHILLIPS ELLEN D WEST SALEM OH PHILLIPS RICHARD G STRONGSVILLE OH PHILPOTT DIANE M WOOSTER OH PIATT FRANK S MASSILLON OH PIATT MARY E WEST SALEM OH PIOTROWSKI KENNETH M HENDERSON NV

NUMBERS RONALD BEACH CITY OH

PITCHER DAVID L HOUSTON TX

OBRECHT JAMES H SHREVE OH

PITKIEWICZ ELIZABETH A DANVILLE OH

OBRIEN MICHAEL BURBANK OH OCONNOR DANIEL P WEST SALEM OH OGDEN RONALD W JEROMESVILLE OH OGG GARRETT J ORRVILLE OH OHIO PURE OIL CORP RICHARDSON TX OILER CHARLES T BIG PRAIRIE OH

PLISKE MARGARET E WOOSTER OH PLUMLEY DARIUS R WOOSTER OH POLIN DEBI L MILLERSBURG OH POMPEY STEVEN D APPLE CREEK OH PORTER DOUGLAS E WOOSTER OH PORTER GLENNA BARTON CITY MI PORTER NORMAN CRESTON OH

OLINGER CHRISTI L FRESNO OH OLSAFSKY ROBERT C GLENMONT OH OROURKE BONNIE N SHREVE OH

POTURICA ROBERT PJR WEST SALEM OH POWELL CHARLES E MILLERSBURG OH POWER GAS MARKETING & TRA DOVER OH

ORR GALEN C WEST SALEM OH OVERMAN JAMES R MILLERSBURG OH PACHMAYER CARL E WOOSTER OH

PRESOCK JAMES L WEST SALEM OH PRIGGE CINDY L WOOSTER OH PRINGLE JAMES W WOOSTER OH

PADO GLADYS LODI OH

PRODUCERS LIVESTOCK BALTIC OH

PAIGE ADIE MILLERSBURG OH

PROPER ARTHUR E BIG PRAIRIE OH

PARAGON GEOPHYSICAL MOUNT GILEAD OH

PRZYBYLA ALAN J MEDINA OH PUCKETT THELMA LAKEVILLE OH

PARKINSON DAVID L SHREVE OH PARKS AVIATION SERVICES AKRON OH PAROBEK JOHN BRECKSVILLE OH

PURDY DANIEL H WEST SALEM OH QUAKER STATE REFINING BELPRE OH QUAKER STATE REFINING BELPRE OH

PARSONS JAMES S KILLBUCK OH PARSONS RONALD E COSHOCTON OH PATRICK PETER WOOSTER OH PATTERSON HARLAN M BURBANK OH PATTERSON NELLIE F CANTON OH PATTERSON SCOTT A BEACH CITY OH PATTERSON WILLIAM CSR ORRVILLE OH PAULLIN EVELYN B LOUDONVILLE OH

PERRY WENDY L WOOSTER OH

PHILLIPS DAVID R MARSHALLVILLE OH

NORRIS DAVID W CRESTON OH

PAULEY RICKIE E MEDINA OH

NAGEL FORREST MEDINA OH

PERRY PEARL E WEST SALEM OH

PETTRY HOWARD CLEVELAND OH

OLDERMAN RUSSELL JJR BATH ME

MORRIS J G WESTERVILLE OH

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NATLAND ENERGY CORP NEW PHILADELPHIA OH

QUALITY COLLISION WEST SALEM OH RABER BEN A MILLERSBURG OH RALPH A. NOLLETTI ORRVILLE OH RAMSEY KRIS E WEST SALEM OH RAMSIER EDWARD G WOOSTER OH RAMSIER REXANNE WEST SALEM OH RAMSIER VICKIE L WEST SALEM OH RANDLES MONA WOOSTER OH

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Unclaimed capital credits RANDOLPH CATHY A SHREVE OH

ROWE BILL JJR KILLBUCK OH

SHAW SUSAN J LODI OH

RANG CLETUS ASHTABULA OH

ROY KLAUS G CLEVELAND HEIGHTS OH

SHEARER JEFFREY D WOOSTER OH

RAPP LEAH D POLK OH

RUCKER ANNABELL E WEST SALEM OH

SHEARER JOEY T LAKEVILLE OH

RASTORFER EDDIE E CRESTON OH

RUCKER KAREN L LODI OH

SHEARS LINDA B KILLBUCK OH

RAY MARVIN W AMHERST OH

RUESCHMAN LARRY L NORTH CANTON OH

SHEELY CURTIS A WOOSTER OH

REED BRIAN J WOOSTER OH

RUFENER DEE K ORRVILLE OH

SHELTON DAN L WEST SALEM OH

REESE ALTA L CANTON OH

RUSSELL CONNIE WOOSTER OH

SHEPHERD TERRY CRESTON OH

REESE JAMES R MILLERSBURG OH

RUSSELL HELEN KILLBUCK OH

SHEPPARD MARK SHREVE OH

REESE JEFFREY A BRINKHAVEN OH

RUTT CRAIG S WOOSTER OH

SHERMAN DRILLING INC MINERAL CITY OH

REGIONAL CABLE TV (USA) GREENWOOD IN

RYAN DAVID A WOOSTER OH

SHETLER BEN H LAKEVILLE OH

REINHARDT JAN LADY LAKE FL

SACHARA DARREN J SEVIERVILLE TN

SHILLING ROBERT R SHELBY OH

RENFREW NETTIE WOOSTER OH

SALISBURY AUTIE RAVENNA OH

SHOUP RALPH M NORTH CANTON OH

REPP DOROTHY C ASHLAND OH

SANTANGELO DAVID J APPLE CREEK OH

SHROCK ELMER BALTIC OH

RESERVE FORD WEST SALEM OH

SCARBERRY PATRICIA A GLENMONT OH

SIEDSCHLAG KARL GJR KENT OH

RESERVE FORD WEST SALEM OH

SCHAEFFER TIM E JEROMESVILLE OH

SIGLER BETTY WOOSTER OH

REUTTER ROBERT W WOOSTER OH

SCHAFFER WALTER J LOUDONVILLE OH

SIGLER DAVID P WOOSTER OH

REYNOLDS DUANE O SMITHVILLE OH

SCHAR CHARLES W WOOSTER OH

SIGLER DENNIS R RITTMAN OH

REYNOLDS EUGENE WEST SALEM OH

SCHAR LOLA M WOOSTER OH

SIGLER MICHAEL D ROCHESTER HILLS MI

REYNOLDS ROBERT K HOLMESVILLE OH

SCHAR MICHAEL T STERLING OH

SIGLER RUSSELL R LODI OH

RHEES JOHNNIE MILLERSBURG OH

SCHEEF GARY E LUMBERTON NC

SILLS BRIAN G WOOSTER OH

RHEIM WALLACE LAKEVILLE OH

SCHEERENS JOSEPH C WOOSTER OH

SILVERMAN WILLIAM PERALTA NM

RIBLET PRODUCTS INC MIDDLEBURY IN

SCHERER ADA M MILLERSBURG OH

SIMMS RODNEY D WEST SALEM OH

RICE FRANKLIN D LODI OH

SCHEUTZOW MARK H RITTMAN OH

SIMPSON HELEN M MILLERSBURG OH

RICE JERRY L MILLERSBURG OH

SCHLABACH BERT E DUNDEE OH

SINES THOMAS D WOOSTER OH

RICHARDS TIMOTHY W SHREVE OH

SCHLABACH DELBERT A MILLERSBURG OH

SINGER JOYCE E WOOSTER OH

RICHARDSON O W COLUMBUS OH

SCHLABACH LAVERN D SUGARCREEK OH

SINGLETON JOHN C WADSWORTH OH

RICHESON FLORENCE WOOSTER OH

SCHLABACH MALINDA S NORTH ROYALTON OH

SINNETT SHELLY DANVILLE OH

SCHLEGEL PATRICIA A MILLERSBURG OH

SKELLY DISPOSAL INC KILLBUCK OH

RICHESON MILDRED MILLERSBURG OH RICHMOND MFG CO ASHLAND OH RICKER CLAY W COPLEY OH RIFFLE THOMAS L AKRON OH RIG DRILLING MARIETTA OH RITSOS & RITSOS CHICAGO IL RITTENHOUSE MEMORIAL NAVARRE OH ROBERTS DONNA K MILLERSBURG OH

