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JANUARY 2018

Carroll Electric Cooperative

Official publication | www.cecpower.coop

We want you! Teenagers on the Electric Cooperative Youth Tour get an experience that isn’t available anywhere else

ALSO INSIDE Remembering the Blizzard of ’78 Warm drinks to cut the winter chill Erma: The original mommy-blogger


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the

COOPERATIVE

PRINCIPLES

1 VOLUNTARY & OPEN MEMBERSHIP

2 DEMOCRATIC

MEMBER CONTROL

3 MEMBERS’ ECONOMIC

PARTICIPATION

4 AUTONOMY &

INDEPENDENCE

5 EDUCATION & TRAINING

6 COOPERATION AMONG

COOPERATIVES

7 CONCERN FOR COMMUNITY

7CoopPrinciples.indd 1

ohioec.org

Co-op membership is open to anyone able to use its services.

Co-ops elect their leaders, who collectively make decisions.

Members contribute financially to their cooperative.

Co-ops are autonomous, and any agreements must maintain their independence.

Co-ops educate and train their members and employees.

Co-ops work with other co-ops to benefit all co-op members.

Co-ops are committed to improving the communities they call home.

6/12/17 10:29 AM


INSIDE

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

HIGHLIGHTS 4

JOIN THE YOUTH TOUR!

There are more reasons than you can count for highschoolers to participate in the annual co-op Youth Tour in Washington, D.C. — but we’ve narrowed it down to the top 8.

FEATURES 19

25

LOCAL PAGES

News and important information from your electric cooperative.

GUESS WHO’S COMING TO DINNER

Enjoy conversation with dinner guests straight out of the history books at numerous spots around the state.

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ALL GREEN, NO FUSS

You don’t need a green thumb to grow attractive houseplants during winter or any time of the year.

THE ORIGINAL MOMMY-BLOGGER

Dayton’s Erma Bombeck mused about marriage and motherhood for a flock of faithful followers.

Cover photo on most editions: Ohio students on the 2017 Youth Tour pose for an iconic photo on the steps of the US Capitol Building.


UP FRONT

C

LOOKING AHEAD TO 2018

I

love this time of year. January, for me, is a time of optimism, when I see all the possibilities ahead of us, which both invite us into the unknown and challenge us to improve.

At the same time, the new year affords us the opportunity to look back at the year that was. Before going into our 2018 priorities, let’s celebrate 2017 — which, looking back, turned out to be a historic year for Ohio electric cooperatives. It was a year in which we:

Rolled out the update and new name for this magazine, Ohio Cooperative Living. With your input, we’ve made efforts to provide a fun, interesting, and informative monthly read.

Made significant progress with our regulators on finding more common-sense and affordable ways to meet environmental goals at our power plants.

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Completed the construction of our indoor lineworker training facility near Mt. Gilead. Now we have 72 apprentice lineworkers enrolled in the four-year training program, and have provided advanced training to 43 journeyman lineworkers in new programs.

Maintained a record-high level of member satisfaction, as measured by the American Consumer Satisfaction Index.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Completed construction of 22 solar installations to supply power to Ohio cooperative members.

All of those things help set the tone for what could be another historic year. Some of our 2018 priorities include:

• Not only assume operational

control of the Cardinal, Mone, and Greenville power plants after reaching an agreement with our long-term partner, AEP, but further improving operations there.

Begin to develop high-voltage grid enhancements in targeted areas of rural Ohio that will improve the reliable delivery of power.

Bring modern electricity supply to the village of Las Tortugas in a remote area of the Guatemala rainforest.

Continue to improve economic opportunities in the communities served by Ohio’s electric cooperatives.

Maintain the power-supply portion of your electric bill at essentially the same rate it’s been since 2012.

Thank you again this year for your continued support and patronage of your electric cooperative. Wishing you God’s blessings and a happy New Year.

Pat O’Loughlin

President & CEO Ohio's Electric Cooperatives

I see all the possibilities ahead of us, which both invite us into the unknown and challenge us to improve.


January 2018 • Volume 60, No. 4

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Samantha Kuhn Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Margo Bartlett, Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Karen Holcomb, Pat Keegan, Catherine Murray, Adam Specht, Damaine Vonada, Kris Wetherbee, and Rick Wetherbee. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. With a paid circulation of 294,359, it is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 6 POWER LINES

STORM OF THE CENTURY: 40 years ago, electric cooperatives

— and the rest of the Midwest — battled the Blizzard of ’78.

8

OHIO ICON

DODDS MONUMENTS: Founded by Scottish immigrants, the Xenia monument company is one of the largest in the U.S.

10 CO-OP PEOPLE RECLAIMING GEMS: A Butler County artisan turns otherwise unwanted scrap wood into unique treasures.

15 GOOD EATS WINTER’S WARMERS: A steamy beverage can cut through the

chill on even the iciest winter day.

23 CO-OP OHIO JUMPING UP TO HELP: 40 workers from 11 Ohio electric

cooperatives helped restore power to New Hampshire in November after a windstorm blew through the Granite State.

38 CALENDAR WHAT’S HAPPENING: January events and other things to do.

The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215, or call 1-800-282-0515. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes.

40 MEMBER INTERACTIVE STAYING WARM: Readers share ways that they avoid the cold.

IN THIS ISSUE

Delaware (p.4, 23) Bellefontaine (p.4) Xenia (p.8) Oxford (p.10) Piqua (p.23) Bryan (p.23) Marion (p.25) Canton (p.26, 28) Mentor (p.26) Niles (p.28) Georgetown (p.27) Dayton (p.34)

Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer. JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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BY ADAM SPECHT; PHOTOGRAPHY BY FORMER YOUTH TOUR PARTICIPANTS

REASONS

YOUTH TOUR IS FOR YOU

E

very June for the past 39 years, high school students from co-op families have attended the Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour — a weeklong leadership experience in Washington, D.C., sponsored by their co-op. Youth Tour is an experience unlike any other — full of fun, friends, and memories that last a lifetime. While everyone at Ohio Cooperative Living would be delighted to discover that the high school student in your family already reads our magazine, if that’s not typically the case, we recommend sharing this list of reasons that your high school student should apply for the 2018 Youth Tour.

1

IT’S NOT LIKE YOUR SCHOOL TRIP

to D.C. Ohio schools put together trips to Washington all the time. In fact, the majority of students who go on Youth Tour from Ohio have already been there at least once. We specifically plan this trip to be different from those middleschool trips; we go to many places you probably didn’t visit on your school trip, and we give you more time to get an in-depth look at what D.C. has to offer. And unlike school trips…

2

YOU’LL MEET NEW PEOPLE — and yourself.

On Youth Tour, you’re not surrounded by people you already know. You’ll meet high school students from around the state and around the country — and you can be yourself in a way that you can’t when you’re around your current friends and classmates. Youth Tour provides an opportunity to come out of your shell and be the person you want to be — not just the person everyone thinks you are. Everyone comes on Youth Tour with a clean slate; it’s a fun, open environment where you can relax and make great new friends.

3

YOU’LL LEARN ABOUT CO-OPS

: businesses that put people over profits. Today’s young people don’t just want to work — they want to work with a purpose. Cooperatives, such as

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

your electric co-op, are places to do just that. Cooperatives are not-for-profit companies governed by the people they serve — not by Wall Street investors. On Youth Tour, you’ll learn how cooperatives operate, how they make communities like yours a better place, and why they’re great places to build a career.

4

YOU CAN TELL CONGRESS WHAT MATTERS TO YOU. Each Youth Tour includes a day on

Capitol Hill, where you’ll be given the opportunity to visit a congressional office. There, you can meet a member of Congress face-to-face and discuss the issues that are important to you. Your office visit will be with a small group, so it’s a prime opportunity to get to know a member of Congress in an unintimidating, personal setting.


You’ll also meet congressional staff members and find out why and how they pursued careers in public service.

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YOU’LL LEARN MORE ABOUT AMERICA’S RICH, COMPLEX HISTORY. Washington is an incredible

melting pot of history and culture — and Youth Tour is the perfect place to engage with it like never before. Youth Tour includes stops at many of D.C.’s incredible museums, monuments, and memorials, including the Smithsonian museums of Air and Space, American History, Natural History, American Indian History, and African American History. We’ll visit George Washington’s Mount Vernon Estate and Arlington National Cemetery — and also stop by the Gettysburg battlefield for a personal guided tour on our way to D.C. It’s a history buff’s dream.

6 7 8

IT’S FUN! Youth Tour is a blast. Even with a full

schedule, we still provide plenty of downtime for you to get to know your fellow Youth Tour students — you can hang out, play card games, and just relax and have a good time. The trip also includes several social events where you can meet students from other states.

IT’S FREE!

That’s right — this experience comes at no cost to you and your family. The trip, including meals, is entirely paid for by your cooperative. Just bring some extra money for souvenirs, and that’s it. It’s another amazing perk of your family’s membership in an Ohio electric cooperative.

IT COULD BE JUST THE BEGINNING.

Each state, including Ohio, selects one student to represent the state on the Youth Leadership Council (YLC). If you are chosen by your peers to serve as Ohio’s YLC delegate, you’ll attend a conference with your fellow delegates in D.C. in July — followed by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla., in March 2019. Additionally, our YLC delegate will also receive a $1,000 scholarship from Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives.

There are so many reasons to apply for Youth Tour — and these just scratch the surface. To learn more about Youth Tour or other youth programs that your cooperative might offer, call your co-op office or visit its website.

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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BY MARGO BARTLETT PHOTOS COURTESY DELAWARE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

STORM OF THE 40 years ago, the record-setting Blizzard of ’78 crippled the Midwest

F

or most Ohioans, the first sign that something unusual was happening on that night 40 years ago was the shriek of a fierce, unrelenting wind.

In the late evening of Jan. 25, 1978, a low-pressure system from Canada met another low-pressure system from Texas. Such storms approach from opposite directions several times each winter, according to the National Weather Service. Usually they miss each other. This time they collided, causing what has come to be widely known as “the storm of the century.”

Immediate and devastating Six Midwest states were clobbered with high winds, heavy snow, and wind chills of at least 50 degrees below zero. Gusts of 69 mph were recorded in Dayton and Columbus; Cleveland noted a gust of 82 mph. Four states, including Ohio, activated the National Guard. Thousands of electric customers lost power. According to the Jan. 27 Delaware (Ohio) Gazette, a spokesman for Delaware’s Rural Electric Cooperative (now Consolidated Electric Cooperative) said most of the outages were from “wires being blown together and then short-circuiting.” Falling poles, downed lines, and fallen trees added to the problems. Rural Electric crews “fought the cold and winds through the night to restore electricity,” the Jan. 27 Gazette reported. Then-manager L.D. Ziegler told the newspaper that linemen were having difficulty getting to problem areas: “Everywhere we go, we have to have a grader in front of us,” he said.

Widespread hardship The combination of snowplows and gusting wind built up piles of snow as high as 15 feet high in some areas of Ohio during the record-setting Blizzard of 1978, 40 years ago this month. Many roads were impassable for days afterward, while residents had to move into shelters because of widespread power and water outages.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Across Ohio, thousands of motorists were stranded in snowbound cars; 22 people in Ohio died after they walked away from their immobilized vehicles. The Ohio Turnpike closed for the only time in its history. Thousands more were evacuated from homes without heat or electricity. They found shelter in churches, schools, and armories.


CENTURY The Guard’s adjutant general at that time, James C. Clem, reported drifts were 15 feet high and 100 yards long in Clermont County. On the Ohio River near Cincinnati, an ice jam 20 feet thick and 2½ miles long shoved 17 barges and towboats against Markland Dam.

Grateful for help The Ohio National Guard magazine, The Buckeye Guard, devoted its April 1978 issue to the blizzard. It included a letter of thanks from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, the statewide association that serves electric co-ops in the state: “Without the help of the helicopter furnished to us, it would have been several days longer before we were able to return service to many thousands of rural electric consumers in Ohio. We would like to commend the pilots and other personnel who worked long and hard helping us with this effort,” the letter said.

Alternate transportation Emerson Snapp, who was a Logan County Electric Cooperative trustee and a volunteer firefighter in 1978, said he was called to a house fire at 6 a.m. Jan. 26. His wife told him to forget it. “‘It’s been snowing and blowing for hours,’” he recalls her saying. But Snapp thought his four-wheel-drive truck could make it. It couldn’t. The Snapps’ house was in a woods, and when Snapp drove beyond the wooded area, the wind and snow were blinding. He backed up, left the truck, and climbed on his snowmobile. Fortunately, the resident with the fire called back to say she’d put it out herself. Snapp, who recently retired as trustee, spent the next five days delivering food, fuel, and heating oil to people in need.

Clearing the way Meanwhile, the Logan County Electric Cooperative coped with power outages by synchronizing its crews with those of the county garage across the road. “When the snowplows went out, our guys went out behind the snowplows,” Snapp says.

On Monday, five days after the blizzard began, the no-travel order was lifted. However, then-Delaware County Sheriff William Lavery warned, “Things are not back to normal by any means.” “Normal” did return, eventually. But the winter of 1977-78 still holds many records: greatest snow depth, lowest barometric pressure, greatest snowfall in a 24-hour period, the state’s most severe storm for any season, the most snowfall during January, and the snowiest winter. And very possibly, the most stories told. JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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OHIO ICON

DODDS MONUMENTS XENIA

Location: Downtown Xenia, about one block from the Greene County Courthouse. Provenance: Brothers George and Andrew Dodds, both of whom were stonemasons and immigrants from Scotland, started making memorials in Yellow Springs in 1859. Five years later, they relocated to a building on West Main Street in the railroad hub of Xenia. It’s now one of the nation’s largest monument companies. “At the turn of the 20th century, the company owned three quarries in New England, and besides the main office in Xenia, it had offices in New York City, Chicago, Boston, and St. Louis,” says Neil Fogarty, current Dodds Monuments president. “The New York office was across the street from Grand Central Station.” After the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, the Dodds family used lumber and other materials from the exposition’s dismantled pavilions to construct a new building on the site of their original Xenia location. The handsome structure, which still serves as the company’s headquarters, is clad in sturdy Indiana limestone and adorned by marble Corinthian columns. A downtown landmark since 1906, it even survived Xenia’s 1974 tornado — the only building left standing on West Main Street. Then-office manager C.A. Bone purchased the company in the 1930s, and Bone family members operated it until 1984, when Fogarty’s parents, Eric and Becky Fogarty, bought it. “Only three families have run this business in its 153year history,” Fogarty says. “I like to think George Dodds would be happy we’ve stayed true to his personal way of doing things.”

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

STORY AND PHOTO BY DAMAINE VONADA

Significance: Dodds Monuments is the oldest continuous business in Greene County, and one of the oldest in Ohio. Known for exceptional workmanship and for using the best grades of granite, it’s also among the oldest and most respected companies in the U.S. monument-building industry. “Many families have been coming here for generations,” Fogarty says. Currently: Although Dodds Monuments has opened seven branches in the Dayton-Cincinnati area, its corporate offices, engraving plant, and main showroom have remained rooted in downtown Xenia. Several years ago, the Fogarty family obtained six stained-glass windows that had once graced a chapel at present-day Bergamo Center near Dayton. “The windows were ordered in 1913 from the F.X. Zettler Royal Bavarian glassworks in Munich,” says Fogarty. “Because World War I started, they had to be smuggled into neutral Belgium and then were shipped down the St. Lawrence River.” Now cleaned, restored, and illuminated night and day, the magnificent windows are on display in custom-made frames at the Xenia showroom. It’s a little-known fact that: Granite from Doddsowned quarries was used to build Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial on South Bass Island and the McKinley Memorial in Canton. Dodds Monuments, 123 W. Main St., Xenia, OH 45385. 800-773-6337, 937-372-4408; www. doddsmonuments.com.


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requires telephone service and high-speed Internet access. WiFi Capable. Callers do not need special equipment or a captioned telephone in order to speak with you. Finally… a phone you can use again. The Hamilton CapTel phone is also packed with features to help make phone calls easier. The keypad has large, easy to use buttons. You get adjustable volume amplification along with the ability to save captions for review later. It even has an answering machine that provides you with the captions of each message.

