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Logan County Electric Cooperative Official publication | www.logancounty.coop

Making their case Candidates for governor and senator answer questions from the co-ops

OCTOBER JANUARY 2018


NATIONAL

COOPERATIVE

MONTH

Every October, we celebrate you. After all, co-ops were formed by members, for members, and are still owned by members like you. Thank you for being a part of your co-op!

ohioec.org/purpose


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018

INSIDE 25 Q & A Knowing the importance of electric cooperative voters in statewide campaigns, the major-party candidates for governor and U.S. senator took some time to answer questions that are crucial to Ohio Cooperative Living readers.

32 DAWES ARBORETUM The remarkable Dawes Arboretum begins its second century as a living shrine to its founders.

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 1


UP FRONT

SIX-MONTH CHECKUP I

t’s been a little more than six months since Buckeye Power assumed operational responsibilities for the Cardinal, Mone, and Greenville power plants from our longtime partner, American Electric Power (AEP). I’m pleased to report that we’re off to a good start, with each facility operating safely, reliably, cost-competitively, and in an environmentally responsible manner. Throughout our history, Ohio’s electric cooperatives relied on AEP to manage our plant operations, thereby availing ourselves of the technical expertise and the economy of scale that AEP brought as a larger organization. But as its business model changed and AEP moved away from Ohio-produced electricity, it became clear that it was time for Buckeye Power to step into a management role. We’ve learned much over the years, and even more in the past few months, about what’s needed to run power plants to produce reliable and affordable electricity. While much of what we’re doing today is the same as it’s been for years, we’re learning new and better ways to operate. It starts with a focus on what’s best for every facility — each has different operating requirements, safety precautions, environmental challenges, and workforce needs. Our operations today are leaner than ever, which keeps costs down. Some of the changes we’ve already made include updating computer systems; finding better ways to both reduce emissions and produce cleaner, more usable ash products; and adding fuel oil storage at the Greenville plant to allow for extended operations on the coldest winter days, when natural gas is less available.

We’ve also promoted Bethany Schunn to Cardinal plant manager, whom you can get to know better by reading an interview with her on Page 6. We’re proud of Bethany’s accomplishments in her new role. Bethany helped lead our transition efforts by employing her considerable industry skills and credentials. I trust you haven’t noticed much difference in your power supply over the past several months, but behind the scenes we’ve been busy planning for the future to assure that we continue to provide clean, safe electricity in a reliable and affordable manner. It’s the cooperative way.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

It starts with a focus on what’s best for every facility — each has different operating requirements, safety precautions, environmental challenges, and workforce needs.


October 2018 • Volume 61, No. 1

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Rebecca Seum Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Patrick Keegan, Catherine Murray, and Damaine Vonada. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. It is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 4 POWER LINES RUNNING THE SHOW: Buckeye Power has taken over operations at the cooperative-owned Cardinal Power Plant.

8

WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE ROOTING OUT THE RATS: Our outdoors editor goes on an expedition to help save a state-endangered species.

10 OHIO ICON HARPERSFIELD BRIDGE: One of the oldest and longest covered bridges in the state, the span has carried traffic since 1868.

12 CO-OP PEOPLE ALPACAS APLENTY: Neighboring breeders cooperate to produce animals renowned for their fleece.

15 GOOD EATS COOK-OFF: A good bowl of chili can warm up any occasion. Here

are four dishes to spice up these cool autumn days.

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO

SYSTEM TOUR: Board members at Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative take a day to check out some businesses they serve.

36 CALENDAR WHAT’S HAPPENING: October events and other things to do. The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

38 MEMBER INTERACTIVE COSTUME PARTY: Our readers pull out all the stops to come up

with just the right get-up for trick-or-treat.

IN THIS ISSUE Brilliant (p.4) West Union (p.8) Harpersfield Twp. (p.10) Burbank (p.12) Wellington (p.23) Newark (p.32)

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 3


POWER LINES

TAKING CHARGE For Ohio electric co-ops, running power plant operations just makes sense BY JEFF MCCALLISTER

F

ifty years ago, when two generating units at Cardinal Power Plant were first placed into operation, Buckeye Power was a newly minted generation cooperative, formed and owned by all of the electric distribution cooperatives in Ohio. American Electric Power (AEP), which built the Cardinal plant, offered a unique partnership agreement to Buckeye Power and its member cooperatives: AEP and Buckeye Power would each own one of the two units, and AEP would operate the plant — at cost — for its partner. “From the start, it only made good sense to partner with AEP to run our unit at Cardinal,” says Tom Alban, Buckeye Power’s vice president of power generation. “We each owned one of the units, and they had the experience and knowhow to take the operational responsibility. It’s been a truly beneficial relationship for all of these years.”

4

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018

Due to growth in the number of electric consumers, the Ohio cooperatives added another unit at the Cardinal site in 1977. Cardinal Units 2 and 3 continue to be the workhorses of the co-ops’ fleet, but through the years, Buckeye Power has added to its generation portfolio and now is more diverse than ever before. “Having AEP operate our plants alongside their own worked extremely well for 50 years,” says Pat O’Loughlin, president and CEO of Buckeye Power. “When investments in emissions control systems were required to comply with regulations, AEP and Buckeye Power shared these costs to meet our common objectives. With AEP operating our plants, we were able to gain efficiencies and rely on an experienced company to ensure an environmentally responsible and reliable delivery of power to our members.”


Changes in the regulation of Ohio investor-owned utilities over the past several years have led AEP to close or sell many of its generating plants. Investor-owned utility customers now rely primarily on electricity purchased from the wholesale market rather than having it produced by their local utility. Ohio’s electric cooperatives have seen the benefit of stable prices that has come from owning and operating competitive and efficient power plants such as Cardinal. The longtime partners agreed, therefore, that a change in roles would be appropriate. So while AEP still owns Unit 1 at the plant, Buckeye Power officially took operational charge of all three units in March of this year, after two years of negotiation and preparation. The 320 staff members there became employees of the Cardinal Operating Company, now directed by Buckeye Power management. In addition, Buckeye Power now operates both the Robert P. Mone Plant in Convoy and the Greenville Generating Station in Darke County — both naturalgas-fueled plants that produce during times of higher energy demand.

“We’re excited for the opportunity this transition has given us,” O’Loughlin says. “While our consumermembers should not see any difference, we’ll be working to identify opportunities for cost savings and improvements in the daily operation of the plant that will keep the Cardinal plant competitive for years to come.” Operating the plant also lets the co-ops have greater say in ensuring that the power provided by their power company remains safe, clean, affordable, and reliable. Co-ops have invested more than $1 billion in the last decade on environmental safeguards at Cardinal and have a vested interest in keeping it running at its best.

Cardinal Power Plant quick facts Location: Along the Ohio River, south of Brilliant, Ohio

Capacity: 1,800 MW total Stack height (Units 1 and 2): 1,000 feet Unit 3 cooling tower capacity: 16.8 million gallons of water per hour

Average annual coal use: 5.2 million tons Average daily coal use: 15,800 tons Coal yard storage capacity: 1.3 million tons

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 5


ON THE

JOB

Schunn takes reins as Cardinal Plant manager STORY (EXERPTED) AND PHOTO BY PAUL GIANNAMORE, USED BY PERMISSION FROM THE (STEUBENVILLE) HERALD-STAR

B

ethany Schunn is a chemist by trade. In fact, she began working in the power industry in 2005 at the American Electric Power Conesville Plant chemistry lab, and eventually climbed the ranks to become maintenance superintendent there. She came to Buckeye Power, the generating arm of Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, in 2017, and earlier this year, she was named plant manager at the Cardinal Power Plant, just as Buckeye Power took over operations of the plant from AEP. She is the first woman to hold the plant’s top post in its nearly 50 years of operation. “We’re taking on a new evolution as the business model has changed,” she says. “Just getting everyone’s mindset on that and looking to the future — and not just immediate needs — is what we need to do here. That’s one of my goals, to get everyone rowing in the same direction to achieve that together.” Schunn said it is a challenging time for coal-fired power plants in general, though Ohio’s electric cooperatives, which collectively own two of the three generating units, have invested more than $1 billion in technology that has made Cardinal one of the cleanest coal-fired plants in the world. “We plan to be here for the long haul,” she says. “There may be more environmental regulations to comply with, but we anticipate that and will plan for those as they come up. In the end, we still need to provide electricity for our co-op members, and we need to do it in the cleanest, safest, most reliable, and most affordable way we can.” “I invite anyone to come to Cardinal so we can explain it to them,” she says. “If they would come to the plant or go on one of our tours, we could show them all of our environmental controls and strict safety standards, and that puts people’s minds at ease to know we are thinking about the environment in that way.”

6

While she doesn’t push the agenda of women in the workplace, it is unavoidable that the topic does come up among those who haven’t worked with her. “In this industry, I’m proud of any woman in any role who works here, or in any male-dominated industry,” she says.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018

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OCTOBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   7

8/20/18 9:02 AM


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

ROOTING OUT THE

RATS

indigenous to eastern North American forests. Norway rats, on the other hand, were unintentionally introduced to America centuries ago, coming ashore after stowing away in the cargo holds of sailing ships. Woodrats are members of the packrat family, and as such, have a curious habit of building “middens.” “A midden is not their nest, but rather, a pile of sticks, leaves, and other natural materials that woodrats gather,” says Mollohan. “The pile can be small, only the size of a dinner plate, or huge, measuring several yards long and possibly a yard deep. As researchers, if we find fresh middens, we know woodrats are in the area.” Woodrats also have the interesting habit of collecting oddities they find in the woods, adding them to their midden. They’re attracted to shiny or unusual objects, and the day I accompanied the researchers, we found a piece of

STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

N

ot many people get excited upon seeing a rat, at least, not in a positive way. But there is a group of folks in southern Ohio who go absolutely giddy when spotting one. They are wildlife researchers, and the object of their ardor is the Allegheny woodrat, a stateendangered species.

I had the opportunity to tag along with this group of dedicated wildlife biologists on a perfect early-fall day. The prior evening, they had set more than 50 live traps in a steep, heavily wooded valley in the sprawling Edge of Appalachia preserve in Adams County, near the Ohio River. Approaching the first few traps, Laura Stalder, one of the researchers, yelled, “We got one!” The animal was a large male, weighing about three-quarters of a pound. After the weighing, the researchers took a tiny DNA sample from the woodrat’s ear, then marked a small spot on its white belly with a blue marker before releasing it. If the woodrat is trapped again the following night — as often happens — that blue mark alerts researchers that the particular animal is a recapture. “In just two nights, we can usually catch about 90 percent of a woodrat population living in a particular area,” says Cheryl Mollohan, the researcher heading the team. To be clear, Allegheny woodrats are not Norway rats. Although the two species are similar in size, woodrats are

8

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018


tinfoil, a penny, and a colorful bird feather in the middens we examined. Laura Stalder says that she once had a woodrat take one of the nylon straps from her trail camera to add to its midden, while a second camera recorded a video clip of the theft.

the poop, looking for undigested seeds to eat. By doing so, they ingest roundworm eggs. Ingesting even one roundworm egg can be lethal to a woodrat. Since the eggs persist for several years in the environment, when the next woodrat moves in, it is also infected and dies.”