SCHMID ALEXANDER BEACH CITY OH SCHNEIDER ROBERT E WEST SALEM OH SCHODORF GARY E HOLMESVILLE OH SCHRACK TIMOTHY A LAKEVILLE OH SCHREINER & WEINSZ CANTON OH SCHROCK LEROY DALTON OH

ROBERTS JOHN G WOOSTER OH

SCHROLL NICHOLAS M MEDINA OH

ROCKWELL RESOURCES INC NEW MATAMORAS OH

SCHULER BRIAN K BEACH CITY OH SCHULER EUGENE EJR CHIPPEWA LAKE OH

RODEHEAVER HARRY B FREDERICKSBURG VA

SCHULTZ DAWN A WEST SALEM OH

ROESSNER DAVID DUBLIN OH

SCHWARTZWALDEJOYCE K WOOSTER OH

ROGERS BESSIE A WEST SALEM OH ROGERS CHARLES F RITTMAN OH ROHRER ROBERT J MILLERSBURG OH ROHSKOPF ANDY KILLBUCK OH ROHSKOPF JAMES WOOSTER OH ROLAND RICHARD A WOOSTER OH ROOT JEAN B HUNTINGTON IN ROQUE ALFREDO M WOOSTER OH ROSE APRIL WOOSTER OH ROSS CINDY L POLK OH ROSS WAYNE D BURBANK OH ROTTMANN MARY A WOOSTER OH ROUSH PATRICIA PAINESVILLE OH ROWE BARBARA J WOOSTER OH

SCHULTZ ROBERT F DELAWARE OH SCOTT PAUL H WOOSTER OH SEAGRAVES CURTIS WOOSTER OH SEIBER BARBARA MEDINA OH SEITZ KENNETH R SILVER LAKE IN SELF J E LAKEVILLE OH SELL JOHN ASHLAND OH SELLERS GREGORY S WOOSTER OH SELLERS ROBERT MASSILLON OH SENZ JOSEPH WEST SALEM OH SETTLES PERRY L WOOSTER OH SHAFER RICHARD E WARSAW OH SHAFFER BARBARA L MEDINA OH SHAFFER DANIEL W MILLERSBURG OH SHARP DAYTON R MACKSBURG OH

SINSEL CARL J NEW PHILADELPHIA OH SLABAUGH JERRY A SEARS MI SLOOP BARBARA LODI OH SMAIL A N KILLBUCK OH SMAIL JAMES C MOUNT VERNON MO SMAIL SCOTT T MILLERSBURG OH SMETZER RAY A MILLERSBURG OH SMITH CARL R MARSHALLVILLE OH SMITH DANIEL L WOOSTER OH SMITH DAVID E WOOSTER OH SMITH DAVID P WEST SALEM OH SMITH DENNIS D NASHVILLE OH SMITH ELSIE V WOOSTER OH SMITH FRANCES V NASHVILLE OH SMITH GEORGE R CRESTON OH SMITH LOIS L WOOSTER OH SMITH MARK FREDERICKSBURG OH SMITH PAT FORT MYERS BEACH FL SMITH RICHARD E BIG PRAIRIE OH SMITH RONALD J WOOSTER OH SMITH ROWENA V BIG PRAIRIE OH SMITH STEVEN E WOOSTER OH SMITH W O MILLERSBURG OH SMUCKER LARRY L KEY LARGO FL SNADER MARY M ORRVILLE OH SNELL JAMES AJR HOLMESVILLE OH

20L OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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Unclaimed capital credits SNYDER ALFRED D DUNDEE OH