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JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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Do you get discouraged when you hear your telephone ring? Do you avoid using your phone because hearing difficulties make it hard to understand the person on the other end of the line? For many Americans the telephone conversation – once an important part of everyday life – has become a thing of the past. Because they can’t understand what is said to them on the phone, they’re often cut off from friends, family, doctors and caregivers. Now, thanks to innovative technology there is finally a better way.

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY KAREN HOLCOMB

CO-OP PEOPLE

RECLAIMING GEMS Wood artisan’s work combines form, function, Asian aesthetic

K

en Duerksen envisages art amid decay. He rescues cast-off wood pieces from burn piles and salvage yards and transforms them into beautiful objects, including organic sculpture, tableware, furniture, chopsticks, and bento boxes. Duerksen — a Butler Rural Electric Cooperative member — uses what he describes as “gem-quality” reclaimed black cherry, Osage orange, black walnut, and other native species. “All my wood is salvaged,” he says. “Sawmills in the vicinity will let me pick through their burn piles. That’s where some real jewels are found. So basically, I use wood that is not easily marketable,”

Ken Duerksen puts the finishing touches on a lidded box at his garage worktable.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

including dozens of ash trees on his property that were devastated by the emerald ash borer. “The process of decomposition sometimes makes things really beautiful,” Duerksen says, explaining that the unique knotholes, graining, and coloration found on diseased wood enhance its aesthetic quality.

Learning from his dad Duerksen lives in Reilly Township, on the outskirts of Oxford, home to Miami University. A professional archaeologist who consults on construction projects for a living, Duerksen learned the finer points of


Two of Ken Duerksen’s best-selling designs are a rice bowl with chopsticks and a natural-edge serving tray (below) that’s perfect for fruits and vegetables.

off motor. Wood pieces are stacked in piles or lean against the walls, sawdust covers the floor, and a friendly gray cat named Bonabo wanders in and out.

Asian-influenced flair

woodworking from his father, an English professor at Miami. He grew up watching his dad dig trenches, pour concrete, build additions to their home, and create a different wooden Christmas ornament each year for family members. The younger Duerksen continues the holiday tradition to this day. “I’ve been making things out of wood my whole life,” says Duerksen, who designed and built toys as a child. “My dad always let me use his power tools. When I was 10, I would use his old death-trap table saw.”

Use what the wood presents Duerksen loves the organic beauty of wood in its raw state. He leaves the natural edge on his rice bowls and serving trays. He uses the graining to enhance the aesthetics, as well as the functionality, of each piece. Many pieces contain other organic elements. Duerksen’s “Neolithic nutcracker,” for example, includes a space for nuts and two openings that securely hold a pair of rocks to crack open the nuts. His archaeology background also comes into play. Duerksen’s “effigy bowls,” inspired by Native American feast bowls, feature the likeness of an animal, such as a bear or bird, carved on a top edge. He also uses archeological motifssimilar to those discovered on artifacts from the moundbuilding Adena tribe native to southern Ohio.

Duerksen sells his pieces on the internet, at art fairs, and in a shop called Local Yokel Mercantile in the Cincinnati area. His best-selling products include rice bowls fitted with chopsticks, natural-edge trays, and individual chopsticks with a unique holder that he invented. “I just love chopsticks,” Duerksen says. “I like Asian aesthetics.” His other Asian pieces include sushi trays, which double as cheese platters, and bento boxes — Japanese-style lunch trays with compartments for different foods. The oil finish is nontoxic and safe for food use, but customers often use these items as wall hangings because of their natural beauty. Over the decades, Duerksen has gained an encyclopedic knowledge of the aesthetics and functionality of wood, and he skillfully marries the two in each object he carves. He can look at a log and know not only the species, but whether the tree was cut in summer or winter. (The bark stays firmly attached if the tree was cut during summer. The bark separates if the tree was cut during winter.) His attraction to his preferred medium is simple. “It’s everywhere,” Duerksen says. “It’s beautiful. I understand it. I know how the grain works. I love the evocative grains you can get with a knot or a burl. It’s a random, organic beauty.” KAREN HOLCOMB is a freelance writer from Butler County and a member of Butler Rural Electric Cooperative.

Duerksen creates the pieces in an attached garage he converted to a workshop. He utilizes assorted hand tools and a lathe he built 20 years ago from an old cast-

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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STORY AND PHOTO BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

AH

T

C

MONEY ON THE SHELF Some outdoorsy book titles can be worth a pretty penny to collectors

A

ldo Leopold (1887-1948) is considered the father of modern-day wildlife management in North America; his 1933 book, Game Management, is a classic. I’m fortunate to own a copy of the second printing (1936) and recently wondered what it might be worth, so I contacted Jim Casada of Rock Hill, S.C., a fellow outdoors writer and an expert on collectible outdoor books. “I’ve been collecting books all my life, dating to my 10th Christmas when my parents gave me a copy of Zane Grey’s Spirit of the Border,” Casada says. “I still have that particular book, and now somewhere between 12,000 and 15,000 others.”

So how valuable are these books? “There are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of outdoor titles that are collectible and have appreciable value,” he says. A few examples would be the “Nash Buckingham” titles published by Derrydale Press, which range in value from about $350 to $400, to as much as $1,000 for a signed and inscribed copy of De Shootin’est Gentman. Casada also points to a couple of turkey hunting books, originals of Henry Edwards Davis’s The American Wild Turkey ($1,200 with dust jacket) or Simon Everitt’s Tales of Wild Turkey Hunting ($800 to $1,000), as notable collectibles. He went on to say that the best way to get an initial idea about the value of a book is to check some of the major online sellers such as Amazon, AbeBooks,

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Biblio, and others to see if the book is listed. “Condition, the edition, whether a book is signed, and whether the dust jacket is present can make a world of difference,” he says. But getting back to the value of my book: Casada says, while it’s nice, it’s not especially rare, and is worth around $50 — more if it was signed. Even unsigned, it has appreciated 10 times its original $5 price tag (which was, by the way, a large amount of money — especially for a book — during the Great Depression when it was first published). Winter in Ohio is the season that bids us to slow down and relax a bit, and there is no better way than to sit down by a fire with a warm drink and a good book. I don’t recommend Game Management, except to professional wildlife managers. Instead, find Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac. Written more for general audiences, it was published posthumously and has sold more than 2 million copies. In it, Leopold chronicles a year spent observing the natural world surrounding his beloved “shack” in southern Wisconsin during the early 20th century. That humble cabin now is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Enjoy! W. H. “CHIP” GROSS (whchipgross@gmail.com) is Ohio Cooperati ve Living’s Outdoors Editor and a member of Consolidated Electric Cooperative.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING READER RECIPE CONTEST

KIDS IN THE KITCHEN

Kids are the most creative and fearless chefs! Do your kids love concocting new creations in the kitchen? Does your grandchild want to be a chef someday? Then this contest is for them — and you! We want to hear about the dishes your young ones like to prepare — preferably independently, but with a bit of help is fine, too. •  To enter, write down your recipe, including all ingredients and measurements, directions, and number of servings. Then tell us how you came up with the recipe and what you love about it. Is it a part of a family tradition? Do you make it for school lunches? Is it your favorite afternoon snack? •  On each recipe, include the child’s name and the address, phone number, and e-mail address of an adult who can be contacted, and the name of the entrant’s electric cooperative. •  Contest winners will be announced in the June edition of Ohio Cooperative Living. 14

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

•  Entries may be submitted by e-mail to memberinteract@ohioec.org, or sent to Catherine Murray, care of Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229. •  Entrants must be 16 or younger. •  Submissions may be an original recipe or adapted from an existing recipe, with at least three distinct changes. •  Children may collaborate with an adult to help write the directions and keep track of measurements. •  Limit of three recipes per entrant.

Entry Deadline: March 16, 2018. Grand prize winner will receive an Ohio-made KitchenAid stand mixer. Two runners-up will receive kid-friendly cookbooks.


W

GOOD EATS

RECIPES AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHERINE MURRAY

inter’s armers

The short, frigid days and long, frosty nights this time of the year bring icy temperatures that you can feel right down to your bones. These warm beverages — perhaps in front of a roaring fire — will melt away that winter chill.

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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LIGHTER FARE

WINTER WASSAIL

1 gallon apple cider 2 apples, thinly sliced with core and peel 2 oranges, thinly sliced with peel 1/4 cup fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 1/3 cup honey

4 cinnamon sticks (2 Tbsp. ground) 5 star anise (21/2 tsp. ground) 12 cloves (3 tsp. ground) 6 allspice berries (1/4 tsp. ground) 1 tsp. ground nutmeg 1 to 2 cups rum or brandy (optional, to taste)

In a large stockpot or in a slow cooker, combine all ingredients except the rum or brandy. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium low. Continue cooking for 1 to 4 hours, stirring occasionally. Strain fruit, ginger, and whole spices, if desired. Add rum or brandy to taste, if desired. Serve hot. Makes 16 servings. Per serving: 166 calories, 0.5 g total fat (0.2 g saturated fat), 2 g fiber, 0.5 g protein

MEXICAN HOT CHOCOLATE WITH WHIPPED CREAM 4 cups milk 1 Tbsp. light brown sugar 2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/8 tsp. ground cayenne pepper 4 oz. semi-sweet chocolate bar, finely chopped

Whipped Cream Ingredients: 1 cup whipping cream 1 Tbsp. sugar 1 tsp. vanilla extract

Pour milk into medium saucepan. Whisk in brown sugar, cinnamon, and cayenne. Heat milk and spices on the stove over medium heat until simmering, taking care not to boil. Slowly add chocolate, continuing to whisk until fully melted. Whipped Cream Directions: In a stand mixer, whisk whipping cream, sugar, and vanilla extract on high until stiff peaks form, 1 to 3 minutes. If overbeaten, butter will begin to form. Pour hot chocolate into mugs, top with whipped cream, sprinkle with extra cinnamon, and serve hot. Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 285 calories, 13 g total fat (9 g saturated fat), 1.6 g fiber, 10 g protein; whipped cream adds: 102 calories, 9 g total fat (6 g saturated fat), 0 g fiber, <1 g protein

CHOCOLATE HAZELNUT LATTE 2 cups milk 4 tsp. chocolate hazelnut spread (such as Nutella)

2 oz. freshly brewed espresso 4 chocolate hazelnut pirouettes (optional)

Heat milk in small saucepan over medium-high heat. Add chocolate hazelnut spread and whisk until spread is melted and milk is heated through and foaming. Whisk faster to create more foam. With a french press or espresso machine, brew 1 oz. of espresso. Pour espresso into serving cups. Take the back of a long spoon and pour milk into the espresso, holding back the foam. Spoon foam on top. Serve with chocolate hazelnut pirouettes, if desired. Makes 2 servings. Per serving: 186 calories, 9 g total fat (4 g saturated fat), <1 g fiber, 9 g protein

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

LIGHTER FARE


CHERRY STEAMER 4 cups milk 1⁄2 cup maraschino cherry juice 11⁄2 tsp. almond extract

4 oz. amaretto liqueur (optional) 12 large marshmallows 4 maraschino cherries

Heat milk in medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add maraschino cherry juice and almond extract. Heat until simmering. Add amaretto if desired. Pour milk mixture into serving cups, then top with marshmallows and maraschino cherries. Per serving: 221 calories, 5 g total fat (3 g saturated fat), 0.5 g fiber, 9 g protein

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THE ENERGY EXPERT

BY PAT KEEGAN

THERMOSTAT SMARTS I

How ‘smart’ should you get when purchasing a new thermostat?

f you still have an old dial thermostat controlling the temperature in your home, you might take note of new technology available that lets thermostats do things they never could before. That said, it’s worth asking if these new thermostats can save enough money to justify the extra cost. There are three main types of thermostats: manual, programmable, or smart. The main benefits of a manual thermostat are that it’s simple to operate and there are no batteries to wear out and replace. You just have to remember to raise and lower the temperature setting in the morning and evening, and whenever you leave the house.

Programmable thermostats typically allow settings for four different periods each day, and some models can even handle a different schedule for each day of the week. You control the settings so they will suit your climate, schedule, and temperature preferences. A smart, or “learning” thermostat connects to your home’s Wi-Fi network. After installation, you input the basics of your schedule and temperature preferences. Over time, as you change the settings, it learns your schedule and adjusts to minimize energy use. Smart thermostats can also detect when no one is home and can be controlled remotely with an app on your smartphone or tablet. The move to smart technology, though, is a significant investment. Units can cost up to $400, though prices are coming down. It’s also important to note that not all homes have the proper wiring in place to accommodate smart thermostats, so you may need to hire a professional to handle the installation.

Top left, clockwise: A programmable thermostat is only effective if it is programmed correctly; smart thermostats can be controlled remotely through a smart phone or tablet; smart thermostats learn from your behavior to maximize energy savings; a manual thermostat is still a good option for people willing and able to give it frequent attention.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Michael Wilson, an energy advisor at Logan County Electric Cooperative, demonstrates a programmable thermostat.

How much a thermostat can save depends on how much you spend on heating and cooling your house. You can estimate your heating and cooling expenses by examining the bills related to heating your home. Compare the bills for winter and summer to those for spring and fall. Most of the difference is likely due to heating and cooling. If that amount is more than $900 per year, which is the national average, you have a better chance of a good return on your investment. The second factor that will determine how much you can save is how you are operating your old thermostat. If you are conscientious about adjusting the temperature to save energy when you’re leaving the house or going to bed, the new thermostat may not reduce your bills that much, even if you program it correctly or if it learns your behavior. PAT KEEGAN writes for Collaborative Efficiency, an energy communications company.

Thermostat efficiency Don’t adjust the thermostat temperature drastically in the hopes of making it heat or cool your home more quickly. In winter, keep the temperature at or below 68 degrees while you are home during the day, and cooler during the night; during summer months, keep it at or above 78 degrees while you are home. You can save up to 10 percent off your monthly heating and cooling bill by turning back your thermostat by 7 to 10 degrees for eight hours a day.


CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

How can we better serve you in 2018?

I

t’s amazing what we learn through listening and observation. New products and services are more likely to gain the satisfaction of consumers when their introduction follows market research.

Here at Carroll Electric, we use the annual member Larry Fenbers satisfaction survey to learn CEO/General Manager what our consumer-members want and need from their electric cooperative. We’ve also provided members with a mobile application, SmartHub, that enables you to check the status of your electric service and receive daily updates on energy use. Carroll Electric members are using SmartHub and the SmartHub app to conduct routine business with us, like online bill payment, updating mailing addresses, and viewing our real-time outage map. Since we launched it in May of 2016, 20 percent of our members use SmartHub and the SmartHub app. These mobile services are just new ways of connecting with people, like the member services representatives you reach when you call us, or who greet you from behind the counters at our office. They help us offer quality services you expect us to provide. Our goal is to find ways to help you control energy costs. That’s why we communicate with you about energy

HIGH THANKS FOR THE

prices and ways we can work together to help ease the burdens on your wallet. We know that you want and need an electric utility that will give you unbiased information. We aim to be that source. Our employees are well-versed in energy efficiency and conservation methods to help your family realize your energy goals, and not just with electricity. Listening improves understanding, builds trust, strengthens relationships, and fosters cooperation. It’s also crucial to collaboration and success. That’s why Carroll Electric still loves face time with our members. Our annual meeting is a social event for our whole co-op family. We hope you’ll make plans now to join us in August at the Carroll County Fairgrounds for a morning of co-op business, fun, and prizes. So, how do we serve you better in 2018? The same way many of us try to serve community, society, and family better each day — by listening. In our offices, on telephones, through social media exchanges, and in our face-to-face meetings, we’re ready to listen. And, we hope that you’ll participate in our member satisfaction survey later this year.

MARKS 2017

74 74 81 Municipal Utilities

Investor-Owned Carroll Electric Utilities Cooperative, Inc.

Member satisfaction data from Q1 and Q2 2017

When you have questions about energy efficiency, electrical service, or any of our services, just ask us. When we know just what you want, we’re in a better position to deliver successful results. So drop in and see us; we’re always glad to hear from you.