“Woodrats will also trade you for an object,” says Mollohan. “For instance, when camping in woodrat country, you might wake up one morning to find that the small pocketknife you inadvertently left outside your tent is missing, having been replaced by a nut or other natural object. If that happens, you’ve been visited during the night by a woodrat.”

The Ohio DNR, Division of Wildlife, has taken the roundworm threat so seriously that not only is it funding this woodrat study, it has also been dropping de-wormer from aircraft into areas of known woodrat populations. The hope is that the de-worming of raccoons in woodrat habitats will prevent further spread of the roundworm and reduce infection.

Allegheny woodrats inhabit the shallow rock caves, cracks, and fissures found in large sandstone and limestone outcroppings. Mollohan believes, however, that it’s not a lack of habitat that has pushed Ohio’s woodrats onto the state-endangered list.

So why should we care? What difference does it make if an obscure wildlife species, such as the Allegheny woodrat, becomes extirpated from Ohio? There are many arguments for attempting to save endangered species, but the one that rings truest for me is that the healthiest natural environments are those that support the greatest diversity of species — including humans.

“Raccoon populations in the state have been extremely high for years,” she says, “and raccoons carry a parasitic roundworm that is fatal to woodrats. Woodrats will take dried raccoon feces back to their dens and search through

If you have a wildlife or outdoors-related story idea you’d like our outdoors editor to investigate, he can be reached by email at whchipgross@gmail.com.

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 9


OHIO ICON

HARPERSFIELD covered bridge Ashtabula County

BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: Harpersfield Road, about a half-mile west of State Route 534 in Ashtabula County. Provenance: Constructed in 1868 to replace an earlier bridge lost in a flood, the double-span Harpersfield Covered Bridge measures 228 feet long and crosses the Grand River, a Lake Erie tributary and one of Ohio’s wild and scenic rivers. Its Howe trusses have characteristic X-shaped members with metal uprights, and that exceptionally strong design was used in the 1800s for lengthy roadway and railroad bridges. After part of the Harpersfield Covered Bridge was swept away in the infamous statewide flood of 1913, a 140-foot steel bridge was added to the wooden structure. Property surrounding the bridge and river became part of presentday Harpersfield Covered Bridge Metropark in 1961, and when the one-lane bridge was renovated in the 1990s, a pedestrian walkway for park visitors was added to it.

Significance: Listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1975, the Harpersfield Covered Bridge turns 150 this year and, except when closed for repairs, has continuously carried traffic since 1868. It’s also one of the oldest and longest covered bridges in the state, a treasured local landmark, and probably the most photographed of the numerous covered bridges in Ashtabula County, which is known as the covered bridge capital of Ohio. Currently: Because of its nostalgic architecture, long history, and beautiful setting, the Harpersfield Covered Bridge is a magnet for tourists and covered-bridge aficionados. “The bridge is majestic-looking,” says Ashtabula County Metroparks executive director Larry Frimerman, “and the views of it as well as from it are quite outstanding. You can see the river, the bluffs, and water cascading over the dam.” In addition to serving as the park’s centerpiece, Harpersfield Covered Bridge is a featured attraction at events ranging from kayak races on the river to the annual Ashtabula County Covered Bridge Festival in October. Locals also love to fish from the bridge’s walkway, and the park’s amenities include a bait and gift shop. It’s a little-known fact that: Because of maintenance costs, Ashtabula County’s engineering/highway department is considering a plan to replace the Harpersfield Covered Bridge with a new two-lane, double-walkway covered bridge. The Harpersfield Covered Bridge, 1122 Harpersfield Road, Geneva, OH 44041. Learn more about the Harpersfield Covered Bridge at www.ashtabulametroparks.com/harpersfield-covered-bridge. For information about Ashtabula County’s covered bridges, visit www.visitashtabulacounty.com. Information about the Ashtabula County Covered Bridge Festival (Oct. 13-14, 2018) can be found at www.coveredbridgefestival.org or by calling 440-576-3769.

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  OCTOBER 2018


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OCTOBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


CO-OP PEOPLE

ALPACAS aplenty

Neighboring breeders cooperate to produce animals renowned for their fleece STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

W

hile driving to an alpaca show in Kentucky a few years ago, Debbie Patonai and Spencer Reames decided to listen to music on their cargo van’s radio. Among the alpacas they were transporting that day was Phlint, a male who spontaneously started singing along with the radio. “Phlint sang all the way to Louisville,” says Patonai. “He kept making his humming noise, and whenever we changed the station, Phlint hummed differently.” Patonai and Reames are friends, business associates, and Holmes-Wayne Electric Cooperative members who breed alpacas on neighboring parcels of farmland near Burbank. Patonai operates The Alpacas of Phantasy Pharm (she channeled a family surname by substituting “ph” for “f”), while Reames runs October Skies Alpacas (he named it for October Sky, an inspirational movie about a coal miner’s son who becomes a NASA engineer). They often share facilities and equipment, and their combined herd has some 220 “yours, mine, and ours” alpacas. The two are also award-winning educators. She has taught mathematics for four decades at St. Vincent-St. Mary High School in Akron, and he recently celebrated 50 years of teaching biology at Bellefontaine’s Benjamin Logan High School. Patonai already owned alpacas when she met Reames during a Presidential Awards teaching conference in the late 1990s. While helping her with an international math and science study, Reames got a crash course in caring for the amiable animals. “We were working on my report at the farm one day when Spencer took a break and went out to the barn,” 12

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018


recalls Patonai. “He was gone for hours and came back all dirty. Once you start cleaning alpaca stalls, you’re definitely hooked.” Reames’s first alpaca, a bred female named Melanee, was imported from Peru. “Anytime she heard anyone speaking Spanish, Melanee perked right up,” says Reames. Patonai likewise originated her herd with a bred female — Shannon — from Peru, where Altiplano people developed alpacas about 5,000 years ago. Alpacas are members of the camelid family, but unlike their larger cousin, the llama, they were bred for their soft fleece, not as pack animals. In the textile-rich Inca culture, in fact, alpaca fleece was considered “the fiber of the gods.” Alpacas come in two types: huacaya (pronounced “wah-KY-ah”), which have dense, wavy fleece, and suri (pronounced “SOO-ree”), whose lustrous fleece grows in ropelike strands. “Alpaca fiber is softer and stronger than wool and insulates better too,” says Patonai. She and Reames specialize in show-quality huacaya alpacas and have produced numerous champions. They’re known for breeding dark-colored animals, but a young, whitefleeced male — Phalling Starz — might broaden both their reputation and the hues of the alpaca yarn, socks, and apparel they sell at festivals and craft shows. “Phalling Starz has really exquisite fleece, so we’re going to use him for a herd sire next year,” says Reames. Since alpacas’ gestation period is about 11 months, Patonai and Reames time the birth of crias — baby alpacas — for summer, and they devote their vacations to

Above, Spencer Reames of October Skies Alpacas looks after some of his charges; below, Debbie Patonai of The Alpacas of Phantasy Pharm gives some love to one of her new, lighter-fleeced alpacas. The two neighboring breeders have formed a friendship through their businesses near Burbank, Ohio.

nurturing them. Both have taken alpaca birthing classes, and in 2018, they ushered 12 cria — six female and six male — into the world. Because alpacas are gregarious, they typically welcome human companions during labor. “Phinesse actually will come to get Spencer when it’s time to have her baby,” says Patonai. Phinesse was Patonai’s first cria, and, at age 21, she is now the matriarch of the herd. The oldest male is 18-year-old Phortune, the sire, grandsire, great-grandsire, and great-greatgrandsire of many of the farms’ alpacas. Alpacas are inquisitive and intelligent animals, and Phortune is quite the character, using his mouth to turn on the water faucet whenever he wants a drink. He also turns on lights and delights in pulling open grain bags. “Phortune isn’t hungry,” explains Patonai. “He just likes to watch the grain bags empty.” The Alpacas of Phantasy Pharm, 330-671-1843. October Skies Alpacas, 937-935-2358.

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 13


14

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018


GOOD EATS

Cook-off Everyone has a different idea of what makes one bowl of chili better than another,

bringing spirited debate to many a fall

afternoon. Whatever version you prefer, one thing’s for sure: A good bowl of chili can warm up any occasion.

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 15


CHILI

CHILI

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CHILI

CHILI

CHILI

CHILI

CHILI

CHILI

CHILI

CHILI

SWEET POTATO CHILI

MEDITERRANEAN CHILI

Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 60 minutes | Servings: 6 2 teaspoons cumin 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 small onion, diced 1 teaspoon salt 1 garlic clove, minced 1⁄2 teaspoon pepper 2 pounds ground turkey 1⁄4 teaspoon cinnamon 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into small cubes TOPPINGS (optional) 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes corn chips or pretzels 1 chicken bouillon cube cilantro, finely chopped 2 cups water sour cream 2 tablespoons chili powder

Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 45 minutes | Servings: 5 1 tablespoon cumin 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium yellow onion, diced small 1 teaspoon garlic salt   1⁄2 teaspoon turmeric  1 large red pepper, diced small 1⁄2 teaspoon ground coriander  4 cloves garlic, minced 1⁄2 teaspoon ground paprika  3 cups water large bunch fresh parsley, 1 cup dry lentils  chopped 2 15.5-ounce cans garbanzo beans TOPPINGS (optional) (chick peas), drained and rinsed 3 14.5-ounce cans diced tomatoes crumbled feta pita chips 3 tablespoons chili powder 

In a large stockpot, drizzle olive oil. Add onions and sauté over medium-high heat for 3 minutes. Add ground turkey and garlic and continue cooking 8 to 10 minutes or until turkey is cooked through. Drain excess grease. Add sweet potatoes, tomatoes, bouillon, and water. Rinse tomato can with 1⁄2 cup water and add water to the pot. In a separate bowl, mix all spices, then add to the pot, stirring thoroughly. Reduce heat to a simmer. Cover pot and cook 45 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes. Check that sweet potatoes are tender enough to easily put a fork through before serving. Top with corn chips (or pretzels), cilantro, and sour cream, if desired. *Nutritional info excludes toppings.

In a large stockpot, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and red pepper, sauté for 3 minutes. Add garlic and sauté 2 more minutes. Add water and lentils and cook, covered, over medium heat for 20 to 30 minutes or until lentils are tender. In a small bowl, mix dry spices, then add them to the pot along with the garbanzo beans and diced tomatoes with juices. Stir, cover, and let simmer for 10 minutes. Lift lid and stir in half the chopped parsley. Scoop chili into individual serving bowls and sprinkle with fresh parsley and crumbled feta, if desired. Serve with pita chips. *Nutritional info excludes toppings.