TARTIR KHALED BIG PRAIRIE OH

VALENTINE JAMES WOOSTER OH

SNYDER BROTHERS WOOSTER OH

TATE FAYE I MEDINA OH

VAN DYKE ALAN C APEX NC

SNYDER DALE A BIG PRAIRIE OH

TAYLOR HOWARD STRONGSVILLE OH

VAN WAGENEN JARED CLEVELAND OH

SNYDER JACK LOUDONVILLE OH

TAYLOR PAUL L DOYLESTOWN OH

VANESS RONALD R WEST SALEM OH

SNYDER JOAN BIG PRAIRIE OH

TAYLOR SANDY K BURBANK OH

VANN KEVIN E WOOSTER OH

SOFFOS JAMES R WOOSTER OH

TEAGUE KATHLEEN A WOOSTER OH

VANSICKLE CAMERON T MILLERSBURG OH

SOMERLADE DAWN M WEST SALEM OH

TENGE CHARLES J HILLSBORO KY

VANTREASE MARK W VANCOUVER WA

SOMMERS CARL LODI OH

TETER DEBRA S ORRVILLE OH

VARISCO ANDREW A GLENMONT OH

SOMMERS ELIZABETH H GLENMONT OH

THE SCURRY GROUP INC MEMPHIS TN

VARNER CLARENCE E COLUMBUS OH

SOUTH PALM ENERGY INC MC CONNELSVILLE OH

THEISS PAULA K WOOSTER OH

VAUGHAN MICHAEL A APPLE CREEK OH

SPACH JAMES F GRAFTON OH

THERIAULT VERN R KILLBUCK OH

VAUGHN TAMMY L WEST SALEM OH

THOMAS DONALD E KILLBUCK OH

VEHAR VICTOR EUCLID OH

THOMAS DOROTHY KENT OH

VENIS MARK A MILLERSBURG OH

THOMAS JERRY W WOOSTER OH

VONALLMAN ERIC C KILLBUCK OH

THOMAS JOHN A AURORA CO

WACHTEL ROBIN K BIG PRAIRIE OH

THOMAS ROBERT J KENT OH

WALLACE THOMAS EJR LOUISVILLE OH

THOMPSON ALLEN D BURBANK OH

WALTERS BETTY L WEST SALEM OH

THOMPSON FLOYD E COUNTRYSIDE IL

WARD THOMAS L RITTMAN OH

THOMPSON WILLIAM AKRON OH

WARD THOMAS W SOUTHAMPTON NY

THREE M DRILLING MOUNT HOPE OH

WARREN FRANKLIN T WOOSTER OH

TILDEN JOHN D CAPE CORAL FL

WATSON MARK F FLORENCE SC

TIPTON GRETCHEN L MILLERSBURG OH

WATSON RODNEY L WEST SALEM OH

TISHER KATHLEEN WOOSTER OH

WEAVER DUANE E MILLERSBURG OH

TITAN ENERGY GROUP INC ZANESVILLE OH

WEAVER IVAN E FREDERICKSBURG OH

TOMLIN TIMOTHY J MADISON IN

WEAVER LEROY H BIG PRAIRIE OH

TOMPKINS LARRY JEROMESVILLE OH

WEAVER MARION R MILLERSBURG OH

TOPE ANNA MILLERSBURG OH

WEAVER MONROE J BELLVILLE OH

TOPS CANTON OH

WEAVER MONROE MJR HOLMESVILLE OH

TOWNER SHERRI L GLENMONT OH

WEAVER SARA J DUNDEE OH

TRACY SAMUEL WEST SALEM OH

WEAVER SARAH HOLMESVILLE OH

TRAIL FEED SERVICE DUNDEE OH

WEBB BOBBIE L BROOK PARK OH

TRENCHING & DITCHING WOOSTER OH

WEBB DORSEY NJR SMITHVILLE OH

TRON GENE G LOUDONVILLE OH

WEIDMAN CRAIG C AURORA OH

TROYER ANDREW A DUNDEE OH

WEISER WILLIAM O BURBANK OH

TROYER DARRYL L CANTON OH

WELLMAN STEVE R APPLE CREEK OH

TROYER DAVID A UTICA OH

WELLS SAMUEL J CLEVELAND OH

TROYER DAVID D HARRISONBURG VA

WENGERD JOHN H MILLERSBURG OH

TROYER JAMES M HOLMESVILLE OH

WENGERD PAUL J MILLERSBURG OH

TROYER JODY S SHREVE OH

WENGERD RIAN C MILLERSBURG OH

TROYER JONI E HOWARD OH

WERSTLER DEAN OLMSTED FALLS OH

TROYER NOAH A MILLERSBURG OH

WESTFALL JANE SHREVE OH

TROYER NORMAN J DUNDEE OH

WEYGANDT HAROLD J WOOSTER OH

TROYER ROY N WINESBURG OH

WHARFF BUTCH T NEWCOMERS–TOWN OH

TUCKER DONALD E WOOSTER OH

WHEELER ARLENE E NEWCOMERSTOWN OH

TUCKER KELLY WADSWORTH OH

WHEELER DONNIE E ORRVILLE OH

TUCKER LEONARD O SPENCER OH

WHITE IRENE F NEW FRANKLIN OH

TWILIGHT MINING CO BERLIN OH

WHITEHEAD JOHN D WEST SALEM OH

U S SILICA CO OTTAWA IL

WHITLOCK MAXWELL M VANDALIA OH

UMFLEET WILLIAM T ORRVILLE OH

WHITMAN RONNIE MILLERSBURG OH

UMSTEAD CLIFFORD SHREVE OH

WHYTSELL RICHARD MEDINA OH

UNDERWOOD THOMAS M WEST SALEM OH

WICKENS JOHN B WOOSTER OH

UNITED TELEPHONE CO MANSFIELD OH

WILLDRICK LARRY D HAMER SC

SPARKS BEN DUNDEE OH SPATZ JOAN M WARSAW OH SPICER LEONARD C SALEM OH SPIRES DONALD K HOLMESVILLE OH SPIRES JAMES M WOOSTER OH SPRINGSTEEN ALICE M WADSWORTH OH SQUIRES EDWARD C GLENMONT OH ST CLAIR RICHARD A WEST SALEM OH STAIDUHAR ANN L KILLBUCK OH STALEY STEVEN WOOSTER OH STANKIEWICZ JOHN S KILLBUCK OH STANLEY JERRY L MC KENZIE TN STANLEY SCOTT HOWARD OH STARCHER DEBBIE WEST SALEM OH STEELE TIMOTHY L WOOSTER OH STEINER RANDALL G APPLE CREEK OH STEINER STEVE DALTON OH STEMEN JEROME D MILLERSBURG OH STETSON INVESTMENT PROP CLEVELAND OH STEVENS VICTORI L WEST SALEM OH STEWART FLORENCE E SARASOTA FL STILKE LARRY E PULASKI VA STILTNER KATHLEEN D HARRISVILLE WV STOLL MARGARET A WOOSTER OH STONE THOMAS R GREENVILLE OH STOVER DONALD WEST SALEM OH STRAIT GLADYS E PAINTED POST NY STRAIT PHYLLIS A BURBANK OH STRYFFELER MYRON W WOOSTER OH STUART JAMES F GULF BREEZE FL STURZNICKEL JAMES F NORTH CANTON OH STUTZ STEVEN A WEST SALEM OH SUNDHEIMER JUNE WALNUT CREEK OH SUSTERSIC JACK WOOSTER OH SWARTZENTRUBE NELLIE I WOOSTER OH SWEDGE DEVELOPMENT COMP WOOSTER OH SWERLINE MIKE WOOSTER OH SWITZER DONIVAN II LOUDONVILLE OH SZANISZLO GARY SPENCER OH TABER EDWARD N LOUISVILLE KY TAMBURIN CINDIE L WEST SALEM OH

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UNITED VIDEO CABLE CINCINNATI OH UPP EVELYN M CRESTON OH

WILES DONALD L WOOSTER OH WILLIAMS ALVOIDE J MILLERSBURG OH

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Unclaimed capital credits WILLIAMS BEULAH M SHREVE OH

WNT OPERATING INC DOVER OH

YEATER BRINTON J HUDSON OH

WILLIAMS BILLY J BURBANK OH

WOHLFORD W J WOOSTER OH

YODER CARL H MILLERSBURG OH

WILLIAMS DALE R WEST SALEM OH

WOLF CHESTER W MANSFIELD OH

YODER DAVID N MILLERSBURG OH

WILLIAMS JAMES P WEST SALEM OH

WOLF MICHAEL J JEROMESVILLE OH

YODER EDWARD R MILLERSBURG OH

WILLIAMS ROY L LAKEVILLE OH

WOLF TAMMY L WOOSTER OH

YODER ERVIN E FREDERICKSBURG OH

WILLIAMS SUSAN L WOOSTER OH

WOOD VICKIE L UNIONTOWN OH

YODER HAROLD J PORTAGE WI

WILLIAMS TIMOTHY O WOOSTER OH

WOODS DEBRA FAYETTEVILLE NC

YODER HENRY A MESA AZ

WILLIAMSON KATHLEEN A ZEPHYRHILLS FL

WORKMAN ADA WOOSTER OH

YODER SAM J FREDERICKSBURG OH

WILSON CHARLES WOOSTER OH

WRIGHT ARTHUR WEST SALEM OH

YODER STEVEN J DUNDEE OH

WILSON CHARLES WIII AKRON OH

WRIGHT ELOISE DUNDEE OH

YOST BERNARD SHERRODSVILLE OH

WILSON DONALD J CLEVELAND OH

WRIGHT STEVEN L WOOSTER OH

YOST BRIAN L HORN LAKE MS

WILSON GARLAND SR FORT MC COY FL

WRIGHT SUSAN WEST SALEM OH

YOUNG JENNIFER E MILLERSBURG OH

WILSON JAMES T ORRVILLE OH

WRIGHT THOMAS A DUNDEE OH

WILSON VERNON R MILLERSBURG OH

YACAPRARA VIC J WEST SALEM OH

YOUNGBLOOD RICHARD A WADSWORTH OH

WILSON WILLIAM A WEST LAFAYETTE OH

YACAPRARO CARL AJR WOOSTER OH

YOUNKER SALLY S WEST SALEM OH

WINDNAGEL MARK F YOUNGSTOWN OH

YANKEE EXPLORATION INC WEST FARMINGTON OH

ZERRER JEFFREY P WOOSTER OH ZICKEFOOSE JUDY A KILLBUCK OH

YANTIS GRACE A FINDLAY OH

ZIMMERMAN THERESA WARSAW OH

YARNELL WESLEY L ST PETERSBURG FL

ZUBROD PAUL A ASHLAND OH

WINKLER LORETTA J WOOSTER OH WINSTANLEY MABEL ROCKY RIVER OH WISSEL SUE A WEST SALEM OH WISSEL WILLIAM FSR WEST SALEM OH WITT ALISON C ELYRIA OH WITT INDUSTRIES CINCINNATI OH

YEAGLEY RETTA J WEST SALEM OH YEAGLEY SANDRA L SMITHVILLE OH YEAKEL J D CANTON OH

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month Fall/winter tip: When you are asleep or out of the house, turn your thermostat back 10 to 15 degrees for eight hours and save around 10 percent a year on your heating bills. A programmable thermostat can make it easy to set back your temperature — set it and forget it! Source: U.S. Dept. of Energy

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Randy Sprang Chairman

Dave Mann Vice Chairman

CONTACT

866-674-1055 (toll-free) www.hwecoop.com

OFFICE

6060 St. Rte. 83 P.O. Box 112 Millersburg, OH 44654-0112

Barry Jolliff

Secretary/Treasurer

Jonathan Berger Kenneth Conrad Bill Grassbaugh Jackie McKee Ronnie Schlegel David Tegtmeier

OHIO OHIO COOPERATIVE COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER LIVING • OCTOBER 2017 2017

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CALL US 24/7 Report outages, submit meter readings, and make payments

Trustees

Glenn W. Miller 20J 22

SMARTHUB Report an outage, submit a meter reading, and pay your bill all through our mobile SmartHub application. Available for both Android and Apple devices.