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Clearing the way

for uninterrupted power In order to provide safe, reliable electric service, we maintain the rightsof-way under our power lines. We do this through a five-year right-of-way and vegetation management cycle that requires pruning or removing trees, cutting brush, and applying herbicides to prevent vegetation from interrupting your service.

ing power lines, which can impede access to equipment and cause power outages during bad weather. This month an Asplundh representative will begin contacting members to discuss maintenance plans and request permission to remove trees that threaten the reliability of your service.

A major factor in restorHerbicide applicator ing power quickly during Carroll Electric has an emergency situations is ongoing relationship clear access to our rightswith Noxious Vegetation of-way. To keep these Control (NOVCO) for areas accessible, we applying herbicide to ROW is cut 15 feet on either side of the keep weeds and brush rights-of-way. NOVCO electric lines from the ground to the sky below a height that will work in the Leesville, would hamper visibility Merrick, and Atwood or hinder access along substation areas in 2018 the right-of-way. Mainteand are expected to begin contacting members to nance involves applying acquire permission for herbicide application soon. commonly used herbicides to non-desirable species One zero three two five zero zero. on the right-of-way. Herbicides are applied under the direction of a licensed herbicide applicator. By clearing trees and other vegetation, we are better able to inspect and maintain cooperative Tree-trimming contractor facilities and provide more reliable electric service. Asplundh Tree Expert Company was awarded the For additional information or to report a tree you contract to clear 209.97 miles of line in the Mosuspect could cause a power outage, please call hawk, Sugar Grove, Springfield, and Washington 1-800-232-7697. (Mechanicstown circuit) substation areas in 2018. Asplundh will prune and remove trees surround-

Right-of-way trimming cycle

2018 — Mohawk, Sugar Grove, Springfield, and Washington (Mechanicstown Circuit) 2019 — Washington & Summitville 2020 — Petersburg & Ross 2021 — Leesville, Merrick, and Atwood 2022 — Malvern & Amsterdam

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Right-of-way spraying cycle

2018 — Leesville, Merrick, and Atwood 2019 — Malvern & Amsterdam 2020 — Mohawk, Sugar Grove, Springfield, and Washington (Mechanicstown Circuit) 2021 — Washington & Summitville 2022 — Petersburg & Ross


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CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Carroll Electric is holding checks for the following people for whom it has no current address. These former members’ capital credits checks were returned “undeliverable” by the U.S. Postal Service. If you recognize a name, notify the person. If the person is deceased, let one of his or her relatives know about the unclaimed check. If you have a current address for anyone listed here, please contact our office at 1-800-232-7697 before March 1, 2018. A & D Development A 1 Builders Abbuhl, Tony Abel, Doug Abel, Helen L Aber, Betty L Abshire, Kenneth M Adams, Dixie M Adams, Joyce A Adams, Kenneth Adams, Mary H Adams, Raymond Adams, Warren Adkins, Barry N Adkins, Betty E Adkins, Ella M Adkins, Victoria Adorisio, Fred Advance Industrial S E Aegerter, Bruce W Aemmer, Wallace H Agard, Paul R Ake, Jean M Alazaus, Donald D Albaugh, Eric A Albaugh, Jack Albaugh, Thomas L JR Alberts, S Albright, Richard J MD Alden, Mary C Aletto, Joseph Alexander, Don Alflen, David S Allan, Charles T Allaway, Alberta Allen, James Allen, Karen I Allen, Larry K Allen, O J Alliance Fed Sav & Loan Allinson, Richard S Almasy, Jack Altekruse, John L Alvis, Edgar Alvis, James F Ambec Corporation Amelung, Carol

Amelung, David Amelung, Harry D American Energy Dev I American Energy Deve L Ames, Jack Amos, Paul F An Car Oil Co An Car Oil Co Inc No Anderson, Ivan L Anderson, John H Anderson, Richard Andrason, Cathy Andrews Agency Inc Andrews, Donald Andrews, Ida Andrews, John Andrews, Ralph Angelo, Marge Anslow, Barry L Anthony, Larry R Antrobius, B J Arbor, John Archer, Edward K Archibald, John N Archibald, L A Armstrong, Robert Ejr Armstrong, Verdean Arnold, Debra S Arnold, Michael R Arntz, Betty L Arrowsmith, Rebecca Art, Michael Art, Michael L Aschembener, E Ash, Barbara J Ash, James E AT&T Store # Oh3400 Atkins, Arthur Atwell, Theodore H Atzberger, Frank J Ault, William C Austin, Noble Ayers, Lawrence W B T Simpson Oil & Gas Badalich, Carl F Bahler, Debra K Bailey, Alberta

20B OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Bailey, Donald Esr Bailey, William E Bair, Charles H Baisden, Deloris A Bake, Susan Baker, Beulah Baker, Bonnie Baker, Charles S Baker, George Baker, Harold Baker, Harry Baker, Harry R Baker, Keith E Baker, Leo E Baker, Rose A Baker, W R Balder, Dean Bales, James L Bales, Mary A Ball, Thomas M Banfield, H F Banta, Alfred T Barber, Deuard B Barger, Alvin E Barkan, Ethel Barker, Jack L Jr Barkheimer, Karla F Barkheimer, Terry Barkhurst, Richard N Barkowski, Helen G Barnett, Dewey Barnhouse, David A Barnhouse, Florence Barr, Pamella L Barrett, Ralph E Barrington, William G Bartlett, F S Jr Bartlett, George F Bartlett, Winifred Bassett, Burney B Baughman, Wade Baxter, Charles R Baxter, James C Baxter, Rex E Bayless, George W Beach, Charles W Beadle, Samuel E

Beadnell, Edward L Beadnell, Jackie L Beadnell, Robert Beam, Denver A Beans, Anna Beatty, Susan Beaver, Darleen Beaver, Dennis L Beaver, Jacquelin Beaver Mining & Coal Beavers, Murel Becher, Susan Beck, Richard B Beckley, Merl Beckwith, R N Beeler, Linda L Beitzel, Ida M Beitzel, James R Belden, Louis Bell, James Bell, James K Belles, Harry Belon, George L Beltz, Paul M Beltz, Ralph Benado, Nissim Md Bender, Garry Bennett, Donald E Bennett, Georgia P Bennett, Geraldine Bennett, Howard D Bennett, Howard I Bennett, Juanita G Bennett, Mike Bennett, Terry Bennett, Terry L Bennett, Vickie Benson, A J Bentley, Elizabeth M Benton Bridge Co Bergeron, Benny D Bergeron, Everett J Bernhardt, Fred D Berry, Guy Berry, Mary Berry, Timothy J Bertram, Dale

Best, David R Best, Margie Betche, Paul Betche, Paul F Bettis, George R Bettis, Mark Beutell, Robert O Bevan, Allen Beylin, Wallace Biasella, Armond R Bichsel, Homer E Bichsel, Kathryn Biggerstaff, Richard L Bigler, Kim Binger, Harold Binkley, Frank E Jr Birney, Carl A Bishop, Martha Bittaker, Sandra Bittinger, Charles Bittinger, Larry D Black, John E Blackburn, Leslie E Blackburn, Quinton Blackburn, W A Blakes American Hdwe Blanc-Oberlin, Susan Blanc-Oberlin, Susan A Blank, Helen M Blevins, Rick Blocher, Robert T Blood, Marion F Bloom, James M Blythe, Robert C II Bodo, Barbara Boebinger Agency Inc. Boebinger Realtors Inc Boebinger Realty Boggs, Lena E Bohmer, Donald P Boldon, Mary Boles, James T Boley, William Boling, Calvin M Boling, Richard N Bollinger, Leroy C Bolte, William G


UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Bonam, Glenn Bond, Charles R Bonebrake, S F Bonner, Mildred Boore, James A Booth, James E Booth, Richard F Border, Melva Bordner, W L Boring, James J Bosold, Charles W Boston, Bill Boston, Earl E Bouscher, David E Bowman, Gloria E Bowser, Kenneth R Boyce, Mason H Boyd, Clarence Boyd, Clarence R Boyd, Donna L Boyd, Duane Boyd, John W Boyer, Charles L Boyer, Lynn Boyle, John J Brackin, Twila J Brackney, Charles E Bradshaw, James T Bradshaw, Juanita T Bradshaw, Roy Brady, Carl J Brakebill, Walter K Jr Brammer, Herbert Braun, Daniel D Braun, Marsha D Bray, Phyllis Bray, Roland S Breeden, Lloyd E Breese, Earl F III Breit, Terry A Brenneman, Lee C Brewer, Sara A Brian, James A Bricker, Kenneth D Briden, C O Briden, Mary E Bright, Elizabeth Briley, Virgil Brink, Richard T Jr Brink, Virgil Brittain, George W Brodzenski, Joseph S Brokaw, Paul W Brooks, Alton M Brooks, Bernice J Brooks, Donald Brothers, Donna J Brown, Betty J

Brown, Diane Brown, Enola Brown, Ernest D Brown, F S Brown, Helen F Brown, James N Brown, John K Brown, Karen L Brown, Karen O Brown, Lewis Brown, Lewis E Brown, Lloyd E Brown, Mae E Brown, Michael Brown, Robert E Brown, W T Brown, Walter G Brown, Wilma Brownfield, Sherman Brownsword, Gene A Bruce, Gary A Brucker, Ralph S Brunt, Miriam L Bryan, Ronald L Brynn, Walter B Bryson, Joseph V Buccini, Ernst O Jr Buchanan, David L Buchanan, James Buchanan, Keith Buchanan, Tim C Bucher, Ray G Buck, C W Buck, Charles F Buck, Ted Buckel, Carl D Buckle, Robert D Buckman, John Bucy, Earl S Bucy, Patricia Buehler, Sharon L Buhite, William C Bungard, Charles H Bunnell, Gerald E Burchett, James W Burgess, Hobert F Burgess, Peggy Burke, Tom M Burkey, Donald H Burkey, James H Burkhalter, Kenneth O Burkhart, Ronald L Burleson, William D Burlingame, Ken Burlingame, Kenneth G Burnem, Raymond Burns, Donald L Burns, Helen

Burnsworth, Dorman Burnworth, Walter J IIIBurton, Walter E Burwell, Betty L Burwell, Charles D Busic, George Butcher, Bertha C Butler, Dallas L Butler, Sharon Butterfield, Nancy Buxton, Alan L Buxton, Roger Byers, Lewis Cain, Melissa A Cain, Thomas R Calabriese, Homes Caldarelli, Charles L Caldwell, Daniel G Caldwell, Daniel J Caldwell, David T Caldwell, Robert Callehan, John R Jr Calvanese, Ernest N Campbell, Edward E Campbell, John S Campbell, Lloyd V Campbell, Robert C Campbell, Rose M Campbell, Samuel S Candoo, William K Caniff, Thomas W Capone, Albert J Capper, Phil H Carano, Carl R Carey, Stephen H Carlisle, Rose Carosielli, Dawn Carosielli, Leonard Carpenter, Afton R Carpenter, Charles Carpenter, Clark Carpenter, Edward L Carpenter, James E Carpenter, Melvin Carpenter, Robert L Carr, Helen Carr, Henry S Carroll, Ethel R Carroll, Thomas P Carter, Richard H Casciato, Arnold W Casey, John Casselberry, Raymond Castner, David H Caygill, Jack N Center Ranch Ch Ro Jan Inc Chadock, Roger

Champion, George F Champion, James M Chandler, Charles E Chandler, V D Chapman, Gene Chevalier, Jeanne Chisholm, Bernice Chivers, Maxine Christian, Charles R Christian, Genevieve Christman, Robert Christnot, Edward F Chumney, Lavonne Cimaglia, Anna Ciotti, Frank Clare, John Clark, Bertha L Clark, Chloe E Clark, Donna J Clark, Dorothy Clark, Doyal D Clark, Earl J Clark, Robert L Clark, Robert N Clark, Wayne Clark, William A Clarke, Deborah L Clauss, Ronald L Clay, James C Clegg, Orval N Clendenin, Charles E Clendenin, Janet L Clifford, Donald J Jr Cline, Clayton Cline, Della Cline, Floyd J Cline, Leah M Clinton, Bessie Clouser, Eileen M Clugston, W L Clutz, Harold Cochran, Don C Cochran, Sharon L Cochran, Zula Coe, Bill Coen, Patricia S Coffy, Thomas E Cole, B N Cole, Jeanne L Cole, Joseph Cole, Lester P Jr Cole, Ralph V Coleman, Gary E Coleman, Jack L Coleman, James F Coleman, Robert Collins, Garry D Collins, Rick L

Collins, Roy D Colson, Pat Comber, William Combs, Gale Combs, Mark R Conley, Lily Conn, Clifford L Connell, James R Conotton Land Co. Cook, Dagmar R Cook, Mack Cook, Mary J Cook, Robert C Cook, Zane W Cookson, Robert D Cooper, Ralph Cooper, Stanley Cope, Harold Cope, Roy F Jr Copeland, Frances Copen, Bertie Coppock, Mary J Corder, Richard A Cordner, Paul B Corn, Jack Cornell, George R Cornell, Walter V Cornett, Emzy Cornett, Grant Corns, Fred R Coss, James W Jr Cottrell, Leonard Cottrell, Leonard B Counts, Luther E Cowan, Walter Cowart, Owen Cowles, Merle D Cowley, Thomas Cox, Violet M Crabtree, Richard Craig, G O Craig, Robert Crallie, Michael R Cramer, Lance Crawford, Hartzel Crawford, Jack Crawford, James D Creamer, Clyde Creek, Donna Creighton, Thomas D Creter, Melvin H Crissinger, Bruce A III Critchfield, Steven H Crosier, Vernon Croskey, Grace Croskey, Karl W Cross, Frank O Cross, Harold W

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CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Cross, Lee R Cross, Sarah A Crossen, Lois Crotwell, Lee Crowl, Andrew B Crowl, Thomas Crozier, Don Crum, W M Csaszar, Frank J Culler, Harley E Culp, Thelma Curnes, Ray W Curry, Douglas Curtis, J B Curtis, James A Custer, Charles F Custer, Lloyd Custer, Richard L Custer, Wilma P Cutlip, Robert R D & L Coal Co D & M Coal Co D R Young Construction Dakoski, Judith A Dalton, Neil Danford, Donald L Daniels, Robert M Danmar Control Inc. Dannemiller, Charles J Danner, Barbara D’Appolonia Petro Inc. D’Appolonia Petroleum Darrah, Louis Q Daugherty, Glen Daugherty, Mary Daugintis, Albert F Davenport, Donald M Davidson, R E Davidson, Trenton Daviduk, Kenneth Davis, Cecil E Davis, Harold Davis, Hazel M Davis, James E Davis, James K Davis, Joseph G Davis, Phillip V Davis, Ronald L Davis, Ronnie Davis, William K Dawson, Arlene C Dawson, Dale Dawson, Dorothy L Day, Carl Day, Clifford Day, Lynn Day, Terry E Day, Thomas A

Dayton, A D Dayton, Ruth M Dayton, Thomas D III Dazey, Charles F De Nicola, Randall De Wire, Robert R Dean, Allison Dearth, David S Deck, K W Decker, Ralph Deem, William S Deems, Orval Deets, Dorothea Define, William F Deist, Verl Demarco, Anthony W Demeo, Michael Demmerle, Ruth B Demmerle, William C Denney, Robert F Dennis, Ray R Desantis, Harry P Dessecker Coal Co Detweiler, Raymond Devanx, Rosie Devitt, Mark Devore, Leroy Devore, Lester L Dewalt, Dennis Di Coceo Dennis D Di Feo George Di Pasquale Frank J Di Sabatino Frank Dibiase, Orfeo Dicken, Fred W Dickson, William Jr Diederich, Harold W Dietzel, Bard P Dillard, Georgia L Diller, James J Dillick, Frederick J Dillinger, James A Dillon, Bob Dine, Brenda F Dinger, Dale W Dinger, Ronnie L Dingler, Larry R Dixon, D C Dobbins, Lester B Dobransky, Flora E Dobric, Robert Dodd, Gary L Doenges, Richard P Dolvin, Donald G Domer, Les J Jr Domer, Lester J Jr Domyan, John Donahey, Robert F