Per serving: 509 calories, 20 grams fat (3 grams saturated fat), 42 grams total carbs, 10 grams fiber, 47 grams protein

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Per serving: 334 calories, 6 grams fat (1 gram saturated fat), 54 grams total carbs, 22 grams fiber, 19 grams protein

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GRANDPA’S SPICY CHILI

CUBAN BLACK BEAN CHILI

Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 75 minutes | Servings: 10 1⁄2 teaspoon salt 3 pounds hamburger 30.5-ounce can Brooks Chili Hot 1 green pepper, finely diced Beans (red beans in chili sauce) 1 medium onion, finely diced 1 6-ounce can tomato paste 2 1.25-ounce packets hot chili 2 cups water  seasoning mix 2 14.5-ounce cans diced tomatoes 1 teaspoon chili powder

Prep: 10 minutes | Cook: 80 minutes | Servings: 8 2 14.5-ounce cans diced tomatoes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 1⁄2 pounds boneless chicken breasts 2 cups chicken stock 1⁄3 cup distilled white or apple 1⁄2 teaspoon salt cider vinegar 1⁄4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 tablespoon chili powder 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 large red onion, diced  TOPPINGS (optional) 3 15.5-ounce cans black sliced avocado beans, drained plantain chips 7.5 ounces chipotle pepper in adobo sauce, minced or pureed diced red onion

In a large skillet, cook hamburger until browned, approximately 10 minutes, breaking it into small pieces. Spoon a little grease into a large stockpot. Add green pepper and onion and sauté for 3 to 4 minutes over medium heat. Drain grease from hamburger. In stockpot, combine hamburger with green pepper, onion, chili seasoning mix, chili powder, salt, tomato paste, and water. Stir well.  Rinse each can with a little bit of water and add water to pot. Add beans and tomatoes with juices. Simmer on mediumlow heat for 1 hour. Store in refrigerator for up to a week or store in small, freezer-safe containers for future meals. Per serving: 383 calories, 10 grams fat (4 grams saturated fat), 26 grams total carbs, 9 grams fiber, 42 grams protein

Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper and add to pot. Cover and let cook for 5 to 7 minutes or until undersides of chicken are nicely browned. Flip and cook another 5 to 7 minutes or until cooked through. Remove chicken from pot and let cool. In the same pot, add garlic and onion (reserving some onion for garnish). Cook until onions are soft, 2 to 3 minutes. Add black beans, minced chipotle pepper in sauce, tomatoes with juices, chicken stock, vinegar, and spices. Stir to combine and continue cooking over medium heat. Using two forks, shred chicken and add to chili. Bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer; cover and cook for 1 hour.  Top with diced red onion, sliced avocado, and plantain chips, if desired. *Nutritional info excludes toppings. Per serving: 726 calories, 7 grams fat (1 gram saturated fat), 111 grams total carbs, 29 grams fiber, 59 grams protein

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 17

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THE EFFICIENCY EXPERT

CUT THE CHILL Tips to stay comfortable this winter BY PAT KEEGAN

When we talk about being warm in our homes in winter, we usually think about where the thermostat is set. But sometimes, even with the heat turned up, it can still feel chilly. It turns out there’s more to winter comfort than just the indoor temperature. An important piece of the comfort puzzle is radiant heat, which transfers heat from a warm surface to a colder one. A person sitting in a room that’s 70 degrees can still feel chilly if there’s a cold surface nearby — like a single-pane window, a hardwood floor, or an exterior wall. Covering these cold surfaces can help. Try using area rugs, wall quilts or tapestries, bookcases, and heavy curtains to help prevent heat loss and make your home feel more comfortable.

A fireplace can also be a major source of air leakage. If you don’t use the fireplace, seal the opening or install an inflatable chimney balloon. Before using the fireplace, consider this: Unless you have a high-efficiency insert, your fireplace will suck heated air from the room out through the chimney. Always close the fireplace flue when it’s not in use. Your pursuit of comfort should also include a careful look at your home’s heating system. Is it distributing heat evenly and efficiently? Forced-air systems distribute air through supply ducts and registers. Small rooms may only have one register, but large rooms could have several. You may find some supply registers are blowing copious amounts of warm air and others little at all.

Keep in mind that radiant heat can also work in your favor. A dark-colored tile floor that receives several hours of direct sun can retain heat during the day and radiate it into the room during the evening.

Ideally, every room should have return air registers. If you see possible shortcomings with your forced-air system, enlist the help of a certified contractor who really knows how to improve ductwork.

Another possible cause of discomfort during the winter is air movement. We recognize this when weather forecasts report chill factor, which is a calculation of air temperature and wind speed. Moving air makes us feel colder, which is why we use fans in the summer. During the winter, that cold, outdoor air can infiltrate our homes.

Ensure that your furnace is running at peak efficiency by scheduling an annual inspection. Check your filter monthly and replace or clean it as necessary. If you heat your home with radiators, bleed them at the beginning of the season so they flow more efficiently.

On average, a typical home loses about half its air every hour, and that amount can increase when outdoor temperatures are extremely cold and the wind is blowing. In that case, the best way to keep your home toasty is to minimize air leaks. You can easily locate air leaks in your home with a blower door test, which is typically conducted by an energy auditor. These are some of the most common spots air leaks occur:

Beyond that, you can always warm yourself by wearing heavier clothing, doing some light exercise throughout the day, and snuggling with a pet or under a blanket. While a fireplace may warm a small area of your home, it can also suck heated air from the room out through the chimney. Always close the fireplace flue when a fire is not burning. Also, during the winter, covering cold surfaces like hardwood floors can improve comfort. An area rug can be visually appealing while helping retain indoor heat.

• Penetrations and cracks around windows and doors • Exterior cracks in brickwork and siding • Plumbing and wiring penetrations from the exterior to the interior of the home • Mail slots or pet doors A variety of products like caulk, weather stripping, outlet cover gaskets, and dryer vent covers can be used to seal leaks. For more of Pat Keegan’s efficiency tips, visit www.collaborativeefficiency.com/energytips.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018


LOGAN COUNTY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

CO-OP NEWS

LCEC EXISTS TO SERVE LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE NOT OVERLOOKING THE PRESENT Dramatic changes are transforming all aspects of the energy industry. Interest in renewable energy is at an all-time high, and ultimately, consumers want greater control over everything from their energy use to their payment methods. The prevalence of smartphone apps and smart technology for the home is increasing. Consumers and businesses are showing greater interest in battery storage and microgrids. There’s no denying it: Electric utilities will have to make changes to the way they provide energy to accommodate these trends. Thankfully, Logan County Electric Cooperative (LCEC) is positioned to meet these changing energy needs because we are a cooperative.

Co-ops are community-led October is National Co-op Month, which is the perfect time to highlight the many ways electric cooperatives are unique.

Cooperatives exist to meet a need that was previously unmet in the community, and we always strive to anticipate and plan for the future needs of our members. LCEC often partners with local groups to bring economic opportunity to the community. It is this facilitation role that is often the most valuable strength of the co-op. Our employees engage in vital community development boards, we help fund important economic development studies, and we meet the needs of new businesses that move into our service territory. The co-op business model is unique. It is practical, mission-oriented, and puts people over profit. Co-ops strive to be a trusted voice in our communities, and we feel we have earned that trust because we have our members’ best interests at heart and are determined to enrich the lives of those living and working in the communities we serve — now and in the future.

Cooperatives are locally governed, looking out for the long-term needs of our members. Electric cooperatives are owned by the communities we serve, and we are led by the members we serve. This heightened community focus allows us to quickly adapt to evolving member expectations, and our closeness to the community ensures a better response to its needs.

Co-ops are a catalyst for good Electric co-ops, including LCEC, strive to be a catalyst for good in our communities. Co-ops engage our communities to do things that might otherwise be impossible or difficult. In the past, that meant bringing power to areas where other utilities did not find it economically feasible. Today, it means providing community solar, researching broadband, utilizing technology to provide multiple bill pay options, donating over $20,000 through Operation Round Up®, and more.

October 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   19


LOGAN COUNTY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

TRUSTEE ELECTIONS

The role of co-op trustees LCEC members provide governance on cooperative strategy, budget, terms and conditions, and policies

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ave you ever stopped to consider why Logan County Electric Cooperative (LCEC) is called a cooperative instead of a company? The difference is not simply in the name; the difference is in the purpose. LCEC does not exist to make a profit from selling a commodity.

To ensure the responsibilities of effective governance are met, trustees take on three fundamental roles — fiduciary, regulator, and advocate.

Instead, Logan County Electric Cooperative exists for the purpose of powering communities and empowering members to improve their quality of life.

As fiduciary, a trustee is Doug Comer Board Chairman entrusted to act for the benefit of another person. The trustee owes this responsibility to all the members of the co-op collectively. When trustees set policies, monitor the general manager’s performance, approve the budget, review compliance, and provide risk oversight, they work in the best interests of the collective membership of LCEC.

This statement captures the purpose of your electric cooperative. Purpose is critical for an organization, serving as a compass to guide decisions and policies. However, this compass is only transformational if it is lived out on a daily basis. Effective governance is vital to the success of LCEC fulfilling its purpose. As such, the cooperative is governed by an elected board of trustees who are themselves members of LCEC. While many electricity consumers pay power bills to companies that are governed by stockholders who demand a healthy profit every quarter, local members set the direction at electric co-ops like LCEC. Co-ops aren’t under pressure to keep rates high enough to generate profits for shareholders. Instead, co-ops try to keep your bill as low as possible while providing high-quality service. After all, the governing trustees pay the same rates you do. The trustees at LCEC also want to see the communities in Logan County succeed. Why? The answer is simple: They live here, too. Local people work for local good. Your trustees support policies and projects that are good for the communities LCEC serves because what’s good for our community is good for the co-op.

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As regulator, a trustee sets the price of electricity to be charged to the members, including himself, based on the costs of providing reliable, always-on electricity and committed, member-focused service. A trustee works to ensure rates are fair for all members, whether the service is residential, farm, or factory. As advocate, the trustee listens to the concerns of the members and brings those concerns to board meetings for discussion. The trustee desires to continue to work toward the key purpose of the cooperative, which is improving the quality of life in the communities we serve. Your co-op was formed locally, and it is still governed by your friends and neighbors. Like you, they want to make their communities and their cooperative stronger. When it comes to LCEC, the trustees put members first. That’s the cooperative difference.


TRUSTEE ELECTIONS

Members serving members Cooperatives are democratic organizations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting policies and making decisions. Elected representatives, or trustees, are elected from among the membership and are accountable to the membership. Rick Petty President and General Manager

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ow that you know the role of a trustee, are you interested in serving on the board of trustees for Logan County Electric Cooperative (LCEC)?

As we approach the end of 2018, LCEC will again be seeking members as candidates for the cooperative’s board of trustees. Being a co-op board member can be a rewarding experience. But at the same time, it can be very challenging as you delve into industry issues and become acutely aware of the regulatory and political environment. To be considered for candidacy, a member must complete and return the member interest card that will be included in the November bill mailed to every member in the districts up for election. Upon expressing interest, the member will receive a biographical questionnaire to answer and submit to LCEC. After submitting the questionnaire, all candidates go through an interview with the nominating committee. If an interested member misses these opportunities, he or she may file a petition with no fewer than 100 member signatures to have his or her name added to the ballot.

interviews each member who has submitted the biographical questionnaire and presents candidates for the trustee positions up for election. One of the strengths of electric cooperatives is the commitment that trustees, managers, and employees make to education and professional development. The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) offers a multipart training program for new electric cooperative trustees. The purpose of all NRECA training is to prepare trustees to make informed business decisions in the boardroom. The courses focus on basic governance knowledge and the skills required of cooperative trustees. The NRECA curriculum provides the important foundation needed to oversee the business of a cooperative and includes courses on strategic planning, financial decision-making, duties, and liabilities. The second part of the trustee education program, the Board Leadership Certificate, consists of a series of courses covering areas like risk management, rate-making, and policy development. If you have questions regarding serving as a board member, please call the office at 937-592-4781 or email Rick Petty at rpetty@logancounty.coop.