President/CEO

Facebook.com /holmeswayneelectriccoop

9/18/17 1:58 PM


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO

PPEC sponsors rodeo to fight cancer Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative (PPEC) was a proud sponsor of Rodeo Night, a fundraiser at the Paulding County Fair in June that raised more than $5,000 for Conquer Childhood Cancer Now (CCCN), a nonprofit awareness group made up of volunteers working to give hope and assistance to local families of children diagnosed with cancer. A total of 29 bull riders and 24 barrel racers from across the U.S. came to support CCCN. The rodeo will be back in 2018 with an even bigger crowd — and a bigger fundraising goal.

Coshocton-based Frontier Power Company took part in the Coshocton Public Library’s annual summer reading program through the Frontier Power Community Connection Fund. This year’s program was themed “Build a Better World,” and Frontier Power provided a digger truck display and passed out hard hats to the 228 children in attendance.

HWEC hosts Amish Health and Safety Day Over 1,450 guests attended the 18th annual Amish Health and Safety Day in August, sponsored by both the Holmes County Health District and Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative (HWEC), located in Millersburg. The event, held in Millersburg, focused on lifestyle topics for the local Amish community. More than 45 exhibits provided interactive displays, including a bicycle skills course, a live line electrical safety demonstration by HWEC, programs on safe reflective markings and emergency vehicles, and health screenings.

North Central Electric’s Touch-A-Truck hits big with kids North Central Electric Cooperative, based in Attica, participated in Mohawk Community Library’s Touch-ATruck event in June, which also coincided with “No One Fights Alone,” a nonprofit organization’s fundraiser for local community members battling cancer.

CO-OP OHIO

Frontier Power engages local children during reading program

During the event, children had an up-close and inside view of many large trucks, tractors, and a North Central Electric bucket truck. OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

October_OCL_full issue.indd 23

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9/28/17 10:38 AM


BY PAUL BATTERSON

BEYOND BUCKEYES THE

Along with the obvious one, Ohio has a bumper crop of nutty college mascots

A

esculus is hardly a word that would strike fear into anyone’s heart. Yet Ohioans take pride in their Buckeyes — the traditional nickname for the sports teams at The Ohio State University that was formally adopted in 1950, but informally used before even the turn of the 20th century. The nickname was derived from the innocuous-looking native tree nuts that can be poisonous to Gophers, Badgers, Wolverines, and many other more fierce-sounding mascots across the country. As unusual a mascot as it might be, however, Brutus Buckeye has lots of out-ofthe-ordinary company, even within the state of Ohio. With football season in high gear, here are our choices for the most unusual mascots around the Buckeye State — Brutus not included.

5. The Big Blue Blob Xavier University’s teams have been known as the Musketeers since 1925, honoring the Cincinnati-based institution’s French origins and culture. Its primary mascot, D’Artagnan, projects a powerful presence when he roams the sidelines at basketball and soccer games (XU does not field a football team). But the university made a notparticularly-startling discovery in 1985: Characters from 18th-century novels by Alexandre Dumas don’t always appeal to children the way, say, big, hairy blobs of blue fur might. Hence, the creation of The Big Blue Blob. “Blobby,” as he/she/it is affectionately called, is wellknown for both his friendly demeanor and his 22-inch tongue, which he uses to gobble up tickets, crackers, or whatever props might be handy — including, during an iconic “This Is SportsCenter” commercial on ESPN, the Hall of Fame jacket of former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly, after Blobby defeated him in a game of “Rock, Paper, Scissors.”

24

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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4 and 3. Fightin’ Quakers and Battling Bishops Wilmington chose its “Fightin’ Quakers” nickname and mascot to pay homage to the school’s roots, having been founded in 1870 by members of the Religious Society of Friends, known as Quakers. Of course, Quakers hold pacifism as one of the basic tenets of their belief system, so “Fightin’ Quakers” makes for quite the unlikely moniker. Ohio Wesleyan’s “Battling Bishops” is almost as much of a contradiction. The Delaware school has long been affiliated with the United Methodist Church, so the bishop part makes sense, though Methodist theologians are not normally known for their pugilism. Interestingly, the mascot underwent a facelift in 2010 to become less friendly looking.

2. Zippy the Zip There are not many modern-day college marketing departments that would even consider an overshoe as a mascot. That was the choice, however, in a 1927 contest to pick a mascot at the University of Akron. The winning entrant had suggested the “Zippers,” in reference to a popular rubber overshoe that was then manufactured in Akron by the B.F. Goodrich Company. The name was trimmed to the “Zips” in 1950. The idea of a large rubber overshoe prowling the sidelines, however, seemed neither inspiring to U of A teams nor intimidating to foes, so in came Zippy the Zip, a red kangaroo — one of the fastest mammals on the planet. Zippy captured the Capital One Mascot of the Year Challenge in 2007. Continued on Page 26

October_OCL_full issue.indd 25

OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

25

9/19/17 10:27 AM


13 10 ⁄8 103⁄4 10 ⁄16 7

10 ⁄2 1

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP

Continued from Page 25

MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION Date of Filing: Sept. 1, 2017. Ohio Cooperative Living (ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly at 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229, with headquarters and or business offices at 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229. Name and Address of Publisher: Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc., 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH43229. Managing editor: Jeff McCallister, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229. Owner of Publication: Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc., 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229. There are no bondholders, mortgagees, or security holders. Total number of copies printed (average for preceding 12 months): 300,634; Copies through dealers: none; Mail subscriptions: 299,563; Free distribution: 1,071; Total distribution: 301,978; Office use, etc.: 622; Returns from news agents: none; Total: 302,599; Percent paid or requested circulation: 99.20 percent. Actual number of copies printed (single issue nearest to filing date): 301,089; Sales through dealers: none; Mail subscriptions: 300,026; Total paid circulation: 300,026; Free distribution: 1,063; Total distribution: 302,404; Office use, etc.: 714; Returns from news agents: none; Total: 303,118; Percent paid r requested circulation: 98.98 percent.

1. Student Princes Heidelberg University in Tiffin took the rare path melding college athletics and musical theater to produce its nickname, the “Student Princes.” As legend goes, the school’s publicity agent was strolling around Tiffin one evening in 1926 when he came across a marquee promoting The Student Prince of Heidelberg, based on Sigmund Romberg’s operetta. Butcher liked the name so much that he began using it to promote the school’s football team. It spread to all of the university’s athletic teams, and eventually replaced the former nickname, the “Cardinals,” as the school’s official moniker. Siggy, the orange-plumed, armor-clad mascot with arched eyebrows and a selfsatisfied smirk, fought off an attempt to change mascots again in the 1990s, when officials pondered “The ’Bergs of Heidelberg,” as a nod to the school’s oft-used colloquial nickname, but popular demand kept Siggy on his throne. One other fact to note: Women’s teams at Heidelberg are called, interestingly, the Student Princes.

I certify that the statements made by me above are true and complete. JEFF McCALLISTER, managing editor Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications)

1. Publication Title

2. Publication Number

2 7 7 2

Ohio Cooperative Living 4. Issue Frequency

_

3. Filing Date

Sept. 1, 2017

0 4 9 X

5. Number of Issues Published Annually

Monthly 12

Monthly 12

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4 ®)

6. Annual Subscription Price

$5.40-$6.72 Contact Person

6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, Franklin Co., OH 43229-1101

6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, Franklin Co., OH 43229-1101

9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc.

6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, Franklin Co., OH 43229-1101

Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

Jeff McCallister, Managing Editor

6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, Franklin Co., OH 43229-1101

Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

Samantha Rhodes, Associate Editor

6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, Franklin Co., OH 43229-1101

10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name Complete Mailing Address

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc.

6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, Franklin Co., OH 43229-1101

11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or None Other Securities. If none, check box Full Name

Complete Mailing Address

13. Publication Title

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

Ohio Cooperative Living

September 2017

15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Each Issue During Issue Published 12.  Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes:

300,634

Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run) Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement)

301,089

299,563 300,026

PS Form 3526, July 2014Mailed [PageOutside-County 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)] PSN: 7530-01-000-9931 PRIVACY Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com. (1) distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

(2)

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

(3)

Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®

(4)

Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®)

none none

none

299,563

c.  Total Paid Distribution [Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)]

1,071

d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail) (4)

none

e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

none none

none

300,026 1,063 none

none

none

2415

2378

622

714

99.20

98.98

1,344

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

1315

301,978 302,404

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

302,599 303,118

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100)

* If you are claiming electronic copies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skip to line 17 on page 3.