20D OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Donley, John J Dornick, Albert Dotson, Gene Dougherty, George Dourm, Guy R II Dowd, Richard B Downes, Barbara A Draa, Clarice Draher, Tom L Drake, William R Dray, Betty J Dreher, Dennis M Dreibelbis, H E Jr Drell Inc Dreussi, James A Dreyer, De Ette Dreyer, Samuel J Druschel, R F Duesenberry, Alfred Duff, John R Duncan, Kenneth L Duncan, Morris V Duncan, Ross Dungan, Mary E Dunn, David H Dunnie, John Dwyer, Margret Dye, Cliford L E & S Petroleum Eaglen, B L Early, L C Eaton, John I Eckroate, Mary Eddleman, George W Jr Eddleman, Jesse Eddy, Charles R Eddy, James Eddy, James R Eddy, Roderick N Edmonds, Gene H Edwards, Arline Edwards, Donald D Edwards, Ronald D Edwards, William J Eggan, Chauncey Eisenbrei, R U Eldred, Jerry R Eldred, William V Jr Elifritz, Ray Elkins, Jon S Elliott, Francis Elliott, William E Emery, Arvel Employee Transfer Co R Enac, Lee Endres, Thomas E Energy Services Engel, Maynard J

Engle, Verdela M Enlow, Ellsworth Ensley, Austin Enterprise Gas & Oil Epling, George M Erskine Countracting Ervin, Carl A Esterly, Merle Etzler, Richard M Evans, Elmer D Evans, John R Evans, Katherine J Evans, Myrel Evans, Myrel W Evans, Thomas J Everett, Donald R Everett, Phil L Everly, Valarie I Eversole, Ray E Ewing, Mary A Eynon, Thomas E Faber, Kenneth H Fankhauser, Richard Farmer, Ethel Farnsworth, Brett A Farnsworth, Harold Farnsworth, Margaret R Farnsworth, Mark A Farnsworth, William Faulk, Graham Faulkner, Gertrude Fausnight, Wayne Fay, Walter G Fedder, Michael Fedder, Michael J Fedukovich, Danny Felgenhauer, Ferris Felgenhauer, Sharon Ferguson, Brian J Ferguson, Clarence E Ferguson, Robert Fetzer, D D Fiddler, James Fiddler, James R Fiddler, Keith J Fields, Tom Fincher, Dale D Fink, R B Fink, Roy B Finnegin, James A Finnegin, Michael J II Finzer, Bonnie L Firm, Deborah L Fischer, Walter R Fishel, Jerry D Fisher, Betty J Fisher, Dale Fisher, F A

Fisher, J C Fisher, Jack Fisher, Richard L Fisher, Robert J Fitzgerald, David B Fitzsimmons, Robert Flagg, Robert M Flaherty, Ethel S Flath, John E Fleishour, A E Fleishour, Evelyn Flemister, V L Flenniken, Peter V Flood, M E Flora, Joseph R Flora, Joseph R Jr Florence, John H Floto, Wade Flowers, Clark H Fluharty & Son Const Fluharty, Wanda R Fogle, Dennis Fogle, Eugene Foltz, James Foltz, James N Ford, James E Forshey, Edward W Forsyth, James D Forsythe, James Foster, David C Foster, Lake Foster, Mark H Foster, Robert G Fowler, George E Fowler, Robert A Fox, Jeffery C France, Bernice R Francis, Richard C Francy, Elmer Frank, Ed Frank, Joseph Frank, Joseph G Fraser, Larry Frazier, Howard L Frederick, Bert Freed, Mary Freeman, Argil A Freeman, Linda A Freund, Ambrose L Frey, Velma P Frey, William Jr Frey, William Sr Friley, Arthur Friley, Forrest E Friley, Helen K Frisch, Willis E Fry, Marvin D Fulton, Sandy


UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Funk, Terri K Furbee, Susan Gaddie, David L Galay, T G Galentine, John F Jr Gall, Robert Gallagher, Allen Gallagher, William Y Gallaher, Elsie Gamble, Sherree S Gammon, Leroy Garbrandt, Ruth Gardner, E E Garn, Vaughn G Garner, A W Garren, Carl B Garren, Dorothy Garrison, Gene Gartrell, John M Garvin, Marsha M Garza, Edna M Gavorcik, Tracy Geckler, Cheryl A Geckler, Donald Geibel, Candice Geiger, Judy Geiser, Sam Geisman, Penny B Generous, John L Gentry, Glenn S George, A N George, Eva George, Marilyn E George Pappas Mining George, Ray E George, Tom Gephart, Phyllis J Gerard, Stephen C Gerkins, J W Gerstenslager, K E Ghaster, Thedore J Gibbons, Phyllis R Gibbs, John D Gibbs, Robert E Gibson, Mark R Gibson, Pamala K Gibson, Samuel R Gibson, Scott Gidley, Kenneth E Gill, Robert E Gill, Robert G Gilliam, Hazel V Gilliam, Marvin E Gingerich, Lucy Gingerich, Michael L Gipson, Raymond A Glass, Anthony F Glauser, Carol L

Glenn, Steven P Glover, F G Glover, Richard W Goddard, Charles A Goddard, Clarence M Godfrey, James H Goldean, John E Gonzales, Michael D Goodenberger, Craig W Gooding, Darrell L Goodwin, Chester P Gorby, James R Gordon, Delbert Gordon, Milan C Gorrell, Charles E Gorrell, T M Gotschall, Ray H Gouge, William T Gould, David C Gower, Keith E Grabiec, John Grable, Joy E Grace, Gavin Grafton, Rex E Graham, Rodney A Grant, Leslie L Graubner, Helen Graves, William Gray, Daniel C Gray, Daniel P Gray, Garry A Gray, Josiah W Sr Gray, Linda Gray, Randy E Greathouse, Arlis Greathouse, Bessie Green, Charles Green, Garry W Green, Herman E Green, Kendall L Green, Marion J Green, Norma Green, Richard G Gregory, Warren C Gressinger, Robert M Grezlik, John Gridley, Brian H Gridley, Harold Griffith, Charles Griffith, David H Griffith, Elizabeth M Griffith, Howard Griffith, Kenneth Griffith, William L Grigsby, Alberta R Grimes, Adaline Grimes, Henry Grimm, Roy

Grimwood, C H Grisez, Frank O Grodhaus, Dennis Groff, Nancy Grosenbaugh, Norma J Grosenbaugh, William Jr Gross, David W Grove, Vaden Grover, James E Grubaugh, Ralph Gruber, Elbert E Gruber, William Guess, Ward Guist, Dennis K Guley, John Gulling, Gerald P Gump, Thomas G Guzzo, V J Haas, Kenneth Haas, Larry D Haas, Leroy Haas, Linda G Haas, Richard K Hadden, John D Hagerty, Mary E Hahn, Donald R Haines, Genevieve Haines, Homer L Haines, Paul E Haines, Robert F Haley, Richard M Halfhill, Robert Halfhill, Robert A Hall, Cheryl Hall, John D Hall, Leeden W Hall, Mary E Hall, Robert Hall, Robert W Hall, Sam Halley, Larry T Hamby, Charlie J Hampton, Johhny R Hancock, Shirley E Handy, Mike Hanes, Orvin T Haniotes, William M Hanley, Jack Hanlin, Charles F Hanna, Clifford S Harbold, Kathryn Hardesty, Howard E Hardesty, Larry A Hardin, Robert Harding, Gloria Harding, Ralph Harkless, Carl R Harless, Emma

Harlin, David P Harlow, James D Sr Harmon, William D Harper, James R Harper, John H Harper, Sharon K Harris, Betty J Harris, Harvie O Harris, Michael W Harsh, Earl D Jr Hart, Donald L Hart, William M Hartley, Clyde Hartong, Cyrus Hartong, Estella L Hasselquist, Ted Hatcher, James Hattie, Donald P Hauber, Charles E Haught, Edna J Haught, Margret J Haun, Harold Haupt, John E Sr Hawk, Chester Hawk, Chester O Hawk, Fred Jr Hawkins, Clyde E Hawkins, Donald L Hawkins, Jeffrey L Hawkins, John Hawkins, Linda Hawkins, Robert L Hayden, Jack Hayden, Jackie H Hayes, Loren D Hays, Jay Hays, Mary O Hazen, Dean L Heddleson, Cliford E Heeley, Robert Hein, Lowell W Heinbach, James E Heiney, Mary Heinzman, Howard Helfrich, William Helline, Leo H Heminger, Michael Heminger, Timothy Hemming, George A Hemphill, Ralph Hemphill, Ralph J Henceroth, Harry G Henderson, Calvin O Henderson, Ruth Hendricks, John Hendrus, Andrew G Hennig, Jack L Hennig, Vickie L

Henninger, Vivian Hennis, Daniel Hepler, Kenneth Hepner, Larry A Hermanson Construction Herrington, Hazel Herrington, Norma J Hesford, Edwin E Hess, Robert A Hester, Hobart Hewitson, Donna Hewitt, Lloyd E Hibbard, David O Hibbs, William E Hickle, Joseph E Hickman, Howard Hickman, Richard Hickman, Rick D Hicks, Cheryle Hicks, Sue G Higginbotham, Robert Hildreth, Charles Hildreth, William H Hiles, Mary A Hill & Gully Dune Buggy Hill, Esta Hill, Helen J Hill, Henry Hill, Jessie L Hill, Joseph K Hill, Shirley A Hilliard, Frederick E Hilly Haven Dairy Hiner, Lewis Jr Hines, John C Hinkel, Dennis Hinman, George H Hinton, Martain T Hissner, Edwin C Hites, Larry H Hobson, Donn A Hodge, Bessie Hodge, Patrick K Hoff, R W Hogling, Arthur W Holden, Gloria A Hollis, F B Holmes, Clyde Holmes, Deborah J Holmes, Garry Holt, William E Home Equity Homerica Honeycutt, Henry L Hoobler Lumber Hoobler, William H Hood, Glenn R Jr

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UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Hoopes, Donald G Hoopingarner, Joseph Hootman, Beatrice Hopkins, Clarence E Jr Hopkins, John H Horn, Sharon Horvath, George Hoschar, Philip S Host, Harold Houghton, Ernest Householder, Dennis Householder, Diane Householder, John Housley, Richard L Howell, Emerson Howell, John W Sr Howell, P B Huber, Thomas Hudson, W E Huff, Laurence E Huffman, Brian Huffman, Johnnie Huffman, Randy D Hughes, Jerry R Huguenot, Dan Hull, Jessie K Hull, William Hummel, Gerald Humphrey, Frank W Hunter, J M Hunter, Thomas K Hunter, Wilbur D Huntsman, Robert E Hupp, James Jr Hupp, Susan C Hurst, Edgar A Hurst, Thomas L Hurst, William E Huston, William R Hutchison, Mark V Hutton, James Ickes, Michael L Inboden, Ralph W Incarnato, Raymond J Ingledue, Ronald Inman, Charles Ipson, Clara A Irish, Ann Irvin, William J Isenhour, Eubert Isham, Donald R Isner, Duane A J Wentzel & M Hukill Jackson, John Jacobs, John M Jr James, Ellen James, Paul H James, Russell G

James, Sidney T James White Constr. C Janke, Lydia Janosky, Philip J Jarvis, William Jefferis, Dorman R Jeffers, William G Jenkins, Christine E Jenkins, Francis L Jenkins, Joseph Jenkins, Joseph W Jenkins, Thomas L Jr Jenkins, William L Jespersen, Hans Jewell, Ralph B John, R E II Johns, Lucille Johnsen, Georgine R Johnson, Al Johnson, Benny L Johnson, Donald R Johnson, Eugene A Johnson, Glenn E Johnson, Herman Johnson, John D Johnson, Norman Johnson, Pattie J Johnson, Randy V Johnson, William D Johnson, William L Johnston, Carrie L Johnston, Howard Jones, Alan Jones, Dennis P II Jones, Edgar W Jones, Gary C Jones, Harry D Jones, Harry T Jones Plumbing & Heating Jones, Raymond F Jones, Virgil E Joseph, Arthur Jovin, Kenneth P Judge, Thomas E Judy, Curtis Justice, Jack P Jr K S T Oil & Gas Co K S T Oil & Gas Co Inc Kackstetter, John H Kahn, Jeffrey Kail, Mark A Kaiser, Anna M Kaiser Keystone Home Kaiserling, Stephen H Kalbrunner, Lee Kangas, David C Kaplan, Harry

20F OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Karaffa, William A Karcher, James L Karner, Roger R Karrer, M T Kassay, Helen Kassay, Michael Kast, Julius W Katich, Anthony P Kauffman, A R Kaufman, Anastacia J Kaufman, Carol Kautz, William Jr Keeder, Wilma Y Keeton, Danny B Keffer, John J Keffer, Margarita R Kehoe, Coletta F Kellar, Pauline Keller, Harry J Keller, Pamela M Keller, Robert G Kelley, Donald Kelley, Michael L Kellogg, Richard L Kelly, Albert E Kelly, Carrie C Kelly, John G Kemmer, Juanita R Kendall, C K Kennedy, A D Kennedy, Earl E Kennedy, Garry B Kennedy, Jerry Kennedy, Joseph A Kennedy, Marilyn Kennedy, Thomas G Kenny, Lloyd Kerns, Valli Kerr, Ronald C Kerzisnik, June A Kessler, Robin

Kestner, Walter Ketchum, Alvin E Ketchum, Evelyn Ketchum, Frank Kidd, Opal L Kieffer, Kenneth W Kiko, Donna J Kiko, Ray E Kilgore, William O Killgrove, O M Kinchen, J N Kinder, Connie S King, Kenneth L King, Roy C King, William King, William A Kingery, David Kinney, Marian Kinsey, Herbert F Kinsley, L G Kirby, Henry J Kirk, Jimmy V Kirkpatrick, Dorothy L Kirkpatrick, Gerald Kistner, John W Jr Kizer, Larry W Klassen, Aaron G Kleen Homes Inc. Klema, Andrew J Kling, Marshal O Klotz, Ruth Knarr, David P Knepper, Stanley Knepper, Stanley R Knerr, Roy Knight, Michael E Knight, William Kobelt, Willard Koch, Eddie J Koch, Ernest Koch, S D

Kocher, Mark T Koehler, Clifton Koehler, Harold F Kohl, Jennie M Kohler, Debra Kohler, Michael K Kolbenschlag, George R Kolm, Richard Komenich, Anna Koontz, Walter L Korneluk, Ruth E Kotch, Stephen F Kovacik, Kathy S Kraft, Frank J Krake, Joseph P Krantz, Ronald E Krantz, Thomas L Kraska, Donald H Kraus, Larry Kreiling, James L Kress, Gordon Krivacic, James M Krug, John Kuenstler, Theodor Kulczak, John H Kuli, Amiel Kulla, Ruby W Kunkel, Douglas Kupcik, Mary E Kurlinski, J G Kuryn, Tom Kuttie, Arthur W Kuyper, John Ladich, Mitchell Lahm, Ralph Lahue, William Lahue, William O Lamb, Linda L Lambert, Gayle J Lamborne, Norman Lance, Randy A

If you are a current member and move off of Carroll Electric’s system, it is important that you keep your address current with us. Each year following your move, if you are entitled to a capital credits refund, your check will be mailed to you.


UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Land Unlimited Inc Lane, Michael C Lane, Ronald L Lang, Daniel M Lang, Donna Langdon, E E Lapat, Jerome J Larch, Elwood Larch, Ronald K Laris, Walter J Larkin, Mildred Larkins, Michael L Latimer, John E Jr Lauva, Janis Law, James T Lawrence, Gary G Lawson, Leroy Lawton, Mike Le, Beau Charles E Leach, Judy Leake, Janice Leatherman, Gary L Ledger, Harry Lee, Elizabeth Lee, Irene R Lee, Lucinda Lee, Owen D Lee, Thomas Leech, M D Leedy, Ernest Leedy, John Leggett, Howard Lehman, David Lehman, Doris Lehman, Harry W Lehman, Kenneth R Lehman, W E Lehman, Warren E Lehnhard, Doris Lemaster, Joseph Lenkey, Myron J Leon, Richard Levine, Peter Lewis, Alice L Lewis, Doris D Lewis, Edward Lewis, John J Lewis, John R Lewis, Richard L Leyda, Herbert G Liber, Mary Lichtenwalter, Dennis R Liermann, Fred Lieser, James D Light, Claude Lightner, Joseph Lightner, Thomas M Lillie, Rose M

Lindsay, Sandra Lindsey, Kenneth O Linn, James B Lint, Gary W Little, George H Little, Richard P Litzinger, Richard G Llewellyn, Mike Lloyd, Delphia Lloyd, Dewey Lloyd, Howard R Lloyd, Viola Locke, Donna J Locke, John Locke, Melvin Locker, Dean R Logan, Wilmer E Lombardi, Edward L Loncher, Kathy Long, Betty J Long, Chester E Long, Dwight Long, Glenn H Long, Jack C Long, James F Long, Maynard E Long, Thomas Long, Thomas H Looby, William T Loudermilk, Harford J Louis, Richard W Lovas, Kathleen B Lowrey Organ Center Lucht, Raymond Ludwig, Emerson G Ludwig, Paul Ludwig, Tom Luehrs, Richard J Lutz, Ronald E Luzer, Mary A Lynch, Victora Lynn, Edna M Lyons, Donald G Madden, Christopher H Madison, Doris C Madison, Franklin J Magnetto, Raymond Maher, Helen L Main, Nancy Malcuit, Bruce A Malcuit, Michael W Malina, Michael Jr Mallernee, David L Mallett, Albert J Manbeck, Harold E Manist, William E Mann, J B Mann, Tom

Manse, L N Mansfield Drilling C O Marchewka, Joseph C Marianek, D J Marinucci, Aldo Markland, Homer C Markle, Virgil E Markley, Charles W Markoski, Charles C Markwell, Phillip L Marlette, Stuart Marlor, Robert Marple, Denzil L Marsh, Joseph B Marshall, Alberta Marshall, E D Marshall, Leo A Marshall, Peter E Marshall, William E Marten, William Martin, Allen Martin, Charles Martin, James Martin, James L Martin, John Martin, Ralph E Martin, Raymond Martindale, Douglas Martinek, Lajos Mason, Jack J Mason, Joseph A Massay, Chloe M Masseria, Anthony Massolini, Frank Sr Mathews, John Mattevi, William C Maurer, Helen Maxwell, Ronald E May, Charles R Mayberry, Larry T Maydock, Betty J Maydock, Steve E Maydock, Steve G Mayle, Dan J Mayle, Hershel M Mayle, Therman Mayle, William M Maynard, Lmc III Mays, Delores Maze, Matthew O Mcafee, Donald Mcafee, Robert G Mcarthur, Ernest L Jr Mcbrayer, Joseph E Mcbride, Gary Mcbride, Sandy Mccaffery, III Francis T Mccallin, John F

Mccallum, C R Mccardel, Edwin M Mccarthy, William T Mccartney, Joy B Mccarty, David Mccauley, Guilford F Mccauley, James O Mcclaskey, Tom Mcclaskey, Vicky Mcclead, John L Mcclearnon, A B Mcclelland, Terry L Mccollister, Carl Mccombs, Donald E Mccombs, Melody K Mcconnaughy, John H Mcconnell, Richard J Mcconnell, Sherri I Mccourt, E A Mccourt, F J Mccourt, Lawrence F Mccourt, Ronald Mccready, Harold G Mccreery, James Mccune, Russell E Mcdannels, Thomas P Mcdavitt, Agnes E Mcdavitt, H C Mcdonald, Willeen Mcdonie, Susan L Mcdonnell, Kenneth Mcdonough, Carolee Mcdougal, Walter R Mcewen, James B Mcfall, George R Mcfarland, Floyd Mcfarland, William A Mcfrederick, Charles Mcgaha, Jack Mcgraw, Edward W Mcgraw, Timothy D Mcgreal, Donald J Mcguire, Palmer Mckee, Carroll T Mckenna, Shawn F Mckillop, Robert Mckinley, Martha Mckinley, Martha M Mckinney, M L Mclane, D B Mclaughlin, Ruth Mclemore, Ralph Mcmahon, Thomas M Mcmannis, Larry G Mcmillan, Fred Mcmullen, Homer Mcneil, Michael Mcnutt, David A

Mcnutt, Delbert Mcnutt, Susan L Mcqueen, Gail Mcquilkin, Willard H Mcrobie, Garland W Mcrobie, Mac Mcvay, Judith Mcvehil, Donald M Meek, Bonnie G Meese, Martha Menapace, Ernest Menard, Ethel Menges, Adrian G Merckle, F Merckle, Floyd H Merrill, Lynch Merriman, Clyde Merriman, Wayne Merryman, Thomas A Metlicka, David J Metz, Ernest A Metzler, Imogene Meyers, Don Michael, Gary J Michael, Richard E Mick, John C Miday, Ronald J Middaugh, Edna M Mihal, William P Mihalik, Nick Mihaltian, R D Mihaltian, William E Millard, William J Miller, Beverly G Miller, C H Miller, David G Miller, Earl M Jr Miller, Frederick W Miller, Glenn N Miller, James A Miller, James C Miller, Jerry W DVM Miller, Joe P Miller, John A Miller, Josephine K Miller, June A Miller, Laura L Miller, Mary Miller, Menno Miller, Olive Miller, Richard F Miller, Robert F Miller, Rodney J Miller, Timothy M Miller, William A Miller, William B Miller, William H Milliken, Frank H

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UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Millinger, Harriet Mills, Cheryl Mingus, Billy S Mingus, Don Jr Minko, Mary J Minnear, William H Minor, George J Minor, Robert L Mischik, Michael C Miskimens, Everett J Mitchell, Gerald G Mitchell, Pam Mitchell, Randi L Mitchell, Richard E Sr Mitchen, Joseph E Mizok, Paul T Mobley, Charles E Moles, Ronald N Mong, Kenneth D Monger, Charles W Monigold, Elenora J Monroe, David Monroe, Ronald Moody, Gary L Moody, Johanna Moore, Arthur Moore, Charles Moore, Dennis E Moore, Gary L Moore, Gene M Moore, Lura M Moore, Maurice W Moore, Paul E Moore, Roy Moore, W L Moore, Wynona Morckel, Howard Morckel, Philip E More Ex Way Ministri E Moreland, Carl W Moretich, Thomas A Morgan, Howard K Morgan, R Morgan, Roy C Morris, Charles Morris, Darril Morris, David Morris, Mary I Morris, Russell Morrison, Charles Morrison, Kenneth D Morrow, Bearl Morrow, James A Morrow, James W Morse, Mary Mort, Gladys Morton, Peter L Moschgat, Douglas

Mottice, James Mowls, Wilbur J Moyer, Robert A Muldovan, Stephen A Mullins, Guy Mumma, Wayne W Munger, Betty Munger, John P Muntean, Eugene J Munteanu, Joseph Murphy, Charles R Murphy, Wayne D Murray, Larry Musarra, Rosario Mushrush, W G Mushrush, W G II Mutigli, Richard A Myers, Alan R Myers, Darius Myers, Earl Myers, Homer D Myers Kent Construct I Myers, Ray E Myers, Ray V Sr Myers, William C Nagel, Roy W Nagley, Robert Nakoneczny, Michael Jr Nasuta, James Neacox, Kenneth Neale, Corey J Nedrow, David E Neeley, David Neely, Kenneth E Nelson, Charles A Nelson, Rick L Nemethy, Joseph J Nero, Nick Jr Nettleton, Gordon Newburn, Sarah G Newhouse, Stan C Newhouse, William J Newman, Art Newman, Carol L Newman, Dennis L Newman, Donald Newsom, Thomas I Nicholas, Donald R Nicholas, General C Nicholas, Janet Nimon, Russell Niswonger, Robert Nixon, George G Nixon, Mary H Noble, Wayne A Noel, Suzzanne P Norcia, Edward Norris, Bruce V

20H OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Norris, Denver Norris, John K Northeast Nat’l Gas C Northeast Natl Gas CO Nourie, William P Novotny, Joseph Noyes, Proctor A Nunez, Patricia J Nutial, Janis Nutter, Marsha O, Tool Margret Oakes, Willis R Oates, Arthur Oberer, Daniel Lmd Oberlin, Robert Obney, Gary Ocheltree, Kenneth Ocker, Larry E Oconnor, Daniel R O’connor, John T O’connor, Randall K Oehlstrom, Fred T Oerter, R E Ohio Coal & Constr CO Ohio Oil & Gas Explorat Ohio Pure Water Comp A Ohler, William G O’keefe, Lloyd F Oldfield, James F Omerod, David W Ondrey, George R O’neal Productions I N Orme, Timothy Orr, Reuben F Otex Inc. Ott, David H Otto, Joe C Owens, Sue Oyer, Jim Paden, Robert A Page, Larry Palfy, John Palijash, Victria M Palmer, George R Palmer, Keith A Palmer, Leslie Palmer, Ronald W Palmer, Russell Jr Palmer, Ruth Panasiti, Michael A Pappas, George S Pappas, Theofanis Parham, Joe Paris & Morabeto Const Parks, Albert D Parks, Richard C Parks, William V Jr Parr, Paul L

Parson, Darrell Pasanen, Robert A Pasco, Carl E Pasco, Roy E Passwaters, Harold L Patrick, Loretta J Patrick, Petty J Patrick, Wes Patterson, Audrey Patterson, Delbert D Patterson, Samuel L Patterson, Steven H Patterson, Warren A Paul Hatcher Inc Pausley, C G Pecaitis, Margaret Pelley, Robert Pendergrass, Ronnie Pennock, Gerald L Perdue, Melvin D Perkins, Delores A Perko, Alice Perozek, James B Perrine, Rose Perry, Ruth Perry, Sharon Perunko, Charles C Peter, Antal B Peter, Anthony B Peterman, Glenn L Peters, James J Petersburg Gen. Stor Peterson, Eric Peterson, Gene L Petro, Lewis Corporation Petroff, Georgina Phelps, Darrell Phila, Gun Club Philippi, Eugene A Jr Phillips, Charles A Phillips, Gary B Phillips, Gene Phillips, John Phillips, Walter E Phinney, Lawrence Piatt, Dale F Jr Pickett, Jeffrey Pickett, Kim Pietrafese, William J Pietras, Roy Pipo, Andrew Pirkle, B A Pisklo, R E Pitts, Dwight Pitz, Dorothy E Plotner, Helen E Poland, Walter F

Polen, Frances E Poling, Donald R Pollock, B J Polumbo, Ralph A Poole, Alberta Poole, Deborah Porter, Charles R Potter, Alvin F Pratt, Delno L Prattz, Charles J Prendes, Stephen Preston, Paul Pretot, Edward J Pribik, Mary Price, C L Price, Robert J Pritchard, Dan Pritchard, Robert Pritt, H D Provens, Clyde Pumneo, Nick Punch, Thomas Puskarich, Rudolph Pyle, Eugene E Quillen, Robert E Quinn, Thomas C R J Miklos Constr. C O Raber, Roman A Radenkovic, Karl L Raeder, Ted L Railing, Max M Rainsberger, A L Ramage, Helen Rambaud, Benjmin Rambling, Ridge Saddle C Ramey, Arkie Ramey, Ken Ramsey, Charles Ramsey, Keith Ranalli, Ronald J Rance, Robin Randazzo, Vincent A Randolph, E W Randolph, John J Randolph, Leopha C Jr Ransom, Dean A Rante, Mary Rapp, Ollie J Rarric, Robert W Rauch, Chris A Raver, Gail F Rawson, Harold F Rawson, Lester W Ray, James L Ray’s Auction & Discoun Rea, Carrie


UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Redlin, Keith J Reed, Clay A Reed, Garnet G Reed, Kenneth J Jr Refiners Petro Corp Reichert, Barbara L Reid, Blanch A Reikowski, Ralph C Reiss, Christian C Renicker, Mark Reninger, Wanda Renzenbrink, Roy Repasky, Andrew Repasky, Catherine Repp, R D Reusser, Marilyn Rex, Gary Reymann, Elinor A Reynolds, Thomas M Rhoads, Launie L Rhoads, Sara Rhodes, Kenneth K Rice, June L Rice, Kevin D Rich, Edward R Rich, Ruth Richards, Homer Richards, Ralph Richards, Ralph E Richardson, Joseph R Richey, William D Richmond, John Rickbrodt, Raymond Riddle, Cloyce Riggs, Stanley D Jr Riley, Don B Ringler, Robert D Rininger, Paul A Rininger, Susan D Rippel, Helen G Risnear, Gerald L Ritchie, Harold W Ritchie, Wilfred J Rittenhouse, Richard L Ritzo, Julius Robberts, Daniel D Roberts, Marvin M Roberts, Thomas G Robinson, D A Robinson, Donald E Robinson, Edwin O Robinson, Frank J Robinson, James Robinson, James H Robinson, Lynda M Robinson, Timothy P Roby, Lewis Rodgers, Werner H

Rodroguez, T A Rogers, Charles E Rogers, Effie Rogers, Homer Rogers, Joe K Rogers, Robert S Rohall, Andrew Rohr, Zola Rohrer, Barbara A Rohrer, Ernest Rohrer, William Roman, Daniel Rominger, Ronda P Rood, George D Rood, Louise Roop, Harold E Root, Steve Rose, Steve Rosenberger, Atlee O Jr Roshon, Willie A Ross, Bruce E Ross, Shirley J Roth, Karl L Roth, William Rothacher, Arlene G Roudebush, Beverly A Roudebush, Roy Rowe, Robert D Rowe, Roy Rowlee, Floyd Rowley, Robert M Rowntree, Frank R Rubel, Sam Rufenacht, Paul F Rummes, Richard A Rural Sports Inc Rush, Loretta Russell, Fred Russell, George Russell, L B Russell, Lester E Jr Russell, Robert L Russell, Wilfred A Ruth, Walter Rutter, Frederick J Rutter, Randall S Ryser, William E Sabatino, Mike Saccucci, Emil A Sado, William G Sado, Wm G Saffles, Donald Salapack, John Salapak, Michael J Salensky, James Sallade, Gary L Salsberry, Frank Saltis, Lawrence M

Salvatore, Phyllis Salvatori, Joseph D Sanchez, Sara M Sanders, Colman L Sands, Walter Sandy, Jerry R Sanniti, James E Santore, Helen A Sassos, Sax Sattoria, Jack Saunders, Hubert J Saunier, Edward L Sawatzki, Gustav Sawyers, Dwayne R Scarlett, W D Schaar, Lynn Schaberl, John J Schall, Russell Scharfenberg, David W Schladen, G F Schlerntzauer, Donald A Schloemer, Daniel N Schlott, Robert A Schmidt, Claire A Schmidt, John M Schneider, Evelyn M Schoenbrunn Estates I Schoonover, Nellie Schott, Elmer C Schrader, John J Schramo, John Schreffler, Leo R Schrock, Eugene Schulz, William A Schupbach, Michael A Schuringa, Alice M Schwartz, Sam Schweitzer, Frances B Schwensen, Robert Scott, Alan E Scott, David A Scott, Florence M Scott, Gary Scott, William J Scoville, Ray A Scurto, Dennis C Seaburn, Carl E Search, E F Searls, Warner D Sears, Carl Sears, Delmar Sears, Mark C Sears, Russell Seemann Builders Inc Seiberling, Mildred K Seifert, J W Seith, Howard K Sell, Evelyn G

Sellers, Terry Seneca Mining Co In C Senkbeil, William L Sensanbaugher Truckin Serfass, Kenneth Sesto, Larry Setley, William W Sevald, Robert J Sexton, John L Shaeffer, James Shaffer, Daniel W Shaffer, Donald Shamblen, Louise Shanabrook, Dale W Shank, Jimmy D Shank, Robert D Shank, Robert W Shannon, Jack P Shannon, Sue A Shapero, James I Sharpe, Joseph E Shasteen, Robert R Shaw, Michael S Shay Oil Co Sheets, & Rawson Sheline, John H Shepard, Howard W Shepherd, Michael D Shepler, Henry M Shepperd, Herbert W Shirley, Rodney D Shively, Charles R Shivers, Lloyd Shockling, Richard D Shockling, Thomas R Short, James E Shotwell, Charles Showalter, Phillip G Shreffler, C L Shremshock, George Shreve, Anna B Shriver, Pagan M Shroyer, Susan Shultz, Lee Shultz, William Shuman, Jeanett Siciliano, Italo Sickles, John Sickles, William E Siegel, Ralph Siegmund, Emil A Siegmund, Robert V Sills, Gary L Sills, Velma Simmons, Colletta J Simmons, Don R Simmons, Earl W Simon, Tom