During the 2018 annual meeting, members of LCEC affirmed the appointment of LCEC members to serve on a nominating committee. The nominating committee

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   20A


LOGAN COUNTY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

GOVERNMENT

CLEAN POWER PLAN REPLACEMENT HOW IT AFFECTS CO-OPS he Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unveiled its proposal to replace the Clean Power Plan (CPP) with a more flexible rule governing carbon dioxide emissions, which is expected to reduce compliance costs for coal-based generation while sustaining reliability.

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stay of the regulation sought by electric cooperatives and others. NRECA argued that the CPP significantly exceeded EPA’s authority under the Clean Air Act and would have mandated significant fuel switching, resulting in stranded assets for many generation and transmission companies.

That’s good news for electric cooperatives.

The new rule would provide states with a definition of the “Best System of Emission Reduction” (BSER) and give them three years to devise implementation plans that apply these criteria to individual generation plants. BSER guidelines would be focused on so-called “inside the fence line” improvements, such as heat-rate enhancements to improve the efficiency of coal-based plants.

NRECA CEO Jim Matheson welcomed the proposal as a means to provide electric cooperatives the certainty and flexibility they need to meet their consumer-members’ local energy needs. The proposed rule appears to provide electric co-ops with a more achievable plan, he said. “It is imperative that EPA recognizes the investment that cooperative members have made in power plants and that there is a prudent path forward for 42 million consumers to benefit from those investments,” Matheson said. “Co-ops are responding to their members’ needs and market forces affecting the entire electric power sector. The electric cooperative fuel mix for providing electricity is changing, with increased investments in natural gas and renewables,” he said. The Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) rule, as proposed by EPA on Aug. 21, would replace the Clean Power Plan, which was never implemented due to a Supreme Court

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The ACE rule also proposes to modify the EPA’s New Source Review program to make it easier for plants to make efficiency improvements without having to go through a prolonged and costly permitting process. Based in part on market forces, co-op reliance on coalbased generation declined from 54 percent to 41 percent between 2014 and 201. During that same period, co-ops increased their use of renewable energy sources from 14 percent to 17 percent. EPA will accept comments on the ACE rule for 0 days after it is published in the Federal Register. The agency says it plans to hold a public hearing on the matter and release a final rule early next year.


GOVERNMENT

Top three co-op priorities for the final version of the Farm Bill

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he House and Senate each passed versions of the Farm Bill earlier this summer and are seeking to reach a compromise on the legislation in the fall.

NRECA is urging lawmakers on the Farm Bill conference committee, tasked with coming up with the final version of the bill, to consider electric co-ops’ priorities. “We are encouraging Congress to pass a final Farm Bill that supports several key policy issues for electric co-ops and their member-consumers in rural America,” said NRECA CEO Jim Matheson. Here are the top priorities for co-ops:

Remove Senate changes to Rural Electrification Act loan program The House Farm Bill retains existing escrow accounts for co-op loan repayments and treatment of deposits into those accounts. The Senate-passed version eliminates the escrow or “cushion of credit” program that allows greater financial flexibility to co-ops and benefits the government by having funds predeposited toward loan payments. “Cooperatives depend on the USDA’s electric loan program and its escrow treatment to serve the most rural areas of the country,” said Matheson.

The House version provides for significant financial investment in broadband development by electric co-ops and other providers in rural areas that have either no internet service or substandard service. The Senate Farm Bill increases funds for rural broadband but provides only limited support for projects in areas with existing but inadequate service. “Deployment of rural broadband is essential to keeping rural communities competitive,” said Matheson. “NRECA is working to ensure co-op memberconsumers get high-speed internet service on par with the rest of the country.”

Include funds for rural economic development and innovation Co-ops use the Rural Economic Development Loan and Grant Program (REDLG) to finance economic development projects, such as refurbishing a library or buying emergency response vehicles. Both bills reauthorize and improve the program through 2021. NRECA supports the Senate provision, which also provides $5 million for the program each year.

Farm Bill Conference: Electric Co-op Priorities Strengthen RUS electric loan program Support House broadband provisions Promote innovative rural development programs

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LOGAN COUNTY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

CO-OPS VOTE

Join us at the polls on Nov. 6

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ogan County Electric Cooperative’s priority is providing our members with local, safe, reliable, and affordable electricity. Doing that requires a team effort among all the departments: member services, finances, communications, and operations. One of the things that is overlooked but vital to our mission is political engagement. That may seem far removed from our primary role, but it’s essential to serving our members, who rely on uninterrupted electricity. That’s why we’re participating with other electric cooperatives in a national program called Co-ops Vote. Co-ops Vote is an initiative that encourages all co-op members to participate in national, state, and local elections while educating political candidates and elected officials about the important role played by electric cooperatives in our communities. The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), the service organization representing the nation’s electric co-ops, launched Co-ops Vote in 201 as a national, nonpartisan get-out-the-vote effort to help drive rural voter turnout in the 201 presidential election. Through this program, electric co-ops realized they had a unique advantage: As co-ops, voting is in our DNA. We show democratic member control — one of the seven cooperative principles — through members’ participation in trustee elections. Co-ops have another advantage. Elected officials and decision-makers across the political spectrum trust us because of the work electric cooperatives have put into political engagement. When we all get involved, we can make things happen — in national politics and in our local communities.

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Our participation in Co-ops Vote helps to ensure that issues that are important to electric cooperatives remain part of the national discussion — and are supported by our elected officials. You can participate in Co-ops Vote by registering to vote and committing to cast your ballot on Nov. . If you’re interested in getting more involved, just give us a call or visit www.vote. coop to learn more about the upcoming elections and access online tools that can help you participate. We will see you at the polls on Election Day.


IN THE COMMUNITY

October is

BREAST CANCER Awareness Month

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ctober is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and this is a friendly reminder to get yourself screened and simply to keep yourself healthy.

In 2017, about 190,500 cancer deaths in the U.S. were caused by cigarette smoking, and an estimated 20 percent of all cancer deaths were caused by obesity, poor nutrition, excess alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity — all things that we, as individuals, have full control over. Early detection and prevention are central to saving lives and producing a world without cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. So, simple actions such as eating right, staying active, and following recommended screening guidelines can have important benefits. Routine cancer screening tests can prevent thousands of

additional cancer deaths by allowing early identification and removal of abnormalities, which allows treatments to be more effective. Although a cancer diagnosis can be scary, selfexamination and early detection are crucial to an individual’s chances of survival. Contact your healthcare providers and schedule routine mammograms, colonoscopies, prostate exams, and Pap smears. Learn how to conduct accurate self-examinations and be in charge of your health. You can find a schedule for preventive screenings at www.cancer.org. Remember: Along with a positive outlook, strong initiative is one of the best cancer fighters out there. So do your research, take care of yourself, and BEAT CANCER! Source: American Cancer Society

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 21


LOGAN COUNTY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

LCEC welcomes Gretchen Magoto

Be sure to welcome Gretchen Magoto when you talk to her on the phone or see her in the office.

The mission of Logan County Electric Cooperative (LCEC) is serving our members in a manner that exceeds their expectations. To better fulfill this mission in the office, LCEC welcomes Gretchen Magoto to our staff as a part-time member services representative.

Magoto grew up next to Bob Evans Farm in Rio Grande, Ohio, and attended Rio Grande University, earning a degree in administrative office assistance. She comes to LCEC with over 10 years’ experience working as a customer service representative in different banks.

Magoto’s responsibilities include interacting with members who call or stop by the office, assisting members with questions and concerns, and taking payments.

Magoto is excited to learn so she can best serve the members and help them with their questions.

MEMBER APPRECIATION

October is National Co-op Month. To celebrate co-ops and our member-owners, LCEC is inviting you to join us on Friday, Oct. 19, at our Bellefontaine office for Member Appreciation Day. You can register for a chance to win up to a $100 credit on your electric bill and enjoy giveaways and tasty treats. From 11 a.m.–1 p.m., we will be serving lunch to members who are able to stop by the office. The winners of the bill credit drawing will be contacted on Oct. 22.

LOGAN COUNTY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

CONTACT

Chair

937-592-4781 www.logancounty.coop SECURE AUTOMATED PAYMENT 844-219-1219 OUTAGE HOTLINE

First Vice Chair

Jim Rice Second Vice Chair

Lanny Davis Warren Taylor OREC Representative

OFFICE

1587 County Road 32 North Bellefontaine, OH 43311 BUSINESS HOURS — LOBBY HOURS

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Jerry Fry

Secretary-Treasurer

855-592-4781

8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Doug Comer

8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018

Scott Hall Janet Blank Trustees

MANAGEMENT TEAM

Rick Petty President/General Manager

Ryan Smith Vice President of Operations

Kristen McDonald Director of Member Services

Tiffany Stoner Director of Finance and Accounting

Michael Wilson Director of Communications

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION?

Email your ideas to: mwilson@logancounty.coop


CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO HIO CO-OP O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO P OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP CO OP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

LMRE board tours businesses The Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative (LMRE) operations department hosts a system tour for the board of trustees every other year, and this year’s tour featured a stop at Allied Waste Industries (AWI) in Lorain County. “We use a lot of power here, but we try to conserve electricity when we can. All shop lights and all pole lights are LED,” says AWI’s maintenance supervisor, Chris Reineck. The LMRE group started the day with a business update from Lorain County Rural Wastewater District (LORCO) Executive Director Gene Toy before heading to Allied Waste Industries. The board also visited the Litchfield substation, where Director of Engineering and Operations Brad Warnement talked about recent upgrades to the substation. The group finished the day by visiting the cooperative’s Spencer Industrial Park in Spencer Township in Medina County.

Washington REC awards lighting rebate to Noble Local SD The Noble Local School District has received a $1,825 rebate from Washington Electric Cooperative for improving lighting efficiency across its campus. The cooperative’s commercial and industrial custom lighting rebate program helps replace inefficient internal and external lighting at member business facilities. The program provides a rebate based on the number of lamp-watts reduced when replacing old lighting with new, energy-efficient lighting. To qualify, lighting at the facility must be used a minimum of 1,800 hours per year. “We’re happy to provide a program that promotes efficient energy use and also helps the school system and the people who support it,” says Washington Electric General Manager Jack Bragg. The upgrades are expected to save the school district $1,495 per year.

Ohio Cooperative Living writer earns award Heather Juzenas, communications manager at The Energy Cooperative and former freelance writer for Ohio Cooperative Living, recently received an award of merit in the Best Treatment of a Technical Subject category at the 2018 Willies Awards for her article “Saving Power, Saving Money” in the July 2017 issue. The Willies, awarded annually by the National Electric Cooperative Statewide Editors Association, recognizes outstanding work published in statewide electric cooperative publications.