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) 16. Electronic Copy Circulation

Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months

0

a. Paid Electronic Copies b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c Í 100) PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 2 of 4)

No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

0

299,563

300,026

99.20

98.98

301,978

c.  Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

302,404

I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

Publication not required.

October 2017 in the ________________________ issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Date

9/4/2017

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

October_OCL_full issue.indd 26 PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

Here are a few other interesting Ohio college mascots and nicknames:

Nila Moyers

Telephone (Include area code)

614-846-5757

8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer)

Best of the rest

Dayton Flyers: One of only a handful of colleges in the country with this nickname, UD pays homage to Dayton native sons Wilbur and Orville Wright, who created and flew the first powered airplane, and to nearby WrightPatterson Air Force Base. Kent State Golden Flashes: Winner of a 1926 contest to replace the former nickname, the “Silver Foxes.” There is apparently no significance to the name other than the fact that it won the contest. Youngstown State Penguins: The nickname came as the result of fans describing the players on the school’s basketball team before a January game in 1933, when the players stomped their feet and swung their arms to warm up. John Carroll Blue Streaks: The college’s original name was St. Ignatius, and its teams were referred to as the “Saints,” which was no longer appropriate after the name changed in 1923. A dying alumnus watching football practice described the team as a “Blue Streak” in 1925, and the name stuck (it remained singular until the mid-1930s).

101⁄2 103⁄4 1013⁄16 107⁄8 9/18/17 12:52 PM

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.


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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

29

9/18/17 12:52 PM 8/14/17 9:11 AM


OHIO HISTORY

BY CRAIG SPRINGER PHOTOS COURTESY OHIO HISTORY CONNECTION

MIDCENTURY MODERN Lustron made atomic homes for the nuclear family

T

he headlines in late 1950 looked grim for our boys on the front lines in the Korean War — and for the Ohio-based Lustron Corporation.

Literally, side by side, you could read newspaper columns across the country about Marines and soldiers facing the coldest winter imaginable as they sought to liberate South Korea from the Communist aggressors, and about the Lustron Corporation facing ruin as it was pushed out of the burgeoning post-World War II housing market. Both made national news. The Lustron story is one of innovation, entrepreneurship, and political chicanery. Let’s rewind another four years. World War II had just ended, and some 12 million U.S. veterans were coming home, only to face a housing shortage. Lustron Corporation tried to fill that need with modern homes that were prefabricated in Columbus, then sent to points both nearby and far away. Prefabricated, or “kit,” homes weren’t necessarily a new thing in the late 1940s. Sears and Roebuck had been selling mail-order bungalows for decades.

30

But Lustron stood apart. Conceived in the wellspring of the mind of industrialist Carl Sandlund, Lustron was to build a better home to house young, postwar families both efficiently and quickly. Sandlund had experience, as he had built prefabs in the commercial market for use as White Castle restaurants and Standard Oil gas stations. Anyone over 50 years of age may remember some of those buildings for the uncommon materials with which they were built: ceramic and steel. And so were Lustron homes. Sandlund envisioned his company producing, en masse, modular homes made of glass-coated steel panels. They would be on the small side for young, small families — starter homes, available in gray, blue, yellow, or tan, with white trim. Sandlund secured $37.5 million in funding through the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, a federal agency designed to kick-start industry where central planners thought it was needed most. Housing was one such market in need. Sandlund found the perfect spot to manufacture the kits: the

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Columbus-based Lustron Homes filled a need for housing when veterans began returning at the end of World War II. The company built more than 2,600 homes that were shipped across the country and around the hemisphere.

recently abandoned Curtiss-Wright Aviation factory near Port Columbus airport that had supplied the military with aircraft during World War II. Sandlund outfitted the vast space with steel presses and ceramic coating apparatus and as much automation as he could use to create an assembly line akin to how cars were made in Detroit. Much like how cars were sold then and today, the metal houses were put up for sale through local dealers. Sandlund built model homes in 100 cities east of the Rockies and offered dealers market exclusivity to their geographic area. At its apex in productivity, several hundred people worked at the Lustron plant in Columbus. More folks were

employed shipping the homes to their concrete pads in Suburbia, USA, in specially crafted semi trucks. An entire 900-square-foot all-metal house, in some 3,000 pre-wired and pre-plumbed parts, could be cobbled together in a matter of days, certainly less than three weeks. The first houses went up in 1947, many around Ohio, but many more in points beyond and some as far away as Alaska, New Mexico, Florida, and Venezuela. Despite the novelty and innovation, the endeavor was to be short-lived. Meddling by staffers in the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, and other factions who wanted a cut of the pie, proved deadly Continued on Page 32

Lustron homes were prefabricated in Columbus, complete with wiring and plumbing; then the 3,000 or so individual components were loaded aboard trucks and constructed on the new owner’s lot.

OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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Lustron executives pose outside the company’s factory near Port Columbus (left); promotional materials that showed the homes boasted both comfort and plenty of amenities of modern life. Continued from Page 31

for Sandlund’s glass-coated Lustron homes. The last houses came off the assembly line in late 1950. Instead of continuing to oversee the manufacture of homes, Sandlund and others were called before Congress in a series of hearings to determine how the government loan was spent. The hearings were the harbinger of the end. The Reconstruction Finance Corporation called in Lustron’s loans, and the plant shuttered. In the end, only 2,680 metal houses rolled off the assembly line and onto the delivery trucks.

But Lustron lives. The midcentury moderns persist in places such as Xenia, Findlay, Columbus, and Whitehall. The Ohio History Center, near the state fairgrounds in Columbus, has a Lustron on display, as a demonstration of American life in the 1950s. Another Lustron, a blue one, is on display at Whitehall Community Park, preserved by the Whitehall Historical Society. These glass-coated houses stand as monuments to another time — a precinct in Ohio history.

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OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

HAVE A FUNNY

WILDLIFE STORY

TO TELL?

A

s Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor, I hear some pretty humorous tales about wildlife in the Buckeye State. For instance, take a look at the photo above. At first glance it looks like a typical possum-atthe-birdfeeder shot. But Steve Seitz assures me there’s more to the story.

“This possum got stuck on my bird feeder while eating suet,” wrote Seitz, a member of North Central Electric Cooperative. “I wondered why it was there during daylight. I thought it was just overly hungry, because it wouldn’t leave. That’s when I saw the animal’s tail was pinched between the two metal bars on the feeder pole. “It was a challenge getting the possum free, as I had to pry the bars apart and at the same time pull its tail loose,” Seitz said. “Needless to say, the possum was not a happy camper, but I was able to release it unharmed —probably just in time for another night of raiding my bird feeders.” Seitz also has a second wildlife story to tell, this one from a few years ago, and it’s more unusual yet. “A wild turkey hen flew through our bedroom window early one spring — shattering the glass — and again, I was able to release the bird unharmed. While the hen was thrashing around in our bedroom, though, two eggs came out of her. One was fully formed with a shell, but the other was not. Anyway, after cleaning up the mess, I took the good egg and made a delicious wild-turkey-egg omelet. I’ll bet not many people can say they ate a wild turkey egg and didn’t get arrested!” Don’t worry, Steve; I won’t tell a soul. Your little secret is just between you and me. My wife, Jan, has an even more bizarre tale to tell of wildlife woes. Years ago, early in our now 44-year marriage, she went through a spell where she racked up roadkills like her car was an animal magnet. Over a two-year period, she hit the following: a deer, a dog, several cats, various raccoons, groundhogs, possums, a few birds, and even two turtles. The good news is that she hasn’t hit anything recently. She didn’t try to hit any of those critters and felt terrible when she did, nearly in tears each time 34

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2017

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But my wife’s ultimate roadkill achievement, if you can call it that — and I don’t know anyone else who has done this — was hitting a live fish! We were living along the shores of Lake Erie at the time, near Marblehead, and one day were driving across the Sandusky Bay Bridge, my wife at the wheel. We saw a gull fly over carrying something large in its mouth, and when the bird got directly in front of our car, it dropped its cargo. We didn’t recognize it as a fish until it hit the pavement and started flopping. As you may have already guessed, it was too late for my wife to swerve out of the way. That did it — when we arrived home I got a can of paint out of the garage. Anyone want to buy a “gently used” car with some small animal pictures painted on the door? If you have a funny or unusual wildliferelated story you’d like to share with Ohio Cooperative Living readers, e-mail it to me at whchipgross@gmail.com. I can’t promise we’ll mention them all, but I’ll choose some of the best for a future column.