Simpson, B T Jr Sines, Donald M Jr Sines, Robert T Sipes, William Sirasky, Gerald M Sivets, Kenneth Skalsky, John M Skibiski, Larry B Skipper, Scott Slagle, Carl D Slagle, Dean Slater, Donald R Slater’s, Landfill Slates, E L Slentz, James M Sligar, James Slocum, Ruth Slone, Stephen T Slusser, Herman H Slutz, John W Smeal, Wallace A Smith, Betty J Smith, Carl Smith, Chad Smith, Charles E Smith, Darrell Smith, Donald E Smith, Donald R Smith, Floyd Smith, H E Smith, H F Smith, Herlen D Jr Smith, Jerry L Smith, Joanne H Smith, John Smith, John J Smith, John R Smith, Kenneth R Smith, Lamar D Smith, Larry Smith, Louis J Smith, Louis J Jr Smith, Marland L Smith, Mary K Smith, Mary M Smith, Mervin A Smith, Ralph Smith, Richard A Smith, Roelof B Smith, Sherri Smith, Stephen S Smith, Tim R Smith, Virgnia Smith, W E Smith, Wayne B Smith, Wesley Smith, William Smith, William W

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UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Smith, Winford L Snodgrass, Laurence A Snodgrass, William J Snyder, Bert Snyder, C C Snyder, Edna M Snyder, James E Sr Snyder, Melvin Snyder, Michael Snyder, Winfield Soliday, Don Soliday, Violet Somers, Paul C Sommers, Lloud Sonntog, Randall R Sousa, R H South, David L Sowards, R E Spaar, Charles W Spahr, Paul Sparks, Gary L Sparks, Kenneth Spehar, Millard Speicher, George Spencer, Roger L Sr Spikes, L R Jr Sponseller, Priscilla J Sprankle, Elvin Sr Spring, Haven Lodge Springer, Carl E Jr Sprouse, Roy E St, George Terry Stackhouse, Robert Jr Stahl, Charles D Jr Stair, Norma G Stalder, Harold Staley, Jim M Stando, Louis J Stanley, Richard L Stansbery, Leroy A Stanton, Carl C Jr Stark Radio Telephone Starks, Zeston Starr, Rolland E Statler, Lenny A Stebbins, Thomas A Steed, Eugene J Steer, James W Stein, M A Steiner, Carl Steiner, Charles Steiner, Gary D Steiner, Joseph F Steis, W B Stephens, James Stephenson, Cecil C Stern, Ginger V Stern, Wilda L

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Stevens, Gail Stevens, Robert Stevenson, Alice Stewart, Dale Stewart, Ida R Stewart, Mary L Sticker, Jesse E Jr Stickley, Janet M Stidom, Roy A Sr Stine, Donald E Stirpe, George A Stockburger, Robert Stone, Devern C Stotts, John V Stout, Donna J Stovall, Eugene Strand, David N Stranger, Alice V Strawder, Arlie D Strawder, Patricia A Strawderman, Ronald Striker, David Struk, John Stuart, Robert A Stuller, Richard Sturtz, Elizabeth S Sturznickel, James F Sturznickle, James F Stuthers, James G Stuver, Sandra Sukosd, Dan Sullivan, William E Suma, John Jr Superior Petroleum IN Superior Petroleum SE Sutton, Edna R Sutton, William Swager, William W Swiger, Roy Swihart, John R Swiney, Lucy M Swiney, Roberta Swogger, Albert L Sycks, Stanley R Syler, J T T J S Realty Inc Talbott, Lynn M Tamilio, Armond Tanner, Charlotte N Tanner, Walter E Taylor Bros. Builder S Taylor, Charles Taylor, Howard R Teeters, Duain F Temple, Ralph W Tennant, Gary D Thayer, James L The City Loan & Savings

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING â&#x20AC;˘ JANUARY 2018

The OH Savings & Trust Thoman, Robert J Thomas, Sharon Thompson Apiaries Thompson, Jack Thompson, Lindsey Thompson, Mary Thompson, Oliver Thompson, Robert L Thompson, Sandra E Thompson, Thomas E Thompson, William E Jr Thorley, Scott E Tice, Harry Tilton, Mary A Toalston, Michael S Toalston Oil No 1 Toalston Oil No 2 Todd, Elizabeth A Toland, Robert C Tolley, Arthur R Tolley, David V Tolley, Hayward Jr Tomblin, Rondall Tompkin, David W Toner, Lawrence E Toothman, John T Tope, Paul C Torrent, Carlos J Toth, Susan J Totherow, Linda Totherow, Teresia Town & Country Nursing Townsend, Chris Trachsel, Dale E Trachsel, Gerald J Transamerica Relocation Trapp, Roy Traster, Frances Trescott, Kenneth D Tressel, Dorothy G Tri County Wrecking Trotter, Wesley Troutman, James R Troutman, Marilyn Troyer, Alvin Troyer, Lloyd Troyer, Ruth Truax, Deborah Tryon, Donald Tucker, Carle R Tucker, Helen C Tucker, Kimberly Tucker, Richard E Tullius, Garland J

Turcott, D V Turcotte, Robert E Tusco Sports Club I N Twaddle, John Twaddle, John W Twin Springs Mobile H Twin Springs Mobile Hom Tyrrell, Robert L Uhr, William J Ulman, Lisa K Ulrich, Cathy Ulrich, Leroy C Umpleby, Anna Union Valley Church Unkefer, Atlee M Uplinger, Debra L Urban, Charles A Utz, Harold J Vadjinia, Mike P Jr Valentz, James R Van, Fossen Carol L Van, Gorp C J Van, Horn Boyd Van, Meter Carl Van, Meter George W Van, Sickel David A Vance, Karen A Vance, Ruby Vance, Samuel R Vandegrift, Erma Vanderbush, Fred Jr Vankirk, Wray E Vannoy, Levi A Vanvoorhis, Georgia Varble, Michael J Jr Varner, Dan Varner, Dan R Vaughn, Leon G Vekas, Paul J Sr Verboski, Joseph L Jr Vermillion, Carl Vermillion, Monika L Veterans, Administrat I Victory Village Viergutz, Robert T Vinci, Diane Virden, Winona E Virtue, Clyde S Virtue, Zahara R Volzer, Robert B Vona, Jerry N Voshel, Charles Vrsan, Andy Vutetakis, George W B Coal Co Wachtel, Max Wackerly, David G

Wackerly, Glen E Wackerly, Robert Wade, Artie H Wade, Ernest H Wade, Frances I Wade, Iva C Wade, Rex V Wade, Robert E Wafler, Terry L Waggoner, Ralph J Wagner, B L Wagner, Emmett Wagner, John W Wagner, Ray A Wagner, Richard H Wagner, Sara L Wagnor, Kennith Wahl, George W Walker, Maynard W Walker, Paul M Walker, Robert M Walkup, Leroy R Wallace, Bill J Wallace, Joseph H Wallace, Reed A Wallace, Richard E Wallace, Ronald Walter, David C Walter, Jerry Walters, Marlin Walters, Marlin M Walton, Ed Walton, James P Waltz, Raymond Wamsley, Edward W Wamsley, Harold L Ward, Dorothy Ward, Otis S Wargo, Ed H Warkall, Karen D Warner, Charles Warner, Dorothy M Warner, Ethel Warner, Michael Warr, Carol Warr, Ronald F Warren, David Warren, Leaford Warring, Alfred H Warwick, Robert W Watkins, Jane Watring, Isabele Watring, James K Watson, William D Watt, Ramona Watts, Larry A Watts, Nancy Wauffull, George A


UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Weaver, Dexter G Weaver, Edward L Weaver, Florence A Weaver, H P Weber, Joseph R Weber, Paul E Webster, Margaret E Weekley, Todd S Weimer, Jack O Jr Weir, L H Weise, Jon H Weisent, Kenneth H Welch, Josephine Weldon, Doyle R Welker, Carl H Wellington, John W Jr Wellman, Robert W Wells, Bruce Wells, Edward Wells, James M Welsh, Patrick J Welton, Melvin Welz, Melva Wendell, Dennis Wendling, Norman L Wenger, Harold E Werner, James Werstler, Helen Wesley, William T West, David C West, Onalee West, Sunset Valley A S Westfall, Nolan B Westlake, Evelyn

Westlake, W C Wetzel, Simone Weyand, James E Wheeler, Donald D Whipkey, John A Whissel, Fred White, Bernard White, Delores White, J D White, Lewis R White Shield Oil & G A Whittaker, George W Jr Whittaker, H P Jr Whitten, George A Whittington, Richard Wickersham, Bradley Wickham, Joseph L Wigfield, Willard R Jr Wiggins, Leo Wiggs, J D Wiggs, Stanley T Wiggs, William Wilcox, Charles A Wilcox, Don C Wilcox, Sheridan T Wilcox, Stephen D Wilder, Haskell Wiley, Ellis A Wilhelm, Thomas N Wilkin, Jerry L Willham, Kenneth T Sr Williams, Ida E Williams, Lowman C Williams, Michael L

Williams, Paul F Williamson, Edna Williamson, H M Williamson, Sylathia Willison, Samuel E Wilson, Charles Wilson, Jack Wilson, James G Wilson, Robert B Wilson, Susan Wilson, Thomas A Wilson, Thomas L Wilson, William J Wilson, Winfred Wilt, Steve Wingerter, Lester Wingerter, Lillian Wingerter, Ray Winland, Donald M Winland, Stephen B Winn, Lynn Winter, James E Winter, Thomas P Winters, Opal Wise, Clarence Wise, Clifford P Wise, Cliford J Wise, Paul J Wisniewski, Brent Witco Chemical Corp Withey, Charles Wm King Oil Co Wohlford, James D Wollam, Joseph C

Wood, Darlene Wood, Evan R Woodburn, Joseph R Woodward, William J Woodward, William J Jr Woomer, Ronald Workman, Norman F Worley, Paul Wortman, Dolores R Wright, A T Jr Wright, Bob Wright, June Wright, Lewis S Wright, Robert Wright, Wanda M Wrikeman, John Wucinich, William J Wurzel, Edward M MD Wyant, Cliford Wyant, Joseph A Wyatt, Calvin Wyatt, Joseph Wyatt, Joseph L Wyles, Jack Wymer, Kenneth W Wynn, Dennis R Yakubowski, Adam A Yakubowski, Jerald Yannone, Nick R Yard, Jim Yeager, Mary E Yeagley, Ralph Yentzer, Dana R Yockey, David A

Yoder, Owen H Yoe, Duane Yoho, Mack S Yoho, Olive D Yoss, Darrel A Yost, James W Young, Bertha J Young, Dan R Young, Paul C Young, Raymond A Young, Roger K Young, Wilbur H Young, William Sr Your, Robert E Yuhas, Ethel Zahir, Sam Zandler, Frank Zandt, Charles F Zaytzeff, Mark A Zerby, Robert R Zimmerman, Dorothy M Zimmerman, James L Zimmerman, Joseph W Zindle, Pauline E Zink, Dwight R Zito, Coral Zobenica, Michael Zoll, James D Zurbrugg, Delmar Zwick, Lester

A note about unclaimed capital credits According to the Cooperative’s Code of Regulations, these names must be published twice in two consecutive issues of Ohio Cooperative Living magazine. Notice to the individuals named in the above list: According to the cooperative’s records, you have not claimed a capital credits refund check from the cooperative. Unless the capital credits check is claimed within 60 days following the last date of publication of this notice in Ohio Cooperative Living magazine, or within 60 days following the date of the cooperative’s notice by mail, whichever date occurs later, such capital credits payment shall become an effective irrevocable assignment and gift to the cooperative. This is the second of two notices for the years allocated 1974-1981.

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

20K


CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

FAQs Unclaimed capital credits The names included on the unclaimed capital credits list are members who moved out of Carroll Electric’s service area and did not provide a forwarding address. They may be friends or relatives of current members and therefore are being publicized in this issue of Ohio Cooperative Living. Do you recognize a name on the unclaimed capital credits list? If so, please read through the most common questions related to unclaimed capital credits before calling Carroll Electric. Why does my name appear on an unclaimed capital credits list? The last time we attempted to send a capital credits check, the United States Postal Service returned your check as “undeliverable.” A forwarding address was not provided to Carroll Electric or the postal service, making it impossible for us to forward the check to your new address.

My deceased parent is on this list. Am I entitled to their capital credits? Possibly, but we need to talk to the executor of his or her estate. We must have documentation and verification from the executor to proceed with capital credits refunds.

My neighbor is on this list. Can I claim their capital credits for them? No. You cannot claim capital credits for another person. Capital credits must be claimed by the person listed. Or, in the case of a deceased person, capital credits may be claimed by the executor of the person’s estate. If the person is living, and you know how to contact them, please encourage them to call Carroll Electric at 1-800-232-7697.

Please be aware that Carroll Electric does not send capital credits checks for $5 or less, so there is the chance that your unclaimed capital credits balance is a small amount. *You’ll receive the capital credits that you are entitled to. Uncollectible accounts — accounts that were left with a balance — will be paid before capital credits checks are mailed.

How long will it take to get my money? Unclaimed capital credits may take six to eight weeks to research and process before you receive a check.

What do I need to provide to claim capital credits? 1. The last four digits of your SSN

Your SSN was required when you signed up for electric service with Carroll Electric. It is a part of how we identify the account(s) you have held with Carroll Electric. Since there are many people with the same name, it helps to ensure that we are providing capital credits to the correct individual.

2. Your current mailing address

Unclaimed capital credits will be provided to you via check sent through the mail.

When I call the office, will you tell me how much money I’ll receive?

How long do I have to claim unclaimed capital credits?

We’ll need to research the account(s) and get back to you with an amount.* Our computer system generates capital credits for every year you were a member of Carroll Electric. We’re currently working to provide unclaimed capital credits for an eightyear period. We will take a look at each of those eight years before we provide a total, taking care to make sure you didn’t have multiple accounts in your name during that period.

Carroll Electric will redistribute unclaimed capital credits 60 days after the second notice appears in Ohio Cooperative Living magazine, or 60 days following the date of the cooperative’s notice by mail (whichever occurs later). The second notice appears in this magazine. You have until March 1 to call Carroll Electric to claim capital credits.

20L OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018


Co-ops push for common-sense replacement rule in place of CPP In October, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced plans to repeal the Clean Power Plan (CPP), a regulation that would have increased costs and impacted many electric cooperatives across the nation. Now, the EPA, informed by public comment, must work to develop a common-sense replacement plan.

away from natural gas use for electricity to developing coalbased electric generation. In many cases, co-op members are still paying for those facilities — and the roughly $12 billion in pollution control measures that were added to them since the early 1990s. But as it turns out, electric co-ops and other utilities are already making significant changes in how they generate power. Co-ops and their members value a healthy environment and vibrant rural communities. Market forces and members’ interests are driving co-ops to further diversify their electric generation portfolios. As a result, co-op-owned coalfired generation has dropped 9 percent since 2014, and co-op solar capacity has increased five times in just the past two years.