Carroll golf outing benefits Relay for Life Carroll Electric Cooperative’s Charity Golf Scramble raised $8,794 for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. The scramble was held July 21 at the Lake Mohawk Golf Course in Malvern. Carroll Electric has raised more than $115,000 in eight years to help fund cancer research, education, prevention, advocacy, and patient services.

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Q&A

Ohioans face some significant choices as they enter the voting booth next month — not the least of which are whom to elect as the next governor and which candidate will best represent the state in the U.S. Senate. Knowing the importance of electric cooperative voters in the campaigns, the major-party candidates for the two offices took some time recently to answer questions that are crucial to Ohio Cooperative Living readers.

Richard Cordray Democrat

Mike DeWine Republican

Sherrod Brown Democrat

Jim Renacci Republican

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GOVERNOR Mike DeWine, Ohio’s attorney general and a former two-term U.S. senator and four-term congressman, is the Republican candidate, with Jon Husted as his running mate for lieutenant governor. He faces Richard Cordray, the Democratic former attorney general and state treasurer and first director of the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and his running mate, Betty Sutton.

Q: What will be the issues of highest priority for your administration? DeWine: • Help bring more high-paying, 21st-century jobs to all parts of Ohio. • Improve early childhood education and health services so kids have the skills they need early in life to succeed. • Implement a 12-point comprehensive action plan to combat the opioid crisis. • Enact real-world education reform that gets our kids either careerready or college-ready. Cordray: Betty’s and my No. 1 priority as governor and lieutenant governor will be putting money back into the pockets of middle-class Ohioans. In order to accomplish that, we will work to keep health care costs low, provide quality workforce training and education programs, and invest in local small businesses. Betty and I know how important the Medicaid expansion is in covering low-income Ohioans, keeping rural hospitals open, and reducing costs for everyone in the state. That is why we have always supported Medicaid expansion, and will work to bolster and improve the Medicaid program as governor and lieutenant governor. Another way that Betty and I will work to put money in the pockets of Ohioans is by giving them the tools and education they need to succeed in the everevolving 21st-century workplace. We will invest in workforce training so that every Ohioan has the opportunity to unlock their full potential. Finally, we will empower Ohio’s small businesses in order to create local jobs and bolster local economies. We will also provide better tax incentives, grants, and small-business loans in order to help local entrepreneurs and business owners. Q: Ohio’s electric cooperatives rely on a diverse set of generation sources. As governor, how closely will your energy policy align with our all-of-the-above approach regarding electric generation? DeWine: Jon Husted and I believe in an all-of-the-above energy strategy. Ohio must have an energy plan that reflects our diverse industries and the availability of natural resources, including both existing and evolving technologies. Ohio is a regional leader for low-cost energy. Maintaining regionally competitive energy prices is a key component in growing Ohio’s economy and attracting new businesses.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018


Cordray: Ohio’s energy policy should focus on making energy costs affordable for middle-class families and expanding the sector so that we are creating good-paying jobs with the opportunities and natural resources available — like water, solar, and wind. That’s why as governor, I’ll pursue an “all-of-the-above” energy policy that takes advantage of Ohio’s great natural resources, while making smart investments in the jobs of the future, in emerging sectors like wind and solar. Through that policy, we can create good-paying jobs for Ohioans in design, construction, and maintenance. Those are good jobs, many of which don’t require a college degree, that can support a person and their family.

for in-demand jobs; and • Expand early childhood education opportunities that help children grow and learn and empower families to go to work. Those efforts will not only improve today’s workforce and economy, but they will also ensure that our state will thrive for future generations. Cordray: For too long, our rural communities have suffered while Republicans in Columbus turned a blind eye. Betty and I will ensure that rural communities aren’t left behind by investing in infrastructure, restoring funding to local communities, and retaining Medicaid expansion.

But if we’re going to move forward on energy, we need to end a misguided ideological agenda in Columbus that’s keeping the renewable-energy sector from investing in Ohio and creating jobs. We need to lead the way on clean energy and tell companies that Ohio is open for business once again in renewable energy and energy efficiency.

Ohio’s infrastructure is crumbling, and nowhere is that more apparent than in our state’s rural areas. We want to fix Ohio’s roads and bridges, repair our water infrastructure, and stretch broadband across the state. These improvements will help to stimulate commerce throughout Ohio and ensure that rural areas have access to the 21st-century economy.

Q: What will you do to help improve the economic vitality of rural communities and improve opportunities for residents of rural areas?

Betty and I will also end state government’s cutbacks on local funds that have left schools underfunded, jails overcrowded, and local infrastructure in ruins. We want to empower change and development on the local level by restoring vital funding to local governments so that they can make the improvements that their communities need.

DeWine: Nearly two-thirds of Ohio counties are rural. These communities were hit hard by the recession. People are doing better, but many rural areas, especially in southeast Ohio, have been left behind. As governor, I will: • Slow and reverse the opioid epidemic with my 12-point action plan; • Create and maintain an economic climate that attracts businesses to Ohio and helps existing businesses grow;

Finally, we will aid Ohio’s rural communities by retaining Medicaid expansion. If Medicaid expansion were ended or diminished, one of the biggest losers would be rural hospitals. With less people insured and more uncompensated care costs, rural hospitals would begin to close, eliminating good-paying, local jobs and putting the health of rural Ohioans in danger.

• Work with businesses, schools and universities, and local agencies to ensure that people can access training

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 27


SENATOR

Democratic incumbent Sherrod Brown seeks his third term in the U.S. Senate after seven terms in the U.S. House and two terms as Ohio’s secretary of state. He faces Jim Renacci, a four-term Republican congressman and former president and general manager of the Columbus Destroyers of the Arena Football League.

Q: What will be the most important, pressing issues facing the U.S. Senate in its next term? Brown: I’m fighting to make sure every single Ohioan has the opportunity to succeed — from the nurse in Cincinnati or the barber in Cleveland to the waitress in New Philadelphia or the business owner in Sandusky. One of the most pressing issues facing our state and country is the need to make sure all workers can earn a living wage, provide for their families, and retire with dignity. Ohioans deserve to see their hard work pay off, and to share in the wealth they create. At the same time, we must also invest in communities to create new jobs and new opportunities for Ohioans. Another one of my top priorities for my next term in the Senate is pursuing new policies that support U.S. job creation, from renegotiation of trade deals so they work better for Ohioans to tax incentives for companies that keep jobs in the United States. Fighting the opioid epidemic is another one of my top priorities. I hear from Ohioans on the frontlines of the epidemic every day, and they need Congress to step up and provide the resources they need to make an impact in their communities. In addition to boosting funding for the hardest-hit states like Ohio, I am working with Senator Portman to make it easier for Ohioans battling addiction to get the treatment they need. Renacci: In 2019, it will be vital to continue pushing for a commonsense, pro-growth agenda that allows all Ohioans to benefit from a thriving American economy. Sustaining long-term economic growth, addressing our debt crisis, and tackling the opioid epidemic are three of our top challenges. Over the past year, we’ve seen tremendous progress and economic expansion; however, many Ohio families continue to struggle. Unfortunately, Ohio has one of the highest unemployment rates in the nation. As your senator, I will advance a pro-growth, common-sense agenda to advance our economy and to decrease our nation’s debt. The financial health of our country impacts more than just our wallets. In order for our state to grow and prosper, we need Ohioans, especially young Ohioans, to feel confident there will be opportunities available to them here at home. Bringing more and better-paying jobs to our state will allow Ohioans to have more confidence in the future, which in turn will lead to stronger, more stable communities.

28

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018


Q: Ohio’s electric cooperatives rely on a diverse set of generation sources. As senator, how closely will your energy policy align with our all-of-the-above approach regarding electric generation? Brown: We need to support innovation across a wide range of energy sources for both our economy and electric cooperatives. That is why I’ve worked to ensure that cooperatives have access to low-interest loans through the United States Department of Agriculture, and why I’ve supported efforts at the Department of Energy to accelerate the development of the next generation of coal-based energy production that would support jobs while ensuring cleaner air. I’ve also fought for policies to reduce the cost of renewable energy and spur the clean energy economy of tomorrow. Renacci: I support an all-of-the-above approach to energy that encompasses the robust energy resources located here at home, including natural gas, clean coal, Americanmade oil, as well as alternative energy sources such as wind, solar, hydropower, and nuclear. Ohio is a leading energy producer, with robust supplies of both natural gas and coal. In Washington, I have fought to roll back burdensome energy regulations and bring more energy sector jobs to the Buckeye State. Supporting all forms of energy production here at home not only creates more good-paying jobs — it helps to keep energy costs low for Ohio families. As your senator, I will continue working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle on a comprehensive energy plan that supports our economy in an environmentally responsible way. This Congress, I am cosponsoring H.R. 1090, the Technologies for Energy Security Act of 2017. The legislation would extend and modify the tax credits for residential energy-efficient property and investments in energy property. The bill would also extend tax credits for investments in energy properties, including renewable energy such as solar, wind, and thermal energy construction.

Furthermore, I staunchly opposed President Obama’s Clean Power Plan in 2015 and voted for legislation to prevent it from going into effect. Due to the negative impact the plan would have had on the state of Ohio, I believe the Supreme Court acted wisely by issuing a stay on its implementation. Q: What are the biggest challenges facing energy production in the U.S. and what are your plans to address them? Brown: Ohio has been at the forefront of natural gas production, with the industry creating jobs and improving livelihoods across the state — and it’s important that we make sure that we’re also at the forefront of safe and responsible natural gas production. Ohio communities can have both the economic benefits of natural gas production and a healthy environment in which to raise their families. We have to keep talking to communities and industry leaders as we grapple with new forms of energy and innovate. As our state’s oldest power plants retire, it’s important that we ensure that Ohioans have access to the low-cost, affordable power that has made our state a great place to live and do business in. Renacci: The United States’ dependence on foreign sources of energy is one of our greatest national security concerns. We cannot afford to halt or discourage domestic exploration and development of our energy resources. Consequently, it is critical to implement policies that support our economic and security interests. Additionally, Waters of the U.S. is another important issue that needs to be addressed. In Congress, I voted for numerous bills to prevent the WOTUS rule from taking effect, to prevent expanded federal oversight and cost increases for co-ops to build and maintain power lines. The Trump Administration is actively working on rules to fully repeal the rule and to implement rules pre-2015.

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 29


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MR. DAWES The remarkable Dawes Arboretum begins its second century as a living shrine BY DAMAINE VONADA

S

uccessful individuals often amass museum-worthy collections reflecting their interests — works of art, luxury cars, fine wines, even historic structures. While Libbey’s glass earnings launched the Toledo Museum of Art and Ford’s automobile funds built Greenfield Village, Pure Oil Company President Beman Dawes pursued a more down-to-earth passion: He collected trees.