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OCTOBER 2017 CALENDAR NORTHWEST

SEPT. 29–OCT. 31 — Lake Eerie Fearfest, Ghostly Manor Thrill Ctr., 3319 Milan Rd., Sandusky. $25. Experience five haunted houses! 419-626-4467 or www.lakeeeriefearfest.com. SEPT. 30–OCT. 1 — Fiber Arts Fest, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Demonstrations of spinning, weaving, knitting, crocheting, tatting, and dyeing, and hands-on activities. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org. OCT. 1 — Farm Toy Show, Van Wert Co. Fgds., 1055 S. Washington St. (U.S. 127), Van Wert, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $2. Contact Lowell Morningstar at 937-826-4201.

NORTHEAST

OCT. 7–8 — Harvest Happenings, Osborn MetroPark, 3910 Perkins Ave., Huron, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. Antique tractor and engine display, pony rides, farmers market, food trucks, and more. Fun for the whole family! 419-625-7783 or http:// eriemetroparks.org/program. OCT. 7–8, 14–15, 21–22, 28–29 — Mums and Pumpkin Festival, Lincoln Ridge Farms, 6588 Pollock Rd., Convoy. Fall fun at the farm for the entire family. $10, under 3 free. 419-749-4224. OCT. 14 — Apple Butter Fest Craft and Quilt Show, Van Buren High School, 217 S. Main St., Van Buren, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free admission and parking. Hosted by Van Buren Lions Club. Crafts and quilts, train rides, live music, free eye screening for children. Homemade apple butter and bean soup for sale. 419-299-3628 or e-mail vanburenapplebutter@yahoo.com.

OCT. 21–22 — Oak Ridge Festival, 15498 E. Twp. Rd. 104, Attica, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, Srs. $5, C. (8-12) $4, under 8 free. Antique farm equipment; living history displays featuring military vehicles and weaponry; handmade crafts; food and entertainment; and kids’ activities. 419-426-0611 or www. oakridgefestival.com.

OCT. 14 — Folklore and Funfest, Wood Co. Historical Ctr. and Museum, 13660 County Home Rd., Bowling Green, 6–9 p.m. Free. Horse-drawn wagon rides, kid-friendly activities in Boo-ville, apple cider press, plus tricks and treats for all ages. 419-352-0967 or www.woodcountyhistory.org.

OCT. 27 — Friday Night Folklore Trick, Treat & Tour, Wood Co. Historical Ctr. and Museum, 13660 County Home Rd., Bowling Green, 7–10 p.m. $15. 419-352-0967 or www. woodcountyhistory.org.

OCT. 14–15 — Oak Harbor Apple Festival, downtown Oak Harbor. $5. Contests, parade, kiddie tractor pull, car show on Sunday, 5K Apple Run, and other fun activities. Baking contest held on Friday, Oct. 13. 419-898-0479 or www.oakharborohio.net. OCT. 20–21 — Van Wert County Apple Festival, Van Wert Co. Fgds., 1055 S. Washington St. (Rte. 127), Van Wert, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. A festival featuring all things apple, including cider, displays. New and old trains to buy, sell, or trade. 440-7859907, e-mail showmanager@thegreatbereatrainshow.org, or www.thegreatbereatrainshow.org.

OCT. 13–14, 20–21, 27–28 — Halloween Fair, Carlisle Visitor Ctr., 12882 Diagonal Rd., LaGrange. $2, under 4 free. 440-4585121 or http://metroparks.cc/halloween.php.

THROUGH OCT. 31 — Corn Maze, Beriswill Farms, 2200 Station Rd., Valley City, Tues.–Fri. & Sun. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Thur. Oct. 5 and 19, open till 9 p.m. Test your sense of direction in this 5-acre maze. 330-350-2486 or http:// beriswillfarms.com. OCT. 1–31 — Spooky Ranch, Rockin’-R-Ranch, 19066 E. River Rd. (St. Rte. 252), Columbia Station. From $12. Five unique haunted attractions. 440-236-5454 or www.spookyranch.com. OCT. 5–8 — Founders Week: Historic Zoar Village, 198 Main St., Zoar. Free. Educational activities celebrating the legacy and history of the Separatist Society of Zoar, one of the most successful communal groups in American history. Speakers, German music, photo collection, and stage play. 800-262-6195 or www.historiczoarvillage.com. OCT. 7–8 — The Great Berea Train Show, Cuyahoga Co. Fgds., 164 Eastland Rd. (use Bagley Rd. entrance), Berea, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $8, under 16 free. Two-day pass $10. All-gauge model train show with over 300 tables and many operating

CENTRAL

OCT. 14 — Fort Laurens Archaeology Day, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $7, C. (under 13) $5. Celebrating Ohio Archaeology Month with presentations from professional and hobbyist archaeologists. Tool stations and mock archaeology dig. 330-874-2059 or www.fortlaurens.org. OCT. 14–15 — Olde Stark Antique Faire, Stark Co. Fgds., Exhibition Bldg., 305 Wertz Ave., Canton, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Early-bird admission Sat. 7 a.m., $7. A large indoor exhibition of quality antiques and collectibles from over 100 dealers and collectors. 330-7949100 or e-mail oldestark@neo.rr.com. OCT. 14–15 — Wayne County Farm Tour, various locations, Sat. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 1–6 p.m. Take a self-drive tour of area farms and agricultural businesses while enjoying the fall colors in northeast Ohio. 330-263-7456 or www.wccvb.com. OCT. 20–21 — Fort Laurens Trick-or-Treaty, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, 7:30–8:30 p.m. $10, C. (5–12) $5, under 5 free. Combo tickets with Ghost Tours of Zoar available. Lantern tour includes tales of American and British soldiers who may haunt the grounds. Tours depart every 15 minutes. Reservations required. 330-874-2059 or e-mail fortlaurens@gmail.com. OCT. 20–21 — Ghost Tours, Dennison Railroad Depot Museum, 400 Center St., Dennison. Tours leave at 8, 8:30, and 9 p.m. $10 non-members, $5 children and members. Reservations required. 740-922-6776 or http://dennisondepot.org.

THROUGH OCT. 31 — Fall Fun Days, Circle S Farms, 9015 London Groveport Rd., Grove City, 9 a.m.–7 p.m. daily. $8.50, under 2 free. Hayrides, barn with slides, bale cave, petting zoo, and corn and sunflower mazes. 614-878-7980 or www. circlesfarm.com/fallfundays.html. OCT. 2 — A Taste of the Harvest, OSU Marion, Guthery Community Room, Maynard Hall, 1465 Mt. Vernon Ave., Marion, 6:30–8:30 p.m. $40. Advance purchase only. Sample wines from around the world and enjoy specialty hors d’oeuvres. 740-725-6340 or www.osumarion.osu.edu/initiatives/ cultural-arts.html.

THROUGH OCT. — Rock Mill Weekends, Rock Mill Park, 1429 Rockmill Place NW, Lancaster, Sat. and Sun., 1–3 p.m. Free. Visit the 1824 grist mill, recently restored to working order, and see demos of grinding methods. Also visit Rock Mill Covered Bridge. www.historicalparks.org/rock-mill-park or www.facebook.com/FairfieldCountyParks.

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dumplings, fritters, and more. Also wagon rides, a flea market, crafts, and entertainment for all ages. www.visitvanwert.org/ family-adventures.php. OCT. 20, 21, 27, 28 — Haunting History Walking Tours and Mystery Dinner, Wauseon Depot and Fulton County Museum, 225 Depot St. and 229 Monroe St., Wauseon, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Tours: $10 non-members, $8 members. Dinner: $15. Tours every 15 minutes. Reservations required. www.fultoncountyhs.org.