Carroll Electric is glad to see the rule go. We’re working with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), our national trade association, to encourage the EPA to replace the rule with a plan that focuses on individual power plants. We hope the agency will craft a replacement The cooling tower at the coal-fired Cardinal Plant in Brilliant, Ohio, emits water vapor rule to address power plant following a $1 billion project to reduce Cardinal’s emissions legally, provide impact on the environment. co-ops with the certainty and flexibility required to meet their members’ needs, and support co-ops in their We live in a carbon-constrained world, and electric mission to provide affordable and reliable electricity. co-ops are reducing their carbon footprint. In fact, since 2005, co-ops have increased electric generation Electric co-ops depend on a diverse fuel mix to meet by 15 million megawatt-hours while reducing carbon the energy needs of 42 million members across the dioxide emissions by nearly 10 percent. nation, protect reliability of the energy system, and ensure affordable power. The fact is that no two Given the progress happening without the Clean electric co-ops are exactly alike. The nation’s 900 Power Plan, you may ask why we want the EPA to electric co-ops rely on a diverse fuel mix to meet go back to the drawing board to come up with a members’ energy needs, maintain reliability, and replacement rule. The main reason is certainty. A ensure affordability. Each one makes strategic longworkable, common-sense rule that adheres to the term investments in energy sources that make the law clarifies the rules of the road for co-ops, which most sense for them. Any new regulation needs to will then be better able to make smart, long-term account for this reality. investments in electric generation. Regulatory certainty is an essential ingredient in ensuring a This flexibility to pursue a diverse fuel mix allows reliable supply of affordable power. co-ops to respond to local and regional factors and member preferences while ensuring affordable and Co-ops are looking forward to working with the EPA reliable power. Past federal policy pushed cooperatives on a plan that gets it right this time around.

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

21


CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

NOTEWORTHY Cash no longer accepted in the field Members paying cash to avoid disconnection must drop off their cash payment to our office during regular office hours 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Check, Visa, or Mastercard are preferred methods of payment for members up for disconnect.

Deadlines approach for youth programs Children of members who seek to apply for a Carroll Electric scholarship or Youth Tour are encouraged to turn in their application on or before the February 1 deadline. For more information, visit www.cecpower. coop or call 1-800-232-7697.

Service availability charge increase This month, the service availability charge increased $3.50 for residential and small commercial meters. For a complete list of rates and service charges, visit www.cecpower.coop.

Win a $1,000 COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP

Paying your bill? We have an app for that Download the SmartHub app on your mobile device. View and pay your bill, monitor daily and monthly electric use history, and report an outage all at the touch of a screen. SmartHub is also available on your desktop computer with additional features. Log on today at www.cecpower.coop.

CARROLL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

CONTACT

President

1-800-232-7697 | 330-627-2116 www.cecpower.coop

Harold Sutton Gary Snode Vice President

Harold Barber Secretary-Treasurer

REPORT OUTAGES 24/7 TO:

1-800-232-7697 OFFICE

350 Canton Rd. NW P.O. Box 67 Carrollton, Ohio 44615 OFFICE HOURS

Todd Brown William Casper Frank Chiurco Robert McCort Diane Tarka Kevin Tullis Trustees

Larry J. Fenbers CEO/General Manager

7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 20N 22

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION? E-mail your ideas to:

info@cecpower.coop facebook.com/CarrollElectricCoop twitter.com/CarrollElectric HIDDEN ACCOUNT NUMBER

Check the Carroll Electric local pages of this magazine for the hidden account number. Somewhere in this section is an account number spelled out. If this number matches your account number, call the co-op office to claim your credit. You must call by the end of the month in which your account number appears.

Carroll Electric Cooperative, Inc.


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO

Ohio co-op crews help restore power in New Hampshire

COURTESY OF BILL CARTER

With the reconnection of service to an empty cottage on Bear Island in Meredith, New Hampshire, on November 7, power was fully restored to all members of New Hampshire Electric Cooperative (NHEC) who had lost it — roughly two of every three members — in the worst windstorm on record for the utility, which blew through on Oct. 30. Ohio line crews were instrumental in the effort, as 40 workers from 11 co-ops around the state jumped in for a full week of mutual aid that restored power to 51,000 NHEC members — outages were reported in every one of the 115 towns served by NHEC — and the crews were recognized during television newscasts on WMUR in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Nov. 4 and Nov. 6. All of the Ohio crews had returned home by Nov. 9 — some had been gone as long as nine days.

Pioneer raises more than $2,000 for Pink Ribbon Girls Throughout October, Pioneer Electric Cooperative employees participated in various events to raise awareness and donations for Pink Ribbon Girls, a local organization created by women with breast cancer to support and empower others who are currently in the fight against breast and reproductive cancers. The group provides meals, housecleaning, transportation, and peer support to individuals with breast and women’s reproductive cancers, free of charge. Employees and trustees purchased T-shirts worn on designated dates throughout the month. Linemen and operations employees also wore pink hard hats throughout October to help spread awareness, and other employees participated in a chili cook-off. Both employees and Pioneer members had the opportunity to add pink ribbons to an honor wall in both of the co-op’s offices, in Urbana and Piqua. Each ribbon displayed the name of someone who has been directly affected by breast cancer.

Consolidated volunteers at camp for the disabled For its annual in-service day, Consolidated Electric Cooperative employees spent a day at Recreation Unlimited, a not-for-profit organization and camp serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. Consolidated’s staff cleaned up trails, windows, life jackets, and rafts, and also assisted with office mailings.

NWEC employee retires after nearly half-century of service North Western Electric Cooperative’s Duane Peugeot retired on Nov. 3 after 47 years of service to the co-op. Throughout his career as a lineman, Peugeot served as a mentor to all who worked with him.

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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GUESS WHO’S

Coming to Dinner A

ttractions across Ohio host dining events throughout the year that feature more than just food — the guests of honor include historic figures (actors, impersonators, or simply historians with a flair for the dramatic, most with Ohio ties) and make for enriching experiences that combine a dash of education with a huge helping of dinner theater.

Dinner with the Presidents Marion County Historical Society, Marion Nov. 3 Every autumn, Marion County’s historical society holds a buffet dinner attended by several U.S. presidents depicted by members and volunteers who not only don period clothing (“Thomas Jefferson” wears a waistcoat) but also use appropriate props (“Franklin Roosevelt” arrives in a wheelchair). Dishes made from White House recipes highlight the dinners, and the roster of illustrious invitees ranges from George Washington to Woodrow Wilson. The society also plans to add a luncheon series this year. 740-387-4255; www.marionhistory.com JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

25


Poe in Person: An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe James A. Garfield National Historic Site, Mentor Oct. 19–20 Just before Halloween, visitors get a rare opportunity to tour President Garfield’s home at night, during which they will enjoy an autumnal dessert of cookies and cider, and see actor David Keltz recite terrifying tales and poems by Edgar Allan Poe. His performances always include “The Raven” and a Poe classic such as “The Pit and the Pendulum.” Tip: Look for Garfield’s own Poe volumes in the site’s Memorial Library. 440-255-8722; www.nps.gov/jaga/

Presidential Packages

McKinley Presidential Library & Museum, Canton Canton’s multifaceted McKinley Library & Museum offers prearranged programs for groups that include a meal and a visit to its McKinley Gallery and the world’s largest collection of William McKinley artifacts. In the gallery, education director Christopher Kenney wears McKinley’s signature red carnation while presenting his first-person interpretation of the president. Tip: The Library & Museum occasionally offers McKinley State Dinners, which also feature Kenney. 330-455-7043; www.mckinleymuseum.org

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018


Thanksgiving Dinner with Abraham Lincoln Hale Farm & Village, Bath Nov. 17 Go over the river (the Cuyahoga) and through the woods (at Cuyahoga Valley National Park) to Hale Farm & Village, where history buff Jerry Payn acts as Abraham Lincoln — who made Thanksgiving a national holiday — during the living history museum’s annual feast. “Lincoln” usually reads his Thanksgiving Proclamation or Gettysburg Address, and costumed educators from Hale Farm & Village sit at the table and discuss life during Lincoln’s time. Dinner includes turkey and pumpkin pie, and some dishes — including the green beans and leeks casserole — are made from vegetables grown at Hale Farm. 330-666-3711; www.wrhs.org

U.S. Grant Days Georgetown Apr. 26–28 Historic Georgetown was the hometown of Ulysses Grant, whose 1820s Boyhood Home and Schoolhouse are now prime attractions. Every April, the village salutes Grant’s birthday with a three-day, Civil War-era observance that includes infantry drills, period foods such as cornbread, ham-and-bean soup, and skillygalee (salt pork and beans); and local folks play-acting as General Sherman, Julia Grant, and other notables. Highlighting the festivities are appearances by the eminent Grant living historian, Curt Fields, who also portrays Grant for the National Park Service. 877-372-8177; www.usgrantboyhoodhome.org

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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Ida McKinley Mother’s Day Tea

Feb. 10

May 19

Canton’s First Ladies’ Library presents elegant teas with staff members and volunteers expertly playing the parts of the presidential wives and hostesses for a beautiful living-history lesson. This year’s White House Weddings Tea re-creates a Victorian wedding reception, and guests even get small boxes containing slices of cake. It honors Frances Folsom Cleveland, the only First Lady married in the White House. For its Mother’s Day high tea, the library serves scones and sandwiches during a three-act play about Canton’s hometown First Lady, Ida Saxton McKinley, and her mother and sister. 330-452-0876; www.firstladies.org

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12/6/17 3:57 PM


BY KRIS WETHERBEE; PHOTOS BY RICK WETHERBEE

IN THE GARDEN

NO-FUSS HOUSEPLANTS You don’t need a green thumb to grow these good-looking houseplants any time of year

H

ouseplants are a widely popular additi on in many homes. For some people, though, the thought of growing a houseplant has

them seeing only brown instead of green. They

Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) Low-maintenance and a versatile favorite, pothos can be grown as a mounding plant if growing tips are pinched, or allow vines to spill over a hanging basket or climb up a moss stick or support. Popular varieties include golden pothos, marble queen, and golden queen. LIGHT: Will grow in low light to bright sunless light, though some light is needed to keep variegation on leaves.

may think their indoor growing conditi ons are

WATER: Water regularly, allowing soil to dry out slightly between waterings; water less in winter.

less than opti mal, or maybe they simply think that

GROWING TIP: Leaves love to be misted.

houseplants are too fussy or take too much ti me. The good news is that you can forget the primping and pampering; there are several houseplants

30

that are easy to grow and maintain, and provide

fact, the best tip to care for any of these no-

any home a touch of green — they’re nearly

fuss houseplants: Always water in moderation;

indestructible and resilient, and happily survive

overwatering is the easiest way to kill them. For

and thrive in nearly any condition and with a

most, it’s usually best to allow the soil surface to dry

level of care that might border on neglect! In

out between waterings.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018


Dracaena (Dracaena spp.) Available in many shapes and forms, with leaves either green or dressed in bi-color or tri-color stripes. Three easy-to-grow types are dragon tree; corn plant; and the deremensis varieties that include all-green “Janet Craig,” the white-edged Warneckii, or the striped series with colored margins in white, yellow, and green. LIGHT: Will grow in low-light areas; best coloring in light shade to medium light. WATER: Keep consistently moist spring through fall; reduce watering in winter. GROWING TIP: Avoid dry soil and overwatering; direct sunlight may scorch leaves.

Heartleaf Philodendron (Philodendron scandens) Said to be the easiest philodendron to grow, this trailing sweetheart of a plant bears 3- to 5-inch shiny green leaves. Tolerates both poor conditions and neglect. LIGHT: Best with indirect light and even grows in low light. WATER: Will tolerate moderate to somewhat dry soil; does best with regular watering, with soil drying out somewhat between waterings. GROWING TIP: Pinch out growing tips to keep plant bushy, or allow vines to trail or grow upright on moss stick.

Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum) Graceful, attractive plant with long, lance-shaped glossy-green leaves and long-lasting white “flower” leaf bracts. Tolerates short-term neglect and will even flower in low light levels. LIGHT: Low to bright indirect light. WATER: Keep moist but avoid overwatering; water when the top of the soil feels dry to the touch. GROWING TIP: Leaves love to be misted; do not grow near cold winter window drafts.

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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BY DAMAINE VONADA

EVERYBODY LOVES ERMA Dayton’s Erma Bombeck was the original mommy-blogger

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ong before mothers were blogging about their daily lives, Erma Bombeck’s syndicated newspaper column — “At Wit’s End” — acquired a legion of faithful followers by mixing her musings about marriage and motherhood with healthy doses of humor. Born and raised in Dayton, Erma certainly knew her subject. She and her husband, Bill, had three school-age children when, at age 37, she began writing the column on a makeshift desk in a bedroom of her suburban Centerville home. Shortly after a Dayton newspaper started running “At Wit’s End” in 1965, it was syndicated and eventually appeared in 900 U.S. newspapers. Three times a week, some 30 million readers turned to Erma for comic relief from the foibles and frustrations of family life. Erma observed that socks disappear in the dryer; that folks choose bathing suits more carefully than spouses; that coat hangers seem to reproduce in closets; and that nobody ever died from sleeping in an unmade bed. She also had a gift for coining proverb-worthy one-liners — “Never have more children than you have car windows” — that are as insightful and relevant now as they were when Erma wrote them.

Erma says: “If you can’t make it better, you can laugh at it.” 34

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018


Her pointed housewife humor made Erma the nation’s favorite mom and a nationally known media personality. Time magazine even put her (and three of her clever quips about housework, cooking, and guilt) on its cover in 1984. “Erma wrote about the ordinary in an extraordinary way,” says Teri Rizvi, founder of the University of Dayton’s Erma Bombeck Writers’ Workshop. “She told a story in 450 words that had people across the country laughing over their morning coffee.”

Erma says: “Seize the moment. Think of all those women on the Titanic who waved off the dessert cart.” While her print column paved the way for today’s digital mommy-blogs, Erma’s stories were selfdeprecating instead of self-centered. She turned everyday incidents into allegories, and her columns were free of angst, petty complaints, and the names of her three children. “She was skillful at keeping us generic enough that people were able to read about us and still think, ‘That’s my kid,’” says Matthew Bombeck, a California writer and Erma’s youngest offspring. Erma realized that both laughter and families are universal, and because she never made her column overtly personal, women particularly identified with her honest and unpretentious writing style. “She gave a voice to

women, and especially to moms,” notes Bombeck. “She said that there was dignity and humanity in raising children and that it was important.” Though she never sugar-coated the challenges of domesticity, Erma valued her role as a parent more than her career. “I never remember her not being there for the things happening in our lives,” says Bombeck. “She wasn’t just home for dinner; she made dinner.” Indeed, as a youngster, Bombeck was so oblivious to the success of Erma’s column that he told someone his mother was a syndicated communist. “We really had no idea what she did,” says Bombeck. “To us, she was Mom.” Erma, however, was a mom who was serious about writing humor. “Because she had a journalism background and three deadlines a week, my mother was very disciplined and hard-working,” says Bombeck. Rather than wait for the literary muse to strike, Erma carried a legal pad with her, and whenever things happened that gave her ideas for her column, she jotted them down. Erma religiously blocked out writing time while her children were at school, and if she closed the door to her “inner sanctum,” they understood that Mom wanted to focus. “If we needed something,” Bombeck recalls, “we’d slip a note under the door. We knew not to disturb her work time.”

Erma says: “Housework, if you do it right, will kill you.” Continued on Page 37

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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Continued from Page 35

In 1971, the Bombecks moved to Arizona, where Bill pursued a graduate degree. Erma’s fame, fortune, and stature grew as she wrote best-selling books and tackled television, but she never forgot her Dayton roots and maintained close ties to her alma mater, the University of Dayton. Although Erma always had writing ambitions, it wasn’t until a UD English professor, Tom Price, informed her, “You can write,” that she was sure of her talent. “His words,” says Bombeck, “really validated her and made her think she could do something with her writing.”

Erma says: “Worry is like a rocking chair: It gives you something to do but never gets you anywhere.” When Erma died in 1996, she was arguably the nation’s most popular columnist. She never won a Pulitzer Prize, but ordinary Americans gave her a far higher honor by posting her columns on their refrigerator doors. Just in time for what would have been Erma’s 90th birthday in 2017, packed houses for the recent stage play about her — Erma Bombeck: At Wit’s End — proved that her words still resonate, and her humor is timeless.

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JANUARY 2018 CALENDAR

NORTHWEST

ENDS JAN. 7 – Hayes Train Special Exhibit, R.B. Hayes Library and Museums, Spiegel Grove, 1337 Hayes Ave., Fremont, Mon.– Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $7.50, Srs. $6.50, C. (6–12) $3. An operating model train display runs through an intricate Victorian holiday scene. Interactive buttons allow visitors to control aspects of the trains’ movements. 419-332-2081 or www. rbhayes.org. JAN. 5 – Silver Screen Classics: War of the Worlds, Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St., Toledo, 7:30 p.m. $5. 419-2422787 or www.valentinetheatre.com.