Growth from the start In 1917, Dawes and his wife, Bertie, planted 50 sugar maples on their 140-acre farm near Newark, which they christened “Daweswood,” and commenced a methodical accumulation of both land and flora. Seeking specimens suited to central Ohio’s climate, Dawes brought in trees from around the world and

32

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018

arranged them in groups at Daweswood. By 1929, they had acquired nearly 300 acres of land on which grew more than 50,000 trees, and the Daweses established The Dawes Arboretum as a private foundation. Their goals included fostering research; giving pleasure to the public; and increasing the general knowledge and love of trees and shrubs. Today, The Dawes Arboretum is an internationally known treasure that staff historian Leslie Wagner calls a museum without walls. Encompassing nearly 2,000 acres and some 17,000 labeled plants, it’s one of the nation’s largest arboretums and attracts upwards of 250,000 guests per year. USA Today has named the arboretum one of the best U.S. botanical gardens. Its main grounds, including the original farm, are on the National Register of Historic Places, and Botanical Gardens Conservation International ranks its maple collection No. 12 in the world.


Family tradition Born and raised in Marietta, Dawes acquired his appreciation for trees while working at the lumber business his father, General Rufus Dawes, opened after the Civil War. “Rufus Dawes taught Beman how to size up a tree, so he could tell at a glance its species, age, and value,” says Mike Ecker, the arboretum’s curator of living collections. A member of the Iron Brigade, Rufus Dawes fought at Gettysburg, but he was not the first — or last — Dawes to have a hand in American history. His great-grandfather, William Dawes, joined Paul Revere in making 1775’s midnight rides to warn that the British were coming, and the general’s eldest son, Charles Gates Dawes, not only became Calvin Coolidge’s vice president, but was also awarded the 1925 Nobel Prize. Although Beman and Bertie Dawes owned several homes, their primary residence was in Columbus. As nature lovers, they often picnicked on that wooded farm they later called Daweswood, and they bought the property after one fateful visit when Beman stepped in to stop workers from cutting down some of its trees. Soon they had transformed its Italianate farmhouse there into a comfortable country retreat. While Beman procured trees, Bertie planned Daweswood’s gardens and kept journals about her roses, tulips, and peonies.

A living laboratory Along with his own deep personal interest in selecting the arborteum’s trees, Dawes also sought advice from experts, including Ohio State forestry professor Norman Scherer and state forester Edmund Secrest to help him decide what to plant and where. Cultivating those eminent arborists soon led to the practice of using the arboretum as a land lab. The American Chestnut Foundation, for example, currently keeps a tree test plot there, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture is studying its borer-resistant Asian ash trees. Also distinguishing The Dawes Arboretum is the family’s ongoing involvement. “The arboretum is the Dawes family’s living legacy,” says Wagner. Beman’s and Bertie’s five children were founding trustees in 1929, and their great-grandchildren still serve as trustees today. The family holds reunions there, and through the generations, they’ve watched as the likes of Admiral Byrd, Orville Wright, and John Glenn dedicated trees and have seen four tree collections — maple, buckeye and horse chestnut, witch hazel, and dawn redwood — gain national accreditation. Today, employees and volunteers continue to develop facilities, propagate educational activities and events, and produce maple syrup from sugar maples Beman planted a century ago. The Dawes Arboretum, 7770 Jacksontown Road SE, Newark, OH 43056. Open year-round; hours vary seasonally. For additional information, call 740-323-2355 or visit www.dawesarb.org.

Six Must-Sees Numerous hiking trails and a 4-mile auto tour (with handy parking spots for vehicles) make it easy to explore the arboretum. Look for these special places along the way: 1. Daweswood House Museum and Gardens — Tours of the Daweses’ antique-filled home provide insights into their lives. Every room has a view of Bertie’s re-created garden, and the Rathskeller displays more than 100 shovels used for the tree dedications that Beman initiated. 2. Dawes Memorial — The arboretum was so dear to Beman and Bertie that they made it their final resting place. They’re entombed in a neoclassic mausoleum inscribed with a quotation that starts with the words, “He that planteth a tree is the servant of God ...” 3. Maple Collection — The collection boasts striking species like Asia’s trident and yellow-paint maples, and in autumn, the colorful sugar maples near the Daweswood house are stunning. 4. Japanese Garden — Planned by landscape architect Makoto Nakamura, it’s a visitor favorite that features a picturesque pond and bridges. 5. Lettered Hedge — Originally designed by Beman, the massive hedge spells out DAWES ARBORETUM in letters formed by American arborvitae. It’s best viewed from the observation tower at the corner of State Route 13 and Ridgley Tract Road. 6. Cypress Swamp — The southern bald cypress trees Beman planted in the late 1920s have yielded one of the nation’s northernmost (and alligator-free!) cypress swamps.

OCTOBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 33


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OCTOBER 2018 CALENDAR NORTHWEST

admission. Antiques, collectibles, furniture, crafts, produce, tools, glass, and more. 419-447-9613 or www.tiffinfleamarket.com. OCT. 6–7 – Harvest Happenings, Osborn MetroPark, 3910 Perkins Ave., Huron, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. Antique tractor and engine display, pony rides, nature tent, hay rides, and more. 419-625-7783 or http:// eriemetroparks.org/program. OCT. 6–7, 13–14, 20–21, 27–28 – Mums and Pumpkin Festival, Lincoln Ridge Farms, 6588 Pollock Rd., Convoy. Fall fun at the farm for the entire family. $10, under 3 free. 419-749-4224. OCT. 6, 13 – The Great Sidney Farmer’s Market, 109 S. Ohio Ave., Sidney, 8 a.m.–noon. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

THROUGH DECEMBER – Lima Civil Air Patrol: Youth Program, Allen Co. Airport, 700 Airport Dr., Lima, every Sat., 1–3 p.m. Free. Geared toward boys and girls ages 12–18. 419-222-6639. THROUGH DECEMBER – Lima Writers’ Community, Meeting Place on Market, 220 W. Market St., Lima, every Wed., 6 p.m. $1 donation. Connect with other writers in a friendly, supportive environment. www.meetup.com/Lima-Writers-Community.

OCT. 7 – Farm Toy Show, Van Wert Co. Fgds., 1055 S. Washington St. (U.S. 127), Van Wert, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. $2, under 12 free. Food and drink available. Parts dealer present. 937-826-4201. OCT. 13 – Apple Butter Fest Craft and Quilt Show, Van Buren High School, 217 S. Main St., Van Buren, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. Craft and quilt show, farmers market, popcorn and nuts, and Buttons the Clown. 419-299-3628 or vanburenapplebutter@yahoo.com.

OCT. 13 – CMP Monthly Air Rifle and Air Pistol Matches, 1000 Lawrence Dr., Port Clinton. Free admission and parking. OCT. 5 – Annual Downtown Chocolate Walk, 109 S. Ohio Ave., Competitions feature a Junior Air Rifle 3x20, 60 Shots Air Rifle Sidney, 7–9 p.m. $15. A 21-and-over event. Tour downtown businesses Standing, 60 Shots Air Pistol, and a beginner 3x10. Rental equipment and enjoy delicious treats. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. available. 419-635-2141 ext. 707, lsherman@thecmp.org (Lue Sherman), or www.thecmp.org. OCT. 5 – First Friday, downtown Sidney. Participating shops and restaurants stay open later, with many offering a discount. 937-658OCT. 13 – Fall Festival, 109 S. Ohio Ave., Sidney, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. 6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. Free. Ghosts, goblins, superheroes, and princesses gather on the court square for a costume contest and activities. Trick-or-treat at OCT. 6–7 – The Fantastic Tiffin Flea Market, Seneca Co. Fgds., 100 Hopewell Ave., Tiffin, Sat. 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free businesses downtown. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

NORTHEAST

old trains to buy, sell, or trade. 440-785-9907, showmanager@ thegreatbereatrainshow.org, or www.thegreatbereatrainshow.org. OCT. 6–7 – Holmes County Antique Festival, downtown Millersburg. Antique markets and auctions, parades, lumberjack show. http://holmescountyantiquefestival.org. OCT. 6–7, 13–14 – Hale Harvest Festival, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 5K run on Oct. 6 at 9:15 a.m. www.wrhs.org/events/harvest-festival-3-2-2. OCT. 8–20 – “Riverboats on the Ohio,” Historic Fort Steuben, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville, Mon.–Sat. 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Exhibit and programs. 740-283-1787 or www.oldfortsteuben.com.

OCT. 1–31 – Corn Maze, Beriswill Farms, 2200 Station Rd., Valley City, Tues.–Fri. and Sun. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Test your sense of direction in this 5-acre maze. 330-350-2486 or http:// beriswillfarms.com. OCT. 5–7, 12–14 – Zoar Fall Foliage Golf Cart Tours, 198 Main St., Zoar, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $15 for adults. See Historic Zoar Village buildings not normally included on the walking tour. Each tour limited to six guests. Reservations required. 800-262-6195 or www. historiczoarvillage.com. OCT. 6–7 – The Great Berea Train Show, Cuyahoga Co. Fgds., 19201 E. Bagley Rd., Middleburg Heights, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $8, under 16 free; $10 for 2-day pass. All-gauge show. New and

SOUTHEAST

OCT. 13 – Oktoberfest, Painesville Depot, 475 Railroad St., Painesville. $5, C. (3–12) $3, Family $12 (max. 2 adults, 3 children). Authentic German and other food and beverages. Polka band 7–10 p.m. 216-470-5780 or www.painesvillerailroadmuseum.org. OCT. 13 – Olde Stark Antique Faire, Stark Co. Fgds., Exhibition Bldg., 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Antiques and collectibles. Free appraisals. 330-794-9100 or find us on Facebook. OCT. 13–14 – Annual Apple Stirrin’ Festival, Unionport Grange, Co. Rd. 39, Unionport. Enjoy everything apples — apple butter, cider, fritters — and live entertainment each day. 740-944-1533. OCT. 13–14 – Wayne County Farm Tour, various locations, Sat. 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 1–6 p.m. Self-drive tour of area farms and agribusinesses. 330-263-7456 or www.ofbf.org/counties/wayne.