OCT. 7–8 — Holmes Co. Antique Festival, downtown Millersburg. Markets and auctions, parades, arts and crafts, lumber jack show, and much more. http://holmescountyantiquefestival.org.

THROUGH OCT. 28 – Pumpkins and Ponies, Spring Mist Farms, 691 Pearl Rd., Brunswick Hills, every Fri. 6–8 p.m. and Sat. 4–8 p.m. $3, C. (1–12) $5. Pony and horse rides, hayrides, feed barrel train. Various animals available for viewing and feeding. 330-225-3565 or www.springmistfarms.com/pumpkins.htm.

COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

OCT. 3–29 — All American Quarter Horse Congress, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus. The largest singlebreed-horse show in the world. 740-943-2346 or www. quarterhorsecongress.com. OCT. 6–8 — Ohio Gourd Show, Delaware Co. Fgds., 236 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware, Fri. noon–5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5 per day, $7 for weekend, under 13 free. Performances and presentations will highlight the wiz-

OCT. 28–29 — Woodcarver’s Show and Sale, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org. OCT. 29 – Coin Show, 122 N. Main St., Mendon, 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Free admission, free appraisals (no obligation). For table reservations, contact Warren Kramer at wrkchevy@hotmail.com or 419-733-0055.

OCT. 20–21, 27–28 — Ghost Tours of Zoar, 198 Main St., Zoar, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $15, C. $10. Combo tickets with Fort Laurens Trick-or-Treaty available. Zoar Village lantern light tours begin every 15 minutes between 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. each night. Reservations required. 800-262-6195 or www. historiczoarvillage.com. OCT. 21 — Antique Toys and Diecast Show, Lakeland Community College, AFC Auxiliary Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. $6, C. (6–12) $2, under 6 free. New and antique toys, diecast models, plastic models, and dolls to buy, sell, or trade. 216-470-5780, e-mail cleveshows@att.net, or www.neocollectibletoys.com. OCT. 21–22 — Colonial Trade Faire, Schoenbrunn Village, 1984 E. High Ave., New Philadelphia, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Experience what life was like in Ohio’s first village in 1772. 330-339-3636 or www.schoenbrunnvillage.org. OCT. 21–22 — Country Crossroads Education of Yesterday Farm Show, 3685 Cass Irish Ridge Rd. (intersection of St. Rtes. 16 and 60), Dresden. Free. Working and static antique construction and mining equipment, farm machinery, trucks, cars, and more. 740-754-6248, e-mail educationofyesterday@gmail. com, or www.facebook.com/EducationofYesterday. OCT. 26 — “The Underground Railroad,” lecture by Craig Whitmore, Richland County Chapter, Ohio Genealogical Society Meeting, OGS Library, 611 St. Rte. 97 W., Bellville, 7 p.m. Free and open to the public. 419-566-4560, e-mail sunda1960@ yahoo.com, or www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohrichgs/. OCT. 27–28 — The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, Schoenbrunn Village, 1984 E. High Ave., New Philadelphia. Join Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman for an outdoor production of the classic tale. Reservations required. 740-922-6776 or www. schoenbrunnvillage.org. OCT. 28–29 — By My Lantern’s Light, Amherst Sandstone Village, 763 Milan Ave., Amherst. Step back in time for tales of spooky history. 440-988-7255 or www.amhersthistoricalsociety.org.

arding world of gourds, gourd art, and gourd music. Fri. and Sat. workshops. www.americangourdsociety.org/ohiochapter. OCT. 6–8 — Willy Wonka Jr., Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $12–$18. This captivating adaptation of Roald Dahl’s fantastical tale features enchanting and memorable songs, dancing Oompa Loompas, and a talented cast of local youth. 740-383-2101 or www. marionpalace.org. OCT. 6, 13, 20, 27 — Firelight Fridays, Geneva Hills, 1380 Blue Valley Rd. SE, Lancaster, 6–9 p.m. $3. Hayrides, night hikes, campfires and s’mores, field games, and more. 740746-8439 or www.genevahills.com. OCT. 8 — Annual Scout Pilgrimage, Harding Memorial, corner of Delaware Ave. (St. Rte. 423) and Vernon Heights Blvd.., Marion, parade at 3 p.m., ceremony at 3:30 p.m. Free. Over 500 Scouts gather each year to pay homage to the late President and First Lady for their support of Scouting. 740387-9630 or www.hardinghome.org.

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OCT. 12 — The Kite Runner, Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7:30 p.m. $16, Stds. $10. In a stunning solo performance, the bestselling novel and international classic is brought to life on stage. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org. OCT. 13–14 — Historic Ghost Tour, Frances Steube Community Ctr., 22 S. Trine St., Canal Winchester, 7 p.m. Last tour leaves at 7:30 p.m. $10, C. (6–18) $5, under 6 free. Hear people from our historic past tell tales like you’ve never heard before! 614-833-1846. OCT. 14 — Behind Closed Doors: Historical Marion Tour, four locations, Marion, 1–5 p.m. $8 in advance, $10 day of event. Go behind doors of sites normally closed to the public. 740387-4255 or www.marionhistory.com. OCT. 14 — Central Ohio Symphony Season Debut, Gray Chapel, 61 S. Sandusky St., Delaware, 7:30 p.m. 740-3621799 or www.centralohiosymphony.org. OCT. 14 — Grandma Gatewood’s Fall Colors Hike, Hocking Hills State Park, 19852 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan, 9 a.m. A

SOUTHEAST

strenuous hike that spans 6 miles. 740-385-6841 or www. thehockinghills.org/Events.htm. OCT. 14 — Lorena Sternwheeler Dinner Cruise, Zanesville, 5–7 p.m. $35. Includes prime rib dinner. Reservations required at least 48 hours in advance. Children’s menu also available. 800-743-2303 or www.facebook.com/LorenaSternwheeler. OCT. 18–19 — Marion County Historical Society’s “Lunch with the Presidents,” Moose Lodge Ballroom, 374 N. Main St., Marion, 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. 740-387-4255. Step back in time to meet and dine with different presidents from U.S. history. www.marionhistory.com. OCT. 18–21 — Circleville Pumpkin Show, downtown Circleville. Free admission. Ohio’s oldest and largest pumpkin celebration. Seven different parades. 740-474-7000 or www. pumpkinshow.com. OCT. 20–22 — Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival, Historic Roscoe Village, 600 N. Whitewoman St., Coshocton, Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Sample fresh apple butter cooked

OCT. 5–6, 12–13, 19–20, 26 — Weekday Fall Foliage Trains, Hocking Valley Scenic Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 West Canal St., Nelsonville, 1 p.m. $17, Srs. $15, C.(3–12) $12, under 3 free. Take a 2-hour train ride through the historic Hocking River Valley to view the beautiful colors of autumn. 740-249-1452 or www.hvsry.org. OCT. 6–8 — Paul Bunyan Show, Guernsey Co. Fgds., 335 Old National Rd., Old Washington, Fri./Sat. 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $8, Srs./C. (7–12) $4, under 7 free. Competitions, demos and clinics, wood crafts, and much more. 614-497-9580, 888-388-7337, or www.ohioforest.org.

THROUGH OCT. 28 — National Imperial Glass Museum Tours, 3200 Belmont. St., Bellaire, Thur.–Sat. 11 a.m.–3 p.m. $3. Learn about and view extensive displays of Imperial glassware. 740-671-3971. THROUGH OCT. 31— Dally Memorial Library Escape Room, 37252 Mound St., Sardis. $15 per person. A fun, exciting, mentally challenging fundraiser for the library. www.facebook.com/ Dally-Memorial-Library-Escape-Room-465587900487570/. OCT. 1 — Friendship VII Chorus Annual Show, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge, 3 p.m. 740-984-2190 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com.