THROUGH FEB. 28 – “Glorious Splendor: Treasures of Early Christian Art,” Toledo Museum of Art, 2445 Monroe St., Toledo. Features some 30 masterpieces of Late Roman art: precious stones, metals, and jewelry. 419-255-8000 or www.toledomuseum.org/exhibitions.

NORTHEAST

JAN. 6 – Model Train Clinic, R.B. Hayes Library and Museums, Spiegel Grove, 1337 Hayes Ave., Fremont, 1–4 p.m. $2. Veteran model train hobbyists will assist you with advice related to model train maintenance and repair, as well as estimating the value of older model trains. 419-332-2081 or www.rbhayes.org. JAN. 6 – Silent Movie Night: Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights, Pemberville Opera House, 115 Main St., Pemberville, 7:30 p.m. 419-287-4848 or www.pembervilleoperahouse.org.

gauges. Buy, sell, or trade new and collectible trains. 440-5269864 (Lee McCarty), macsir@aol.com, or www.cvsga.com. JAN. 10–14 – Ohio RV Supershow, I-X Center, One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Wed.–Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. $13, under 12 free. $10 parking. America’s largest indoor recreational vehicle show. 330-678-4489 or http://ohiorvshow.com. JAN. 13–14 – Medina Gun Show, Medina County Community Ctr., 735 Lafayette Rd. (St. Rte. 42), Medina, Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m $6. One of the area’s largest gun shows, with over 450 vendor tables. 330-948-4400, jim@ conraddowdell.com, or www.conraddowdell.com.

ENDS JAN. 7 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Over 75 life-size, hand-painted nutcrackers in an outdoor display. 866-301-1787. JAN. 6 – Antique and Collectible Old Toy Show, Lakeland Community College (AFC Auxiliary Gym), 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. $6, C. (6–12) $2. Pressed steel, diecast, mechanical toys and robots, dolls, and much more. 216-470-5780 (Tom), cleveshows@att.net, or www.neocollectibletoys.com. JAN. 6 – Snow Dogs Train Show, presented by Cuyahoga Valley S Gauge Association, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $6, under 12 free. Free parking. Allgauge show with over 150 tables. Operating layouts of several

SOUTHEAST

JAN. 13–14 – Mohican Winter Fest, 131 W. Main St., Loudonville, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free. Award-winning Aaron Costic and his crew from Elegant Ice Creations are back to make some truly inspired creations from ice. See over 25 elegant ice sculptures. Additional ice carving around Central Park fountain, fire spinning, and entertainment. 419-994-2519 or www.discovermohican.com. JAN. 14 – Mohican Winter Hike, Mohican State Park, 3116 St. Rte. 3, Loudonville, 10 a.m–1 p.m. Choose from 5K, 10K, or a guided nature hike led by a park naturalist. Trails run from moderate to difficult. Campfire, hot soup, cookies, and drinks will be provided after the hike. 419-994-5125 or http://parks. ohiodnr.gov/Mohican.

ENDS JAN. 2 – Dickens Victorian Village, downtown Cambridge. Stroll the streets to view scenes depicting life in 1850s England, featuring life-sized, handmade mannequins wearing real vintage clothing. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. ENDS JAN. 2 – Holiday Light Show, Guernsey County Courthouse, Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m.; Jan. 1, 5:30–11 p.m. Four different light and music shows performed each evening. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com.

JAN. 6–7 – Tri-State Gun Show, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima (2 miles east of Lima on St. Rte. 309), Sat. 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 18 free. Over 400 tables of modern and antique guns, knives, hunting equipment, and associated collectibles for purchase. 419-647-0067 or www. tristategunshow.org. JAN. 12 – Silver Screen Classics: North by Northwest, Valentine Theatre, 400 N. Superior St., Toledo,7:30 p.m. $5. 419-2422787 or www.valentinetheatre.com. JAN. 12–14 – Civilian Markmanship Program: Camp Perry Open, 1000 N. Lawrence Rd., Port Clinton. A thrilling and unique event for air rifle and air pistol competitors, both adults and juniors. Spectators welcome. 419-635-2141, kharrington@ thecmp.org, or http://thecmp.org. JAN. 20–21 – Lima Symphony: Baroque by Candlelight, Sat. 7:30 p.m., Trinity United Methodist Church, Lima; Sun. 4 p.m., St. Augustine Catholic Church, Minster. $20, Stds. $10. 419-2225701 or www.limasymphony.com.

JAN. 18–21 – Mid-America Boat Show, I-X Ctr., 1 I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Thur.–Fri. 12–9 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. $14, Srs. $12, under 13 free. Features all-new “boating experience” pavilion and Metroparks exhibit. www. clevelandboatshow.com. JAN. 20 – Northern Ohio Fly Fishing Expo, Cuyahoga Valley Career Ctr., 8001 Brecksville Rd., Brecksville, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $10, Youth (13–18) $5, free with military ID. Seminars, fly casting demonstrations and lessons, beginning fly tying, fishing gear and supplies, and more. http://ncff.net/expo/. JAN. 21 – Norwalk & Western RR Winter Model Train Show, German’s Villa, 3330 Liberty Ave., Vermilion,10 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 10 free. All scales, operating layouts and displays, model train supplies, railroad historical items, and more. 419706-8038 or www.norwalkandwesternrr.com. JAN. 26–28 – Cleveland Motorcycle Show, I-X Center, One I-X Center Dr., Cleveland, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 9:30 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $16, under 12 free. $10 parking. 216-2657005 or http://motorcycleshows.com. JAN. 27 – Winter Train Meet, presented by Great Lakes Division, Train Collectors Association, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Adult $6, Family $8, kids admitted free. Free parking. All-gauge show with over 175 tables. New and old trains to buy, sell, or trade. 440-665-0882 (Ed Mularz), emularz1124@aol.com, or www.greatlakestca.org.

JAN. 14 – Rhonda Vincent & The Rage, Stuart’s Opera House, 52 Public Square, Nelsonville, 3 p.m. $28–$38. The most award-winning band in bluegrass music history performs at a special Sunday matinee. www.stuartsoperahouse.org. JAN. 20 – “Digging the Past:” Archaeology Day, Campus Martius Museum, 601 Second St., Marietta, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Learn about Quadranaou, a prehistoric earthwork between Third and Fourth streets in Marietta. View original artifacts from the prehistoric to the historic period displayed by local collectors and others from around the state. 740-373-3750 or http:// campusmartiusmuseum.org.

JAN. 14 – Bridal and Prom Showcase, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 12–4 p.m. $5. Caterers, DJs, photographers, realtors, hair salons, makeup artists, and more JAN. 27 – Country on the Carpet, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., will be available with ideas to make your special day memora7033 Glenn Hwy., Cambridge, 7 p.m. $6 advance, $8 at the ble. 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com. door. A great lineup of country and bluegrass music for your listening pleasure! 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

CENTRAL

session about the Gahanna Herb Group and the new Earthy Herbal Garden Series. 614-342-4250 or www.gahanna.gov. JAN. 12 – Presidio Brass: “Sounds of the Cinema,” Marion Palace Theatre, May Pavilion, 276 W. Center St., Marion, 7 p.m. $18, Stds. $10. The five-member ensemble combines a brass quintet, piano, and percussion instruments with fresh, original arrangements for a unique sound. Come enjoy this bold new generation of brass entertainment. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

JAN. 5–7 – Columbus Build, Remodel, and Landscape Expo, Greater Columbus Convention Ctr., Halls C and D, 400 N. High St., Columbus, Fri. 12–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, under 18 free. From top-quality exhibits, to informative seminars, to insightful demonstrations and more, you’ll discover thousands of smart, stylish, and cost-effective ways to design or renovate your home. www. homeshowcenter.com. JAN. 5–14 – Ohio RV and Boat Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., 717 E. 17th St., Columbus, Wed.–Fri. 12–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. This year’s event will feature over 21 dealers from all over central Ohio with hundreds of campers and boats. Also includes ATVs, motorcycles, and golf cars, plus camping gear, equipment, and more. www.ohiorvandboatshow.com. JAN. 11 – Herb Center Open House, Ohio Herb Education Ctr., 110 Mill St., Gahanna, 6:30–8 p.m. Free information

SOUTHWEST

JAN. 12–21 – Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical, Columbus Performing Arts Ctr., Van Fleet Theatre, 549 Franklin Ave., Columbus, 1–2 p.m. Adults $15, kids $10. The perfect show for a family-friendly outing, filled with adventure, song, a beloved stuffed animal, and dancing laundry! 614-469-0939 or www.catco.org. JAN. 19–21 – Midwest Sports Spectacular, Ohio Expo Ctr., Cardinal Hall, 717 E. 17th Ave, Columbus, Fri. 3–8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission on Fri., $10 for Sat./Sun. pass. Sports collector cards, vintage and new collectibles, memorabilia, autograph signings. http:// ohiosportsgroup.com/2018-midwest-sports-spectacular/. JAN. 20 – Hocking Hills Winter Hike, 19852 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan, beginning anytime from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Free. See the beauty of Hocking Hills in the winter as you hike from Old Man’s Cave to Ash Cave, with a stop at Cedar Falls for soup and cornbread. 740-685-6841 or www.hockinghills.com. JAN. 20 – Logan Frozen Festival, Main St., Logan, 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Free. The festival features more than 30 ice carvings lining Main Street, ice carving demonstrations by

JAN. 6–7 – Wedding Expo and Show, Dayton Convention Ctr., 22 E. Fifth St., Dayton, 11 a.m–4 p.m. $5 advance, $8 at door. Fashion shows 12:30 and 3 p.m. www.weddingapolis.com. JAN. 12–14 – Cincinnati Golf Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati, Fri. 5–9:30 p.m., Sat. 11 a.m.–7 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Find deals on equipment and clothing, get tips from golf pros, find out the best places to golf near and far, and much more. www.cincinnatigolfshow.com. JAN. 12–14, 17–21 – Cincinnati Travel, Sports, and Boat Show, Duke Energy Convention Ctr., 525 Elm St., Cincinnati. Find everything you need to plan your next outdoor adventure! www.cincinnatiboatshow.com.

WEST VIRGINIA

JAN. 19–21 – Winter Wonder Weekend, North Bend State Park, 202 North Bend Park Rd., Cairo. Activities for all ages, including hikes, games, contests, arts and crafts, and much more. 304-558-2754 (Emily Fleming) or https://wvstateparks.com/park/north-bend-state-park/. JAN. 26–28 – Huntington RV and Boat Show, Big Sandy Superstore Arena, 1 Center Plaza, Huntington, Fri. 5–9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. The region’s first and longest continuously running RV and boat expo. 304-7575487 or www.bigsandyarena.com. JAN. 27 – Honey Bee Expo, West Virginia University–Parkersburg, Rte. 47, Parkersburg. $20 advance, $25 at door; age 12 and under, $8. All-day conference dedicated to the honey bee and the hobby of beekeeping. Workshops for all levels of beekeepers, from beginners to advanced. www.movba.org.

the award-winning Rock On Ice, musical entertainment inside and out, plenty of dining options, and a Pop-Up Shop. 800-462-5464. JAN. 26–28 – Johnson’s Log Home and Timber Frame Show, Ohio Expo Ctr., Rhodes Bldg., 717 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Fri. 1–7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Registration Sat./Sun. at 9:30 a.m. $12; 18 and under free. www. loghomeshows.com. JAN. 27 – Workshop: “Grafting the Right Way,” Dawes Arboretum, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 8–11 a.m. or 1–4 p.m. $40/$30 for members. Learn about the science and art of grafting. Rootstock and scion wood provided; attendees may bring their own scion wood, if appropriate rootstock is available. Participants take home their grafted items to nurture. Appropriate for ages 14 and above. Registration required. 800443-2937 or https://dawesarb.org/learn/calendar. JAN. 27 – “Tap Your Trees:” Maple Syrup Workshop, Dawes Arboretum, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 9 a.m.–12 p.m. $15/$10 members. Learn the process of making maple syrup. This interactive class explores techniques for tapping trees; collection, storage, and cooking methods; and kits and common items used in maple syruping. Registration required. 800-443-2937 or https://dawesarb.org/learn/calendar. JAN. 27 – Workshop: “Introduction to Essential Oils,” Dawes Arboretum, 7770 Jacksontown Rd., Newark, 1–3 p.m. $10/$5 members. Learn how to safely and effectively use essential oils. Registration required. 800-443-2937 or https://dawesarb.org/learn/calendar.

JAN. 20 – Rhonda Vincent & The Rage, St. Clair Memorial Hall, 215 W. Fourth St., Greenville, 8 p.m. $25. The most award-winning band in bluegrass music history. 877-8400457 or www.centerforarts.net. JAN. 21 – Wedding Expo and Show, Dayton Marriott, 1414 South Patterson Blvd., University of Dayton, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. $5 advance, $8 at door. Dayton’s premier wedding event. Fashion show 1 p.m., seminar/demo 2:30 p.m., grand prize giveaway 3 p.m. www.weddingapolis.com. JAN. 27–28 – Lebanon Antique Show and Sale, Warren Co. Fgds., 665 N. Broadway, Lebanon, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Browse high-quality antique American and Continental furnishings and decorative arts, textiles, jewelry, primitives, folk art, and fine art. www.wchsmuseum.org.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but strongly urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event by writing to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address of where the event takes place or a number/website for more information.

JANUARY 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

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MEMBER INTERACTIVE

STAYING WARM Our Jack Russell Terrier, Maggie, would always sleep with her paws crossed over her nose, as well as her tail, for extra warmth! Anna and Cecilia Coccia, our granddaughters, staying warm in the snow at our cabin near Laurelville. Sharyn Coccia South Central Power Company member

Jill Ladrick South Central Power Company member

Thomas, the grandson of Jim and Cheryl Fortman, is all ready for the snow, but can’t move! Cheryl Fortman Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperati ve member Lulu loves to snuggle with Grandma to get cozy-warm for a nap. Brandy Bowers Logan County Electric Cooperati ve member

Send us your pictures! Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/ memberinteractive. For April, send “The First Time We...” by Jan. 15; for May, send “Scenic Ohio” by Feb. 14. Make sure to give us your name, mailing address, phone number or e-mail, the name of your electric co-op, and an explanation of the photo, including the names of people shown. 40

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2017 OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • JANUARY 2018

Staying warm ON my friend — our dogs, Charlie and Maggie, enjoying the melting winter snow. Julie Wilhelm Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperati ve member

Talk to us

The Buckeye State is packed with museums of all shapes, sizes, and interests. Connect with your co-op on Facebook and tell us your favorite Ohio museum, along with what makes it so fascinati ng. We’ll print select responses in a future editi on.


ohioec.org

FOCUSED ON YOUR STREET. NOT WALL STREET. Think of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives as your advocate. We represent your local, not-for-profit electric cooperative, which is owned by you and the other members of your community. We’ll always work in your best interest.

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION.

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Ohio Electric Cooperatives Service Areas 4

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1 —  North Western Electric Cooperative 2 —  Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative 3 —  Paulding-Putnam Electric Cooperative 4 —  Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative 5 —  North Central Electric Cooperative 6 —  Firelands Electric Cooperative 7 —  Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative 8 —  Midwest Electric 9 —  Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative 10 —  Darke Rural Electric Cooperative

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1 1 —  Pioneer Electric Cooperative 12 —  Logan County Electric Cooperative 13 —  Union Rural Electric Cooperative 14 —  Consolidated Electric Cooperative 15 —  Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative 16 —  Carroll Electric Cooperative 17 —  The Frontier Power Company 18 — The Energy Cooperative (Licking Rural Electrification) 19 —  Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative

0 —  South Central Power Company 2 21 —  Washington Electric Cooperative 22 —  Butler rural Electric Cooperative 23 —  Adams Rural Electric Cooperative 24 —  Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative 25 — Midwest Energy Cooperative (based in Michigan) 26 —  Harrison Rural Electrification Association

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614.846.5757 | 800.282.6962

Ohio Cooperative Living - January 2018 - Carroll  
Ohio Cooperative Living - January 2018 - Carroll