OCT. 13–14 – Oak Harbor Apple Festival, downtown Oak Harbor. $5. Contests, parade, kiddie tractor pull, classic car show, 5K Apple Run, and other fun activities. 419-898-0479 or www.oakharborohio.net. OCT. 19–20 – Van Wert County Apple Festival, Van Wert Co. Fgds., 1055 S. Washington St. (Rte. 127), Van Wert, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. A festival featuring all things apple, including cider, dumplings, fritters, and more. www.visitvanwert.org. OCT. 20 – Folklore and Funfest, Wood Co. Historical Ctr. and Museum, 13660 County Home Rd., Bowling Green, 4–9 p.m. Free. Horse-drawn wagon rides, apple cider press, plus tricks and treats for all ages. 419-352-0967 or www.woodcountyhistory.org. OCT. 20–21 – Oak Ridge Festival, 15498 E. Twp. Rd. 104, Attica, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $6, Srs. $5, C. (8–12) $4, under 8 free. Antique farm equipment, military vehicles, handmade crafts, kids’ activities, and entertainment. 419-426-0611 or www.oakridgefestival.com. OCT. 27 – Murder Mystery Dinner Theatre: “Murder in Margaritaland,” Bruno’s, 110 E. Poplar St., Sidney, 7 p.m. A night of fun, mayhem, and food. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org. OCT. 27–28 – Woodcarver’s Show and Sale, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Skilled woodcarvers showcase handcrafted wildlife, fish, birds, bowls, ornaments, pens, and more. 800-590-9755 or www.saudervillage.org. OCT. 30 – War of the Worlds, Wood Co. Historical Museum, 13660 County Home Rd., Bowling Green, 8–9 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. $10. Live presentation by the Vintage Radio Players. Self-guided museum tours included with ticket price. Light refreshments served. 419-352-0967 or www.woodcountyhistory.org.

light tours every 15 minutes between 6:30 and 7:45 p.m. Golf cart tours are $30 and include a visit to the cemetery. Reservations required. 800-262-6195 or www.historiczoarvillage.com. OCT. 20 – Kidron Red Beet Festival, Sonnenberg Village, 13515 Hackett Rd., Kidron, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Beet contest, food vendors, live music. 330-857-9111 or www.kidronhistoricalsociety.org. OCT. 20–21 – Colonial Trade Faire, Schoenbrunn Village, 1984 E. High Ave., New Philadelphia, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. 330-663-6610 or www.schoenbrunnvillagefaire.org. OCT. 20–21 – Country Crossroads Education of Yesterday Farm Show, 3685 Cass Irish Ridge Rd. (intersection of St. Rtes. 16 and 60), Dresden. Free. Working antique farm and construction machinery, trucks, cars. 740-754-6248, educationofyesterday@ gmail.com, or www.facebook.com/EducationofYesterday. OCT. 26–27 – Fort Laurens Ghost Tours, 11067 Fort Laurens Rd. NW, Bolivar, 7:30–8:30 p.m. $10, C. (5–12 ) $5, under 5 free. Tours depart every 15 minutes. Reservations required. 330-874-2059 or fortlaurens@gmail.com. OCT. 26–27 – The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, Schoenbrunn Village, 1984 E. High Ave., New Philadelphia, 7 and 9 p.m. Reservations required. 740-922-6776 or www.facebook.com/ HistoricSchoenbrunnVillage.

OCT. 19–20, 26–27 – Ghost Tours of Zoar, 198 Main St., Zoar, Ohio, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Adults $15, children $10. Zoar Village lantern

OCT. 27 – TCA Great Lakes Division Train Meet, UAW Hall, 5615 Chevrolet Blvd., Parma, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Adult $6, Family $8, kids admitted free. Free parking. All-gauge show with over 175 tables. New and old trains to buy, sell, or trade. 440-665-0882 (Ed Mularz), emularz1124@aol.com, or www.greatlakestca.org.

competitions, demonstrations and clinics, wood crafts, and more. 888-388-7337 or www.ohioforest.org.

OCT. 19–21 – Muskingum Valley Trade Days, 6602 St. Rte. 78, Reinersville. 740-558-2740.

OCT. 6 – Fall Festival Day, National Road/Zane Grey Museum, OCT. 21 – The Ohio State University Marching Band, 421 New Concord, 11 a.m.–2 p.m. 740-872-3143 or www.ohiohistory.org. Yoctangee Parkway, Chillicothe, 4 p.m. Gates open at 2:30 p.m. OCT. 6 – E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second $25, Stds. $10. Live auction for 2018 Ohio State game tickets. www. adenamansion.com. St., Chillicothe, 7 p.m. $5. www.majesticchillicothe.net. OCT. 27 – Chillicothe Halloween Parade, downtown Chillicothe, OCT. 6–7 – Lucasville Trade Days, Scioto Co. Fgds., 1193 Fairground Rd., Lucasville. $3, under 13 free. 937-728-6643 or www. 7–8:30 p.m. http://visitchillicotheohio.com. lucasvilletradedays.com. OCT. 27 – Forgotten Places and Spaces Walking Tour, historic downtown Cambridge, 3–4:30 p.m. 740-705-1873 or www. OCT. 12–14 – Bob Evans Farm Festival, Bob Evans Farm and Homestead Museum, 10854 St. Rte. 588, Rio Grande, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. $5, ohiomadegetaways.com. under 6 free. 740-245-5305 or www.bobevans.com/aboutus/the-farm/ OCT. 27 – McGuffey Lane, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second St., farmfestival. Chillicothe, 8 p.m. $15–$20. www.majesticchillicothe.net.

OCT. 4–5, 11–12, 18–19, 25 – Weekday Fall Foliage Trains, Hocking Valley Scenic Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 W. Canal St., Nelsonville, 1 p.m. $15–17, under 3 free. 740-249-1452 or www. hvsry.org. OCT. 4–31 – The Sleepy Hollow Experience at Haunted Mountain, Sugarloaf Mountain Amphitheatre, 5968 Marietta Rd., Chillicothe, Thur.–Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. $15–$40. www. tecumsehdrama.com. OCT. 5–7 – Paul Bunyan Show, Guernsey Co. Fgds., 335 Old National Rd., Old Washington (Cambridge), Fri./Sat. 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.–3 p.m. $10, Srs./C. (7–12) $5, under 7 free. Lumberjack

OCT. 12–14 – Chillicothe Halloween Festival, Yoctangee Park, downtown Chillicothe. Features Halloween- and paranormalthemed merchandise, celebrity appearances, haunted house, mechanical rides, inflatables, costume contest, coffin races, and festival foods. www.chillicothehalloweenfestival.com. OCT. 13–14 – Townsquare Quilt Guild Quilt Show, Floral Hall, Noble Co. Fgds., Caldwell, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $5 admission. “Poppies” theme commemorates the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. 740-679-3342. OCT. 19 – Fall Festival of Leaves, downtown Bainbridge. Arts and crafts, entertainment, parades, contests, and self-guided Paint Valley Skyline Drive tours. www.fallfestivalofleaves.com.

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OCT. 27 – Trail of Treats, Deerassic Park Education Ctr., 14250 Cadiz Rd., Cambridge, 2–3 p.m. Local businesses pass out goodies on our kid-friendly trail, geared for those under 14. 740-435-3335 or www.deerassic.com. OCT. 27 – Un-haunted Forest, Shawnee State Park, 4404 St. Rte. 125, Portsmouth, 6–9 p.m. A guided, lantern-lit walk on an easy halfmile loop trail. 740-858-6652 or http://parks.ohiodnr.gov/Shawnee. OCT. 28 – Annual Toy and Craft Show, Pritchard Laughlin Civic Ctr., 7033 Glenn Highway, Cambridge, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Free admission. 740-439-7009 or www.pritchardlaughlin.com.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

sale. Demonstrations, food trucks, and fun for the entire family. www.facebook.com/ohiomakesfestival.

CENTRAL

OCT. 19–20 – Historic Ghost Tour, Frances Steube Community Ctr., 22 S. Trine St., Canal Winchester, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Six tours of Canal Winchester’s past. 614-833-1846 or www.cwhistory.org.

OCT. 6–7, 13–14, 20–21 – Lorena Sternwheeler Fall Foliage Rides, Zane’s Landing Park, West Market St., Zanesville, 2–3 p.m. $8, Srs. $7, C. (2–12) $4. Enjoy a one-hour scenic cruise on the Muskingum River. 800-743-2303 or www.visitzanesville.com.

OCT. 19–21 – Apple Butter Stirrin’ Festival, Historic Roscoe Village, 600 N. Whitewoman St., Coshocton, Fri./Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $5, under 12 free. Fresh apple butter cooked over an open fire. Living history tours, canal boat rides, and children’s activities. 740-622-7664 or www.roscoevillage.com.

OCT. 6–28 – Rock Mill Weekends, Rock Mill Park, 1429 Rockmill Place NW, Lancaster, every Sat. and Sun., 12–4 p.m. Free. Tour the 1824 mill, walk on the covered bridge, and enjoy Hocking River Falls. 740-681-7249 or www.fairfieldcountyparks.org/events.

OCT. 19–21 – Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?, Marion Palace Theatre May Pavilion, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Adults $18, children $12. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

OCT. 11 – First Drafts Book Club, Combustion Brewery & Taproom, 80 W. Church St. #101, Pickerington, 7–8 p.m. Featured book is Gilded Cage by Vic James. Age 21 and over. 614-837-4104 ext. 233 or www.pickeringtonlibrary.org/sycamore-plaza-library. OCT. 4 – Yoga at Your Library, Sycamore Plaza Library, 7861 Refugee Rd., Pickerington, 11 a.m.–noon. Free. No registration required. www.pickeringtonlibrary.org/sycamore-plaza-library.

OCT. 13 – Grandma Gatewood’s Fall Colors Hike, Hocking Hills State Park, 19852 St. Rte. 664 S., Logan, 9 a.m. A strenuous hike that spans 6 miles, from Old Man’s Cave to Cedar Falls and back. 740-385-6841 or www.thehockinghills.org/Events.htm.

OCT. 5–7 – Columbus Italian Festival, St. John the Baptist Italian Catholic Church, 720 Hamlet St., Columbus, Fri. 5–11 p.m., Sat. noon–11 p.m., Sun. noon–7 p.m. $5, under 12 free. 614-2948259 or www.columbusitalianfestival.com.

OCT. 13 – Lorena Sternwheeler Dinner Cruise, Zane’s Landing Park, West Market St., Zanesville, 5–7 p.m. $35. Reservations required at least 48 hours in advance. 800-743-2303 www. visitzanesville.com.

OCT. 5–7 – Junie B. Jones Jr.: The Musical, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Adults $18, children $12. 740-383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

OCT. 14 – 87th Annual Scout Pilgrimage, Harding Memorial, corner of Delaware Ave. (St. Rte. 423) and Vernon Heights Blvd.., Marion, parade at 3 p.m., ceremony at 3:30 p.m. Free. 740-3879630 or www.hardinghome.org.

OCT. 5–7 – Ohio Gourd Show, Delaware Co. Fgds., 236 Pennsylvania Ave., Delaware, Fri. noon–5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $5 per day, $7 for weekend, under 13 free. Features gourd arts and crafts, competitions, workshops, and even gourd music! www.americangourdsociety.org/ohiochapter or www.facebook.com/OhioGourdShow. OCT. 6–7 – 1st Annual Ohio Makes Festival, Zane State College, 1555 Newark Rd., Zanesville, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Free. Makers and manufacturers of all sizes will be offering their products for

OCT. 20–21 – The Great Pumpkin Glow, Kingwood Center Gardens, 50 Trimble Rd., Mansfield, Sat. 5–10 p.m., Sun. 5–9 p.m. $6 online, $8 at the door; under 7 free. Free community carving days on Oct. 17–19, 11 a.m.–8 p.m. 419-522-0211 ext. 108 or http:// kingwoodcenter.org/events/2018-pumpkin-glow. OCT. 22 – Easy Holiday Arrangements, Pickerington Public Library, 201 Opportunity Way, Pickerington, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Free. Learn how to create easy, elegant floral arrangements. Presented by the Pickerington Garden Club. Registration recommended: in person; by calling 614-837-4104 ext. 226; or online at https:// pickeringtonlibrary.org/event/easy-holiday-arrangements. OCT. 27 – Applebutter Stir and Horseradish Day, Lawrence Orchards, 2634 Smeltzer Rd., Marion, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Free. 740389-3019 or www.lawrenceorchards.com. OCT. 27 – Chili Dinner, Canal Winchester Community Center, 22 S. Trine St., Canal Winchester, 4–8 p.m. Includes silent auction, raffle, and bake sale. Proceeds benefit Friends for Life Animal Haven. 614-837-8276.