SOUTHWEST

OCT. 7, 14, 21 — Petrified Forest, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge. This outdoor haunted trail is geared toward those 13 and over. All others must be accompanied by an adult. 740-435-3335 or http://deerassic.com.

over an open fire. Enjoy a delicious assortment of unique foods, music, and attractions, including living history tours, lantern tours (Fri./Sat. only), canal boat rides, and a children’s activity area. 740-622-7664 or www.roscoevillage.com. OCT. 21 — Marion County Historical Society’s “Dinner with the Presidents,” Harding High School, 1500 Harding Hwy. E., Marion, 5:30–8:30 p.m. $26 single, $47 couple. Step back in time to meet and dine with different presidents from U.S. history. 740-387-4255 or www.marionhistory.com. OCT. 28 — Applebutter Stir and Horseradish Day, Lawrence Orchards, 2634 Smeltzer Rd., Marion, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. Apple butter is cooked in a copper kettle over a wood fire, while the horseradish crop is ground fresh. 740-389-3019 or www.lawrenceorchards.com. OCT. 30 — Haunted Village, Olde Pickerington Village, St. Rte. 256 (Columbus St. at Center St.), Pickerington, 6–8 p.m. Free ghost tours, hayrides, trick-or-treating, haunted museum, and more. 614-833-2211 or www.pickeringtonvillage.com/events.html. rides, coffin races, costume contests, and plenty of food. www. chillicothehalloweenfestival.com. OCT. 20–22 — Muskingum Valley Trade Days, 6602 St. Rte. 78, Reinersville. Large flea market. 740-558-2740. OCT. 20 — 50th annual Fall Festival of Leaves, downtown Bainbridge (Ross Co.). Celebrate the beauty of the season and region with arts and crafts, entertainment, parades, contests, and much more. www.fallfestivalofleaves.com. OCT. 21— Pumpkin Fest, Dairy Barn Arts Ctr., 8000 Dairy Ln., Athens. A family-friendly fall celebration including free pumpkin carving, art activities, and games. 740-592-4981 or www.dairybarn.org. OCT. 22 — Farm Toy and Craft Show, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission. Food, craft, and toy vendors. 740-439-7009 or www. pritchardlaughlin.com.

OCT. 13–15 — Bob Evans Farm Festival, Bob Evans Farm and Homestead Museum, 10854 St. Rte. 588, Rio Grande, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, C. (6–18) $4, under 6 free. Featuring down-home OCT. 28 — Trail of Treats, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 2–3 entertainment, great food, homestead living displays, and more p.m. Geared toward those under 14. Free. Local businesses pass than 100 demonstrators and crafters. 740-245-5305 or www. out goodies on our kid-friendly trail. 740-435-3335 or http:// bobevans.com/aboutus/the-farm. deerassic.com. OCT. 13–15 — Chillicothe Halloween Festival, Yoctangee Park, OCT. 28 — Un-haunted Forest, Shawnee State Park, 4404 St. Chillicothe, Fri. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. Rte. 125, Portsmouth, 6–9 p.m. A guided, lantern-lit walk to 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Halloween- and paranormal-themed exhibits, learn more about creatures of the night on an easy half-mile loop merchandise, and guest speakers, plus local/regional bands, trail. 740-858-6652 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/Shawnee. and contests. Sat. car show and craft show. Pumpkin pie and bread baking contest on Wed. 937-448-0630 or www. bradfordpumpkinshow.org.

WEST VIRGINIA

OCT. 11, 18, 25 — Weekly Wednesday Bluegrass Night, Pit to Plate BBQ, 8021 Hamilton Ave., Mt. Healthy, 7–9 p.m. Hosted by Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Bring your instrument and join the band to pick a good bluegrass number. 513-931-9100. OCT. 13 — Mainstreet Piqua Chocolate Walk, downtown Piqua, 5:30–8 p.m. $15. Make your way to the over 20 downtown businesses participating in the walk. Some treats can be enjoyed on the spot and others will be placed in your bag to enjoy later. 937-773-9355 or www.mainstreetpiqua.com. THROUGH OCT. 29 — Fall Farm Days, Bonnybrook Farm, 3779 St. Rte. 132, Clarksville, every Sat. and Sun., noon–6 p.m. Free. Pumpkin picking, wagon rides, corn maze, petting zoo, games, and food. 937-289-2500 or http://bonnybrookfarms.com. THROUGH OCT. 29 — Ohio Renaissance Festival, Renaissance Park, Harveysburg, on St. Rte. 73 just off I-71 or I-75, every Sat. and Sun., 10:30 a.m.–6 p.m. $22.50, Srs. $20.50, C. (5–12) $9.50. Step back in time to this 30-acre re-created 16th-century English village and enjoy Renaissance-themed shows, unique arts and crafts shops, hearty food and drink, games of skill, and human-powered rides. 513-897-7000 or www.renfestival.com. OCT. 7 — Celebrate Fall at the Johnston Farm, 9845 N. Hardin Rd., Piqua. Tour the Johnston home, visit the Historic Indian and Canal Museum, and take a ride on the General Harrison of Piqua, a replica of a 19th-century canal boat. 800-752-2619 or www.johnstonfarmohio.com. OCT. 7, 14, 21, 28 — Lantern Light Wagon Rides and Corn Maze, Bonnybrook Farm, 3779 St. Rte. 132, Clarksville, 7:30–10:30 p.m. $8–$21, under 6 free. 937-289-2500 or http://bonnybrookfarms.com. OCT. 10–14 — Bradford Pumpkin Show, downtown Bradford. Free admission. Daily parades, concessions, rides,

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OCT. 13–15 — Operation Pumpkin, downtown Hamilton, Fri./Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission. The fun-filled weekend includes a giant pumpkin weigh-off, pumpkin sculpting, pet parade, live entertainment, fall brews, wine, delicious food, art vendors, and much more. 513-844-8080 or www.operation-pumpkin.org. OCT. 14 — Iam Homestead Pioneer Harvest Fest, 349 S. Broadway, Trotwood, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission. Enjoy chili cooked over an open fire, roasted hot dogs, and freshly harvested corn. Activities include corn husking contest, corn binding, hayrides, corn husker shredder demonstration, and much more. 937-837-5387 or http://t-mhs.blogspot.com. OCT. 14–15 — Fall Farm Fest, Lost Creek Reserve and Knoop Agricultural Learning Center, 2385 E. St. Rte. 41, Troy, Sat. 12–7 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. Free admission. Corn maze, pumpkin patch, scarecrow contest, wagon rides, kids’ activities, and more. 937-335-6273 or www.miamicountyparks.com. OCT. 14–15 — Ohio Sauerkraut Festival, 10B N. Wayne St., Waynesville, Sat. 9 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Try sauerkraut pizza, fudge, doughnuts, cookies, and pies. 513897-8855 or www.sauerkrautfestival.com.

OCT. 8 — West Virginia Chestnut Festival, Rowlesburg, 10:30 a.m.–7:30 p.m. Roasted chestnuts for sampling or purchase, chestnut saplings for planting, chestnut crafts and wares, and guest speakers/researchers. www.wvchestnutfestival.com. OCT. 27–28 — West Virginia Book Festival, Civic Ctr., 200 Lee St. E., Charleston. Free. http://wvbookfestival.org.

PLEASE NOTE:  Ohio Cooperative Living strives for ac­curacy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec. org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.

OCTOBER 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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MEMBER INTERACTIVE

FUN FALL FESTIVITIES Loving o n th

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My gran dson, Cooper, at the Mennon ite Hom e Fall Fest ival in Bluffton , Ohio. Beth Sc hey Tricou Rural Ele nty ctr Coopera ic tive member

ren, Lily and Sam, our twin grandchild The joy of watching patch. kin mp pu kins at the age 2½, picking pump Cheryl Raphael tive member era op Co Firelands Electric

Send us your pictures!

Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive. For January 2018, send your photos of “Staying warm” by Oct. 15; for February, send “Lovebirds of all kinds” by Nov. 15. Make sure to give us your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, and an explanation of the photo, including the names of people shown.

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My granddaughter, Lexi Long, represen ting Logan Elm Hig School in the big Mi h ss Pumpkin Show co ntest. James Collins r Company memb er

South Central Powe

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