OCT. 17–20 – Circleville Pumpkin Show, downtown Circleville. Free admission. Ohio’s oldest and largest pumpkin celebration. Seven different parades. 740-474-7000 or www.pumpkinshow.com. OCT. 18–31 – Scarecrows on the Lawn, 221 E. Broadway, Granville. Free. Themed scarecrows, designed and created by Welsh Hills H.S. students, invade the museum lawn. 740-5870430 or www.robbinshunter.org.

OCT. 27 – Teen Book Fest, Pickerington Public Library, 201 Opportunity Way, Pickerington, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. A one-day event with 13 authors, discussion panels, book signings, and food trucks. www.pickeringtonlibrary.org.

OCT. 6–7, 14, 20–21, 27–28 – Pumpkin Blow, Neusole Glassworks, 11925 Kemper Springs Dr., Cincinnati, between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. $40 per person per 30-min. session. Children must be 5 years or older. Blow your own pumpkin from hot molten glass. Reservations required: 513-751-3292 or neusoleglassworks@ hotmail.com.

SOUTHWEST

OCT. 12 – Mainstreet Piqua Chocolate Walk, downtown Piqua, 5:30–8 p.m. $20. Visit over 20 businesses and get a chocolate treat at each stop. 937-773-9355 or www.mainstreetpiqua.com.

OCT. 6–28 – Fall Farm Days, Bonnybrook Farm, 3779 St. Rte. 132, Clarksville, Sat. 12–7 p.m., Sun. 12–6 p.m. $15. Pumpkin picking, wagon rides, corn maze, petting zoo, games, and food. 937-2892500 or http://bonnybrookfarms.com. OCT. 7 – Artist-in-Residence Gallery Show and Art Sale, Highlands Nature Sanctuary, 7660 Cave Rd., Bainbridge. A gala showcase and sale of works produced by the artists-in-residence during their stay. http://arcofappalachia.org/artist-in-residence. OCT. 5–6 – Champaign County Balloon Fest: A Hot Air Affair, Grimes Field, 1631 N. Main St., Urbana, 4–9 p.m. Weekend pass $2 adults, $1 children. Family fun activities, music, food, and don’t forget “Airport Pie”! Balloons rise at 6 p.m. Bring your lawn chair. 937-652-4319 or www.balloonfestohio.com. OCT. 5–7 – Fall Women’s Retreat, Highlands Nature Sanctuary, 7660 Cave Rd., Bainbridge. Enjoy the company of like-minded women and get back to nature. Space is limited. Register at 937-3651935 or http://arcofappalachia.org/womens-retreat. OCT. 6 – Celebrate Fall at the Johnston Farm, 9845 N. Hardin Rd., Piqua, 12–5:30 p.m. Tour the Johnston home, visit the Historic Indian and Canal Museum, and take a ride on the General Harrison of Piqua. 800-752-2619 or www.johnstonfarmohio.com.

OCT. 7 – Wilmington Doll Show and Sale, Roberts Ctr., 123 Gano Rd., Wilmington, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $6, under 13 free. Early-bird admission 8:30 a.m. ($20). Dolls, bears, and toys from antique to modern. Appraisals and ID/valuation, workshops, on-site restringing. Handicap accessible. www.wilmingtondollshow.com. OCT. 9–13 – Bradford Pumpkin Show, downtown Bradford. Free admission. Parades, rides, and contests. Car show and craft show on Saturday. Pumpkin pie and bread baking contest on Wednesday. 937-448-0630 or www.bradfordpumpkinshow.org. OCT. 12 – Bluegrass Night at Fibonacci Brewing Company, 1445 Compton Rd., Cincinnati, 7–9 p.m. Free admission. Enjoy music by Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass. Food available. 513-832-1422, events@fibbrew.com, or www.fibbrew.com.

OCT. 13 – Hodgesville Lions Club “Eat a Bite for Sight” Pancake and Sausage Breakfast, Warren District Community Ctr., Hodgesville, 7 a.m.–1 p.m. Pancakes, regular and buckwheat, with sausage, sausage gravy and biscuit, and drinks. Please bring your old eyeglasses for recycling. Brooms for sale. 304-472-3455. OCT. 21 – Bridge Day, New River Gorge Bridge, Fayette County. West Virginia’s largest single-day festival. Spectators can walk across the famed span and watch as rappellers and base jumpers leap into the gorge. Food and craft vendors. https://officialbridgeday.com or 800-927-0263.

OCT. 13–14 – Fall Farm Fest, Lost Creek Reserve and Knoop Agricultural Learning Center, 2385 E. St. Rte. 41, Troy, Sat. 12–7 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. Free admission. Corn maze, pumpkin patch, scarecrow contest, wagon rides, kids’ activities, and more. 937-3356273 or www.miamicountyparks.com. OCT. 13–14 – Ohio Sauerkraut Festival, 10B N. Wayne St., Waynesville, Sat. 9 a.m.–8 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Sample homemade sauerkraut and kraut-containing foods. Over 450 craft booths from vendors across the nation. 513-897-8855 or https:// sauerkrautfestival.waynesvilleohio.com.

OCT. 7 – West Virginia Chestnut Festival, Rowlesburg, 10:30 a.m.–7:30 p.m. Roasted chestnuts for sampling or purchase, chestnut saplings for planting, chestnut crafts and wares, and guest speakers/researchers. www.wvchestnutfestival.com.

WEST VIRGINIA

OCT. 12–14 – Operation Pumpkin, downtown Hamilton, Fri./ Sat. 11 a.m.–10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission. Pumpkin weigh-off, pumpkin sculpting, pet parade, live entertainment, and more. 513-844-8080 or www.operation-pumpkin.org.

OCT. 19 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Butler County Bluegrass Assoc., 200 Warwick Rd., Hamilton, 7–9 p.m. Donation requested. An evening of lively bluegrass. 513-607-1874 or www.fotmc.com. OCT. 20 – “Sinkholes, Seeps, Stone Arches: The Splendid Karst Landscape of Fort Hill,” Fort Hill, 13614 Fort Hill Rd., Hillsboro. Guided hike to learn about the preserve. Register at 937-365-1935 or http://arcofappalachia.org/arc-events. OCT. 21 – Music at the Mound with Steve Free, Serpent Mound, 3850 OH-73, Peebles, 1 p.m. Free admission; $8 parking. http:// arcofappalachia.org/steve-free.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/ website for more information.

OCTOBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


Costume Party MEMBER INTERACTIVE

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018


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1. and 2. My son, Clay, wanted me to make him a bat costume, while my owl-loving daughter, Meara, asked for a snowy owl. Dawn Rice South Central Power Company member

3. Brutus, my favorite clown! Nedra Hall Tricounty Rural Electric Cooperative member

4. My granddaughter, the cutest little fawn I have ever seen. Andie Eschbaugh Washington Electric Cooperative member

5. Our grandchildren, Trevor, Jeffrey, T.J., Jaime, and Tori, ready to go to the Good Zoo Halloween event. Patty Quaglia South Central Power Company member

6. Max, our 13-year-old rat terrier, loves to dress up for fun. Here he is in his leather bike outfit. Rick and Theresa Turner Midwest Electric members

7. My daughter, Josi, aka Dorothy, with her best friend Aliah, a cute hippie, at the New Vienna Elementary School Fall Carnival. Leah Balon South Central Power Company member

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4. Issue Frequency MONTHLY

5. Number of Issues Published Annually 6. Annual Subscription Price 12 $ 5.52

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication 6677 BUSCH BLVD COLUMBUS, FRANKLIN, OH 43229-1101

3. Filing Date 09/10/2018

Contact Person NILA MOYERS

11

Telephone (614) 846-5757

8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher 6677 BUSCH BLVD COLUMBUS, OH 43229-1101 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor Publisher (Name and complete mailing address) Ohio Rural Electric Cooperativ 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229-1101 Editor (Name and complete mailing address) Jeff McCallister, Editor 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229-1101

12

Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name

Complete Mailing Address

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperativ

6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229-1101

11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Hoding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds. Mortgages, or Other Securities. If none, check box Full Name Complete Mailing Address

X None

12. Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes:

13

X Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months

Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement) PS Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 1)

13. Publication Title

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

OHIO RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES/OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 15. Extend and Nature of Circulation

09/01/2018 Average No. Copies Each Issue No. Copies of Single Issue During Preceding 12 Months Published Nearest to Filing Date

a. Total Numbers of Copies (Net press run) Mailed Outside County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS (1) Form 3541(include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser's proof copies, and exchange copies)

301798

302261

300737

301207

0

0

0

0

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form b. Paid Circulation (2) 3541(include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser's proof copies, and exchange copies) (By Mail and Outside Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales the Mail) (3) Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the (4) USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), (4)) Free or Nominal Rate Outside County Copies (1) included on PS Form 3541

0

0

300737

301207

1061

1054

0

0

d. Free or Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies included on (2) PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Outside the (3) Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail) Mail) or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (4) Free (Carriers or other means) e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3), (4)) f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e) g. Copies not Distributed h. Total (Sum of 15f and 15g)

0

0

1549

1581

2610

2635

303347

303842

313

192

303660

304034

99.14 %

99.13 %

a. Paid Electronic Copies

0

0

b. Total Paid Print Copies(Line 15C) + Paid Electronic Copies

0

0

c. Total Print Distribution(Line 15F) + Paid Electronic Copies

0

0

0.00 %

0.00 %

i. Percent Paid ((15c / 15f) times 100)

14

15

16. If total circulation includes electronic copies, report that circulation on lines below.

d. Percent Paid(Both Print and Electronic Copies)

I Certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (Electronic and Print) are paid above a nominal price. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership

X If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

Publication not required.

in the 10/01/2018 issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner Title Jeff McCallister

Date Managing Editor

09/10/2018 14:41:36 PM

13. Bosco, a three-legged cancer survivor, is a pirate for Halloween. Nancy Painter

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties). PS Form 3526, September 2007 (Page 2)

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com

11. Our son, Oliver Scott Lindemer, on his first Halloween, dressed as a bunch of grapes! Kimberly Lindemer Harrison Rural Electrification Association member

12. Our kids, Ridge, as the Grinch, and Macy, as Cindy Lou Who, are all ready for trick-or-treating! Molly Bernard Firelands Electric Cooperative member

40

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • OCTOBER 2018

South Central Power Company member

14. My daughter, Jodi, dressing to the nines in her 1920s costume. Debra Malusky Carroll Electric Cooperative member

15. Ben Wolfe of Cambridge, then 8 years old, in front of the John and Annie Glenn Museum in New Concord during trick-or-treat night. Niki Wolfe Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member


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Take date night up a notch with The One Card That Does It All®. Help celebrate National Cooperative Month by using your Co-op Connections Card on October 5 to receive special deals and discounts. Then share a photo featuring your card with the hashtag #ImConnected to be eligible to win a prize.

ohioec.org/purpose


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Ohio Cooperative Living - October 2018 - Logan  
Ohio Cooperative Living - October 2018 - Logan